Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 5 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
MUNICIPAL APATHY

MUNICIPAL APATHY. It is my earnest desire," said the ;King, in replying to an address at Not- tingham recently, that the munici- palities of the country should always he alive to the value of the beneficial powers which they possess." King George crystallised in a phrase a fact which members of Local Authorities should keep before their minds. When, after his famous Colonial tour, he gave that short, sharp, and emphatic mes- sage, Wako up. England," he uttered a clarion call to the leaders of the great commercial and industrial forces, upon which the prosperity of the Empire so greatly depend. It stimulated the en- terprise of captains of industry, and was a pertinent reminder that we can- not. live in the past, but must ever be pressing forward to further goals. In his call to municipalities, the King has once more given a message the influence -of which, it may be hoped, will be felt to the farthest coasts of the Kiitgdom. Local governing authorities are too apt to sink into the rut of monotonous rou- tine. Not seldom they fail to realise the, possibilities of the "beneficent powers they possess. There is a con- stant cry for legislation when what is needed is efficient administration of the I laws already passed, the provisions of A, d(,ad Ic?tter. ?A d many of which are a dead letter. Ad- vantage. has not been taken of all file opportunities which present themselves fo the alert and progressive public man. Conscious of the need for vigilance in the affairs of the nation, the King has given a timely stimulus, from which it is hoped may spring a determination on the part of local administrators to energise municipal government. The Royal message is a call to patriotism, a significant reminder from one who lias shown his keen interest, in the life of the people, to rulers of local affairs that they must make enlightened and active use of their powers if the locality they represent is to continue to main- tain an honourable place in municipal progress. We are all proud of our Em- pire. and believe that our nation is in the van of civilisation, but it is almost a fixed convention to overlook the im- portance of the town or village in which we live. 'And yet it is the ag- gregation of towns and villages that make up the nation. The true patriot is devoted to the place in which he Ji ves, and moves, and has his being, and the enlightened citizen will re-echo the desire of the King that each locality maw utilise its powers in the cause of progress and the general welfare of its inhabitants.

FLOWER SERVICE AT BARRY DOCK CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHI

FLOWER SERVICE AT BARRY  DOCK CONGREGATIONAL  CHURCH. I The flower services at Tynewydd-road Con- gregational Church, Barry Docks, on Sun- day last. were exceptionally wrell-attended, the church being beautifully decorated with a profusion of flowers. The Rev. J. Mydyr Evans, pastor, preached an appropriate ser- mon at the morning service, and in the even- ing the preacher was the Rev. Ben Evans, the lk-v. W. E. Davies, Kelvadon, Essex, formerly of Barry Docks, taking the intro- ductory portion of the service. A solo was rendered by Mr. A. Lathey. A special ser- vice was held in the afternoon. Mr. Smith Jones presiding, and Mr. W. Bryn Davies. H.M. Inspector of Schools, delivered a prac- tical children's address on Solomon's Tem- ple." Mr. David Harris also sang a solo, and selections were rendered by the child- ren's choir, under the leadership of Mr. A. J. Medcroft, Mr. D. J. Thomas being the organist throughout. The collections were in aid of the church funds.

CHCHCH EXTENSION IN THE VALE

CHCHCH EXTENSION IN THE VALE. A bazaar and fete in aid of St. Athan Church Hall was held in the Rectory Grounds, Gileston, on Tuesday last, and was opened by the Honourable Mrs. Godfrey Williams, St. Donat's Castle. In addition to the bazaar, which was conducted by the ehurehpeople of the Parish, there were vari- ous attractions, including theatrical perform- ances and oookery and other competitions, the cookery contests being adjudicated by Miss Evans, Llanmaes Rectory, teacher of cookery under the London County Council, find dancing on the lawns. The bazaar was continued on Wednesday, when it was opened by Major-General H. H. I-oe. R.E., D.L, The Mount. Dinars Powis.

