Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

i McKEE & CO., Waler;>roof. Weatherproof & Oilskin Experts, 10, Queen Street, CARDIFF. The New "NEVER-GET-WET" Coloured Oikkins. Increasingly For L., fashionable. 1 2,'S an d 2 1 For LaGics ••• 12/9 and 21- For Gentlemen t29 21- 1 For Boyt aad Girls • •• 6 9 upwardj. ?l a Don't ri$k a S7a,ing- [?el a H Never-gét- Wet" ai onc.  A.-) e?-ce i lert 3 0 an,! 4 2,1 For GC7-t l ee-,], 4 30!. an, 42, T).)n ,t s#art o-,i a N e,.v Ic K et- The "BUTE" Guaranteed WatarproefCoar, for Gentlemen or Ladies. Prices, 21/. 30/ 42/, cash. Carriage Pai". There are many professed Waterproofs, but if jou want a perfect Rain Resister, get one of our "BUTE"guaranteed Waterproofs. Well cut.Smart, variety of newest materials. Money returned if not approved. Waterproof Bed Sheets, 1/ 1/6. Rubber both sides, 2/ 2/6, 3/6. Soft Rub- ber Cushions. 8 6. Hot Water Bottles. 4 6. Non-Stoop Braces to make you upright, 4/6 per pair. Boys' and Girls', 3/9. Elastic Stockings, extra strong, 5'6 and 7,6 per pair. Ask for Price List (Ire:) of the many Rubber Comforts and Appliances that we supply. All the above Carriage paid.—Money refunded if not afproved. McKEE & CO «u^r°of McKEE Experts. 10. Quee* Street. CARDIFF. W. H. GOULD, IRON & BRASS FOUNDER AND GENERAL ENGINEER (BETWEEN NOS. 4 AND 5 TIPS), B A I-, R Y. lEI MORTAR MILLS tNg PARTS ¡ ALWAYS KEPT IN STOCK, AND ALL I DESCRIPTION OF CASTINGS MADE. SOLE MAKfcR OF SMITH'S PATENT GULLEYS. BUILDERS' CASTINGS SUPPLIED MACHINERY BOUGHT AND SOLD. Telephone -Works-Barry Foundry, 41;"í & 41f. Sarry (2 lines). „ Borough Foundry, 3873 Cardiff. Residence—80, Dirize Powis. Telegraphic AddrCSE-" CaslingiJ," sBarry. iWHARTON-STREET SALEROOMS CARDIFF. MR. A. SETCHFIELD will S'ELL by jM. AUCTION on THURSDAY NEXT a Large Assemblage of Superior HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND EFFECTS, removed for convenience of Sale, comprising Dining and Drawing-room Suites, 2 excellent Pianofortes, Walnut Sideboards and Over- mantels, Dining and Occasional Tables, Wal- t,L?d Occasional Tables, Wal- nut and Oak Hallstands, Clocks, Bronzes; Tea and Dinner Services, Carpets and Rugs, Curbs and Brasses, 6 Bedroom Suites in various woods, All-Brass and other Bed- steads, Wire and Wool Overlays, Chests of Drawers, Washstands, Tables, Toilet Ware, Ac., &c. Sale at 2 o'clock sharp. No reserve. i ^TH^TE^MINUTESCUREFO ^l t HEADACHE OR NEURALGIA RECOMMENDED by Dr. ANDREW WILSON, the Eminent Health Authority; Dr. RAMAGE, L.R.C.P.; Dr. THURSTIN, fte Ac., Ac.; Madame FANNY MOODY MANNERS, Prima Donna; Mdlle. ZELIA DE LUBBEN, Prima Donna; Adlle. KURELIJL REVY, Prima Donna; MALCOLM SCOTT (The Woman Who Knows); AUGUSTE YAN BIENE (Broken Melody); Maj. Gen. Sir J. W. CAMPBELL, Bart, C.B.; and thou sards of others. If you have not tried this famous remedy, enclose a Penny Stamp to Mr. AQAR, KAPUTINE, Ltd., MANCHESTER, and you will receive free sam- ples by return. v Of all Chemists, Co-ops., and Stores, at Is. and 2 9 per Packet; Sample dosBa, Id. Free for stamps to SOLE PROPRIETORS: KAPUTINE, Ltd., MANCHESTER. I WEODING, KEEPER, & ENGAGEMENT: RINGS. YINEST SELECTION AND BEST VALIE H. B. CROUCH'S, 16, St. MARY-STREET, 48, QUEEN STREET 9, High-street Arcade, Cardiff I THE 'CITY' JEWELLERS, So Free Presents ba (laaranteed Best Value is the Kinzdoir. reas you the right time to do everything and has brings 865 Successful Days to Busmen Iton, Speculators, Sportsmen, Farmers, hardeners, Labourers, Shopkeepers, Soldiers, amilors, Fishermen, Politicians, and even Lovers. Gives Fate and Fortune of Peeress j 8Dd PeamLnt MUlgirl. Serving-Maid Barmaid Peasant. Wi?e, Mother, Baby.  How Ready. Of all Newsagents, or 7d. posted in envelope. fiOULSHAM, 6, Pilgrim-street, London, E.&'

