Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 5 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Fred BDCKLAND, i SPECIALIST For Boy Scout & Cadet Uniforms. I GET YOUR QUOTATION TO-DAY FOR SCOUT MASTER'S OUTFIT. MATERIALS ARE BECOMING VERY SCARCE, AND ALL ORDERS SHOULD BE PLACED NOW.

THE GREATEST BATTLE OF THE WAR

THE GREATEST BATTLE OF THE WAR. I Our thoughts this Easter are I centred on the momentous events taking place on the Western Front, for whatever their outcome they must bring the war to a climax. Germany, apparently, is prepared to state all on this final trial of strength, and only by reaching the Channel ports, and crushing out the heart of France, can she hold and exploit her vast gains at the expense of Russia. It is be- lieved that the British Hligh Cdm- mand welcomes the great German offensive, and it suggests that internal conditions in Germany will not per- mit of a continued dead-lock in the West. It is inevitably a time of in- tense anxiety for the Allies, but it is also full of danger for the enemy, for if the great offensive fails in its objectives, the Kaiser and Hinden- burg will have nothing left to offer the German people to induce them to suffer the hardships of interminable war. It is, therefore, greatly to be lioped that the movement made in the American Senate to form a League of Nations, and employ the economic weapon against Germany, will take definite form and purpose. Failing a general democratic peace, the pro- posed league would exclude German ships, and all enemy imports and ex- ports, from the ports of the leagued nations for a number of years. Vague talk about the commercial isolation of Germany will accomplish nothing, but in the event of an inconclusive military issue on the Western Front, it would have a very decisive bearing [ on the war if the Allies put in motion a drastic economic campaign against the enemy countries. Once the Ger- man people were confronted with the choice between military glitter and glory and commercial ruin, there would be an end to Prussian mili- tarism.

BARRY WAR PENSIONS COMMITTEE

BARRY WAR PENSIONS COM- MITTEE. Mr. C. B. Griffiths presided at a meeting of Barry War Pensions Com- mittee on Wednesday evening last. A communication was received from the Ministry of Pensions to the effect that Local War Pension Com- mittees should take care of and look to the welfare and upbringing of motherless children of sailors and soldiers. Where practicable these children should be boarded out in private families. While they were not bound to do so, the Minister of Pensions hoped that the local Com- mittees would do their utmost in the matter.—The matter was referred to the Supplementary War Pensions Committee.

IPRESENTATION TO NURSEI r BLAKE

I PRESENTATION TO NURSE I r* BLAKE. A meeting of the Barry Branch of the Midwives' Association was held on Thursday, March 21, to appoint a new member of the Maternity and Child Welfare Committee. Nurse Blake was presented with a beautiful biscuit bowl and breakfast cruet for her services during the past twelve months, which she appreciated very much. The meeting was largely at- tended, and Miss Weale was nomin- ated in her stead.

YOUNG BARRY OFFICER AGAIN DISABLED

YOUNG BARRY OFFICER AGAIN DISABLED. Lieut. W. T. Lewis, of the Tyne- side .Scottish, Northumberland Fusi- liers, has again been disabled in ac- tion in France. He was wounded on three previous occasions, and was severely gassed in the recent fighting. Lleut. Lewis, who in civil life is a member of the literary staff of the Íí. Barry Dock News," is now in hos- pital at Streatham Hall, Exeter. i

CORRESPONDENCE I

CORRESPONDENCE. I Give tiioctouvc all uiner haertieH, ibe liberty to Know, to utter, and so argue treeiy, t»uy.

CADOXTON MANS SUDDENI DEATHI

CADOXTON MAN'S SUDDEN I DEATH. Mr. D. Rees, the district coroner, held an inquest at Cadoxton Police Station, on Wednesday last, on the body of John G. F. Venning, 11, Mel- rose-street, Cadoxton-Barry. Mrs. Venning gave evidence that her husband, a mason, was 49 years of age, and died on Saturday morn- ing. He had complained since Janu- ary of pain in his chest. He worked on Friday, and had also been working in the garden in the evening. During the night he sat up in bed, and said Mother, it is coming on again." Witness had only time to light the candle before he passed away. Dr. P. J. O'Donnell attributed death to heart failure, following an acute attack of dyspepsia and indiges- tion. Deceased had eaten a meal of bacon, potatoes, and cabbage, which was very unsuitable. A verdict of death from natural causes was returned.

