Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
5 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

the EVENINGBW* If it were better known that Backache, Dropsy, Rheumatism, Sediment, Gravel and Stone point to Kidney Disease, there would be fewer fatal cases than there are. Backache in the evening and backache in the morning. The same pains, the same worry, the same cause. How many people lufTer constantly from lame, aching backs, and don't know why ? Backache is kidney-ache in most cases. The kidneys (located in the small of the back) ache and throb with dull pain, because there is a congestion or inflammation within. You can't got rid of that ache until you cure the cause-the kidneys. Doan's Backache Kidney Pills core kidney ills, and thus drive away backache for good. If it hurts your back to stoop or lift— if you suffer sudden, darting pains through the hips, loins and sides, suspect the kidneys. There will be other signs too: headaches, dizziness, scanty or painful urination, too frequent urination, rheumatism, sediment, biliousness, or a constant tired feeling. Thousands have found quick relief and lasting cures by the use of Doan's Backache Kidney Fills. Doan's Pills have a quick and direct action on the kidneys and bladder. They promote a free flow from the urinary system, washing out clogging impurities from the passages, and draining out the collected water through the natural channels. They gently lead the kidneys back to health and activity, and thus reach the CAUSE of most cases of dropsy. Doan's Backache Kidney Pills have no action on the heart, nor on the liver, stomach or bowels; they are solely for the kidneys and urinary system, and are, there. fore, of the highest value in dropsy, gravel, stone, rheumatism, and all diseases arising from kidney and bladder trouble. Iff. 1/9 boxes only, six boxei 13/9. Sevtr toll toon. OJ all chemists and stores, or from Foster-ffcClellan Co., 3, WeUs-strtti, Word-street, London, W. Refit St rubllitutst. MMTS Backache Kidney Pills GEAR & DURE, I The Ironmongers, AND Successful Housekeeping. We have a complete range of Modern Labour Saving Requisites in Stock and we invite you to come in and see with what little expense you can make your home-life easier. We would remind you of our Workshop Department for Plumbing and Sanitary Engineering, Gasfitting, Sheet Metal Working, and Bell Fitters. 218, HOLTON ROAD, TELEPHONE: 174. 1 ji EASY TDIS. EASY TERMS. LADIES' AND GENTS' HIGH-CUSS BRiPERY AND CLOTHING Of EVERY DE8CIPTION SUPPLIED ON CREDIT. H. A. YOUNG, DRAPER & TAILOR, 9, Parade, Barry. SEND POSTCARD. SEND POSTCARD. CLASSICS TEMPHUICE HOTEL AID suns BOOMS, WOLTON-BOAD, tiAay. DOCK*. war DLNNTO8 DAILY. (■HMBoiHtim for Visibom WaU-airal Mi. Bo* aad Cold Mka taarsaxoa-ai L 808&M WE DO NOT ASK THE HEAVY CHARGES ceqnired by many lenders, a# we (tfsofiqtfxi&te and aboose honourable borrowers, who iIíet their obligations. Therefore we need only ask a reason* able commercial profit. A:10 TO £ 10,000 advanced promptly and privately, without foarantora or security, repayable by instalments, which can be conveniently spared from your income. Our Business being absolutely Genuine, nnleet oaah actually advanced, not a penny charged. WRITE CALL, OR 'PHONE, CHARLES STEVENS, LTD., Hayes Buildings, The Hayes, CARDIFF. ¡ fal.—487 Cardiff, Ttrlegram8- Atina. Cardiff. ^WM\V\ The Welshman's Favourite. | MABON Sauce l5 If At good Ø8 its Name. j 8 DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. 9 Ataxwfactwnv-s-BL.AxcK's, SL Peter St., Cardiff. If KaewaBMMiaiMMaaiMIIMMIMMMMMiaiMMBMMWMIMM l