FUN AND FANCY I

FUN AND FANCY. I "There is a great deal of politeness about I going to sea, isn't there?" "I don't liow how you mean." "I mean, in the Tfjiy toe oceans wave and the ships bow." "Sometimes," said the press humorist, "I think my jokes are rotten. I s'pose that's my modesty." "No," explained a friend, "that's your common sense." The Traveller: "And are you sure these sheets are clean?" 'Tweenie: "Clean! Why, mum, they was only washed this morning. If you feels 'em you'll find they ain't even dry Judge: "You do not seem to realise the enormity of the charge that is against you." Prisoner: "No; I haven't got my solicitor's bill yet, but I'm expectin' the charge'll be enormous "Yes," said the man who had been travel- ling in the Wild West, "I saw three trains held up in one night." "You don't eay so!" exclaimed the innocent bystander. Waa anyone hurt?" "No," said the traveller. "They were held up by women in a ball- room." "Did you tell papa how tender your love is for me, darling T "I did, sweetheart; but he only laughed, and said that it was legal tender he wanted to see before we could do business." Brannigan: "What's the matter, Willi- kin?" Willikin: "Matter enough. You know some time ago I assigned all my pro- perty to my wife to—keep it out of the hands of—of people I owe money, you know!" "Yes." "Well, she's taken the money and gone off—says she won't live with me because I swindled my creditors." Mr. A.: "My dear, your butcher gives you short weight for your money." Mrs. A.: "But consider, my dear, the long wait I you gave him for his." Neighbour: "Was that your piano that I heard yesterday ?" Proud Hostess: Yes. My daughter is taking lessons by the quarter now." Neighbour: "By the quarter, indeed. I thought it was by the pound." Chumple, y: -.Jenkins, my man, these Apartments seem less roomy than when I moved into them in the spring." Jenkins: «Yes, sir. Quite so, sir. But you are now wearing your winter underclothing, sir." Bess: "He said my face was a perfect poem." Jess: "It is—like one of Brown- ing's." Bem: "What do you mean?" J: Some of the lines are so deep." A bricklayer and a plumber were dis- cussing the subject of love. "If you are terribly in love," said the bricklayer, "the best way to cure yourself is to run away." "Yea," replied the plumber, "that will cer- tainly cure you, provided that you ran ( away with the girl." Mother: "Oh, don't you think we had better send for the doctor? Johnny says he feels so bad." Father: "Oh, he's felt bad before this, and got over it." Mother (anxi- ously): "Yes, dear; but never on a school holiday." ———— Bcene: Grocery bar. Pte. Shonk-: "Pound of baoon, please." Canteen Manager: "Yes; what sort would you like?" Pte. Shonk: "Nice, long streaky bacon; then I can uso the rind for boot-laces." Wickshire: "1 tell you, Yabby, my boy, there is nothing like a baby to brighten a man's home." Yabby: "Yes, I have notice d that the gas seems at full height in your house at almost any hour of the night.' "Are you a friend to William BligginsF That ne'er-do-well?" "I should think not, indeed!" "Then you'll hardly lia interested to hear that he has inherited a hundred thousand pounds." "What? Dear old Bill!" A young fellow had popped the question, and anxiously awaited the answer that was to decide his fate. "Do you ever gamble at cards?" the fair one asked. "No," he answered; "but if I did now would be the time." "Why?" she inquired. "Because," he answered, with a deep sigh, "I hold such a beautiful hand." She was very literary, and he was not, She had spent a harrowing evening discus.. ling authors of whom he knew nothing, and their books, of which he knew less. Pre. sently the maiden asked archly: "Of course you've read 'Romeo and Juliet'?" He floundered helplessly for a moment, and then having a brilliant thought, blurted out happily: "I've—I've- read Romeo'! < Teacher: "Billy, can you tell me the diffe- rence between caution and cowardice ?" Billy: "Yes, ma'am. When you're afraid yourself, then that's caution; but when the other fellow's afraid, that's cowardice." Councilman: "I've come to see, sir, if you will subscribe anything to the town ceme- tery." Old Resident: "Good gracious! I've already subscribed three wives." Daily: "They say that the art of chasing silver ia a very difficult one." Borrowit: "I know it ia. I've been trying all the day to find & man who would lend me half-a- ero wn." Wife (who is very fond of her first baby): "The landlord waa here to-day. I gave him the five pounds and showed him the baby." Husband (who was kept awake last night): "It would have been much better if you'd given him the baby and showed him the five pounds." A little boy who had just joined Sunday- School was asked by his mother how he liked it. "Why," exclaimed Charlie, "they don't know much! The teacher asked what was the Collect, and I was the only one who knew." "And what did you say, dear?" "Why, I told them pretty quick that it was a pain in the stomach." Bertie: "The dentist said I had a large cavity that needed filling:" Bertha: "Did he recommend any special course of study?" Emily: "Why are you waving your hand- kerchief?" Angelina: "Since papa has for- bidden Tom the house wo have arranged a code of signals." Emily: "What is it?" Angelina: "When he waves his handker- chief five times, that means Do you love me?' And when I wave frantically in reply, it means Yes. darling. Emily: "And Ein l l v ,t k n d how do yoa ask other questions? Angelina: "We don't. That's the whole code." "How did the rumour that Billfare, the restaurant-keeper, was rinancially embar- rassed get about?" "Someone saw him dining in his own restaurant. I believe"

