Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
3 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

FOR PRINTING OF Every Description, TRY THE "Barry Dock News" OFFICES, Holton Road, Barry Docks. Despatch: A Speciality! WEDDING CARDS OF THE CHOICEST DESIGNS AND ARTISTIC EXECUTION MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE 44 arr Dock N ews, "Barry Dock News," Eolton Road, Barry Docks. Cards from 2/6 per dozen. Cards can be supplied the same day as ordered.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED THE LADY IN THE BLACR MASK

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] THE LADY IN THE BLACR MASK BY TOM GALLON, Auttiof of Tattcr!ey," Meg the Lady," The Great Gay Road," &c. SYNOPStS. Hmt Tn!)fnHA!t, compelled to earn her own living, is engaged by Daniel Verinder as companion to his ward, Damia Marsh. Ruth is at the theatre with Clement Singleton. Both are much interested in the p'ay, in which a man is killed in a curious fashion.' Ruth notices a man in a box who ia atao much interested in the play. She seems to know the man, but cannot recollect where she haa seen him Returning to Mr. Verinder's h r c.onfes.G('(} that there appeared to be none. The condition of the room and the fact that papers were scattered all over it might suggest anything or nothing; it might be merely a ruse on the part of the murderer to suggest robbery, when no rob- bery had taken place. A further investiga- tion seemed to prove that even the theory of robbery was absurd, because a considerable sum in ready money in the safe had re- mained untouched. The little conference broke up. After the police and. medical examination the body of Verinder had bc-cn decently laid out in his room; the doctor had gone away, and the house had resumed almost its normal con- dition. Voices and footsteps .were hushed; but, for the rest, there was nothing to indi- cate that anything extraordinary had taken place within the past few hours. Damia Marsh had gone straight back to her room, and had had some breakfast taken to her there. Ruth, creeping in with the faint hope that the girl would at least talk over that extraordinary business with her, was petulantly repulsed; D&mia was too ill and frightened and worried to talk about the dreadful thing with anyone. Ruth crept away to her own room, too sick at heart to eat or to do anything elae. At about eleven o'clock a brougham drew up at the door, and Lady Woodmaaon, in a state of violent agitation, bustled into the house, and demanded to know where Damia was. As Damia refused to come down, the old lady had perforce to mount the stairs, which she did, talking hard all the way, and especially begging that she might not be taken anywhere near the body. After hastily kiting her niece. Lady Woodmaaon plumped down in a chair, and rattled off at a great rate,. without waiting for an answer to any single question. "Now who do you think can have done it? I don't suppose the man had an enemy in the world, though goodness knows he was secretive enough about everything. It looks to me, my dear, as though whoever did it watched you out of the house, knowing quite well that you wouldn't be back until late. Do you think so? I wonder what in the world whoever it was wanted to kill the man for? And I do hope that whatever happens we shan't have too much of it in the news- papers—and, above all, that they won't drag my name into it. In these days they poai- tively snapshot you in the street, with one leg up as you walk—just for all the world r like a chicken. I wonder if you would like to come back with me now out of this dread- ful house—eh? "I may come round to you later in the day," said Damia. "I feel too upset even to move at the present moment. I think 111 stay here; I'll telephone presently whether I'll come round or not." "Please yourself," said the old lady, get- ting to her feet. "I know that nothing would induce me to stop in the house five minutes; I should expect to be murdered myself. Q<)od-bye, my dear-and I shall positively expect to see you later in the day." She pecked at Damia's cheek again, and went out of the room, and out of the house. Damia, lying very still, heard the hall door cloae, and then the carriage drive away; she sat up in bed. Very cautiously and quietly she slipped to the noor, pulled a dressing- gown over her shoulders, and went to the door of the room. She opened the door, and looked out; there was no one about. She came back into the room, sat down before her writing-table, and took the receiver off the telephone that stood there. After a moment, with a glance behind her, she lite- rally whispered a number as the operator spoke; murmured it just a little louder at the girl's request; and then sat beating her fingers softly on the table, impatient for the answer. "There is no reply." "Oh, ring them again; there muat be someone there; I tell you. I must have them. I can't do more than ring," came the impatient answer. Damia waited there for neatly five minutes; the result was the same. Finally, with a sigh, eoe hung up the receiver, flung herself on the bed again, and burst into a passion of teara. It was near to midday when a maid, corn- ing up the stairs, met Ruth going down, and, evidently in search for her, stopped. "Someone is asking for you on the tele- anSdo, meone 1! said t g" gi?.I. phone, miss," said the girl. 1 This waa another telephone in a small rcom at the end of the hall; Ruth, wonder- ing a little, thanked the girl, and went down to the room; closing the door as she went in. The receiver was lying on the table; she took it up, and apoke in a faint voice into it. "Who is it, please t" ''la that you. Ruth?" &Mwered a cheery voice. I thought you were never coming. Yes—it's Clement-good old Clem. Awful cheek on my part to ring you up; but I'm so excited I feel that I must speak to you. Is there any chance of your getting out thia morning and meeting me. I simply must ace you. "My darling boy," said Ruth a little brokenly, t.hat's just how I feel myself. If I don't see you I think that I shall go mad. No, no, 1 can't explain; but I'll come out;—and I'll meet you anywhere you like. Lunch? That will bp splendid. Yef—1 know tlia place; I'll be thera at one o'clock. Good-bye, don't fail me: Good-bye'" By all the rutea of bet new life Ruth .110111.41 jaMMtf 14m MM PI. PAMiaf asked permisatoa to be allowed to go out; but she determined that she would not do that. Everything was changed now; it might happen that if she went away she would never come back. The horror of thi< thihg that seemed to be thrusting itself upon her was proving almost too much for her strength. She determined that øhe would go out of the house—and trust every- thing else to chance. She went back to her room, and put on her outdoor things—just the mourning she had worn for her father, and which was now growing a little shabby even with all the care she bestowed upon it. She opened the outer door, and stepped out into the wquare. As she started to walk away her quick 

