Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

FOR PRINTING OF ♦ Every Description, £ V TRY THE m "Barry Dock News" OFFICES, Holton Road, Barry Docks. Holton Road, Barry Docks. Despatch: A Speciality! WEDDING CARDS • OF THE CHOICEST DESIGNS AND ARTISTIC EXECUTION MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE "Barry Dock News," Holton Road, Barry Docks. a.. ■ Cards f?om 2/6 per dozen. Cards can be supplied the same day as ordered. Î

I Copyright in US America AU Eights Reaerved LADY MARGARETS VOW

I [Copyright in U.S. America. AU Eights Reaerved.) LADY MARGARET'S VOW BY BLANCHE EARDLEY, Author of "A Bid for a Bride:' MrI. Maxwell's Silence," &c. SYNOPSIS. -11" Elliott, a rich gentleman farmer, is secretly erigaged to Olivia Caseella. H • urges her to end the eecreey by an immediate marriage, but the girl, afraid of losing by this action her share of the fortune of her front, Lady Margaret Hogarth, who has forbidden any engagement, declines Ret rning home from the meeting witn hfcr lover she encounters Luke Sladen, Imly Margaret's secretary, who is in love with her, and confirms the fact that in the event of her marriage to Elliott s/ie will b* unable to touch a psnriy of her aunt's money. The sam. ^lay she is Mirpris'd by braving from Lady Margaret that the l.itter lias c1wsen a husband for her, bo other than Sla len himself. If she rufuses, the fjtilue is to be divided between Sladen and her younger sister, Virginia. Lady Margaret then decides .-uddenly on a visit tl London, and immediately she La, gone Olivia linds her new will, made on the previous day, l'tal tl n" new., then arrives, for Lady Margaret has been f und irm;< lerad near the summerhouae in the woods. Olivia bears ¡ he shock of the crime stoically, 'but shows signs that she has begun to fear Sladen. CHAPTER V. THE BURDEX OF PITY. When Olivia opened the morning room door Mr. Dyson started. Could this tall, stately woiritlii, who carried herself with the., air of a duchess, and whose only sig)is- ofi sorrow were the pallor of her ivory ski:) aud the unfathomable pools in her great dark eyes, be the passiexi-swayed girl who had stumbled into his arms with words of hate on her lips! He held out his hand to her. "You sent for me, Miss Casaella? I am truly, deeply touched by the tragic death of our dear 'Lady Bountiful.' and if I can do anything— or Mrs. Dyson—to alleviate your great sor- row, please let me know." Olivia's face lost, some of its rigidity. She had never liked Mr. Dyson. When she had been sent to church on Sunday mornings with Virginia she had always been bored by his sermons, and hie little ferrety eyes and bald head had irritated her into scathing criti- cism. But his words had a kindly ring of sincerity about them that appealed to her. "You are very good, Mr. Dyson," she said gently, "but I really don't know that either you or Mrs. Dyson can help us much during thia terrible time, though it is comforting to know that we have friends so close to us." It was a. graceful speech, but spoken by a "grand lady," not a grateful, sorrowful girl. Unconsciously she seemed to put a differ- ence between herself and the Vicar, juusia. "A million pounds!" Olivia gasped. Are you sure my aunt liad so much, Mr. es? ■ I It was a childish question, coming strangely from the stately young chitelaine of the great house, and the solicitor smiled. "I am quite sure, Miss Cassella," he said, itand according to the terms of the will I have on me now her ladyship's wishes are very fairly and nobly set out. There is one little thing I should like to ask you about, though, and that is whether Lady Margaret made a later will than this of seven years ago? Olivia looked at him blankly. "I know nothing about my aunt's affairs, she said bimply. "She never talked to me about them, but tne secretary, Mr. Sladen, might be able to tell you more. He had complete control over her private business." "The reason I ask this," Mr. Holmes said hurriedly, "was because some days before her tragic death Lady Margaret wrote to me I that she had considerably altered the condi- tions of her will, and that I was to come down to see her, but was to wait till she sent me a telegram. I think that was about a week before her death," he added. Olivia did not reply. She was thinking of that last bitter, passionate scene she had had with her aunt. It was after that that she had written to her solictor, and yet, unlike her