Advertising

A BURNING QUESTION. W O'R K.E R S! {-:is? ). Jpr "The time has come for the nam ..y ? tion Bc??usBy to con?Ede? the p?o? J .? blem of low wages and deal with "t:?:-Xc'iil i y !t in a broad and Hbe?a? spirit-  ? ? The existence of a large class of ????-? \? ?j low-paid wo?ke?s, effectively hin- Y N O ?-?'? ders the national standard of ) '?"    ??? ? health from rising to a lever of ) w ?????? efficiency."—?. 2 of Report of A/r.?? ??"?? I" George s Land ? :> II '——— JI J JOHN BULL:-There is the problem, gentlemen! What are you going to do about it ? wT When buying RI [ BAKING POWDER t insist on having I BORWICK S It is the perfection I of power and purity. I The STRONGEST, I therefore the cheapest; I The PUREST, I therefore the Best. JV

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC AMUSEMENT

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC AMUSEMENT. KING'S HALL. The Hand that condemns," a strong pic- ture drama, will be shown at this hall for the first three evenings of next week. and in- cluded in the programmes will be excellent dramas and laughable comics. I THEATRE ROYAL. BARRY. I A .splendid holiday programme was provided by the Thea.tre Royal management for the past three evenings of the week, and, know- ing as we do the great popularity of this picture resort, it is hardly necessary to men- tion that there were crowded houses. The I programme of filmsa really delightful as- sortment—was headed by "Ben Bolt," a dramatisation of Thomas Dunn's song, which was introduced iry "Trilby." The dramatic piøturesL-always a feature at this popular house—included "Playing for a Fortu.,ie," "Law of Humanity," and "Wittli Eyes" so Tender and Blue." "Joining of the Ocea-nis was an interesting item, whilst the comics were "His Majesty the Baby" and "Fellow Voyagers." Frank and Eileen, American vocalists and dancers, were a huge success at' each performance, and they will again oppear for the remaining evenings of the week. 'Xeaih, the Lion's Paw" will head another fine programme for to-night (Thursday) and the remaining nights, and the dramas will be "Claim Jumpers," "And an Angel Camo." Really side-splitting comics are announced. For the first three evenings of next week, "Big Horn Massacre," a thrilling Western drama introducing hundreds of men and horses in the great fight between Indians and emigrants, will head the programme. The vocalists will be Mr. H. A, Hi ley, a well- known local baritone. VINT'S ELECTRIC PALACE. Great business has been done at Vint's popular picture palace over the holidays. Briefly, the management provided a typical holiday programme for all tastes, and it caught on. Artistes and pictures alike were of the best, and patrons to the house for the past three nights have readily admitted that it was an evening well spent. The variety section of the programme was headed by Kirk and Saraski, two fine girls, whose marvellous exhibitions under water have never been equalled. They are the only aquatic acro- bats in the world. Harry Arthurs was a clever chorus comedian with catchy songs and a good collection of witty sayings whilst Mat ie Terry was a comedienne who was bound to appeal, and be a big success. The programme will be completely changed for the* remaining three evenings of the week. The previous evening's artistes will again appear, and the pictorial items will bo stirring and interesting. A further proof of the enterprise of the management is afforded by the expensive engagement for next week of Tom Costello, the famous London comedian, who will give new songs, including Comrades," "Ship I Love," and "At Trinity Church." Joan De Ferrars, a phenomenal soprano vocalist, will also contribute to an excellent pro- gramme, which should not fail to be a huge success. Pictures of the highest order will also be thrown on the screen. ROMILLY HALL. A carefully selected holiday programme de- lighted large crowds at the Komilly Hall this week, the two outstanding items being "The Filly," a very fine Irish .sporting drama, and On the Border," a story of love and hate. For the latter portion of this week arfither tme drama, entitled "The Prin- cess's Dilemma," will top the bill. Miss Betty Xansen, who takes the leading part, being undoubtedly the most successful emo- tional actress taking part in pictures. For the first three evenings of next week the management of the Hall has secured at enor- mous expense the film entitled Moths," a reproduction of Ouida/s world-famous novel. A great and masterly production, featuring that great artiste Miss Maud Fea-ly. The second part of The Master Crook" will (I VO be screened.