MRS GRUNDYS JOTTINGSI

MRS GRUNDY'S JOTTINGS. I The traffic rcceipta on the Barry Railway, including the Vateof tihuuorgan itailway, last week atuouuitd to EIS,496, an increase compa ei wirh the correajjoiiaing week of last year of k39. Aggregate decrease, £ 4,037. -:0:- Now that the Barry Council have adopted the Acquisition of Dwellings acc, au opportunity is given to working-mtm to purchase houses for themselves. There is a house in the Old Village at Cadoxton-Barry which has been occupied by the same family for 120 years. -:0:- The clock over the National Schools, Dinas Powis, has gone on strike." It stopped between the hours of one and two, and a correspondent thinks that the Parish Coun- cil should endeavour to solve the-mystery of the clock's lapse at their next meeting. The timepiece, by the way, has never been heard to "strike," but now it won't go at all. -:0:- Mr. W. R. Lee, one of the new justices, took his seat on the magisterial bench at Barry Police Court last Friday. o: Miss Gertrude Lathey and Miss Blodwen Norton, the two Barry singers who accom- panied the Barry Romilly Schoolboys' Choir on their recent American and Canadian tour, have returned home. Like the choir, these two young ladies were a great success, and received many tempting offers to remain in the States But they preferred Barry, and came back. o: At a special service held at the Palace Chapel last Saturday, the Bishop of Llan- daff licensed the Rev. John Charles Kemp- thorne Buckley. Lie. Div., to the curacy of Barry and Poithkerry. -:0:- The Rev. L. Ton Evans, the missionary of the Black Republic. formerly of Cadox- ton-Barry,, who has for some time settled down in Pennsylvania as pastor of ? Bap- tist church at Jeanne tie, will spend August in; Lcndxm and South Wales. An American correspondent write* that an idea of the popularity of Mr. Evans may be gathered from the fact that a great negro convention representing 500.000 church members (all ex-slaves and their families), met at North Carolina, and passed an earnest resolution praying on the WeO-slh. missionary to go hack to Haiti. At the Cardiff Rowing Club Regatta last I Saturday, the Barry Amateur Howing Club won the second prize in the maiden four- oared race. The team consisted of Messrs. [;1. Vaugjban, A. Farmer, H. Whiite, W. Hayes and A. Steerer. Mr. W. Jones Thomas. J.P., Barry, en- tertained the South Glamorgan Liberal executive to tea at the close of the meeting at Cardiff last Saturday. -:0:- The Cardiff and Barry Works Company of the Glamorgan (Fortress-) Royal Engineers, under Lieutenant F. R. Hybart, who are in camp at Plymouth, have been engaged upon field work of a highly interesting nature. Last Saturday the Rev. J. S. Longdon, M.A., rector of Oadoxton-Barry, conducted a drunirhead service on the pa,ade ground. — :o:— Mr. Isaac J. Mho has been ap- pointed keeper of the Arts Department cf the National Museum of Wales, is a native of Merthyr, where he acts in tbe dual capa- city of curator of the museum at Ovfarthfa Castle and superintendent of handicraft and art teacher for the borough- He has been teacher of Wood Carving at the Glamorgan Summer School at Barry for, several yaars. Mr. Williams is son-in-law of Mr. B. Sum- mers, Vere-Street, Cadoxton- Barry. I — :0:— "Welsh air is far from perfect," says Mr. Arthur Mee in an article on astronomy. o: The Rev. W. E. Davies, Kelvadon, Essex, who was formerly a clerk in the Barry Dis- trict Council Offices, is on a visit to Barry, and took part in the flower service at Tynew- ydd-road Congregational Church, Barry Docks, last Sunday. The Glamorgan (Fortress) Royal Engineers, which includes a large detachment from Barry, had a tempestuous day in camp at Plymouth last Sunday. After the drumhead service, conducted by the Rev. J. S. Long- don, M.A., rector of Cadoxton-Barry, the large marquee was caught by a sudden squall, and blown down. — o — At a neighbouring Council meeting, the members divided on a certain question, two voting against the resolution, and the re mainder of the members in its favour. The Chairman, whose vote was one of the negative two, declared the resolution carried nem. (on. — o — The members of the Barry Municipal Em- ployees' Association held their annual outing last Saturday, an enjoyable time being spent at Cowbridge. -:0:- The third prize in the junior division of the recent International Sunday School Union Scriptural examination was won by M iss Betty Morgan, a young member of Trinity Pi-e,?; b Trinity Presbyterian Sunday School, Barry. She was warmly congratulated by the Barry Sunday School Union last Tuesday evening. — o — A branch of the National Provincial Bank of England will shortly he opened at Barry. — o — Mr. R. W. Hall. M.R.C.V.S., Tynewydd- road, Barry Docks, has, I am sorry to learn, undergone a serious operation in London. I wish him a speedy and complete recovery. -:0:- Police-constable AY. Punter, formerly of Cadoxton-Barry, and now stationed at tJan- twit Major, has just been promoted to the rank of acting-sergeant. o: Speaking at a rally of Boy Scouts in Farn- ham Park last Saturday, the Bishop of Win- chester said The scout movement does this for a boy. It makes his body strong and active, instead of being heavy and slow, and that is a great thing; it makes his mind nimble and lively, instead of being dull and (,,a(l of being dull unobservant. It makes his character more generous, more honourable, and more unsel- fish. He will be more respectful to women: he will be more tender and careful to a little child; lie will bear himself more honourably as he grows up among his fellow men."