FON AND FANCY

FON AND FANCY. go-- Wife: How doea my aew opiiMf hat look, Tom?" Hub: "Um! It lookx ? mo U two weeks' aalajry." First TraveUer: gfwhy ia that poiBtpOM fellow strutting about eo abialD7" Second Traveller: "He found some Juun 18 his railway Mndwich." Family Physician: "I am afraid 7ft havw been eaMng too much cake and 81t'eetetuI'. Let me Me your tongue." Little Girl -i "Oh, you cAn look at tt, but it won't ten. NeTTous Lady Paaaenger (in the tnda, ttfter ptasing a temporary bridge): "ThMiE goodneM, we are now on terra NrmAt" Funny MM: "Yea, ma'am-lea telror wad mole nrmer." Only a lock of golden hair," the loTer eighed. Perchance to-night it formeth oa h«r pillow fair a halo bright." Only « lock of golden hair," the maiden, Mulina' aweetly said, as she lajd it over the back o! a chair and went to bed. He purchased his sweetheart a pair of ten- button kid gloTee, and handed them in at the door himself. The servant-girl toot them, and, going to the foot of the staiM, bawled out :-IIPlease, misa, 'ore's a youM man ex has brought you a pair of leggings" Young Reporter: "The atorm king hurled his torn and tumbling torrenta over the ruina of the broken and dismembered ediBce." Old Editor: "What's that? What do you mean, young fellow?" Young Re- porter: "1—er—the nood washed away Patrick McDougaI's old soap factory." A foreign-looking gentleman was walking in the Johannesburg Zoo not so very long ago and read the notice, "Birds'-nesting it strictly forbidden." '*How cruel you are in Africa!" he said to his friend. "Why, even the birda are not allowed to make their nests in your public Zoo and gardene. ——— ?' ? Private: "Jack, to whom are you writ- ing?" Corporal: "To my Lizzie. Private: '"Then you might write a letter for me at the same time." Corporal: "Well, and what am I to say to your girl?" Private: "Just the same ae you've been telling yours. Mra. Green: "You apoke just mow of aocial tact. Precisely just what do you mean?" Mrs. Wyae: "By social tact I mean getting familiar with all