I LEADING PEOPLE TO TELL LIES

I" LEADING PEOPLE TO TELL LIES." MR. FOWLER AND THE TRANS- FERENCE OF LICENCES. I I LICENCES GRANTED AFTER f DUE TESTS. I — I I THE CHAIRMAN THINKS IT IS WASTED LABOUR. I BARRY DISTRICT COUNCIL I SPECIAL MEETING. A special meeting of the Barry Urban District Council was held on Thursday even- ing last, when the chair was occupied by Mr. S. R. Jones, J.P., and the members present were Messrs. J. Felix Williams, W. Fowler, E. Walton, F. E. J. Murrell, Howell Williams. J. Marshall, James Jones, W- Fowler, T. P. Prichard, Thomas Evans, F. C. Milner, D. T. Howe, and W. Beck. The recommendations of the Parks and Licensing Committee, in granting licences for vehicles to ply for hire, trading licences at Barry Island, seamen's lodging house licences, and pleasure boat licences were confirmed. The question of transferring a licence for a stall at Barry Island was considered, Mr. Fowler remarking that if it was granted it would only" lead people to tell lies." The Island, he said, ought to realise £0)00 a year. They were only looking after the shop- keepers who were there. Mr. Howe moved that the transfer be granted. Mr. Fowler seconded, and the motion was carried. A letter was received from Mr. E. P. Percy. Barry Island, asking if the Council would grant him a permit to sell papers at the beach, it being pointed out that the ap- plicant had disposed of his business to an- other tradesman. Mr. Milner thought they should not grant this application, because, he pointed out, the applicant would be competing unfairly against the purchaser of his late business. The application was granted. "A LONG DRAG." The Chairman mentioned the matter of the inspection at the Buttrills Field of vehicles seeking licences. Mr. Jones asked whether it was not a lot of wasted labour to the Buttrills. Could not the inspection be done in Wyndham-street, or somewhere near ? Mr. Levers asked whether it would not interfere with the traffic. Mr. James JonEls did not think it would. The Chairman moved that the matter be discussed a month before the next annual meeting of the Licensing Committee, and this was agreed to. DANGEROUS BRAKE-STEPS. -I Mr. Fowler proposed that all brakes should have step-ladders at the back instead of iron steps, as at present. It was not a big item, and the steps on some brakes were very dan- gerous. Mr. Levers: This has been discussed lie- fore over and over again, but nothing has been done. Mr. Fowler: We could give them notice that they must have ladders on their brakes, and see that they comply before we grant the licenses. He moved this. Mr. Levers seconded, and the motion was carried. KIOSK AT ROMILLY PARK. Mr. Howell Williams brought forward the question of the kiosk at Romilly Park, re- marking upon the trouble which the Council had had in letting. it. They had let it this year at a low rental. He did not think it was advertised sufficiently, and therefore moved that a signpost be erected. Mr. James Jones seconded, and it was agreed. COUNCIL OFFICIALS' ANNUAL OUTING, It was announced that the Council officials annual outing to Ascot would take place on June 17th.

BARRY GENTLEMANS WILL I I

BARRY GENTLEMAN'S WILL. I J 'I l le Parade, Barry, Mr. Robert Scott, 25, The Parade, Barry, I engineer, who died on March 20th last, aged I 61 ° voars, left estate of the gross value of £ 3,838, of which the net personalty has been sworn at £ 3,773. To his widow he left j all of his property absolutely.

BARRY FINANCE COMMITTEE

BARRY FINANCE COMMITTEE. COSTS OF OPPOSITION TO BARRY RAILWAY HILL. INCREASED RENTS AND RATES. The monthly meeting of the Finance Com- mittee of the Barry Urban District Coun- cil was held on Thursday evening last. Mr. F. C. Milner (chairman) presiding, and the members in attendance were Messrs. S. R. Jones, J.P., J. Felix Williams, J. E. Levers, E. Walton, D. T. Howe, James Jones, F. E. J. Murrell, T. Preece Prichard, and Howell Williams. COSTS OF COUNCIL OPPOSITION: Whilst the accounts were being passed, a discussion arose as to the allocation of the cost of opposing the Barry Railway Parlia- mentary Bill. It was recommended that the Gas and Water Committee should pay £ 300, and that LIIS be paid from the general fund. Mr. Felix AVilliams opposed the allocation, remarking that the whole of the costs should be borne by the Gas and Water Committee. Mr. Levers: The amount has been fairly apportioned in the allocation. Mr. S. R. Jonecs: I think it is a very fair allocation. There is no doubt that tIlS should be paid by the Finance Committee. There are certain things in the Bill which affected the general interests of the town. On the proposition of Mr. S. R. Jones, the allocation was agreed to. SUPERINTENDENT COLLECTOR'S REPORT. ( Mr. John Jenkins, the superintendent col- lector, reported that the total collections during the past month were £ 3,452 Iüs. 9d, It was pointed out that the amount of rate collected had increased considerably i during the past month, owing to the fact I that house rents had increased, and were titill increasing. I ADOPTION OF THE SMALL DWELLINGS 1 ACT. A communication was received from Mr. H. E. Parsons, asking the Committee to consider the advisability of adopting the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act, 1889. The matter was deferred till the next meeting. THE NATIONAL LIBRARY. A letter of appreciation of the assistance rendered to the National Library of "Wales Building Fund, by the Barry District Coun- cil, was received from the Board of Gover- nors of the Library.