THE ENGINEERS STRIKE AT BARRY

THE ENGINEERS' STRIKE AT BARRY. An informal conference convened by the Barry Trades and Labour Council, was held at the Dockers' Hall, Barry Docks, on Sun- day last when representatives of the engin- eers' societies were present. The engineers' strike was discus/sod but the proceedings were private, and no report was given.

I SEQUEL TO LONG DRAGGING AIMLESS DISCUSSIONS

SEQUEL TO LONG, DRAGGING, & AIMLESS DISCUSSIONS. BY THE BARRY HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. HIGH-FLYING DECISION OF THE I DISTRICT COUNCIL. DETERMINES THE ATTITUDE OF THE DOCTORS. THE HOSPITAL COMMITTEE WILL MEET ON FRIDAY EVEN- ING. We have repeatedly called attention to the lsng. dragging, and aimless—if not indeed entirely fallacious—discussions which have taken place at meetings of the Barry Hos- pital Committee and the District Council during the past two or three years, with re- ference to the constitution of the medical staff of the Town Accident and Surgical Hos- pital. There have been strained relations between the Local Authority and the doc- tors serving on the hospital staff for a con- siderable time, but it was not until a resolu- tion was passed by the District Council at its last meeting—a resolution which it is very doubtful was ever inteii(it,d to be carried out —to appoint a "highly qualified surgeon." to take supreme charge of the Hospital, at a salary of tGOO a year—that the members of the medeal staff, who have carried out the surgical and clinical work of the hospi- talon practically voluntary lines, and with the greate t possible efficiency, decided in a hody to send in their resignations. It was perfectly obvious, in view of the whole of the circumstances, that there was no other course left for a self-respecting body of professional gentiemen to take, and, rather than wait until they were dismissed from office, as a result of the contemplated appointment of a "highly skilled man," their resignation must have come as a matter of course. The mem bers of the medical staff met on Friday afternoon last, and the decision to send in their resignation was a unanimous one. the communication conveying such de- cision being forwarded to the Clerk of the District Council the same evening, and will take effect at the close of the present month. unless some reasonable working undertaking is arrived at with the Local Authority in the meantime. The decision of the doctors will affect a rota of thirteen or fourteen in connection with the work of the Hospital, there being six on the surgical staff, and in addition to two on the clinical staff, the six members on the surgical staff being also prepared to do clinical work. At the outset, when the Accident Hospital was first opened, the surgical work was done voluntarily iand gratuitously, and al- though the number of cases has greatly increased, and the work done well, the remuneration paid by the Dis- trict Council to the medical staff is t200 a year, but whether the doctors are prepared I to continue to give their services to tllp { hospital remains to be seen, they certainly are not prepared to accept re-engagement at the existing rate of remuneration. The situation created by the decision of the doctors to terminate their services on July 31st is a serious one, and should re- ceive the prompt and careful consideration of the Local Authority. For this purpose the ordinary meeting of the Hospital Com- mittee will be held this (Friday) evening at eight o'clock, and is sure to attract a con- sidenible amount of excited interc-t.

