Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

A Word with You YOU have confidence in your A^ — own judgment as a smoker, and that is why we are ready to submit Black Cat Cigarettes to your judgment,. so that you will i learn for yourself how superior | they are in quality, mildness, i j and freedom from "bite" to any other Virginia cigarettes. Try them to-day and prove C- >%§mL for yourself that Black Cat is the 10 for 3d." cigarette JyfVai £ rj&tjf,IF /w/ll with the "10 for 6d." flavour.i[Jflmy SAVE your COUPONS irc-IG -rfos 10 They entitle you to many handsome and \SX. -s???????????  valuable Pro you to manGy i'ts. Ask your h ? W&L vatuaMe Protit-sharing tobacconist to-day for a Proht-shanng Gift List. i i., Stm M' Black Cat pMn| J'tBELMBdtB??Td????rL?JISL?r L ???

REVIEW OF PUBLICATIONS

í REVIEW OF PUBLICATIONS I 4i LADY'S WORLD." The July number of the "Lady's World'' -No. 190 (Messrs. Horace Marshall and Son, 125, Fleet-street, London, E.C.) contains an- other instalment of "A Scotchman and l," by an Englishwoman, and the further ad- ventures cf "Nina in the Country," by Fred M. White, also a complete story by Alexandra Watson. The society section is illustrated by the newest photographs of wt-d-known people, while theatrical news is up-to-date and also well illustrated. Dame faction contains many full-page illustrations cf novelties from Paris suitable for the sum- mer season. Bathing costumes, seaside and country holiday wear are al11 beautifully de- picted, and full page illustrations given, with instructions how to make up the various gar- ments shown. Underwear and millinery are practically represented; the millinery les&on this month tells How to make one of the new sailor hats." Sheena wrik's an instruc- tive article on "Etiquette of the Dinner Party," and table napkin folding has been illustrated and explained in a highly scienti- fic manner. The house beautiful article by Miss Bartlett, entitled Children's Houses/' will be interesting to mothers. The nursery section illustrates the holiday dolls in an amusing manner for children. An instruc- tive article is written by E. S. Rometro- Todosco upon umbrellas and parasols. As an occupation for girls, "A Tea. Shop in the City," the story of a successful venture, is all important position, and the article by An Onlcoker," entitled "Seaside Love Affairs," will he read with much interest. The fancy work section contains articles suit- able for embroidery with novelties in crochet work. Transfer patterns for embroidering the ends for a table stnap, and a Three-m- ono gratis blouse pattern are given away with this number. Order this number early so as to be sure of obtaining the gratis pat- j terns mentioned, and besides readers will fil:d this number of the" Lady's World a very amusing one for the holidays. Ad- dress: The "Lady's World Office, 6. Es- sex-il.reL,t, Strand, London, W.C., price 3d., by post 5jd. '-THE WELSH OUTLOOK." I Ini the July number of "The WeLsn Uut- lock is an article on The Future cf Welsh Education," by Principal Roberts, who, hav- ing recently attended, as a representative of the Univorsity of Wales, the newly-i.stab- lisned Teachers' Regifitration Council, and observed the very large number of teachers from all parts of the Kingdom whose appli- cations for admission to the Register are under consideration, expresses his disap- pointment that the number of applicants from Wales and Monmouthshire up-to~

BARRY FORTRESS ENGINEERS IN CAMP

BARRY FORTRESS ENGINEERS IN CAMP. Fine weather bias „so far favoured the Glamorgan (Fortress) Royal Engineers dur- ing their tra.ining at Staddon Heights, near Plymouth. Much useful instructional work lias been done. The telephonists are en- gaged in running lines, and they he- H con- nected tho camp with tb-e exchanges at Plymouth. East week General Triscott, commanding the Western Coa,st Defences, visited the camp and inspected the corps, and the Fielcl Work Companies were also inspected. The same evening the non-com- missioned officers of the Glamorgans at- tended a concert at Elphinstone. Barracks; and on Thursday evening a return concert was given at the Staddon Heights Camp.

