Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

jspftfei. -FULL CREAM CONDENSED MILK retains the natural flavour of the pure West Country milk. Richest in cream. AND IT IS BRITISH St. Ivel Ltd., Staplemead, Somerset GOULD'S FOUNDRIES, LTD., IRON AND BRASS FOUNDERS AND GENERAL ENGINEERS, (BETWEEN NOS. 4 AND 5 TIPS), BARRY. NEW MORTAIL- MILLS AND PARTS ALWAYS KEPT IN STOCK, AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF CASTINGS MADE. SOLE MAKERS OF SMITH'S PATENT GULLEYS. BUILDERS' CASTINGS SUPPLIED MACHINERY BOUGHT AND SOLD. Tolephonets Foundries—Cardiff, 4743 & 4744. Barry. 415 &t 416.. Residences-Dinaa Powis, 80. Barry, 416. Penarth, 349. Telegrams-" Capal j,, Cardiff. Castings, Barry. R. J. HEATH & SONS, SOLE AGENTS for the WORLD-RENOWNED J BROADWOOD PIANOS, PLEYEL PIANOS, STEINWAY PIANOLA-PIANOS, AND THE ORCHEoTRELLE OO.S PIANOLA-PIANOS & ÆOLIANS. MASON AND HAMLIN ORGANS. PIANOFORTES IN STOCK BY OOLL&RD, BRINSMBAD, HOPKINSON, CH ALLEN, CRAMER, BORD, &a. New Pianofortes FROM 10/6 MONTHLY. ORGANS BT MASON A-zo Et-kMLI-T, BSCiL, DOMINION, ko Official Depot for "HIS MISTER'S VOICE" GRAMOPHONES, RECORDS, etc. R. J. HEATH & SONS, 76, Queen-street, CARDIFF; 70, TAPF STREET, PONTYPRIDD; PEN ART H, and PORT TALBOT. Telephone-2199 CARDIFF; 21 PONTYPRIDD. Telephone 374. S. WOODHAUJ & SON, Wholesali & Retail Fruit Stores, 108, HIGH STREET. BARRY. IPRESEE CUT FRUIT & VEGETABLES FROM OWN GARDENS DAILY. Families waited on Daily. Specialities Wreaths, Crosses, and Cut Flowers. All kinds of Garden Plants in Stock. R. W. WOOLCOCK'S I Arabian Oil Embrocation FOR ALL ANIMALS. 4' Stands unrivalled. The hair will grow same color. Flies will not touch any part where oil is applied. No bathing or binding fa required. Animals like it to be applied as it sooths the wounds immediately. 100 YEARS IN USE. 1/- per Bottle. W See my name on bottle. SoLD EVERYWHERE. OR FROM 80U PROFRTETOIT, R. W. WOOLCOCK, CARDIGAN. TESTIMONIAL. s. W. DAWKINS, ESQ., J.P., Haylett j Grange, Haverfordwest, says :—" I have found your Embrocation very good for Sore Udders in Oows, and for Wounds and Sore Shoulders on Horses. Sold at furry by MR. P. D. RICHARDS, Ph.C., M.P.S., The Pharmacy, Oadoxton; and by MR. D. J. THOMAS, M.P.S., Chemist, 148, Holton-road. H, -A. FOSTER,, PRACTICAL PLUMBER, Park Crescent, Barry. PEBSONAL WORK. Town and Country work with 30 yens' practical experience, not theory. Post Card will oasors prompt ottentian.

No title

MR. GUY BUCKLAND as "Victor de Brett."

