Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
IALL RIGHTS RESERVED THE LOVE TIDES

IALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] THE LOVE TIDES BY FRANK H. SHAW, Author of "A Life's Devotion," First at the Pole," &c. SYNOPSIS. HILARY FLEMING, a young and Ü-ing cng-iIwcr, is going to Central Africa. His passage is booked, and on the night before his ship Fails lie intends to ask Miss Marjory Merry- weather to marry liim. 3Iiss Merryweatbc-r is a heartless flirt, and, half an hour before Fleming proposes, c' consents to an engagement with Jack MiMmay, thong-h insisting that the affair shall be kept secret. Then F ''ming'dt&asterful vooiug carries her oil her feet. She really loves him as much as she can love anyone. She promises to marry him. Later, a meeting takes place between the two men on the edge of a cliff. In his joy Fleming tells Mildmay of his gocd fortune. Mildmav declares, on the contrary, that Marjory is engaged to him. Fleming's ungovernable temper iiames up, the men fight, and Mildmay goes over the cliff. i CHAPTER III. (Continued.) THE FIGHT ON THE CLIFF, He culled, softly at first, but with increas- ing loudness, as no reply was vouchsafed to his urgent entreaty. Only the crashing beat of the surges answered him. j Great facts are mot born instantaneously; it was not until a clear minute had elapsed that Fleming realised the enormity of what lie had done. If Mildmay were living he must surely have- heard that piteous appeal; if he had heard lie must have responded; the evidence slowly limned itself in the lis- tener's brain in fiery outlines. Mildmay was dead. He was a iiitirdererl The black sky before him seemed of a sudden to blaze out luridly, the damning letters of the word were painted on the sombre background. He was a mur- derer He had shed a man's blood, he had checked the course of a strong young life with his own hand. Shuddering, he looked at his palms; the dar kness almost hid them, but they were sticky—he seemed to smell acrid blood everywhere about him. A mur- derer No, no!" he gasped hoarsely" no, not a murderer; I had no wish to kill him." And he knew that he lied to himself. The gust of passion, that mighty storm in his brain, was gone, leaving him cold and afraid; but he knew that at the moment he had wished to kill Mildmay; he had desired above all other things to wipe away for ever that cynical sneer of disbelief. From far away came the strains of the band; it was playing a seductive waltz. He had slain a man, but away back there, almost within sight of his burning eyes, the world moved on as ever—light, careless, frivolous. What did it matter to them that a human eoul had been sent to face its Maker out in the darkness? The instinct of self-preservation is deeply rooted in every human heart. Fleming- was no exception to the general rule; and now that panic had seized him, he took swift thought to the future. He was a marked man; the dead body would be seen with the dawn; inquiries would be set afoot at once. How could he explain his own dishevelled appearance? The keen eye of the law would aiote the hundred evidences about him: the stained shirt-front, the muddy hands. And he could make no real defence to the charge. He had murdered Mildmay: and justice would take its course. TIe saw in rapid imagination the set faces of the jury as they listened to the tale; he saw the white-haired judge reaching forward to secure the patch of blaek that should herald the pronounce- ment of those awful words: To be hanged by the neck until you are dead, and may Go have mercy en your soiil No, not that! Better anything than such an infamy. He had completely forgotten the woman who had been the cause of the crime after- wards he was to wonder at this; now the fact was not present in his mind. One instinct possessed him to the exclusion of all others, lie must escape. Before the body was re- covered, before the first awful suspicions of the world were aroused, lie must have left E-ngland behind him. There were places where he could find safety. The distant hoot of a steamer's whistle brought him to living facts with a jerk. Of course, the way was open wide before his feet. He had booked a passage on the Sebindo, and she was to sail witit the dawn. Before the darkness lifted he would be front- ing the open sea, safe—safe as if the sea had opened to swallow him. He crawled to ihe edge a gain and looked over, shouting hoarsely still. No reply: but his straining ears seemed to detect, a slight sound, as if feet were crunching the pebbles beneath "Mildmay! he called, "Mildmay!" Still the whirling blackness was void. And if Mildmay were alive, even if seriously hurt, the appeal in his voice must have elicited a response. He could see nothing save the faint gleam of the foam on the rocks below. He was on his feet again; voices had sounded behind him, near at hand. He re- cognised them; a girl laughed perfunctorily; a deeper note echoed her mirth. That laugh had irritated him an hour before; (he fatu- ous devotion of the young man who had iu- stituted himself as attendant cavalier to its poss essor had made him smile. Now they would shrink from him in horror if only they knew the truth. They were moving towards the cliff edge; in a moment they would be on him. He turned away silently, and fled through the grounds like a maniacal shadow. It was not until he reached the small station that he realised the state of his dress. He was hatles? eoatless; as he passed under a. lamp he saw that his shirt-front was smeared with mud and gravel. He looked at his hands—no, thank God! the .stickiness was not due to blood; only thick mud clut- tered his fingers. But suspicion would be aroused at his plight, and above all things he must avoid suspicion. He crouched away in the darkness until he heard the screech of the incoming train; he waited until it was moving out again before he raced across the platform and sprang into an empty, carriage. It was a local train, little used at that time of night. The drumming wheels kept time with his racing thoughts the train seemed to be hurling him heedlessly into a pit of infinite torture. What a fool lie had 'been! Then for the first time recollection of the girl came to him. After all, the coward had deserved his fate. He had traduced the woman he loved; lie had accused her of t being a trifler with hearts: she, his peerless Marjory, a flirt! The idea was preposterous. He must write to her before ihe steamer sailed and explain his hurried departure. He would tell her that what he had done Was done in heat, in her