BARRY DOCK TIDE TABLE I I

BARRY DOCK TIDE TABLE, The following is the Tide Table for Barry rock for the week-commencing to-day (Friday) Morning. Afternoon. b.m. ft. in. h m. ft. in. i Friday, 24 7-58 :H.!I 8-12 36 0 Saturday. 25 S-36 ;{¡). G 8 47 :6. f) Slintiay, 20 ;{;i- fi 9 22 36- 5 Monday, 27 9 44 35 0 10- 1 3;). 7 Tuesday, 28 10-22 33-11 10.39 34-2 Wednesday. 20. 11-0 32-4 11 20 32-1 Thursday, SO JJ-42 30- 4 —

RECKLESS DRIVING OF MOTOR CAR

RECKLESS DRIVING OF MOTOR CAR. GOVERNESS-CAR OVERTURNED ON WENVOE ROAD. LOCAL MAGISTRATES" ACTION FOR DAMAGES. ON BEHALF OF INJURED SON. Mr. GLaude Dudley Thompson, J.P., of, Woodside, Wenvoe, brought an action at the Glamorgan Assizes at Swansea on I Thursday of last week (befoi-e Mr. Justice A. T. Lawrence) against Mr. G. E. Aiad- decks, colliery agent, Penarth, for the re- covery of damages for injuries sustained by his son, Colin Merrik Thompson, as a re- sult of the alleged reckless driving of a motor-car by the defendant. Mr. Ralph Bankes, K.C., and Mr. Wil- frid Lewis appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr. David White and Mr. Mervyn Howell defended. The case for the plaintiff was that on May 17th of last yetir his little loy was being driven in a pony governess car to the Railway Station by a coachman to meet his father. The car was proceeding at the rate of about six miles an hour, and on the pro- per side of the road, and had reached a sharp dangerous corner, when defendant's car appeared, approaching at a rate not safe under the circumstances. The corner, said counsel, was a difficult one to negotiate, and it appeared that defendant had occasion to bo in a hrurry to keep an appointment to play at a cricket match at Wenvoe. Sec- i ing the governess car in front of him, de- fendant jammed his brakes on. which caused the car to skid into the governess car and upset it. The little boy was thrown out and sustained most aenous injury, ks thigh being broken, his subsequent illness result- ing in one leg being permanently shorter than the other, and medical and other ex- penses amounting to nearly The coachman was also injured and the horse and carriage damaged. j As to whether or not defendant was to blame, counsel continued, immediately af- terwards a Mrs. Manlcy came up in a motor- car .which defendant had juist previously overtaken, and when she saw what had hap- pened she said, What a dreadful acci- dent 1", Defendant replied, "I am very sorry; it was all my fault. I had an ap- pointment at Wenvoe, and was ten minutes late." Defendant subsequently told the coachman he was on the wrong side of the road, but when the coachman challenged him to examine the tracks of the wheels he said he could not because he had not time. For the defence negligence was denied. Plaintiff's coachman, named Rolls, said there was plenty of room for defendant's car to PM' had he rounded the corner at the slow pace he ought to have done consider- ing the nature of the place, which was one where considerable caution v. as needed. The trap was struck bv the hinder part of the car a* it skidded on the wrong side of the road, was knocked right over, with its wheels in the air, the shafts were broken, and the horse ran away, while the plaintiff's ton was violently thrown on to the si de of the road. Mrs. Manley,of Punnrth, and Mr. J- C. Barker, printer, of Cardiff gave evidence of being overtaken, the former in her brother's car. and the latter on his cycle, before the accident by defendant, whom they described as going at a rapid peNl, and they also spoke to the statements made by the de- fendant that he was at fault. Mr. Barker said the skid marks indicated that the car skidded on to the wrong side of the road. Mr. Tuhhy, of Harley-street, the eminent surgeon, described the boy's injuries and the mode of treatment. He said considering the age of the hoy he regarded him not a. fit subject for a surgical operation, and he in- vented an apparatus himself for dealing with the thigh. Already there liad been a great improvement, but lie believed he would be permanently incapacitated from entering the Army or N-avy, and the condi- tion of the Limb would make a great differ- ence in his powers of walking or running. He would suffer pain in future life as the result of one leg being half an inch shorter than the other. The plaintiff was called, and spoke of the expense to which he had been put as the re- sult of the accident. He had already spent £ 587, and he estimated lie would have to spend a further sum which would increase the total to £ 673. Mr. White was cross-examining plaintiff with a. view of showing, as he told the Judge, that he had been reckless in his ex- penditure in regard to the bov, w1k-ii the hearing was adjourned till the following morning. INSINUATIONS WITHDRAWN BY I COUNCIL FOR THE DEFENCE. The hearing was resumed on Friday. The cross-examination of Mr. Thompson was continued by Mr. White, who put it to the defendant that the account for his son's nursing and attendance were over-stated. Mr. Bankes (re-examining) You are an estate agent, and have to work for your living?—Yes. The suggestion was made that you have put in accounts in regard to which money has never passed. Mr. White: I withdraw that suggestion unreservedly. Mr. Bankes: Tt was a most improper sug- gestion to make. There is a suggestion equally improper that you have charged for a professional masseur who you never en- gaged. As a matter of fact, you had a pro- fessional masseur from St. Andrcv,"s-pJace for some time.—Answer: Yes. and the ac- count was P,19 10s. Mr. Whi te said he withdrew this ugges- tion also. Dr. Pearson, of Cardiff, gave evidence as to the boy's condition. Mr. White opened the defence, which nas that the governors car was on the wrons: side of the road when the accident happened. The defendant denied that he was liable at all. and if lie was he was not liable for anything like the amount claimed by the plaintiff. Mr. T. E. Maddock s said he was a colliery agent at Cardiff. He was going to a cricket match in his car, and on turning the corner at the point in question he found the plain- tiff's governess car on the wrong side of the roadj giving him no room to He immediately pulled up. and the back nart of his car. which was a. light one, skidded across the road. and the vehicles colhlecl In cross-examination, Mr. Ma block* ad- mitted that he took the shorter road t.o Wenvoe as he was late, and that when he passed Mrs. Manley on a straight bit of road, he was going at a high speed. Tins was what he explained to Mrs. Manlev after- wards. SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGES. Summing up. his Lordship said with re- gard to the expenses, the plaintiff was en- titled to have the best possible advic-c he could get, and he dud exactly as a person in his position would do. The jury returned a verdict for plaintiff for £ 825. namely, £ 425 for the boy and £.400 for the expenses.