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC AMUSEMENT

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC AMUSEMENT. THEATRE ROYAL, BARRY. I Picture lovers could not desire a bet- ter programme than that shown at the Theatre Royal, Barry, during the ini- tial portion of the week proved. The Fatal Wedding" was an eminently suc- cessful star film, touching a strong chord in the public heart. The comedy side of the programme was also well catered for. The Charlie Chaplin com- petition is very amusing and the audi- ence have a very difficult task in select- ing the fortunate competitor. The films presented were "The Alibi, a stirr- ing drama; "Hair of her Head," an amusing comedy; "Natures Triumph," a powerful drama; "Rival Waitress," an amusing comedy and "Rum and Wall-paper," an amusing farce. This evening (Thursday) and for the remaining portion of the week, an- other exceptionally fine programme will be presented. The 14th episode of the Black Box entitled A Bolt from the Blue will be screened and, if possible, it is of a more exciting character than the preceding episodes. The various aspirants to the graces of Charlie Chaplin will again occupy the stage. The films will be of a fine character and the audience will not experience a dull moment throughout. The films screened will be "Claim of Honour," a powerful drama: Podgy (Perkins' Plot," an amusing farce; "Terrors of the Jungle," a nne animal picture; Pimple's Scrap of Paper," an amus- ing comedy; The Convent Gate, an absorbing feature drama; and Fatty's Reckless fling," a side-aaher. The first production in Barry of the latest London West End success in the way of musical comedy is always an event that arouses the keenest interest amongst theatre-goers and music lovers in the town. More especially is this the case when the play in question happens to be produced and managed by Mr. Robert Couritneidge, of the Shaftesbury Theatre, London. The Cinema Star," which we are to seo for the first time here on Monday next has been considered by Press and pub- lic," wherever it has been seen, the best thing Mr. Courtneidge ha-s done sincd "The Arcadians." The comedy is in three acts, and the plot consists mainly in a good humoured skit on the "movie" business. The music never jars, and there is no rag-time, but it is always bright, tuneful, and ear-haunt- ing, while the production generally is, as Mr. Courtneidge's name guarantees, both elaborate and artistic. The or- chestra, which will be considerably augmented, will be under the conduc- torship of Mr. Albert Bartlett. It should be noted that the performances commence at 7.45 prompt. Early booking is advisable. ROMILLY HALL, BARRY. A special feature at the Rom illy Hall this week is a recitation, very ably rendered by Private Ridd, of the 1st Welch, entitled "An Appeal from the Trenches." For the latter three evenings of the week, a stirring Ideal exclusive, The Enemies," will be shown. It is a fine sea story. On, the last three evenings the 14th episode of "The Black Box" and "Peter's Picnic" will be the chief items of a varied high-class programme, which will also include a special War topical film, full of absorbing interest, entitled "The Great French Victory in Champagne." Next week, a grand exclusive by the London Film Company, entitled "Liberty Hall will be the chief item of a very strong programme. KING'S HALL. I In consequence of the reception of "The Cinema Star" at the Theatre Royal, the King's Hall will be oc- cupied next week for screening a fine programme of' dramatic and comic films. On Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, a thrilling story of the Far West will be portrayed in "The Indian." The latest pictures of the war will also be shown. On Thursday and for the remaining evenings of the week, "Mysterious Contragrav" and the end of the "Black Box" will be showu, Every- one must see this.

No title

MR. FRANK ST. CLAIR, as. "Billy," the stage manager.