defence. She would love him all the more in that he had run his neck into a noose that her good name might not be sullied. She would welcome tie letter- He started to his feet, and paced rapidly vp and down the floor of the lurching car- riage. A letter would convey a ulue-but the. "The Sebindo will be watched!" li,6 cried. Yes, there was no escaping that fact. It was known that lie was about to sail by the steamer; and hi* presence aboard—did the vessel carry wireless? He was not sure, but it wan likely that she would. And even if she did not, she would be .searched when "he reached her first port, and he would he detected. Men would speak as to his dis- hevelled appearance; he would be arrested and brought back to face his outraged countrymen. Then, what was to be done? I'll give myself up," he muttered, Morosely. g" What's the use of trying further? They'll get me wherever I go." And then, as the train drew up, remem- rance floated through his brain. Hero w? solution to the problem it w.? surely a R 'i go. 'n  'that God's hand was not tumed against 1 J11 for all tim0, ?? not Captain Bri what's happened. But perhaps it is better so. I've Jost her for ever; I'm out of her life now; she might forgive me for the thing J have done-she would forgive me; but I can't sully her with my sin. No, no, a thousand times, no." He was asleep again; when he wakened the next time lie was conscious of a sense of motion. The gurgle of water sounded dis- tantly; ropes thudded over his head; .he ship was creaking strangely. But he was- very cold; outwardly he was ice, but his brain was like a living fire. All that had gone before was incoherent; he could not rally his ideas; formless chaos occupied his mind. Once more a heavy senselessness pos- sessed him; and the ship moved serenely out towards the sea. How long he slept he did not know; but when lie awakened ultimately he stared about without consciousness of his locality. Ife was like a man suddenly dropped from the ckmds into the midst of a strange country: he had no sense of space or direction. He knew that a pungent smell was in his nos- trils, and that lie was very thirsty, but knowledge was slow in coming to his ex- hausted brain—then he remembered. Rats scampered past him; one loathsome body actually brushed his face; it was o:iiv with difficulty that he suppressed a scream. lie was a murderer! He was hungry; thirst, beset him fever- ishly; neither food nor water was to be had. He did not cry out against the hardships lie was doomed to suffer; lie recognised, not dis- tinctly but with a curious, half-understond fatalism, that all his ordeals were but part of a wondrous scheme that was, above all else, terribly just. He deserved the suffer- ing, and he steeled himself to endure. He had only a hazy idea of time; for down there in the hold no light penetrated; for all ventilators and hatches were closely sealed in view of impending bad weather, Jlo be sure he heard the ship's bell struck occasionally but whether the eight strokes denoted mid- night or noon he could not tell. His watch had stopped—he told that by cqxming ihe face and feeling the hands-his clothes had d L'ied oil I is body; he was not cold, but- a queer callousness slowly began to over-reach him he was suffering from keen hunger, and did not know that this indifference to the future was simply a sign of physical exhaus- tion. The ship began to Jllng herself about roughly; eases shifted gratingly beside him: somewhere in the stifling gloom a heavy object detached itself from its place of stowage and rolled about maddeningly with the heave of tn," ship. That monotonous roll, succeeded always by a thud as the object brought up agaiest a case, distracted him. aud drove other rhosghts from his miud. His immediate sins lost all poigiiajicv for the. I nonce; he shook his fists at the invisible tinng; he wept weak tears at his futility. Through all the gamut of emotions he passed, until there came a time when he found him- self—he never knew how he got there—be- neath the hatch he had descended, v'eiling, in a. voice that sounded strange to him, for help. But his cries passed unheeded; sound-deaden- ing tarpaulins were battened tightly over the hatch a cry more or less was nollmW to t,,06e on deck. Then panic seized him:: the- blind, awful panic that comes to some men in the dark- ness. A panic that was haunted by gibbering faces and moclong tingns--a panic tb-H sent him at one moment cowering away into the remoter recesses of the hold, and at another sent him tearing1 up ihe rough ir-.ni ladder to the hatches. He beat on the wood with clenched fist until his knuckles bled; still he was unheeded. Until a strange lassitude overcame him; he dropped back on to the cargo which no more than filled the 'tween decks, and sat theje., prac- tically unconscious of sensation. "Lor4 lumme, if it ain't ;1- He heard the words, and became aware that a rough- faced man was staring curiously at him. There was light streaming around him, blessed light; his nostrils inhaled keen air. In leaps his senses came back; lie tried to rise to his feet, but sheer weakness over- powered him; he fell forward in a heari, muttering fecbly. I "A bloomin' stowaway," grunted the man, lugging him ungently by the collar. "Funniest lookin' scarecrow I've ever seed. Strike me if he ain't a German waiter." Fleming awoke from stupor to find him- self hauled, not ungently, from his late abiding place. He was helped aft, and as he passed along the decks the strong gush of wind overhead brought back life. He made 311 effort to hold himself upright, and suc- ceeded in "on" m<>< r une iusHuet led I him to protest inwardly against the rough II and ready handling lie was receiving. "I want to see the captain," he said. "I must see the captain." And a man who stood near chuckled grimly. "lou'll see 'im soon enough, mate, you fear. Too bally soon, if I knows aught." Ileming was too weak to understand. He felt now that he was safe at last; Cap- tain Briggs would receive him with "a measure of friendship, as he had promised; he stood at the foot of the poop bidder awaiting the old skipper's appearance. The second mate, a big, mousfached man, j'e- garded h im curiously, but attempted no conversation beyond a word to the men. A harsh voice caused Fleming to lift his eye-, suddenly. A big man, bearded to the eyes, was standing at the break of the poop, hurling blasphemies of the foulest descrip- tion at his devoted head. "A tt'vIII'vqllal?le(I this man. "A stowaway. Throw'h'm over- board No one obeyed; and Fler.iing.d?- I g-usted as muc]¡ 