I BARRY ACCIDENT HOSPITAL INQUIRY

I BARRY ACCIDENT HOSPITAL INQUIRY. (To the Editor of the Barry Dock Xews.") Sir, Mr. William Beck, for whom I am acting in the above matter, has produced to me a report of the Sub-Committee which investigated Mr. Beck's complaints. Air. Beck has asked me to write to you pointing out that, acting upon my advice, neither h. nor any of his witnesses attended the inqnjrv to give evidence, as the Committee could not ca tend to the witnesses the privileges of court of law, and were not prepared to ahou the various parties to be represented. I advised Mr. Beck, in the interests of thooC who were prepared to make complaints, that if he attended, and any statements of a defamatory nature were made by liim or his witnesses, it would leave them open to an action for slander. In view of these facts, it is evident that the report is of-iio val-Lic, as only one side has been heard by the Com- mittee, and neither has the evidence pro- duced been subjected to the test of cross- examination. On Mr. Beck's behalf, I am doing all I possibly can to obtain an impartial inquiry under the control of the Local Gov- ernment Board. I am, yours, etc., HABOLD 1I LLOYD. Cardiff. CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MR. HAROLD LLOYD AXD THE COUNCIL., j The following correspondence has taken place between Mr. Harold Lloyd, solicitor, acting on behalf of Mr. W. Beck, and the Clerk to the Barry Distritc Council OIr. T. B. Tordoff) — 8, Park P'itce> Cardiff, 4th May, 1914. Dear Sir,— re Accident 1 fospital Inquiry. Air. William Beck has instructed me to adAise him in this, matter. My client instructs me that he has made a series of charges with reference to the way injured persons are dealt with at the Hospital, which at the proper time and place he is prepared to substantiate. M\ client aiso informs nie that a sub-com- mittee has been appointed to inquire into the charges which he has made. Mr. Beck has instructed me to obtain the nec essary evidence, and to prepare his case, but it is perfectly obvious that it is quite impossible for Mr. Beck's complaint to be properly and adequately inquired into by any sub-corn mi titee of your Council. In saying this I d lwt for one moment intend to reflect I in any way upon the good faith or illtegrity of the gentlemen who have been appointeù upon this committee, but, as you yourself know, neither the committee or my client have the power to summon the necessary wit- nesses before you to give evidence, and fur- ther it is in the interests of everyone that those who attend to give evidence should be subjected to examination and cross-examina- tion by the parties concerned. I have also had to point out to my client that any person making statements before a sub-ccmmittee of your Council, may possibly, under certain circumstances, have himself open to an action for libel or slander as the case may be, and I say this. particularly bearing in mind the fact that at present my client has already been threatened with an action for libel by Dr. Budge with reference to a statement made recently in an election pamphlet concerning this matter. Under the circumstances I have advised my client that the best possible course that he can adopt, and one which I hope meets with the approval of your sub-committee, is to ,u b -?-oii)iii i tt(,P. i,, to apply to the Local Government Board for all appointment of an inspector to hold an inquiry under the Public Health Act into the chaiges made by Mr. Beck. If the Board assent, and the inquiry held, witnesses can be summoned, and they can also give their evidence protected by the privileges of the courts, and the whole matter can be thoroughly and properly inquired into. I have no doubt that when your committee consider this matter they will see that the best possible course to adopt is the one I have suggested, and will join with Mr. Beck in asking the Local Government Board for an inquiry. I should also imagine that the seven doc- tors. who signed the request to the Council for an inquiry into Mr. Beck's charges, will also be satisfied I am writing the Local Government Board to-night, asking, on behalf of Mr. Beck, for an Inquiry to be held, and in the meantime I have advised Mr. Beck not to take part in any proceedings before your committee until the Local Government Board have deci- ded what they will do in the matter. I shall be glad if you will let me hear from you immediately.