REVIEW OF PUBLICATIONS

REVIEW OF PUBLICATIONS. THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS." The November issue of the above magazine conibains several features of outstanding interest. In the section de- voted to a rapid sketch of The Pro- gress of the World, the editor dools faithfully and forcefully with the lead- ing events of the past month; and in doing thi-s this observations are lidufmin- ated with several exceedingly appro- priate cartoons, ais wedl as two fine por- traits of Serbia's King and Prime Minister. Many readers willbo glad to know that Mias Ediitih Cavoll, the heroic British Nurse executed by the Creim-ms, has been selected as frontispiece to the nuagazine. The interests of women, in- deed, seem to be a prominent featfcirre of the number, for articles are devoted to the work of Miss Irene Miller, Miss Grace Nea-1, and Miss Violet Aloier. Portraits are given of these ladies, the Latter of whom has been doing her bit" in reciting at London recruiting meetings. The Rev. Henry Canter con- tributes an informative article on Drink under 'Control,' which, as 1} sub-title indicates, is A Social Revolu- tion." As iusuad, a comprehensive col* lection of cartoons from Germain sources are given under the explanatory head- ing of Fatherland Frightfulness." The dmaiiatic critic of The Review" deals cleverly with two plays, Iris Intervenes" and "The Case of Lady Camber." Literature .is given rather more space than (usual, and ma,ny im- portant books are reviewed. Madame Olga Novikoff makes an important sug- gestion regarding the employment of prisoners of war. The remaining con- tents of the number make good reading, presented in an attractive manner, and I justtifijes die claim of the Review of Revie;ws to be the busy man's maga- zine.1Ionthly Gd.. Bank Buildings, Kingswiay, London, W.C. "SAVE THE BABIES." The most important subject arising out of the war is the saving of the' babies, in order to repair the war wast- age. 100,000 babies die in this coun- try every year, before they are one year old, from causes mainly preventable. This equals one in every eight of the total babies born. Doctors are agreed that 90,000 of these need not die if pro- perly fed and managed. In one year of the most devastating war our lana has known, 76,000 men have lost their lives; yet every year 90,000 infants die whose lives could have been saved bv proper care. Here, then, is the means ready to hand to make good the loss of our brave sons at the Front. Ignorance is the principal cause of the waste of in- fant life, and this ignorance must be dispelled by scattering broadcast proper and authenticated advice as to feeding and management. With this object in view the 4th or War-Time Edition of Mrs. Frank Stephens' penny book called "How to Rear a Baby" has just been issued by Messrs. Horace Marshall and Son, # Temple Avenue, London, E.C. It gives all the information needed to remedy this appalling waste of life, and it may be obtained from any newsagent or bookstall for one penny. PITMAN'S BUSINESS LIBRARY. [ Parts 55-9 of Pitman's Business Library have come to hand, dealing with book-keeping for retailers. The lessons are carefully prepared, and no difficulty can be experienced by the student. Messrs. H. W. Porritt and W. Nicklin, A.S.A.A., are compilers and being authorities on the subject, they are able to deal fully therewith. Price lid., 32 pp., obtainable from the publishers, Sir Isaac Pitman and Sons Ltd., 1, Amen Corner, London, E.C.

i RHEUMATISM AND KIDNEY TROUBLEI

RHEUMATISM AND KIDNEY TROUBLE. Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is mostly the cause of backache, lum- bago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel, dropsy. To prove Estora Tablets are the successful treatment for such complaints, one full box of 40 tablets will be sent to readers of the 