usual business-like methods, she had delayed in sending for him. "Then my aunt did not call on you in. I London? she said slowly. He shook his head. Ño; the first intima- tion I had that she had visited London was in her maid's evidence at the inquest. I was amazed to think that she had been to London and had not asked me to meet her." "So am I," Olivia answered. "I wonder .why she went!" Then she went on quickly: "I will send for Mr. Sladen, he has a com- plete knowledge of my aunt's papers. I have not been into the study yet." "And please ask Miss Virginia to come down, too," the solicitor said. "We may as well get this matter settled quietly at once, and I hope, Miss Cassella, that you will per- mit me to act for you in your future business dealings." Olivia smiled. "You are very kind, Mr. Holmes, but I had better not say yes' until I know that I have any business dealings to dispose of. My sister and I may have been left out of any second will that may exist." She rang the bell and gave a brief order to a servant, and a few minutes later Virginia came into the room, and after a bow to Mr. Holmes eat down in a chair beside her sister, turning her head so that her face was in the shadow. The solicitor busied himself with laying out the papers he had taken from a small black bag. Presently the door opened again, and Luke Sladen entered the room. His pale, thin face was grave, and he bowed to Mr. Holmes without glancing at either Olivia or Virginia. "Mr. Sladen," Olivia said quietly, "Mr. Holmes wishes to know if you have any later will or codicil that my aunt may have entrusted to you before going to London T The secretary glanced at her curiously. Yes," he said; "I have a will in a despatch-box, which Lady Margaret had asked me to draw up roughly for her. I signed it as one of the witnesses, and her maid as the other." Mr. Holmes' face grew serious. "Will you kindly produce it," he said. The secretary left the room, and Olivia sat gazing with absent eyes before her. Both she and Virginia might have been made of stone, so cold and immovable were their two faces. When the secretary returned he placed a black despatch-box before the solicitor. ine win is in there, he said, darting a triumphant glance at Olivia. Mr. Holmes took the key and opened the box, removing and examining paper after {>aper with minute scrutiny. Presently he 00ked up. "There is no will here, Mr. Sladen," he said. The secretary's face went deathly pale, then flushed. "It was there," he said. "I saw Lady Margaret place it there." Mr. Holmes shrugged his shoulders. "Per- haps she changed her mind and destroyed it. She was a woman of violent impulses, I am afraid. "The will was not destroyed by Lady Mar- garet," the secretary said doggedly. "She was most keen on it, and intended having the old one destroyed." "I am afraid till it is produced, the old one must stand," the solicitor said dryly. "In the meantime a thorough search must be made for it; then, after due time, Mies Cassella must take out probate for the will in existence, in which she a.nd her sister are co-lieiresses." When he had gone Olivia returned to the morning-room. Virginia had vanished, but the secretary was still there, standing by the window, his hands in his pockets. He turned as OHvia came into the room and looked at her with an evil face. "So you think you have scored, Mis.; Cas- sella," he said slowly. She returned his gaze coolly. "Are you referring to the fact that my aunt didn't make me the cast-off relation you hoped, Mr. Sladen?" "No," he said softly, "but to the fact that you think yourself safe while you are on the edge of a precipice." She laughed contemptuously. "My good man, you are talking in metaphor. Pleaee be more explicit." "Very well, since you wish it, I will," he answered. "You are carrying things off with a high hand, but you have forgotten one thing, in spite of your cleverness." "And that is?" she queried mockingly. "That I know where you were on the after- noon of Ladv Margaret's murder!" the I secretary hissed softly. CHAPTER VI. I A VISITOR FROM THE "YARD." I ) Jim Elliott, followed by Spy, walked in the direction of The Mount, a shadow on his usually handsome face. Before, when going to meet the girl he loved, he had had a happy, eager look in his eyes, but to-day. when he was going to see her for the first time in public, instead of at a secret meeting, the happiness and eagerness had gone