I HEALTH LESSONS TO BARRYj SCHOOL CHILDRENI

— HEALTH LESSONS TO BARRY SCHOOL CHILDREN The monthly meeting of the, Barry Educa- tion School Management Committee was held on Tuesday afternoon last, Mr. J. Marshall presiding. The members present were Miss M. E. Meredith, Dr. P. J. O'Donnell. J.P., Messrs. J. Lowdon, J.P., S. R. Jones, J.P.. F. C. Milner. Edgar Jones, M.A., and L. P. Griffiths. HEALTH LFCTI/kLS TO SCHOOL CHILDREN. I Mr. L. GJ nm J 011 es attended on behalf of Dr. Owen Morris, Welsh National Memorial Association. He suggested that the Com- mittee should invite lectures from the Asso- ciation Committee to attend the local schools to give short health lessons to the children dealing with the prevention of tuberculosis. Mr. Jones also asked that on one afternoon the schools in Barry should be closed, and a conference convened by the teachers. They would be addressed by Dr. Morris. The methods of dealing with the work of stamp- ing out tuberculosis could be discussed. He felt that the school teachers had an excellent opportunity of supporting the work. The former suggestion was agreed to. and it was decided that a conference of school- teachers should take place after school hours. SCHOOL TEACHERS RESIGN. Resignations from several teachers in the girls' and infants' sections of the schools were accepted. EXCESSIVE PUNISHMENT DISPUTED. With reference to the complaint of Mr. H. Ward. Spencer-street, that his son had been excessively punished at Gladstone-road Boys' School, a sub-committee had enquired into the matter, and reported that there was not sufficient evidence to show whether the punishment was excessive or not. TENDERS FOR TOOLS. It was decided to obtain tenders for the tools and other equipments required at the Cadoxton Woodwork Centre. i

BARRY HORTICULTURAL I SOCIETY ANNUAL SHOW I

BARRY HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY ANNUAL SHOW. I The fourth annual Flower Show and Fete under the auspices of the Barry Horticul- tural Society will be held on Wednesday next at Romilty Park. The opening cere- mony will be performed by Lady Beatrice Stewart. In the afternoon, at 4.30, a Baby Show will be held. The other attractions will include the Barry Red Cross Silver Band. Maypole dances and songs, dancing on the green, illuminations, etc. Refresh. menta will be obtainable on the field. Ad- mission, after 4 p.m., 6d. Keen interest is being taken in the babv competition in connection with the show, and Drs. Gillon Irving and Mason Jones have kindly consented to act as judges.

i DILIGENT EVENING SCHOLARS I

DILIGENT EVENING SCHOLARS. I GOOD ATTENDANCE AT BARRY I TECHNICAL CLASSES. APPEAL TO THE BARRY I RAILWAY COMPANY. The Barry Evening Schools' Committee met on Thursday evening last, under the chair- manship of Mr. J. O. Davies. The members present were Miss E. P. Hughes, Miss J. S. Fleming, Mrs. Arthur Jones, Miss Ellen Wil- liams, Messrs. S. R. Jones, J.P., J. Lowdon, J.P., W. R. Lee, J.P., Colonel J. A. Hughes, C.B., J. R. Llewellyn, R. T. Evans, and D. T. Howe. A. GOOD COMPARISON. I Mr. David Jones, the organising teacher, submitted a report of attendance at the classes during the past session. Mr. Lee They compare favourably with the previous year P Mr. D. Jones: The comparison comes out I much better than I thought it would. The percentage at Holton School is 91.5 for the session. The previous year it was 81.5 per cent. All stages have made a better per- centage than last session. There is an increase of some thousands in the number of hours put in. Two students have spent 224 hours at the classes. We have done every- thing that is possible. Miss Hughes How about the attendance of the girls. Has it been as good as last year ? Mr. D. Jones No. Mr. Howe Have the classes on the whole improved ? Mr. Jones replied in the affirmative. Mr. S. R. Jones: We must do something. We have been very unfortunate in our attempts. I hope something will be done. Mr. Hughes I think there was a sugges- tion that we send a deputation to the Barry Railway Company, with a view to obtaining facilities for their engineering apprentices. It would be an excellent thing it we could make some arrangements with the Company. Our private education has been noted throughout the county, and I do not see the reason why it should not continue to be so. The Chairman I think I gathered from Mr. D. W. Roberts that Mr. Rendell, the genera l manager, is favourably disposed in the matter. Mr. I vowdon proposed that a letter be sent to the general manager. Mr,. S. R. Jones seconded, and the propo- sition was carried. APPOINTMENT OF TEACHEHS. I The question of the appointment of teach- ers for the ensuing session was considered. Mr. Lowdon thought that all the teachers last year were satisfactory, and were all willing to act again. Upon the motion of Mr. Lee, seconded by r. J. R. Llewellyn, last session's teachers were re-appointed. ADDITIONAL TEACHERS. -1 i he question of appointing additional I teachers was left to a sub-committee. DISTRIBUTION OF PHIZES AND I CERTIFICATES. Mr. R. Treharne Rees stated that it had been decided by the County Council to re- commence the classes on the 14th of Septem- ber, a fortnight earlier than usual. Mr. Lowdon moved the same Committee as last year, with the addition of Mr. D. W. Roberts, be appointed to deal with the ques- tion of distributing the prizes. Colonel Hughes seconded, and the Commit- tee agreed. THE GRANTING OF PHIZES. I The Committee voted tl2 for prizes to the most successful students at the classes during the coming year, it being stated that the Glamorgan County Council were consid- ering the advisability of granting prizes to the classes of engineering students.