BARRY POLICE COUHT I 1

BARRY POLICE COUHT. I 1 FRIDAY. Before Mr. 0. D. Thompson and Major Reynolds. I | RELIEF TO BE REFUNDED. I The Cardiff Union Board of Guar- dians sought to recover £ 16 14s. 6d. out-door relief paid by way of loan to George Thompson, a blind Cadoxton man. Mr. H. Edwards, relieving officer, stated that the money had heen paid by way of loan to defendant, who had now received £ 125 compensation, and was in a position to repay it. Defendant's wife pointed out that her husband, who was totally blind, had been a ratepayer of the town for over twenty years, and after working to keep him and the family for over twelve months, she was compelled to seek re- lief from the Guardians. I The Bench ordered repayment of the amount. r "THAT BIG BLACK NIGGER." A coloured muleteer, named John! Gamman, was charged with disobey-1 ing the lawful commands of the second officer of the transport Liddetfdale at Barry Docks, and also with assaulting j the second officer. Daniel Brown, the officer concerned, stated that on the 6th instant, he was giving orders to a Chinaman, when the defendant interfered and struck him in the face, knocking him down, and kick- ing him whilst on the ground. Defen- dant threatened to "rip him open" with a razor. Complainant called for assis- tance, and the muleteers' cook inter- fered. William Stewart, the cook, and Ben Ridley, watchman, corroborated the complainant's story of the assault. Defendant alleged that the latter wit- ness was in bed at the time, and, there- fore, he did not see the assault. The second officer, he said, had repeatedly provoked him by calling him names like "That big black nigger." On the day in question the complainant first struck him, and he (defendant) retalia- ted by using a piece of wood. The complaint in the first case was that the defendant refused to leave the bridge deck when requested, but this charge was dismissed. For the assault defendant was sent to prison for two months with hard labour. MAY DAY SQUABBLE. I Esther Richards, of Beverley-street, Oadoxton, complained that on May 1st she was struck by her husband, whom she had accused of having had some drink. The defendant came into the kitchen, and after ishe had made the accusation against him, he smacked her face. The husband, Wm. E. Richards,, figured as defendant for this alleged offence, and lie denied his wife's story. Inspector R. H. Thomas charac- terised the defendant as a drunken man, and he had several times neglec- ted his wife and children. One Christ- mas he had seen the family without any food, the defendant drinking heavily at the time. A fine of £1 or fourteen, days' im- prisonment was imposed. A DANGEROUS DOG. I Mr. F. P. Jones Lloyd, solicitor, de- fended James Blackmore, who was charged with failing to keep a danger- our dog under control. A lad named Thomas Beddoe said he was bitten on the leg by the dog, a col- lie, whilst he was playing in a field at the bottom of Coigne-terrace, Barry Docks. The animal also attempted to bite another boy. Complainant was taken to the surgery of Dr. E. R. Grif- fiths. Mr. Jones Lloyd expressed, on behalf of his client, regret that the dog had bitten the boy. The Bench made an order for the dog to be kept under control. ROW ON A TRANSPORT. I A. coloured man, named Frank Wil- kins, appeared in the dock in his shirt sleeves, whilst the prosecutor, Smiley Levy. had his head swathed in band- ages. It was a charge of unlawful wounding, the defendant being repre- sented by Mr. F. P. Jones Lloyd, soli- citor. I The parties are cattle-men on board I the transport Liddesdale at Barry Docks, and on the previous day, prose- I cutor said, he was having dinner, when the defendant, without the least provo- cation, struck him on the shoulder with a shovel. When he made an effort to get on deck, the defendant cut him on the head with a razor. Dr. N. J. Northev Bray, who atten- ded to the prosecutor on the ship, said there was a wound across the scalp penetrating to the bone, about five inches long, and was bleeding furi- ously. Two arteries had been cut. Dock-constable E. Harpur, spoke to arresting the defendant. and when charged at the Central Police Station, Wilkins said, "He hit me with a stick