from his face. He had not returned to Eppstone the day he had promised, but the tragedy of Lady Margaret's death, of which his first intimation had been in a newspaper report, had brought him down at once, prepared to com- fort and help Olivia. But though she had answered his note with pretty, graceful ex- pressions of gratitude, she had not asked him to come up to the house, and had not ac- cepted his suggestion to meet elsewhere. So he had stayed away until she sent for him one day after the funeral. As he rang the bell he wondered curiously how the tragedy had affected her, and whether she had ever thought of the bitter wrangles that she and Lady Margaret had had. For Jim Elliott's heart was as tender and forgiving as a baby's, and he was sorry that he had said a bitter word against the old woman who had been struck down by a eecret assassin. A grave man-servant showed him into the library, and left him, and while Jim waited the door was opened abruptly, and the late secretary's dark sinister face appeared. Jim nodded to him curtly. He had never exchanged a greeting with Lady Margaret's secretary, but knew him by sight. "'Von have called to see Miss Cassella?" said the secretary in an oily voice, noting the while the other man's attractive appear- ance, and straightforward bearing in juxta- position with his own repellant and subtle parsonalit v. "Yes, Jim answered, more, by way of saving something than opening a conversa- tion, "this tragedy has b«en an awful thing for her and her sister to bear alone." "It has been a great shock to us all," the secretary said slowly, "but Miss Capsetla has borne up spleudidly, with almost remarkable fortitude and eelf-possesskm. The tragedy t seems to have fallen on us, but to have passed 1 over her head. It is remarkable, but then there is a great deal that is remarkable im ¡ Miss Casaella's character." Jim flushed angrily. The words in them- selves were nothing, but the tone was an impertinence, and worse, to Olivia. Besides, no young lover likes to hear his divinity in- vested with peculiar traits. He gave the pre- sumptuous secretary a quick, haughty glance, then deliberately turned his back on him, and though he did not know it, that simple gesture rivetted another link in the long chain of hate that Luke Sladen was forging to use against Olivia. When Jim turned round again the secre- tary had gone, but in his place stood Olivia, her face pale and alarmed. Jim went towards her with outstretched hands. "Darling, how glad I am to see you again," he said. "All this awful time I have been longing for you, but stayed away till you sent for me." Olivia hardly seemed to notice his words, though the warmth of his manner brought back the colour to her cheeks. "What was that man, Lulre Sladen, say- ing to you?" she said quickly. "I saw him leave the room as I wa.s coming down the hall, and he smiled at me so insolently." "He was hardly here a moment, darling," Jim said, "but I did not like his manner, nor the tone in which lie s poke of your remark- able fortitude. It seem ad like a sneer to me. Why don't you send the man away?" he went on as Olivia listened to him eagerly. "You don't need a secretary, do you?" "Yes—and no," she said with a sigh, "there are hundreds of things to be attended to, you know, and yet I hate the idea of that man helping me." "Then pay him a quarter's money and get rid of him," was Jim's practical reply. "I can't," she muttered, "at leasts not immediately. You seo there is eome dispute about another will, which he .I,d Annt Mar- garet's maid say they signed. Till the whole place is ransacked for it, my position and Virginia's is somewlict anomalou.s." Jim was silent. While she hud been speak- ing he had been looking at her closely with keen but loving eyes, and he was struck, as Mr. Dyson had been, by the alteration in her. Her natural, spontaneous manner seemed to have deserted her. She had the air of a great lady; even in the smile she gave him there was none of the clinging, weak woman. lie was the subject—she the queen. What was it that had altered her so, he won- dered uneasily. She had not loved her aunt —she h-ad been frankly at, agonistic towards the old lady; then how was it this tragedy had changed a passionate, impetuous girl into a stately, watchful woman? He felt that she was slipping from him, that he had lost the little girl of the secret meetings in the woods, and found in her