TRANSFER OF TEACHERSI

TRANSFER OF TEACHERS. I GLADSTONE-ROAD DEMONSTRA- TION SCHOOL. MHETING OF .MANAGERS. I TEACHERS WHO WISH TO HE-I MAIN UNDER THE EDUCATION AUTHORITY. I The managers of the Gladstone-road De- I monstration School, in connection with the Training College, met on Tuesday evening last. Dr. P. J. O'Donnell, J.P. (chairman) presided, and the mem bers w ho were pre- sent were Miss E. P. Hughes, Miss H. M. Raw, Miss M. E. Meredith, Miss Ellen Wil- liams, Messrs. J. Lowdon" J.P., L. P- Griniths D. Lloyd, and Hev. D. H.' Wil- liams, M.A., and J. R. Llewellyn. APPLICATIONS FOR TRANSFERS. I The Committee accepted the applications of the following teachers for transfer to Gladstone-road Demonstration School in con- nection with the new Training College:— M'sses Kate Jones. Agnes Mitchell, E. Myfanwy Davies,, N. Thomas, A. M. Roberts, M. Aubrey. The Committee decided to ask Miss Boaler, first assistant at Cadoxton School, be, transferred to Gladstone-road as first assistant; and also to ask Miss Edith Hughes, of Cadoxton, to be transferred to Gladstone-road;. It was agreed to a.,ilc -ItISFi H. Rowland, IN I iss C. M. Bedingfield and Miss M. Evans to remain at Gladstone-road School. The teachers who have agreed to remain at Gladstone-road School are Misses G. A. Wilde, A. B. Ward. G. A. Sharpe, G. G. Evans,, A. M. Dixon, E. E. Powell, G. M. Williams, and M. E. Biggane. In reply to a question by Mis-is E. P. Hughes, as to whether the teachers had given any reason for their applications for transfers, The Correspondent (Mr. R. Treliarne Rees) read the following petition from a number of teachers:—" We were given to understand on Friday, May 22nd, by Mr. Owen M. Edwards. H.M. Inspector of Schools, that this school (Gladstone-road) is to be carried on under entirely different; management. In that case we humbly re- quest you to transfer us to other schools in this district under your direct management as soon as is practicable." The Chairman: They prefer to be under the management of the Barry Education Committee1.