Advertising

'COAGULINE' Transparent Cement for Glass, China, &c., 6d. & 1/ Of Chemists I and Stores. I

IAT LAST THE GREAT OFFENSIVE

AT LAST THE GREAT OFFENSIVE. BIGGEST BATTLE IN THE WORLD'S HISTORY. STRATEGIC RETREAT OF BRITISH: GROUND COVERED WITH GERMAN DEAD. 1 I ENEMY CLAIM LARGE CAPTURES OF MEN AND MATERIAL. i BRITISH FALL BACK SLOWLY: SEVERAL TOWNS AND 1 VILLAGES ABANDONED, NO GROUND FOR DESPONDENCY SWING OF THE PENDULUM I MOMENTARILY EXPECTED. I LARGE NUMBER OF HOSTILE AIRCRAFT BROUGHT DOWN. I FRENCH TROOPS IN AID TWO MILLION AMERICANS TO COME OVER- FINE BRITISH ADVANCE IN JPALESTINE: THE JORDAN CROSSED. THE KING'S INSPIRING MESSA^ETO THE TROOPS IN FRANCE. I I M FRID A y, British Official.-A heavy bom- bardment was opened by the enemy shortly before dawn on Thursday against our whole front from Vendeuil (south of St. Quentin) to the River Scarpe. A successful raid was car- ried out by us near St. Quentin; thirteen prisoners and three machine- guns were brought back by our troops. Prisoners were also taken by us in patrol encounters south-east of Messines; and in another successful raid carried out by us south of Hout- hulst Forest. A raid attempted by the enemy at Armentieres was re- pulsed. On Thursday morning, after an intense bombardment of both high explosive and gas shells on forward and back areas, a powerful infantry attack was launched by the enemy on a front of over 50 miles, extending from the River Oise, in the neigh- bourhood of La Frere, to the Sensee River above Croisilles. A hostile ar- tillery demonstration has taken place on a wide front north of La Bassee Canal and in the Ypres sector. The attack was pressed with the greatest vigour and determination throughout the day. The enemy broke through our outpost positions, and succeeded in penetrating into our battle posi- tions in certain parts of the front. The attacks were delivered in large masses, and proved extremely costly to the hostile troops engaged, whose losses have been exceptionally heavy. Large numbers of hostile reinforcing troops have been observed during the day moving forward behind the enemy's lines. Several enemy divi- sions, which had been specially trained for this great attack, have al- ready been identified, including units of the Guards. At no part of the long front of the attack has the enemy attained his objective. Our night- flying squadrons dropped 300 bombs on a hostile aerodrome south-west of Tournai, used by the enemy's night- flying machines, and also on a large ammunition depot north-east of St. Quentin. All our machines returned. SATURDAY. British Officia1. The, second day of the world's greatest battle has passed without the Germans being able to achieve any signal success. At some points they made progress at great sacrifice. At others the British regained positions. It is the enemy's object to crush our front by mere weight of men and metal, and his immediate effort has apparently been concentrated on recovery of that por- tion of the Hindenburg line which he lost in the battle of Cambrai. Over 40 divisions made the initial onset. They comprised the pick of the Kaiser's troops. More divisions were thrown in yesterday, and others are arriving in the battle-zone. A great concentration of German and Aus- trian artillery has been made. It is stated that on one sector there was a gun to every fifteen yards. The Ger- man High Command, being under necessity to declare success, an* nounces that the British first line was carried and over 16,000 prisoners and 200 guns were taken, but it is signifi- cant that it does not set forth the cap- tured positions. Some indication of the centres at which the fierce fight- ing, which still continues, has been most intense is afforded by the special mention which Sir Douglas Haig makes of the 24th Division at Le Ver- guier (seven miles north-west of St. Quentin), the 3rd Division near Croisilles (about eight miles south- east of Arras, in the neighbourhood of Bullecourt and Queant), and the 51st Division on the Bapaume-Cam- brai road. The Press Association special correspondent says The Germans are seeking a decision now, if ever, and when I hear that, although we have been pressed back at parts of our line, the situation is far from causing uneasiness to those upon whom the full weight of respon- sibility rests, I think we must feel both proud and thankful." French Official.