Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
TALX RIGaTS RESERVED1 A DREADFUL INHERITANCE j

TALX RIGaTS RESERVED.] 1 A DREADFUL INHERITANCE j BY KATHARINE TYNAN, Author of "The Story of Cecilia," Princess i Katherine," "Blily Carew," &c. CHAPTER XXIV. THE VIGIL. When Father Peter had imagined to him- self in his quiet hours how the blow would fall upon Pat, if some day it should fall, his imagination had not touched the dreadful- ness of what happened, Pat was beside himself as the full shame of it was borne in upon him. All the years of preparation in which memory and the .in- consistencies of his life had been piecing themselves together in his mind were clean swept away. He was not prepared, not in the very least, for the thing he had to bear. He raved, h& wept, he stormed; he threatened to kill himself; he denounced the cruel, kindne which had brought him up to think himself like other men. The gay and sweet Pat of all the golden years was gone. This Pat was terrible. Father Peter shook before him like a convicted criminal. He before him like n, exhausted himself at last, being already worn out with grief and sleeplessness and fasting, and lay where he had flung himself face downwards on a sofa, only a heave of the shoulders now and again testifying that he still lived and Buffered. He did not know how long it was when he knew that Pat stirred. As a matter of fact, he had been sound asleep for four hours. It would be about three o'clock in the morning, and the light of the full moon was on Pat's sofa. Pat was lying awake, looking so pale in the moonlight that it was a relief to the old man when he spoke. "Father Peter," he said, and there was a drowsiness in his voice which showed that the narcotic had not yet lost all its power. "Father Peter." "I am here, my son. I fear I slept at my post," Father Peter said, struggling to his feet. He was very cold. There was a night- frost, and the fire in the room was all but out. "What is it. my son?" he asked, rubbing hia stiff old hands together. "I thought you came last night before I went asleep," said Pat in his drowsy voice. "I thought I didn't dream it. Father Peter, where is mamma? My child, I do not know. Indeed I wish I did," Father Peter said hurriedly, wonder- ing how much Pat knew, how much he re- membered how much was sleep and dreams. "She has gone away," said Pat. You know that, don't you? I shall never be j happy till I have found her." "We shall look for her together, my son. Poor girl! she should have come to me. Your uncle hurried to me thinkiug she had surely oome. I have waited and hoped that she would come; but there is no word of her. Father Peter wondered over Pat's easy acceptance of Mrs. Noyes as his mother. He wondered if it was something that would pass; the effect of the drug; a return to the old imaginations and delusions of the days following the accident. Pat's next words enlightened him. They were spoken very quietly. I have been thinking it all out since I've been lying awake," he said. "What- ever she did then, she has purged herself now. Poor little mother, how can we tell what happened to her? She need not be afraid of her son." Was it possible that Pat was condoning his mother's Bin? The strangeness of it, the compassion of the child for the mother, overwhelmed the priest. Surely Thy ways ar wonderful and past finding out he murmured to himself, rub- bing his chill old hands in the dark room. You must help me to find her, Father Peter," went on Pat's dreamy young voice. We cannot stay hero, of course, where people would remember the -past against her. I shall give up Grayes, and when I have found her I shall take her away and look after her for the time that is to come. I shall make up to her for the years in which she has been alone." "But, Pat, you have other duties, other obligations, my son. There is Miss Mark- ham. Diana. It will not hurt her very much. Of course, all that is over. All that be- over -?ll titat t?e- longed to the life in which I was Pat Mayne. I am Pat Luttrell henceforth." Under his hand, which he had rested on Pat's, the priest felt a strong shudder go through the young body. We need talk no more of it after this, Father Peter," he said. From henceforth I am Luttrell, and not Mayne. That will be something of the wrong undone, that one should lose a name. What it must have cost him lying up there!" To-morrow, after the funeral," said Pat dreamily, "I will let the friends I have here know what I am going to do. Only tho friends count. If they turn away from mc- well and good! There arc some, I think, who will not turn away. The Harlands—it was they who suffered the greatest wrong. I shall keep the Harlands. And Mrs. Wynne. You have always known, and so have the Evelyns. Perhaps they will think I ought not to stand by mamma. Then they ,will have to go. My whole futuro life is given to her." "But your fiancee, Pat?" "I hope we shall be friends," said Pat drowsily. "I should never have aspired to her. She will be happy without me, happier than with me. To-morrow, before the funeral, I am going to read the reports of the trial. I have found them in Uncle Cuthbert's desk—did you know that they were published in a little papcr-covcrod book at a shilling? I suppose people were greatly interested. Strange that Undo Cuthbert should have kept it, considering. 