EVENING STUDENTS SUCCESSES AT BARRY

EVENING STUDENTS' SUCCESSES AT BARRY. Iu connection with the recent examinations I of the Royal Society of Arts, the following Barry students were successful — ,qlioi-thand-Afab(-] Book-keeping—Harrv Clissold, Julia Irene Cosulich, Harold Samuel Ewens, Walter Jones, Mary Sarah Lloyd, and Thomas Clarke Morgan. William Coles gained the Board of Educa- tion certificate for practical geometry and graphics. wen gained the higher certifi-,ate for Sidney Owen gained the higher certificate for [ machine construction aua drawing.

rCORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. The Editor desires to state that he does not nectssarily endorse the opinion expressed by Correspondent*. Give me above all other liberties, the liberty to know, to utter, and to argne freely, according to conscience.(,An Milton. WHAT MAY WE DO FOR OUR BLIND CHILDREN. To the Editor of the Barry Dock News." Sir,—Will you kindly allow me. through the medium of your valuable paper, to state a few facts concerning the blind people of this country? There are 25,000 adult blind men and women, and 9.000 children under the age of sixteen years, in Great Britain alone. I turn my attention to the children. What do we do for them? In the first place. I admit we provide schools for them. where education is compulsory, and they are taught basket-work, needlework, etc. But when they attain the age of six-t-ceii years they are no longer entitled to remain in these schools. and are cast adrift. A great "number of them are orphans, with no one on whom they can depend therefore, when they leave the schools they have no alternative but to earn their living by begging on the streets, and in all of our large towns and cities a blind beggar at the street corner is quite a fami- liar figure. Does this not, to a certain ex- tent, reflect discredit upon our countrymen, who allow their afflicted and less fortunate brothers and sisters to live their lives in this way? I would suggest that more in- stitutions be formed, and it would be a good thing if libraries containing books written in the ?l.?illie were erected. Several thousands of money have been de- voted to the building of free public libraries throughout the country by philanthropists. such as Mr. Andrew Caruegie and others, whose sole object was to spread knowledge and wi.dom-a truly noble ideal. But would it not be a boon to the blind folk if libraries. such as 1 have mentioned, were erected? Would it not be a still nobler work to bring some light and knowledge of the "un- seen world" into the lives of these people. and allow them the privilege of study? An argument has been put forth that brnd persons are lacking in common sense. and unable to learn, but this is not so. On the contrary, if properly taught, they be- come brilliant scholars. For instance, every- one has heard of Helen Keller, who. although deaf. and dumb. and blind, became a distin- guished scholar, and graduated at Oxford University. We people do not know what the affliction of blindness means, and a cheering word or a friendly guiding hand. go a long way towards making their lives more happy and contented. I hope that this question—which is indeed a very serious question—will be taken up by ot hers throughout the country.—I am. vours, etc.. OPTIAlf STIC. Barry. July 21st. 1914. BARRY HOSPITAL INQUIRY FINDINGS. To the Editor of the "Barry Dock News." Dear Sir,—Will you be kind enough to in- sert the following in your paper. whilst the the fo l loll- ,,Ilg ill pal)el. t l 1,, above is fresh in the public mind:— Although, we were to'd last week at the Council meeting that no witnesses attended to give evidence at the inquiry in support of seven out of eight of the complaints given them to investigate. I understand the Com- mittee have admitted to foili- otit of the eight cases, namely, two cases of broken arm and one of fractured shoulder was re- fused treatment at the Hospital. and a child had to wait two hours for a doctor. What I am surprised at is the attitude of the Council in not instructing the'r Clerk to send letters of regret to the three other cases as they did in the case of the child. Are they hoodwinking the public, who. I think, ought to know?—Yours, etc., A WORKER AT THE DOCKS.