-Yours faithfully. (Signed) HAROLD LLOYD. T B Tordoff, Esq.. Clerk to the Barry Urban District Counci l. Council Offices, Barrv, 5th May. 1914. Hatold Lloyd, Esq., Cardiff. Dear Sir,—Your letter of the 4th inst., on behalf of Mr. William Beck, has been con- sideied by the Committee appointed to inquire into the charges made by him. It seems to the Committee that. as the charges made are really of default on the part of the staff whom the Council have engaged to attend to patients at the Hospital, the mat- ter is not one for a Local Government Board Inquiry, but for an inquiry by a committee of the Council. They are not prepared, therefore, to join in your application to the Local Government Board to hold an inquiry. The Committee have decided to meet at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, the 13th instant, in the Committee Room at the Council Offices, to commence the Inquiry. At this meeting the Committee will only deal wit litlic three cases particularly mentioned in Air. Beck's election circular, and they have instructed me to ask for the attendance at this meeting of the patients, the doctors concerned, the matron of the Hospital, and the persons whom Mr. Bed.. has named as his informants. I am ilso instructed to invite, through you. Mr. Beck to be present. Other cases alluded to by Mr. Beck will be inquired into at a sub- sequent meeting. The medical staff of the Hospital have asked to be allowed to be legally represented at the Inquiry, but the Committee are of opinion that it is unnecessary that there should be any legal representation, and they have instructed me to inform the Doctors and yourself accordingly.—Yours faithfully, (Signed) T. B. TORDOFF. 8. Park Place, Cardiff. May 9th, 1914. Dear Sir,—I have now seen my client with reference to your letter of the 5th instant. and he regrets that your Committee cannot s-ee their way to join him in. asking the Local Government Board to grant all inquiry into the charges made. Your Committee appears to misunderstand the position of matters. No charges have at any time been made of default of any member of the staff, whom the Council have engaged to attend the patients at the Hospital The charges made are against a system which renders it possible that when a patient is taken to your Hospital that lie may have to wait in an injured condition for a consid- 1 era ble time owing to the fact that the various members of your staff are engaged on their own professional work elsewhere. I have satisfied myself that the Local Gov- ernment Board have jurisdiction to hold an inquiry into a rate-aided Institution, and, on behalf of Mr. Beck, I intend doing all I can to get an Inquiry held. As I have before stated, and your Com- mittee must know it, it is impossible for them to hold a proper inquiry as thev have not the power to do so. In addition to the cases which have already been referred to. my Client has now in his possession information with regard to a very large number of others of a similar nature, which at the proper time he proposes sub- mitting to the Local Government Board. 1 have advised Air. Beck under the circum- stances not to attend a meeting of your Com- mittee on "Wednesday next, or at any other time, End, on his behalf, I intend communi- cating with each of the. persons referred to in the pamphlet and inform them that it is not All". Beck s desire that they should attend before your Committer and make a state- ment, and that if they do so the statement made will not in any way be privileged. 1 note that your Committee have decided that it is unnecessary that any party to the inquiry shouid have any legal representation, This is a matter for them, but at the same time it forms another important reason why persons should not attend and make state- ments when they are not in a position to be advised as to whether any statements they may make are actionable or not. It seems to me that your inquiry is doomed to failure, firstly because your Committee have not the power to hold a proper inquiry, and secondly because it is obvious that people who have made complaints are not going to run the risk oi attending before your Com- mittee and possibly have an action brought against them with reference to any state- ment they may make. There is a large body of public opinion behind Air. Beck in this matter, and even if the Local Government Board refuse an inquiry, I intend on Mr. Beck's behalf to see that th, matter is raised in the House of Commons.—-Yours faithfully, (Signed) HAROLD LLOYD. T. B.. Tordoff, Esq., Clerk, Barry Urban District Council.