IOGT AT CADOXTONBARRY j

I.O.G.T. AT CADOXTON-BARRY. j REV. E. G. MAULEY ON THE EVILS OF INTEMPERANCE. The members of St. David's. Lodge of ) Good Templars, Cadoxton, were on Thurs- day last'fortunate in securing the Rev. E. G. Maa-Iey, pa'Jtor of ButtrilisHroad Chapel, to give an address on Temperance. Bro. Lloyd, D.C.T., occupied the chair. The rev. gentleman stated that he had never before, although a total abstainer, addressed a Lodge of Good Templars, but was very pleased to co-operate in such a noble cause. It was evident that the speaker was well abreast of the times in his thinking, and the cause of inebriety had received his care- ful consideration. His line of argument was that it was futile to pursue a destructive policy unless they ai'-so substituted a con- structive policy, and make eounter-iattpac- tions more alluring than the dazzling at- tractions of the drinking saloon. He strongly advocated outdoor games as an ef- fective means of helping on the cause of Temperance, as friendly rivalry on the bowl- ing greens, for instance, kept men inter- orated and healthy. His method of explain- ing the el effects of bad habits on the brain, by forming deep channels, and the longer the habit was indulged in the deeper the ehan- nel and the more helpless the individual to resist temptation. But good habits also formed channels, though in an upward and opposite direction. The inference was ob- vious: avoid bad habits, which lead to degra- dation of character; cultivate good habits, I which qualify the individual for correspo«- demce with the pure environment of the spiritual world. I A vote of thanks was accorded Mr. Mar- ley for his helpful address, to which ho very modestly responded. i

Advertising

,o I"AL *IL.. rAT  ir op I i PIL D GS |^k C%?Kt??????WAy?$???? ? jki rVr?i SCIATIC A ° j;s J RHEUMAT#SM KS. CHAPPED tf LE S w For and Diseases Zam-Buk hu no equal Refuse aU substitute-i I