place a distant chatelaine of H, great house. Suddenly, almost as though she knew what he was thinking, Olivia turned to him and held her hands out to him. "Jim, don't go back on me,. dear!" she cried in a low. trembling voice. "I have de- pended on yon to understand and trust me; don't let hard thoughts come between us, dear, or let other people prejudice you against me." He caught her in his arms and pillowed her head on his breast and kissed her white, cold face with caeer. ardent lins. "Sweetheart! What nonsense are you talk- he said. "How on earth could I ever be turned against yon? I love you with all my heart, you know, and admire your courage and pluck more than I can say. No other girl in the world could have been so biave in such circumstances as you have." She clung to him with a long drawn-out sobbing little sigh. Her relief at the warmth of his love was almost too deep to express. The great fear that he too would look at her with averted eyes, as others were doing, had for the moment broken down that barrier of ice that she had raised between herself and the outside world. Jim's love and admiration formed the rudder that would steer her frail barque with safety. She must keep them at I any aost. He did not guess how important it was that she should be sure—absolutely sure -of-bis devotion. She raised her had from his shoulder and j gave a little laugh. "How foolish you must ] think me. I have not given way like this be- fore, not even when we first heard of the- the—murder." "I am gl.ad that you can 'give way,' darl- ing," Jim replied* "Tears may be weaken- ing, hut there i.s something normal in them. One can sympathise with weakness, but there is something awful about strength we cannot understand." C4 Strength we cannot understand!" she re- peated slowly. "Do you think that the s' liiv s l ioin strength I have shown lately has anything re- markable about it?" "In a sense, yes," lie answered. "I know it is because your will power won't let you give way before them; but people who don't understand you might attribute it to hard- ness, or even "—lie hesitated for a word— "or even callotigiiess "I see," Olivia said thoughtfully. Then with a brilliant smile she turned to him. "it any rate, so long as you know that I am neither hard nor callous' it does not. much matter what the others think." "Have the police found any clue to the murder yet?" Jim asked presently, when she had released herself a second time from his arms. "They have followed every clue possible," she replied slowly; "ilie wildest theories have been taken up and found to be fruitless. It is a mystery that baffles every one. Aunt Margaret never went so far into the wood bc- fore, and why should she have been robbed and—and killed on the day she did so?" "Poor old lady!" Jim murmured. "I sup- pose yon are going to have a man down from Scotland Yard? Olivia Bushed suddenly. "Scotland Yard has had several men down," she said; "they have done everything they can do." "Then why not engage a private detec- tive?" Jim suggested. "He would fail like the others," Olivia replied quickly. "Besides, we have dragged the affair into publicity long enough. 1 am longing to bury it in oblivion." Jim looked at her curiously. For a moment it seemed to him that she wanted to allow the murderer of her aunt to go scot free. Then the next moment he rcproached himself for an unjust thought. It was enly natural that a girl should hate the idea of being always associated with murder investigations. At that moment the door opened and Vir- ginia stood on the threshold, but such a white faced, wild-rved, and trembling Virginia that instinctively Jim hurried forward, while Olivia made a quick sign to her behind his back. "What's the maif cd" Jim said kindly. "ITow ill you look, Virginia '1 he girl looked at her sister with appeal- ing eyes, and Jim noticed how white and cold Olivia's face had grown, just as it had when she had surprised the secretary with him. "One of the servants gave me this card," Virginia said, holding out a piece of card- board. "She wa's bringing it to you, Olivia, but I took it from her." Olivia took the card, and as she read the same on it her lips were drained of all their colour. Jim, looking over her shoulder read the words: "Detective Inspector Thaw, C.I.D., Scot- land Yard." And pencilled across the top was the sentence: "To see Miss Cassella on urgent business." (To be Continued.)