before I struck him with the rardor; and James Quimn was fined 2/6 for the same offence. SINGULAR APPLICATION. I George Whittock (otherwise Seal), pit-prop worker, of Cadoxton, Was sum- moned by Ada Mackenzie: affiliation I order. Complainant said she was a married woman, and last saw her husband 18 years ago. He had left her three years previously. During that time she had been living with the defendant, and I seven children had been born, of whom he was the father. Defendant used to give her £ 2 a week when he was work- ing but lie had left her a month ago. Henry Davies, a naval pensioner, stated tliat lie knew the applicant had I been living with the defendant for 18 years. The Bench made an order in respect of each child of 2/6 per week until they I attained the age of fourteen years. I UNLICENSED VEHICLES. I I A charge of plying for hire without a license was preferred against George I Simpkins, hackney carriage driver, and a penalty of 7/6 was imposed. Similar offences resulted in fines of I 7 iG eílch being imposed upon James Clemo and John Hawker. I DOGGIES' LICENSE. I For failing to take out la. license in I I respect of his dog, John Waddes was I fined 7/6. I UNBECOMING LANGUAGE. I I Johanna. Holmes, a Cadoxton I woman, was cautioned for using in- I I decent language. I GRANDFATHER FOUGHT UNDER I BLUCHER. John Frederick A. Nieuman, a fisherman, was brought up on remand charged with being an alien enemy, a German, residing within a prohibited area at Barry Docks, in contravention of the Aliens' Restriction Order. Police liispector R. H. Thomas gave evidence of arresting defendant in Hol- ton-road, Barry Docks, and charging him with being an alien enemy. De- fendant sa.id he had been to the Police Station to register, but was told that lie ineed not register, inasmuch as he stated that lie was born at the Mumbles, on board a German barque. His father was an Englishman, and his mother I a German, and he resided in Germany until eleven years of age. Defendant had since made a state- ment. Inspector Thomas added, that he had always signed on a ship as a Ger- man, or other nationality, because he did not want his father to find him. f v -iiiotlier used Prisoner had stated, mother used to beat me, until the shirt stuck to my back, and said she would knock the bull-dog breed out of me. My father was at ione time commander of H.M.S. Black Prince, and my grandfather fought under Blucher in the Battle of Waterloo. -er Fred Br i nson Registration Oiffcer Fred Brinson said prisoner came to the office to re- gister himself some time ago, and said he was born at the Mumbles. He did not say he was born on a ship. A-fary Wilson, sister-in-law of the accused, said that ion several occasions he had told her that he was a German. Inspector Thomas pointed out that the prisoner had obtained a permit from tho military authorities to fish in the Channel. The Clerk (Mr. T. W. Morris): Did you tell the military authorities that you were a German? Prisoner: No. they did not ask me. The Clerk: You would not have had this permit if you told them the truth. Prisoner was further remanded in custody for a week, the military autho- rities to be communicated with in the meantime. DRINK NO EXCUSE FOR ASSAULT I ON THE POLICE. Mr. F. P. 'Jones Lloyd, solicitor, ap- peared for David Beynon, who was charged with being drunk and dis- orderly, and assaulting the police. Police-constable John Henry gave evidence that lie was called to a dis- turbance in Barry-road, Cadoxton, when tho defendant, who was very drunk, caught hold of his collar, and dragged him into the passage of his house. With the aid of a civilian he freed himself, and defendant struck the civilian with a poker and chair, and also struck witness with the poker. rtfr. Jones Lloyd pleaded guilty on Gehalf of the defendant, who, he said, was under the influence of drink at the time. The Bench considered that the as- sault was a serious one. The excuse that defendant was under the influence of drink would not have any effect upon them. Defendant was fined 5s. and costs, or seven days' imprisonment for being, drunk and disorderly. For assault on the police he was ordered to pay Y,2 and costs, or one mo ill's im- prisonment.