I ITHINGS THOUGHTFUL m

I I THINGS THOUGHTFUL. m He's a, cruel thief who asks fog minutes and takes an hour. HELPFUL LIGHT. ?.- A scientific article on light and the, greatly increased means of illumination, treats also of its ignorant abuse and the in- jurious effects that have followed. It con- cludes with the hope that the human raoe "may not be driven altogether blind by un- intelligent use of the means of seeing." There is, perhaps, a kindred danger in the, flood of mental and spiritual light that it being poured upon the world. It is light, but even light must be properly used if it is to guide and benefit instead of blind and ^Aat.roy. ——————————— "PRACTICAL" FOLK. We have, within the past five years, ceased to cry "fool," "madman," "dreamer," at the men who talk of soaring through the- air. Professor Langley, whom history will write down as a pioneer of aviation, wae derided as a "Darius Green," and goaded to his death by the contempt of the worldly. wise. Now all men know that his wisdom was higher, truer and more practical than that of the hard-headed critics at whose hands he suffered. In somewhat similar fashion, the men and women who talk of oonsecration and of pre-eminence of the life that is spiritual, and of the vital import of communion with God, are often regarded with impatience and disdain by "practical" folk. Yet it is certain that in due time all men will know that the dreamers of dream* for the spiritual life were wiser, in their day than the visionlees persons who would believe only what they could see with their physical eyes. The greatest truth of life is that the individual mortal may have direct oommunion with the divine. Wuri is a guardian angel. Work turna the wilderness into a garden. Work does sometimes what even love cannot do: roots a man firmly in his place in the world and gives him the blessed sensation. This plot of ground in the wide immensit y of earth was meant for me to grow in.—Robert Hichens. Don't worry, friend-: just live thy life; Work, sing, and trust is God's behest— And if some days seem full of strife, Remember night brings peace and rest. Don't worry, friend, if cloud and rain Prevent the sunshine reaching you; Without the cloud you ne'er again Could see the rainbow's wondrous hue. Don't worry, friend; to-day alone Is yours for joy or gain or loss; Why dread and fret o'er things unknown?- The bridge you fear you ne'er may crosr- Don't worry, friend, nor sit and rest; Without temptation virtue's naught, And trials are sent life's gold to test By Him who knows the human heart. Don't worry, friend; it cannot be That naught but joys to thee belong; Each heart hath its Gethsemane, Its hour of pain, its triumphant song! Don't worry, friend: just daily plod; Let love and prayer each hour attend; Do thou thy best and trust in God, And joy shall crown thy journey's end. -John R. Moreland; HEART POWER. Have you anything to do? Put heart- power into it. No life has ever become great, and no work has ever gained real success without the impulse in it of an eager heart. Search every achievement in science or art, in literature or music; hunt out the source and the life of every great move- ment for advancement and uplift, and if you go deep enough you will find at the beginning and at the very centre of it a burning, throbbing