Advertising

r .c_-cC- AN UMPAift I EXPENDITURE UNDER ~i I FREE TRADE GOVERNMENT. p. ?914-15 ?210,580,000 ? 1906-OT? ?149J?M.OpO ? iMSRE&SE ?M,S80,008 JOCKEY BULL:—What, put more on my mount whan you've nearly broken his back already Why don't you put some handicap on the other .horse so that we can run fair ? ;c-_u-

nAIlny CGUSTY COU RT I

í nAIlny CGUSTY COU RT. His Honour Judge Ifillf Kelly sat at the Barry County Court on Tuesday last. Prior to the Judge's sitting Mr. A. Jackson, the registrar, dealt with a number of uncon- tested cases. THE Yi TEE'S. NOT HER HUSBAND'S. I t1r.l 1\ -I.' 1' 1 lid\. -:1.- 1 ,:J. There wa: idd;ng. Mr. Jones explained, was :v-aided a sum of money as compensat'Oil for the ,h-f\ûh (.f lier husband. She married again, and upon 8d. was pa:d O-U t f Court to her parents, who had (.U -lC.L1.- (j. '.J.L proved ti(I lis foi- ihe iiroral. and informed plain- tiffs t.h"t as soen as his daughter's money v.'aspa'd?i!t?fC'?.'?.hehr?"-a'a:?'i-'t would I)e settled. Humphries afT?r'.vmd? denied IIahil tv. Ch?-les Priddiv-g. ?.- -?,cco d husban d fd l)]1fr:j,:{'¡f !¡í'«(r\(:(l ':¡'{:(::1' :H benefit from th- ? c. ..< of his w i t:- av. d it was his fat h-i n-h?Y. w hu ?r.v? the onbr for the funeral. Defendant order, and called his two sons to prove that t was Pridding who had made the funeral arrangements. Judgment was eventually given lor doten- dant, with costs. APPLICANT AND COLLEGE EXPENSES. When His- Honour heard an application by J Mrs. Rowe, of Barry, for an amount to be na ill out of a compensation a llowance, the applicant stated that her daughter intended | to enter a training college, and the fees had to be paid in advance. His Honour thought the appllcant should make further enquiries as to the payment of and advised her to renew the applica- tion at the next Court.

Advertising

r J er^Hh 'i Ii i I  I FiSt-slmiU oj "U% P(låá. 1 tjlrGhcr's idea Retu:rns ?& ??y'aetHcx'efP!Ve&eeM? I .1'. r¡":f t.