1 A BiMTS RMMtVBD1 A DREADFUL INHERITANCE

[A" BiMTS RMMtVBD.] A DREADFUL INHERITANCE BY KATHARINE TYNAN, Author of "The Story of Cedlia." S Princess Katherine," Billy Carew," &r- CHAPTER XI. (Continued). THE SMALL AND NARROW HOUSE. He went back to Fenmoor, troubled for Cuthbert Mayne's contumacy. He was not free to speak. He thanked Heaven humbly that the choice did not fall on him. He could sympathise deeply with Cuthbert Mayne. The hardest thing that could be laid upon him would be to destroy Pat's happiness. Cuthbert Mayne had carried it off with a high hand at the last. He had bidden Father Peter to remember that his con- science was at ease. Father Peter doubted it. That shuffling off of everything-he had told Father Peter that, though Pat did not know it yet, he was going to be a pensioner on Pat's bounty. There was remorse in that, the priest guessed, remorse also in the things he was doing for Diana with a feverish haste as though he could not do enough. He was having the family jewels re-set for her. He had mentioned it to Father Peter with a sick shudder as though the subject were abhorent to him. H She would have had all these if she had waited," he said; pushed the case into a safe and snapped the lock upon them is though they were something noxious. Grayes was being embellished from top to bottom. It hardly stood in need of embel- lishment, but it was a solid old Georgian house, rather stately than beautiful, need- ing lightness and brightness. It was all to be well advanced before Pat's return. It was intended as a surprise to him; and the place" as alive with workmen, whom Cuth- bert Mayne hurried as though the time were very short. Father Peter had to inspect what was being done. Pat's room, which the work- men had not yet reached, was the room of a boy, ivitli Pat's sword and pistols on the wall, his cricket bat and pads in the corner, his austere little camp bed becoming a soldier, his boxing gloves tossed on the table by his writing desk, a pair of spurs here, a tobacco jar there, flanking a long German pipe and a couple of beer glasses. There Father Peter had a shock. Amid the photographs and sketches on the wall there looked d9wn on him a delicate portrait in water-colours in a gilt oval frame, a portrait of a lady. No need to ask who she was. Anyone who had once seen Pat must have recognised the lady for his mother. Cuthbert Mayne stood, his eyes averted from the portrait, aware in every fibre of him of Father Peter's shocked surprise. Pat knows so much?" he said, breaking the silence. It is kismet, blind chance, what you will. Pat having a wet day on his hands ransacked the attics. She was standing there with her face to the wall, as she will stand at Judgment Day. Pat came down carrying it in his arms, delighted with his find: He does not know she is his mother. His glass might have told him if he had troubled his glass. He has set her up there in the place of honour. I only pray he may keep her there away from people who might recognise her. Those Harlands for instance! What a complication! I suggested to Pat once that we should leave Saxham if we could get rid of Grayes. He would not hear of it. Grayes was his first English home— after Germany I mean. He loves the place as though he were born in it." Afterwards Father Peter had inspected Cuthbert Mayne's own little house to be. Except that it was walled in books it was of a startling plainness. No carpets on the floors, no curtains at the windows. A few plain articles of furniture for utility. A cupboard in the sitting-room wall contained some plain- glass and cutlery. There was but one sitting-room, but it had many win-I dows and they looked south. A bedroom above was similarly situated. There was the plainest of beds, of crockery, of plenish- ing right through. Father Peter noted it all. The absence of comforts, the, small fireplaces, the draughtiness of the rooms. He had the foreign objection to draughts; although lie had lived for so many years in the little house tumbling to pieces, which had been condemned by the sanitary authorities who could not prevent him a3 owner living there. "Pat will not- like it, my friend," he said. "It is too uncomfortable." He still pro- nounced it "uncomfortable." "It is too un- comfortable. And, you are hard on Brother Ass the Body, as the dear St. Francis used to call it." "I do not move in here till Pat is married." Cuthbert Mayne said, with his inexplicable smile. "He will be too busy now the time grows short to inspect this. As for Brother Ass, he does not need very much, being in sight of a long rest." Father Peter began to understand. He had always known Cuthbert Mayne as a sick man, sick in body and mind. Now lie dis- covered suddenly, as he took snuff and passed it to the other man with a stealthy, long look, that there was a change in the man whose sickness had always been taken for granted. His face, which must have been ruddy once, had a leaden-blue colour. He had a big frame. The flesh had melted away from it and the skin hung loosely, bagging about his cheeks and throat like an ill-fitting garment. "What is it, my friend? he asked. Angina pectoris. I have kept it from Pat. Fortunately, so far, the attacks have not been frequent. I have denied myself Pat's society, dearly as I love him. I am glad it is to be a quiet wedding; otherwise. I should have to stay away. Yon noticed I had a new servant. I had to pension off McGregor. The new man, Ellison, is a trained nurse-attendant. He keeps my secret as long as it can be kept." "But Pat ought to know. It will be a long honeymoon. He would not forgive him- self if-" "I should not forgive myself if I shadowed him with that. They will be three months away. I confess to you that my hope is that three months will end it for me. It will be a release. I am weary of suffering. And Pat will be able to bear it, the loss of a useless old man, with that splendid creature by his side." Before Father Peter left he had an oppor- tunity of testing the likelihood of Cuthbert May" ne's anticipations concerning himself. He was with him through one of the dread- ful attacks which none who have seen them can ever forget. Ellison stood by, applying this and that remedy, while