-We repulsed, with appreciable losses, enemy sur- prise attacks to the south of Juvin- court, in the sector of Godat, to the north of Courcy, to the north of the -1 I Aisne,* and in Champagne. I Two German aeroplanes were destroyed jind four seriously damaged as the re- sult of fights with our pilots. Three more enemy machines were brought down by the fire of our special guns. MONDAY. I British Official .-Fighting of the' fiercest character has gone on continu- ously south of the Scarpe. To the south of the British front, and where our line joins the French, the enemy has progressed further. The Somme was crossed below Peronne at some points, and Sir Douglas Haig says "These are being dealt with." North of Peronne, on the little stream of the Tortille, the British withdrew to new positions after resisting violent at- tacks. On the northern sectors of the battle front our troops have repeatedly repulsed the German infantry, who have not been able to make much pro- gress in the four days' fighting in this region. Peronne and Ham have fallen, but we still retain Bapaume. Sunday afternoon's German official stated that 30,000 prisoners and 600 guns had been captured. In one of the divisions mentioned by Sir Dou- I. glas Haig as having greatly distin- I guished themselves are, some famous Welsh troops. During the week-end 111 German aeroplanes were ac- counted for, against nineteen British. rhe enemy has opened fire on Paris from a distance of no less than 75 I mites. TUESDAY. 1 After throwing the enemy back across the Somme, our troops are again retiring, both south and north of Peronne. Bapaume has been lost, together with Nesle, which is four I miles west of the Somme. Nesle was the scene of determined fighting, being lost and re-captured several times. It is admitted that we have lost considerable material, including some tanks. The French Army on our right is heavily engaged near Noyon on the Oise, having taken over a portion of our front in this region. Berlin reports the capture of 45,000 prisoners since the opening of the battle, and claims that between the Ancre and the Somme the front, as it I stood previous to the offensive of July, 1916, has been gained. This line is close to Albert. In a message to Sir Douglas Haig, the Premier says that the men necessary to replace casualties, and the guns required to make good those lost, are either now in France or already on their way, and still further reinforcements are ready to be thrown into the battle. WEDNESDAY. I Our line was withdrawn on Tuesday fo Albert and Bray, and west of Roye and Noyon. At Albert and Bray the Germans have crossed the original front as it existed before the battle of the Somme. Amiens, the great rail and road centre between Paris and Calais, is manifestly the enemy's goal. Its capture would enable him to threaten both the Channel ports and Paris. Amiens is only sixteen miles distant from Albert. The enemy's losses continue to be severe, and he has been obliged to reinforce the battle-front from all parts of his line. Over 70 of his divisions have been en- gaged in the battle. Berlin reports the capture of 963 guns and over 100 tanks since the opening of the offen- sive. THURSDAY. J Sixteen British vessels over 1,600 tons, and twelve ships under, were sunk by .enemy submarine last week. In their bid for Amiens, the Germans advanced to within eleven miles of the town, but were thrown back three miles by fine British connter-blow.