SPORTS AT THE BRISTOL EXHIBITION

SPORTS AT THE BRISTOL EXHIBITION: Tfie sports committee of the Bristol Exhi- b:"sion which, is formed of the most prominent members of all the athletic clubs of Bi- I stol, have just issued their prospectus for their Amateur Athletic Sports (under A.A.A. laws) he held upon the pageant ground of the Exhibition on Tuesday, 4th August. The first I !-II'e is fixed for three o'clock, so that the visitors will have every opportunity of seeing the multitude of attractions in the Exhibition before and after the sports. The open events are 100 yards handicap, 220 yards handicap, and one mile handicap (all C5 for first prizes), 100- yards veterans' race (38 years of age.or over), 220 yards youths handicap (15 to 18), relay race, one mile (teams of four, one at 880, one at 440, and two at 220 yards). Entry fees are quite nominal, Is. each or 2s. 6d. for three. All entries close on Saturday, July 25th, to the sports hon. secretary, Mr. Horlick, 3 Gooldvii-street, Bristol. It should be men- tioiied that the prizes are guaranteed full advertised value and are cxchangablc. In- tending competitors may send in their entries on any A.A.A. official entry form to save time. To-day (Friday) is set apart for school sports, and the scholars throughout Bristol and the district have been encouraged to visit the Kxhibition in celebration of their bieaking-up for the summer holidays. The events include all forms of athletic sports, slid the number of entries is very large. The organisation of the programme is such that there will be no cessation of activities upon the pageant ground, where the sports will be held, and continuous amusement will be r?ford?d from the opening of the programme at 5 o'clock. Daylight fireworks will be pro- yidpd for the amusement of the youngsters, f,nd the general visitors to the Exhibition. Tomorrow (Saturday) the Bristol and Dis- trict Amateur Gymnastic Association will conduct a splendid evening gymnastic dis- play, including parallel bar, vaulting horse, horizontal bar, and mass work. Here, again, entries are exceedingly numerous, and the pageant ground will be divided so that six or seven events may be proceeding at the same time. and the evening will be concluded with a grand display of ifreworks by Alessrs. C. T. Brock and Co. The Exhibition will introduce a new feature on Monday next, when the Summer Model Aeroplane Exhibi- tion and flying competitions of the Bristol and West of England Aero Club" will be held. The models will be on view throughout the week from Monday next, in the International Pavilion, and upon Saturday, August 1st, at 3 o'clock, the Model Flying Competition will take place in the pageant ground, handsome prizes being offered in the contests for single sciew and multiple screw models. Prizes are also offered for target contests, and for looping the loop. Much interest is being taken in both the Exhibition and competi- tions amongst the local followers of aviation, and there is no doubt that there will be a very large crow d to witness the competitions on Saturday next.

1BARRY SUNDAY SCHOOL IUNION

BARRY SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION. I THE NEW LADY PRESIDENT. t l i(-? i-??tli-lzig i)t-(,?, i dent, Mr W H James, the retiring president, occupied the chair pro. tem. at the monthly meeting of the Barry District Sunday School Union at Salem Welsh Baptist Chapel School- room, Barry Docks, on Tuesday e,pning !a?t. Miss G. M, Ferguson, the newly-elected plfsitknL occupied the chair. In vacattnn ll)e chair to th? now nrcsident. Mr W. H. James said that Miss Fergusson was deeply intcrosted in Sunday school work. She was a great educationalist, spiritually as- weH as morally. Aliss Fergusson thanked the retiring pres- ident and the committee for electing her, and suited that she would always do her utmost for tiie Union. A series of lectures on Sunday school work have been arranged for October next, and will be conducted by Air. G. H. Archibald. The lec tures will probably be held at Ilolton- load English Baptist Chapel, Barry Docks, and will extend for several days. It was decided to send a letter of congrat- ulation to Miss Betty Morgan, of Trinity Sunday School. Barry, who was successful in winning third prize in the junior division of the International Sunday School Union Scripture Examination, recently.

CRUSHED BY BUFFERS

CRUSHED BY BUFFERS. CADOXTON LABOURER IN ABER- THAAV MISHAP. A labourer named Joseph Hooper, of 35. Robbiris-lane. Cad-oxton-Barrv. met with a severe accident at Abertliaw on Saturday last. He was working on a. train of trucks, w lien he was caught between the buffers, sustaining .shocking internal injuries. He was in a critical condition when conveyed to the Barry Voluntary Hospital. T-lie injuied man succumbed to his vv juries at the Voluntary Hospital ou Tuesday night last.