SCHOLARSHIPS RENEWED

SCHOLARSHIPS RENEWED. MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOLARS. MEETING OF BARRY COI/NTY SCHOOL GOVERNORS. The chair at a meeting of the Barry County School Governors on Wednesday evening last- was occupied by Mr. J. Lowd-on. J.P.. and the members present were [rs, Sibbering Jones, Dr. P. J. O'Donnell. J.P.. Colonel J. Arthur Hughes. C.B.. and Councillor S. R. Jones. J.P. RENEWAL OF SCHOLARSHIPS. The Chairman explained that there were to be renewed. 23 entrance scholarships, two extel-lial tlij-ek, scholarships by examination, two service scholarships, three internal scholarships, and two maintenance scholarships. These were for the boys' sec- tion. In the girls' section, there were re- newed 31 entrance scholarships, three in- ternal. fifteen maintenance, and four district scholarships. INSPECTION OF SCHOLARS. I Mr. A. Jackson, the clerk. stated that a letter had been sent to the Board of Educa- tion. and their reply was to the effect that it was within the power of the Governors to expend money for the medical inspection of sch olars. The Chairman I think we should first apply to the County Council, and see if they will undertake the work. Colonel Hughes agreed that the County ought to do the work. The Chairman reported that he had re- ceived Sol- for grass which had been cut in the school grounds. He suggested that this money should be handed over for cutting the grass on the tennis court. This was agreed to. m' COMPLAINT BY INSPECTOR. 111.11- l lie tliairman stated that the inspector, when at the school, had complained that the ii- l iell 'it the commercial classroom was not sufficiently equipped. There was needed a cupboard and a Remington duplicator. The Headmaster (Mr. Edgar Jones) said a duplicator was also asked for. These it was decided to obtain. HOCKEY GROUND. Colonel Hughes asked what the County Council were going to do with the land that Mrs. Jenner had given. When were they going to fence it? The Chairman When the road is made. Colonel Hughes That may be years. Are they gng to do any levelling? I thought we were going to have a good hockey ground. The matter was deferred.

BARRY EDUCATION ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE

BARRY EDUCATION ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE. Mr. J. Marshall (chairman) presided at the monthly meeting of the Barry Education Accounts Sub-Committee on Wednesday af- ternoon last, when the only member in at- tendance was Mr. J. Lowdon. J.P. Tbe ordinary business of the Committee was transacted.