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NATIONAL FUND

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE NATIONAL FUND. BARRY LOCAL RELIEF COMMITTEE MEETING. Councillor J. Marshall, J.P., pre- sided at a meeting of the Barry Local Relief Committee on Friday evening last, present, Miss M. E. Meredith, Mr. D. W..Roberts, J.P., Mr. R. A. Sprent, J.P., Mr. W. R. Lee, J.P., Col. J. A. Hughes, C.B., Rev. J. S. Longdon, Rev. W. Popham hosford, Mr. S. R. Jones, and Mrs. L. Davies. A communication was received from Messrs. Houlder Bros., Ltd., ship- owners, in reply to a request by the Committee that they should give assis- tance to a woman at Cadoxton who was destitute, her husband having gone away on one of the Company's vessels. The reply was to the effect that they could not give any assistance to the case in question, as they risked losing the money advanced, it being possible that the man might desert.. It was suggested to make a grant to the wife until the ship returned. Colonel Hughes moved that a letter be sent to the owners asking that the matter might be brought before the man when lie was paid off. Mr. D. W. Roberts seconded. The Clerk (Mr. T. B. Tordoff) pointed out that it would be an inadvis- able precedent to draw upon the local fund for matters not connected with the war. Eventually the matter was referred to the next meeting. A letter was read from the assistant secretary of the Educational Campaign of the National Food Fund, enclosing brief outlines of a scheme which was being promoted by the fund, for the collection and distribution of food, and the prevention of waste of the national food. The fund, it was stated, was already feeding thousands of persons daily in London, mainly refugees, with food collected through the instrumen- tality of the fund. Arrangements had bean madew hold lectures and demonstrations throughout the Kingdom on the principles of house- hold economy. The letter was allowed to lie on the table. The Clerk reported that the local con- tributions to the Prince of Wales* National Relief Fund amounted to t2,232 17s. lid., and the Committee had received £ 2,655. Revised arrangements, for the payment of the dependents of soldiers were considered, the pre- sent conditions ibeing difficult to work upon. The ladies, it was pointed out, had met the same morning, and had discussed the question, and made several suggestions which were now considered. It was agreed to give the suggestions a trial.

WHY WOMEN COMPLAIN

WHY WOMEN 'COMPLAIN. Nature's "best handiwork" never was intended to be handicapped by illness, as so many women are. Nature's in- tention never was that women should be more harrassed than men. Yet how frequently young girls, business women, housewives, and mothers com- plain of feeling "unfit." What makes the growing girl so languid, the business girl so depressed, the housewife and mother so over- whelmed with worries and cares? What gives rise to the headaches and weaknesses that unfit women for life's joys and duties? The answer is. Bloodlessness. Girls grow into "unnf women if they la.ck the help of new blood during their teens: housewives overtax their blood by overwork and over-anxiety, and by neglecting the need of sufficient sleep, regular meals and fresh air. Hence tho blood becomes watery. But women who keep their blood rich and red. never need fear illness. Whole- some food. sufficient rest, and Dr. Wil- liams' Pink Pills for Pale People will keep every woman's health right. These pills alone have proved a price- less boon to weak anasmic women, and if you su ffer, you should try them. Obtain -I)r. Alilliinis' Pink Pills at your dealer's to-day, but do not accept substitutes. FREE.—The woman's health guide "Plain Talks. Send a postcard to Hints Dept.. 46, Holborn Viaduct. London, for a copy.

BARRY BRIGADE AT ST NICHOLAS FIRE

BARRY BRIGADE AT ST. NICHOLAS FIRE. A tire broke out. at Laurels Fanm, St. Nicholas, on Sa.turday last, but was brought under control by the timely arrival of the Barry Fire Brigade, under the direction of Captain E. R. Hinchsliffe, Vice-captain E. Guest, and Engineer W. Matthews. The outbreak was discovered in a fai-in rick, and soon spread to the hayricks, one of which wa.s cut through by the Fire Brigade, and the flames were prevented from ex- tending. There was practically no water sup- ply, and the village was drained before the fire was got under. The damage, about 11.00. was covered by insurance.