WEDDING CARDSr

WEDDING CARDS, r To suit all t-astefe, from 2/6 a dozen, executed promptly aid neatly at the "Barry' Dock News" Printing and Publishki £ Works.

I SOCIAL EVENINGS TO THE SOLDIERS AT BARRY

I SOCIAL EVENINGS TO THE; SOLDIERS AT BARRY. Since the arrival of the Shropshire Regiment at Barry, social evenings and entertainments have been provided for- the men att the Wesleyan Schoolroon-i, by a, committee drawn from all the churche-s in Barry. On Sunday even- ing liast a short ,sacred eoncert wttis held and the soldiers were addressed by Mr. W. W. Marshall, the port. niissionerr to- the British and Foreign Sailors" Society. Members of tlhe Romill3i Boys' String Band assisted. There, were about 200 present at a concert on Monday eve-ning last, when- Major Huntbaeh several other commissioned officers were present- Mr. John Davies, B-nrry, presided, and an excellent propyam me was rendered,, and all thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Concerts will be given every Monday evening, and the hall is open eacli day for games, etc., a temperance canteen- having also been commenced. Mr. F. W. Poole is chairman of the concert committee, and the oiffcer commanding the Shropshire Regiment h&s expressed his appreciation of the good work doiie. a-mongst his troops. I CONCERT AT HOLTON-ROAD BAPTISTS. The weekly conceit to the soldiers a.t Holton-road English Baptist School- room, Barry Docks, on Tuesday even- ing last, was given by the Barry Oc- tette Party (conductor, Mr. D. Farr), who, in addition to singing a number of choruses, generously gave a dona- tion towards providing refreshments to the men. Mr. E. Turner. Cardiff, was chairman, and a capital c-lass^ pro- gramme was taken part in by Messrs. D. Hopkins, T. W. Hibbert, Griff. Griffiths, H. HilSy. A. Lathsy, Arnold Da vies, and J. Widdisen (Cardiff). Mr T. Rees accompanied. The cniteitairi- ment was thoroughly appreciated, and the company spent a most enjoj'ablo tll(A co-iiipziiiy ?i, 4iiost eii j oi-a-blo?

IIN QUICKSANDS AT BARRY

IN QUICKSANDS AT BARRY. BELGIAN CHILDREN'S EXCITING ADVENTTm. "Danger! Beware of Quicksands. This is a notice that has not been seen anywhere on the coast at Barry, though it bias been moire fha1] once advised by the Coroner. On Tuesday afternoon last, two littk- Belgian refugee sisters, Maria and. Lucille Loraine, left Ea-st Barry House, the residence of Mr. ami Mrs. H. J. Vincent, where they have taken up their abode witir their parents. The sisters, with another 1 intJe girl, took a walk to Cold Kiiap and proceeded to wend their way across the stretch of sand at the mouth of tihe Harbour, be- tween Cold Knap and Friar's Point, Barry Island, the tide being out ait th,« time. They were just half-way across when Lucille, who had gone some dis- tance ahead of her cowipajiions-, sud- denly began to sink. Maria, the elder of the sisters, bravely ran to the assist- ance of Lucille, but she aJLso sank. When their cries for help brought goine workmen to the s pot. Lucille had oo-nk considerably, whilst Maria had disap- peared up to her neck, her head only;- being in sight. The men were power-- less to render assistance, but- Mr. Edgar Ford, of Barry Island, a pilot, with cnmnwndab]o presence of mind' ob- tained a boat, and. after about a quar- ter ?f an hours hard work drivin?.the boat' along ?he qu:ck?nds, he effect?t the rescue ef the two little girls, whe. were now in a precarious state fromi fright and exhaustion. They weri6 taken to East Barry tihey soon recovered from gie, effects of their- alarming adventure.

dIPROMOTION OF BARRY BT OFFICIAL I

d PROMOTION OF BARRY B.T. OFFICIAL. Mr. W. J. Dimond. third-cl;ass in- spector of Mercantile Marine at Barry, has been promoted by the Ikard of Trade to the rank of district second- class inspector for the port of Barry, Inspector Dimond ha. been gtationed at Barry for more tfhan twen-v. yaars, and is highly popular in ship- ping and town circle#.

THE WAR

THE WAR. This war, tt is a dreadful thing, To all our homes bad neWE; it brings • Our SIOMiers, too, are tilting still, .J" "hIle some are wounded, sick, and ?.. The sailors on the deep blue sea., Who of our country kQoel}) the key, Are on the wa.ter aM the time, No laatter when, in frost or rime. But when the war is finished, And every foe diminished. Then home will come our men so bnare, When parents need not sob or crave. The soldiers in their khaki. And the sailors in their blue; Everyone will worship them. "Old England's" wide-world through. And, oli! the welcome nueeting, And then the hearty greeting. From England's people young and, old, Who've eoma to welcome their heroes bold. MARY JUDITH LEWIS. (Aged 11 years, a Pnpiil at Rom illy-road Seho&l.) t