Father Peter, one clammy hand in his, tried to strengthen the sufferer with all the invisible aids that heaven could afford him, summoning to his help the radiant shapes which were as real to Father Peter as flesh and blood. At last it was over. Cuthbert Mayne lay exhausted, the dreadful bluish pallor about his lips. There was only a glimmer of leaden light under the eyelids. The man might have been dead. Presently strong restoratives having been applied he opened his eyes; he could speak, though only faintly. "I wish—you could—be near me when the end comes," he said. "Now—you see, my giving up—was—only—pretended—un- selfishness. What have I—to do with houses —seeing I shall not—for long--ant my own? The small—and narrow house-the house—not builded -by' handa-ho. close--it keeps us prisoners. What a struggle it if- to escape." Father Peter went away with a case of conscience on his hands. Himself he felt that Pat's bride ought to be told the truth. But if he persuaded Cuthbert Mayne of that might not he be willing to assume whatever guilt attached lest Pat should be struck down in the midst of hie joy? He promised Cuthbert Mayne a long visit, as soon as he could get someone to take his place at Fenmoor. The Bishop had implored Father Peter to take a rest. He had worn himself to a shadow in his incessant trudg- ing after souls. It would be Father Peter's first holiday for forty-five years, despite the Erotests of the reigning family of Fftsten- burg who had brought all sorts of pressure to bear on Father Peter so that he migM re- turn for a little while to visit his relatives. This would be a holiday after Father Peter's own mind. He would be at hand-if he were needed, when he were needed. He would help Cuthbert Mayne over the threshold of eternity. He should not die alone, with only a paid servant to keep him company. So much Father Peter said to Mousque- taire explaining to him why they were leav- ing Fenmoor for a time. After all, said Father Peter, men must talk to someone. It was a deal easier to tell things to Moustjue- taire, who was a little well of secrecy, giving up nothing once dropped into it, than to talk to people less discreet. CHAPTER Xn. THE ILL OMEN. Pat spent those last days between Grayes and Broom Hall, which was to be given i, ) presently since they should not have need ox two houses. 'A little flat in town, perhaps, Pat suggested. Di was thrown away on Saxham. He wanted the world to see his jewel. And Diana had agreed to the sug- gestion, rather surprising Pat by her eager- ness. Something new had happened to Di. She grumbled at Saxham dullness, she who had always seemed to make her own world. She thought a flat in town would be very pleasant. There was a chan ge in Di of which the young lover was aware in a puzzled way. She had meeds, whims and fancies like any other woman; she had even tempers. Pat called it temperament and so saved his loyalty. She was sharp with Pat once or twice, then almost disproportion- ately contrite when she saw she had hurt him. She could make Pat forget anything and he excused her royally when she was un- reasonable, understanding that for such a creature as Di to step down from her maiden throne and give herself in marriage was something of an unnerving ordeal. He vowed to himself that she should be deli- cately cherished, be worshipped and cared for as was never woman before. All.the chivalry in his simple young beest called forth by this beloved Woman, who had the incredible generosity to give herself to unworthy Pat. She confessed one day, smiling through tears, that Saxham had got on her nerves after all those years. The first time she had wept Pat had been beside himself with alarm. She had reassured him, laughing at him because he did not know that from the Queen on her throne to the least of her sub- jects tears were the overwrought woman's relief. She did not deny that she was over- wrought. "I wish it was over, Pat," she said in her young lover's arms; and Pat echoed the wish fervently, although his motives doubtless were somewhat difFerent. Everyone was good to them. Presents rained upon them. There was a lovely chest of delicate linen and lace from Pat's friends in Furstenburg. Princess Mathilde, who had been like a mother to Pat, had the instincts of the German haus-frau in her kind and ample bosom. The house-linen was a wonder and delight to Pat, because it waa to be theirs, his and Di's. If he had a grief it was because Grayes was so well- plenished. If he had his will they would have started in quite a small way. He would have built the home, not taken posses- sion of it ready-built. Diana called him primitive for these desires. She was afraid she had no natural aptitude for housework, though she loved the simple life. She saw the beauty of manual labour, of the husband and wife, side by side, making the home. The ideal had a dignity lost to their complicated, over-convenienced life. Then she would look at her white hands and laugh. And Pat would laugh too, with a little rueful- ness because he could not have everything, stooping to kiss the beautiful hands covered with rings. He found Diana weeping one day when several packets had arrived. A leather case stood open on the table before her, reveal- ing against a background of white velvet a light and delicate tiara of pearls and dia- monds, Lord Halstead's gift. "He should not have given me pearls," she said, with a wan smile like the sun coming through rain. "Pearls are for tears, you know. J Pat thought he understood. Lord Hal- stead had been in love with her. That was common property. She was sorry for him. It was no end of decent of him to have be- haved so well. He had sent such a lovely gift—almost extravagantly lovely-and it had touched her heart, that generosity of the unloved lover. Of jealousy Pat had no thought. To his arrogant youth Lord Hal- steaa with his more than forty yeara was quite beyond the thought of love. Mrs. Frith sat in her corner and knitted in those days with the air of a Fate. Pat was a little chilled by her. She had not wished him joy. He could not ignore her sitting there in Di's chimney-corner with an air that quite obviously did not wish him joy- (To be Continued).