rTHE YALE OF GLAMORGAN

r THE YALE OF GLAMORGAN. I I ITS BEAT-TIES AXD ATTRAC- TIONS. I BY MR. F. M. PRICE. LATE OF BOVER- TON. Is the summer anywhere more beautiful than in the Yale of Glamorgan ? Pastures deep. and hayfields deeper with verdant grass, and golden cornfields where the gentle breezes of the Severn Sea bend the feathered- stems till they shimmer like steel. and tosses. the ruddy plumes of the sorrel, where patches of the pretty landscape, with full. green, leafy foliage, out of which here and there- often peer lofty grey towers of venerable old churches, ancient castles or hoary keep. Be- hind all, to the northward, is stretched the dim purplish eurtain of the everlasting hills, or if you look southward there lies the, wide Severn Sea, where brown barques and wooden ships gentJy glide to and fro, and vast iron artifieel. carrying the gay bunting and flag of oJd England, steadily plough the tide past the glittE-ring towns and villages. and the bright hills and dales of "Gwlad yr Haf—the Land of Summer." Bristling with the ruins of historical cas- tles. ancient churches with their venerable monuments and memorials, picturesque old Manor Houses, quaint old farmsteads, and pretty rustic cottages, with a wealth of gar- den flowers, and rich in scenes famous in sgng and story, and exquisitely beautiful in them- selves. with a profusion of fragrant flowers. The pietui-esque old world, villages, and hamlets of the vale, and the quaint old way- side country inns, have a peculiar attraction for the tourist, or anyone who concerns him- self with the past history x>f the picturesque Yale of Glamorgan, solemnly immortalised as the Garden of Wales. The A ale is a paradise for poet and artist, who would revel in its beiuties and attrac- tions, and it is fulf of interest to the anti- quarian historian, white to the modern man and woman in the busy present it has also- many charms. Jn the rustic solitudes, and beneath, tho tre-es and eaves of the old farm- steads. and quaint rustic cottages, one has no other idea than pleasant inland life. The Yale has a countryside that is unparalleled. The green hedges of her country lanes, the narrow winding ways through her little vil- lage." and hamlets, the carpets of bluebells in the leafy woods, and the pleasing variety of woodland and fiek'lpaths throug~h verdant mcat?tws. The change is startling from active town life to the quiet and peaceful repose of the country. The night of towns has its tramp of policemen, the tramp of public, the refrain of the earouser, the occasional disturbance, and the rush of the fire engine. The night. of the village has its accompaniments—the cry of the belated bird, the summons of the watch-dog, each answering eich-t-lie anthem of the woods. Listen and living waves of sound are around you. sometimes so faint and tremulous that only by painful intensity can you note them. The sunrise is a vision of glorious beauty" sunset is a marvel of splendour—one like a virgin flashes forth her unsullied brilliancy upon a world the other like a hero grandly withdraws amid a halo of glory. What more bewitching scene than the rising of the full- orbed harvest moon, and the beanty of the planets? In the grey woods life abounds. bird calls haunt the air. and by the deep blue sea you hare the wild monotone and restless piny of fin. surge, and wave. For tens of thousands of years the storms have revelled thereon, and the sunrise has shone in tenderness, and its setting left awhile its path or gold. The gentle beauties of the Yale, the wondrous perfections of flower, plant and leaf are here represented. Nature is clad in wildness and in stern simpliety, and near you, straying from the distant farm and rustic cottage comes the busy bee; and the Jark. rising from its hidden nest, soars, and ever soaring, sings. Rural life, says Cicero. is not delight- ful by reason of cornfields only, and meadows and vineyards, and groves, but also for its. g31 dens and orchards, for the feeding of cat- tie and the swarms of bees and the beauty of all kinds of nowcrs." Bacon considered thin a garden is tlie greatest refreshment to the spirits of men. without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks, and a man all ever see that when ages grow to civihty an ] elegancy, men come to build stately soon, than to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection. No doubt the pleasure which we taken in a garden is one of the most-innocent delights in human life. But nature does not provide delights for the eye only. The other senses are not forgotten—a thousand sounds, many delightful in themselves, and by all associa- tion songs of birds, hum of insects, rustle of leaves, ripple of water, seem to fill the air. I raga.nt flowers are sweet, as as !ovciy;.?' the pleasing dfed of landscape, woodland, 'd seaside :.er.c;'v is good for thcmin(taswe)iasthebody. The Vale of (?amorgan Hai)way h.as opened out a series of some of the most attractive scenes in South 'Yak", for varied picturesque vie ws of the countryside and seaside scenery. Leaving iiltli its colossal- docks and network of railways lined with minerals, etc., and passing through the tun- nel, we emerge into the beautiful picturesque Porthkerry Park, and here we have a charm- ing and delightful variety and track of scenery that cannot be surpassed by the Wildest and most ptcnuesque localities of Wales. oi' an d l?l' -o-,i have Descend then, we wander through the- pietty Y??ofG?mM???amI?y?ihave been amongst the smoke and fire, din and tnrmoii of the great ironworks and coHieries. the change from turmoil to peace, from dust to pure, bracing air. from the spectacle of men in laborious action to nature in calm and rural repose will be most refreshing and beneficial to the mind and body. Travelling in the train from Barry to Rhoose. Aber thaw. Gileston. and Llantwit- Ma.jor. the magnificent view over the Severn Sea. with the hills and dales of Somerset and Devonshire looming in the distance, i; alone a picture worth travell- ing many a mile to see. As you. wander between banks of full, green, leafy foliage, with their wealth of fern and lfower- ing plants, wild rose and honeysuckle, with pretty mistic winding lanes and old-fashioned cottages, producing throughout many excel- lent enough to fill an artists sketch book. The Severn Sea exerts its softening effect on the climate. The brook runs witli its cheery song and venerable old trees, wave silently silently in the Summer air. and the azure of the earth is beautiful, breathing of peaeo and goodwill to men.

V IFATAL ACCIDENT AT BARRY

V I FATAL ACCIDENT AT BARRY. SEAMAN FALLS DOWN HOLD OF SHIP. Bernard Wilkinson (21). an ordinary sea- man on board the s.s. Treasuiy, lying i-Lndei- No. 29 Tip at Barry Docks, went down to the 'tween deck of the vessel to fix a ladder on "Wednesday morning last, and. miss/ing his footing, fell to the" bottom of the hold, a distance of about 40 feet, and sustained a fractured skull. He died on hoard about five minutes after the accident, and was. removed to the Barry Town Mortuary hy the dock police. Dec-eased had only joined the ship four dan. and lived at No. 42a, Toliji- street, Pendleton, near Manchester.