EASTER DANCE AT ST MARYS HALL

EASTER DANCE AT ST. MARY'S HALL. A Dance will be held at St. Mary's Hall, Barry Docks, on Easter Wed- nesday. Mr. Purnell, M.C. Music by the Quadrille Band. Fancy dress is optional. Tickets, gentlemen 1/6, ladies !/•>

MRS GiiUNDTS JOTTINGS

MRS GiiUNDTS JOTTINGS Mr. Rheinallt Isaac, eldest son of the Rev. Morris Isaac, Welsh Baptist minister, Cadoxton, has this week passed the Board of Trade examination as master mariner. He is only 23 years of age. -:0:- The Welsh Conservative Agents' Association, at a meeting at Swansea last Thursday, made a presentation to Mr. H. Robt. Topping, the chief Con- servative agent for Cardiff and the Llandaff and Barry Divisions, in re- cognition of his valuable services to the Association as immediate past president. o: — Barry Schoolboys, having defeated Cardiff in the semi-final for the Welsh Shield, will proceed to the final, and, it is confidently anticipated, bringing the trophy home with them. Summer is coming. Straw hats are I frequently in vogue at Barry. I Colonel G. S. Ommanney, formerly in command ot the Keserve Battalion Welsh Regiment, Barry and Cardiff, died last week in London. Palm Sunday this year was more a summer day than early spring, and Parry Cemetery and other places for I interment were, as usual, popularly visited, and the graves were beauti- fully decorated with flowers. -:0:- Captain Redmond, M.D., son of the late Mr. John Redmond, M.P., the leader of the Trish Parliamentary Party, keeps the Waterford constitu- ency in the family. He resigned East Tyrone to fight his late father's seat against a Sinn Feiner, and has been returned by a majority of 479 in a total poll of 2,007. — :o: — Captain J. M. Parker, who was de- corated with the distinguished service cross by the King last Saturday, for gallant service at sea, belongs to Dinas Powis. The prize drawing for the benefit of the Barry Prisoners of War Fund has proved an immense success, thanks to the diligent and untiring efforts of Mrs. Felix Williams, Belle Vue, Cadoxton, and other lady friends, up- wards of J3120 having been realised for the benefit of the worthy object in view. I —:o: — The total value of national war bonds taken up in the Barry district during the 25 weeks ended March 23 is 2189,370. The Barry schooiboys team, wiiicil beat Cardiff boys last Saturday, were trained by Mr. Robert Brown, late trainer of the Burton A.F.C. o: Captain Alexander, of the 15th Hussars, youngest son of Mr. D. T. Alexander, J.P., Brynceithen, Dinas Powis, has been severely wounded in the recent heavy engagements in France, and is now in hospital in Rouen. o: A marriage has been arranged, and will shortly take place, between Mr. Edward Mayow Hastings Lloyd, Civil Servant, of the Inland Revenue and Ministry of Food, third surviving son of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. M. Lloyd, of Hartford House, Winchfield, Hants, and Margaret Noel, elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Kerr, of Twynceri, Barry. — :o: — Miss Margaret Lindsay Williams has been commissioned to paint the presentation portrait, the fund for which, to commemorate his golden wedding, has been' publicly sub- scribed throughout the county, of Alderman Hopkin Morgan, mayor of Neath and chairman of the Glamor- ganshire County Council. — :o:— Rhondda Pessimist: I do hope the war will be over this year."—Op- timist "'Ope you say? It's blinkin' well got ter be; I've written to Barry Islan' an' booked my diggins for the summer 'olidays, don't you see o: Barry Male Voice Choir intend entering this year's Welsh National Eisteddfod, at Neath. An amusing incident occurred in a Barry railway carriage recently. A erentleman, formerly an officer in the Royal Dragoon Guards, was joined in a smoking compartment by three young ladies, who, shortly after the train started, commenced smoking cigarettes. The gentleman regarded the fair trio dubiously for a time, and then calmly produced some knitting work. The mild reproof was suffi- cient, and the three fags disappeared through the window. -:0:- Two farmers from the Vale of Glamorgan met at the last stock sale, at Barry. One had in his hand a new whip. "I see said his friend, "you have got a new whip. "Yes," was the reply, that is all I am allowed to give my poor horses now." t