heart. Reform movements, political parties, and propaganda of every sort have been urged again and again for purely economic or theoretical reasons, and they have found partial acceptance for a time, but nev. have they won great success unless there was behind them and all through them a. passion of human hearts. Patriotism, and service to the weak, and brotherhood will unite men, while questions of tariff will divide them. Man's brain is more liable to- error than his heart. It will never carry him as far nor as high. It will never enable him to "endure hardness like a good soldier." It will never impel him to self- sacrifice for the good of others. It was not the music of Jenny Lind's wonderful voice as she sang at the Leed's Festival, "I know that my Redeemer liveth," which led a young man in Dr. Forest's parish to givs- his heart to Christ. It was the heart of the singer, who testified that she never sang the song without first asking God that it- might be blessed to at least one soul in her audience. It was the passion of faith and love in her own heart which carried convio- tion and kindled a flame in another' heart. THE SINGLE COLLAR. There are a multitude of burdened men. and women carrying loads beyond their strength. The pilgrim's way is loud with groans and .hs Where is the dance of the vintage? Vhere is the song of -the harvest home? God's children are fainting on the long road; they are dropping at the hill. What is there wrong? -It is the fault of the single collar. We are resolving life into individualism when it was purposed to be a fellowship. We are making it merely human when it was intended to be divine. We are wearing a single collar when it was intended that we should wear the yoke. "Take My yoke upon you for My yoke is easy and My burden is light."—Rev. J. H. Jowett. SELF-CONCEIT OR SELF-ESTEEM? There is plenty of self-conceit in the world to-day, but we have not nearly enough self-esteem. Let me try to show the- difference. Self-conceit is like some noisy little river- craft, puffing across its tiny waters. Self- esteem is like some mighty liner, moving majestically across the great deep. Self-conceit never looks beyond its pool. Self-eateem gazes wonderingly into the infinite. Self-conceit concerns itself with the secon- dary, self-eateem with the primary; the one- with incidentals, the other with essentials. Self-conceit is concerned with living, self- esteem is concerned with life; the one is intent upon possessions, the other is intent upon character. And, therefore, we should get rid of self- conoeit and cultivate a worthy self-esteem. One puffs up, the otl-er edifies; one contem- plates a swelling ego, the other a large- humanity.—Rev. J. H. Jowett, D.D. DOUBTFUL TEACHINGS. The greatest dankf,,r in connection with doubtful teachings is not found in the teacher, but in his followers. The younger minds, not well trained, enthusiastic, enamoured of novelty, catching up the vagary which the professor knew well enough not to carry to its extreme lengths, pushing it to its end, give trouble. The teacher is responsible, however, all the same. Had he been careful to avoid doubtful theories and notions, had he been content with the exploitation of solid and helpful truths rather than of fancies, hio pupils would not have gone astray.