TSiPALELIPPEDwIRL

TSiPALE-LIPPED^wIRL. }iloodle>sness is the trouble of many girls who ought to be full of Lie and good spirits. I Instead, they are pale, their hps have no I colour, they have no appetite, their digestion i: poor, and if they try to hurry in til. I street or run upstairs, they are so tired and out of breath that their hearts beat as if to burst. Con; rally tie y are thin, iiat- ckested, round-shouldered and sallow, with nothing attractive about them. If they do not get better they will have a cough every winter and presently it will be consumption, A girl should not be like this. She should be plump, rosy, full-bosomed, and full of life-—able to dance and run with the best. But she must have plenty of good, puitf blood fcr this. It is only through blood that we can fVed aire part of the body—nerves, flesh, brain, or spine. And the only medi- cine which will make blood is Dr. Williams' Pink PiJis. Tlieir effect upon pule-liftped. fiat-t-he'-ud girls is wonderful. The appetite improves, backach es and headaches no longer give L'L11.](" and every man is attracted. In a few days the improvement begins to be apparent, and the anaemic girl often be- comes the belle of the family. Your dealer can soil you Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale people: if not. send 2s. 9d. one box (or 1.3s. 9d. for six boxes) to Dr. Williams' Medicine Co., -1G. Holborn )"i:1dwt. London—ro charge for postage. A free book, "Tim Blocd and its Work. can be had by serdlng a postcard to the Book Dept. 40. Holborn Viaduct. London.

BAHHY SEA SCOUTS TO CAMP AT COWES IW

BAHHY SEA SCOUTS TO CAMP AT COWES, I.W. This Troop of Barry Sea. Scouts has been invited to join the Camp on the Solent, near Cower, duiing G wes Regatta week in Augu- t next. Th.' Camp will i-o under the charge of a. navai omcer, and ihe Bay Scouts w?n hav? many cpportuuitics of ht.jng and boating, aud also of seeing yacht racing, and probably opportunities of going j r I c, c of-war and private yachts. ,anv members of t-he Troop arc not earn- ing any money, s'lme being at school, and otners who arc earning anything are for the most part apprentices and junior clerks, earn- ing small sums. The railway fares from Barry to^outhanipton amount to a consider- able sum, and the Scouts will not be able to find the necessary money to pay the railway fares, and the week's camp. The Scouts are contributing, but there is a considerable balance left to meet. The Chief Scc.ut has wiseh- laid it down Tli?(,. Chi?-f S.-t?,,ut liiis ?lii(i -?t d

Advertising

I Tho lightest Cakes, Pastry, 4c., are made by usIng SORWECK'S BAKING POWDER.

0001 PROPERTIES OFEERED AT BAHHY

0001) PROPERTIES OFEERED AT BAHHY. Mr. A. T. Hammond, auctioneer, oi.. 10.. eaie at Barry on Thursday evening last. several valuable lots of residential property in the town, but buyers were soaroe. The well-built, centrally situated, and coin- modious villa, 33, Kings-'and-orcscent, Barrr Docks, lield for 99 years from May 1st, LSSib at the ground rent of £ 3 10s. per annum, an Mr. Nicholas Bates, for £210. Lot, 2. ,Meath Lodge." 29. HomiUy- i road, lreld on a 99 years' lease, from March, 1889, at an annual ground rent of to 12s. —Withdrawn at Lots 3, 4, and Glamorgan-street, held on 99 years' leases from May, 1891, at annual round rents of let at 8s. per week inclusive. Withdrawn at fered separately were a so withdrawn. '?: 0.— Xo. i"(;h?oi'a?-s?'c?t. h?Id?!. a UD years ie-a-o from 1891 at an annual v; a; 1 a1: r ■;< s i b-1 a Ss. per wevk inclusive.—Withdrawn at 180. Lot. i. 8, and to—Nos\ 07, 69, an d 7.1, i{,2cir;};¡;j;¡:;[;¡¡ leases at annual groun d i?nL.scri: ? 2s., £ X 2s. an d £ ) OJ. i\ speotivc i y. lor at ?- Q-- and O-' :v p r- >'•— V t1 •• a: 7- >. ro-^re ww no oxieiing w hen tlieso i<'t.?uc')'? .??dse?arai'('y. 'I no soiicitoi s ior the .??.d(;;?\(' Mr. -• iae k son. Barry j\x k' I ,L 1); Mr. E. J. il:i;,r¡;;Y :E'l);'Ej';};; :t Morgan, crane s. Stanton. and r. rn-.Jl,