No title

Amateur comedian: "I can't go on for a minute or two, Jim, I feel very funny. "—Jim: "Funny, is it? Then for heaven's sake, man, go on at once, and make the-most of it while it lasts!"

Advertising

rRee!pe for I XMAS PLUM PUDDING: ) I Take three-quarters of a pouad I | of Dour. one ounce of | BORWICK'S t BAKING POWDER I I two ounces of bread crumbs, one I t and a half pounds of suet, two ■ I pounds of raisins, one pound of I a currants, ten ounces of sugar, two ■ ■ ounces of almonds, one pound of ■ ■ mixed candied peel, salt and spice I t to taste. Mix the ingredients well I I together, and add six eggs, well I I beaten, and three quarters of a I pint of milk; divide in two, aqd A boil eight hours. JM  I  I  u?Trn  J II Colonial and Foreign Department 17, CORNHILL, LONDON, ILO. This Bank has over 880 Offices in England and Wales, as well as Corres- pondents and Agents throughout the British Islands and a large number of Colonial and Foreign Agents. It thus offers all possible banking facilities to its customers, both at home and abroad. Head Office: 71, LOMBARD STREET, E.C. FRENCH AUXILIARY: LLOYDS BANK (FRANCE) LIMITED. Offices In PARIS, BORDEAUX, BIARRITZ H4YIIE. I can mend your FOUNTAIN PEN and IFit NIB, CAP, or FEED, while yoa wait. J. H. DYER Scholastic Book Depot. CHAMBERS 20th CENTURY DICTIONARY 3/6 for 2/8. [DAY IBOOKS from 6d. to 7/6. each. LEDGERS from 1/- to 15/- each. INDEX FILES 1/. each 10/6 dozen. OFFICE FILES from 1/- to 4/6'eafch. WEDDING CARDS the latest desig1)8. COOKERY BOOKS from 1/- to 7/6 each. POCKET DICTIONARIES all Lan&qW from 1/- each. SWAN, WATERMAN and ONOTO FOUNTAIN PENS, 10/6, 12/6 to 35/- GENTS' POCKET BOOKS and LETTER CASES. 100 6/- NOVELS to be cleared 1/- each. Discount 3d. in the Is. off Books not Nett. PARK HALL BUILDINGS, 95, QUEEN STREET, CARDIFF COOKSLEY, BALL & Co., Art Florists, Nurserymen, and Seedsmen, 160, HOLTON ROAD. TELEPHONE-285. Floral Work of all Description tastefully carried out at moderate prices on the shortedt notice. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 1a'RfIfIIA1 W -I I The Welshman's Favourite. MOON Saute ] | UW AM good Of its Name. 11 I DOfrr FAIL TO GET IT. 1I1k..uc:8' SL Ptttf IL. C&rdiff- CULMNCB TIIKPUA lei BODla AID DIVII& BOOMS, HOLTON-ROAD, BARRY DOCKS. HOT DINNER DAILY. Accommodation for Visitors. Well- aired Beds. Hot and Cold Baths. PROPRIETRESS-MRS. WALSH. ESTABLISHED 1900. Barry District Window Cleaning. Carpet Beating & Shute Gleaning Co., Proprietor-THOMAS COOKSLEY. 63, PYKE-STREET, BARRY DOCKS. I have no connection with any other Firm trading under the name of Cooksley. THINK Of us whrn in need of fine-quality Printing. # WEDDING CARDS, Of the daintiest and most up-to-date styles, executed at the "Barry Dock News Offices. ■'