A LANCASHIRE RAMBLERS

"A LANCASHIRE RAMBLERS REVUE AT THE THEATRE ROYAL. IN AID OF THE COMPASSION-* ATE FUND AND LOCAL WAR CHARITIES. Major Blencowe, the officers, and men of the Lancashire Fusiliers, are to be congratulated on the production of their revue, A Lancashire Ram- bler," at the Theatre Royal, Barry, on Tuesday evening last, especially as one of the objects was to help the Barry War Charities. The staging at the Buttrills was excellent, but the bril- liance and wit of the author was re- vealed on the Theatre Royal stage in the succession of scenes that abounded with up-to-date and topical allusions. The opening scene, A Street Scene in Oldham," was typical of the time of declaration of war, and introduced the leading characters. Private Howard, as Horace VV lggins, kept the house in a ripple of laughter with his quaint quips. His comedy duo with Lance-Corporal Bernbaum stamps him as an artiste in the front ranks. Right through the piece his humorous songs were a scrdfcm, That's the stuff to give 'em being enthusiastically re- I ceived. C.Q.M.S. laylor made a clever Mrs. Wiggins, and after sing- ing I do like a c'hup of c'hocoa," gave a smart dance which earned a repetition. Drummers Ede and Bird, as newsboys, recruits, and soldiers, were capable actors; and Privates Davies and Mulvee made good mill- hands. Lance-Corporal Bernbaum would undoubtedly be a star in the variety world were it not for the war. His quartette of characters, Maurice," Street Hawker," Re- cruit," and Stammering Sam," were top-hole." His juggling acts were a feature, and his songs, especiallve Tingle Ingling," were of a high musical comedy order. Lieut. Howard, who was making his debut on the stage, very cleverly adapted himself to his allotted parts. C.S.M. Wilde gave a splendid representation of a recruit- ing sergeant, his oddities causing great amusement. Captain Ravenscroft im- proved on his Buttrills appearance, the larger stage giving scope for his very smart show as a knut." His danc- ing and singing were au fait." Lance-Corporal Harrison, also as' a knut, was very clever. He was a typi- cal dude, and captured the audience by his amusing personation of the up-to- date swell. One of the hits of the evening was Lieut. G. Loseby, who, by his simplicity aS a Wmscientious objector, put the hallmark of actor on his name. He is more than an amateur. Other officers and men that did good work were Captain G. R. Fryer, Corporal Fothrgil1, and Lance-Corporal Stanley, who swelled the chorus and added to the gaiety of the evening. The revue would not I have been a success without the valu- able assistance of the ladies. Miss Davine Sinclair (niece of Dr. Gillon Irving) was "top of the bill" as "Miss Busybody." In single numbers, duets, and trios she was both vivacious and clever. In Hello, my dearie she captivated the audience. Miss Lillian Lewis, a local comedienne, more than upheld her reputation, and as Liza Brown was on top of her form." Her songs were sprightly and bright. Miss Gertrude Jones again made a capable special constable. The Chorus was also enriched by the sing- ing of the Misses M'Crostie, Jones 1 and Nash. The revue was produced by Lieut. Condliffe; Lieut. Jackson was stage manager; the scenery was designed and painted by Captain F. S. Gar- ratt, Second Lieut. H. Rye, Lance- corporal Hallworth, and Private Rod- gers, had been removed from the But- trills Camp, and adjusted to suit the Theatre Royal stage. The Orchestral Band of the Regiment was present, and the music was arranged by C.S.M. Jackson and Sergeant Driver Cannon. During the interval Colonel Aspinall Turner, Major Smith, and Mr. W. Graham, J.P., spoke of the excellent work done by' the Barry Prisoners of War Committee. The hat worn by Horace Wiggins was sold to Mr. Gra- ham for 25.-E.J.P.

I WAR MEMORIAL TO BARRY I ISLAND SOLDIERS

I WAR MEMORIAL TO BARRY I ISLAND SOLDIERS. To further the erection of a War Monument to the memory of Barry Island soldiers who have taken part in the war, a public meeting was held in Clive Road Council Schools, Barry Island, on Wednesday evening last. A model of the proposed monument was on view in the window of Mr. E. Ashton, baker and confectioner, Ply- mouth-road. I A report of the meeting will appear in our next issue.

Advertising

KAY S LINSEED COMPOUND' the old established rmedy for Coughs and Colds. i 1Ud.. 1/3, 3/ t I