'I want to know everything about it. No one shall say I did not know everything. Poor little mamma! She was like an angel in my dreams. I wonder what can have pos- sessed her! There was silence for a few seconds in the room. Father Peter, comforted by tho armth, was dropping asleep. "To-morrow, said Pat, "when it is all jpveT I shall set out to find mamma." "You must bear with us who acted for the jbest," said Father Peter sleepily. "Before we lay your uncle to rest you must forgive him fully and. freely, as you hope to be for- given. Say it over, Pat, that you forgive him fully and freely as you hope to be for- given. He loved you tenderly." "There is nothing to forgive," said Pat, jrondeiingly. "I know he loved me." 5, "Say over the words." said Father Peter. For all his faults and errors done out of love to you you freely and fully forgive him. "I freely and fully forgive him—if there is anything to forgive." said Pat. CHAPTER XXV. DONNA QUIXOTK. Pat was alone when Diana found him a few days later. On the terrace outside she had passed Father Peter, who, in the in- terval of reading his Vespers and Compline, was trying to induce a robin to take a crumb from his hand. The little bright-eyed creature, hopping nearer and nearer, flew away at the sound of Diana's step. Father Peter turned about with an ashamed air, and lifted his shabby old shovel hat. He did not speak as she glassed him by, the big dog who went with Iter scarcely noticing the bristlinz of Pat's terriers. The dogs had come in as a trouble and a 'difficulty in Pat's scheme of getting rid of Grayes. So had the horses and the live stock of the place generally. So had the servants. Pat already had realised wearily how many harmless lives and happinesses I depended upon him. There was a little army of people and creatures who would be torn up by the roots the day he went out of Grayes. Father Peter looked after Diana. He had never seen Pat's fiancee, but he had no doubt it was she. Her height, her grace, her noble air, as Pat had painted them for him, were unmistakable. He watched her go into the house; then closed his breviary, and, with the air of a truant schoolboy, re- sumed his endeavour to coax the robin out of his shyness. Diana went on into the house. She had schooled her face to show nothing but ten- derness. The effort was an obvious one to her mind. She wondered if others could see it, the stiff, mechanical love and pity of her face, as she felt it must be. The first sight of Pat, a slim, golden- haired boy sitting at the end of a long library-table, changed all that for her. Some lovely wave of compassion took her and swept her. If this was not love, it was something warm enough to make her part easier than she had dared to hope. "Dear Pat," ahe cried, coming to him with a tender hurry. "Dear Pat! My own lKY! I waited til! you were (juic-t." He looked v up at her with a sudden ashamed lock, and then with a boyish action which went sharply to her heart he laid down his head on the papers before him, his face hidden from her. It seemed the most natural thing in the world to take Pat's head in her arms, to her breast and comfort him. Tears rushed to her eyes. Why, it was easy with Pat, as though one comforted a child. There was something beautiful after all, more beauti- ful in its sexless mociierly tenderness than passion that disturbs and hurls. There were no reservations in her mind, as there was nothing Halstead could object to in her heart. when she cradlcd Pat's desolate young head against the wave of her breast. For a second there was silence in the Toom, except for the ticking of the clock and the failing of a coal from the grate. For a second, ton seconds, twenty seconds, a minute perhaps. Then Pat lifted his head. He was pale, partly with the pallor of the sleeping- draught. the effects of which still hung about him. He lifted his IK ad and disengaged himself gently from hj]; uvms. Then with his characteristic olcl-fn.shioncd politeness, which Klity Hai-land had said would not fail Pat on the Day of Judgment, he set a chair for her. "Dear Di!" he said. "Kind Di! You are all I thought you and more. My dear girl, I have written to you. You must not do that again, Di, what you have just done, lest you should make it too hard for me; and because—I have set you free." She was wound up to any height of sacri- fice, and Pat in his affliction was more ap- pealing than he had ever be-on in his days of untroubled beauty. Suffering had com- pleted him. Thpre had beeu something in- complete about the old I'at, almost soullessly beautiful and untroubled. This Pat looked at her with the eyes of experience. "Oh, but," she said, "if I will not take my freedom! I don't want to give you up, Pat. Nothing is changed between us. I want you to marry me as soon as ever you will. If e would not wish us to wait." "Darling Diana!" said Pat, looking at 1 -i ?;L It, her across the Persian rug as though across seas and lands of distances, "all that is over and done with. You and I will never marry now. Perhaps even if these things had not happened to put it beyond the pos- sibilitv of change — we should never have married. I was never good enough for you, Di. never your mate. What a presumptuous young ass I was to aspire to you! It does not hurt you, Di, beyond what your tender heart feels for inc. I seem now to have always known that there was another man who came first, before me. I wish now I had not siocd in the way, for a little while." The self-contained, splendid DLana burst into tears. Pat's eyes were heavy and blood- shot, his hair tossed, his colour dull; some blight had come upon golden Pat, but to the woman he was giving up he had never seemed so desirable. For r. moment she thought that the feeling she had for Pat when she comforted him would be enough, not realis- ing that such feelings are for the high-days and holidays of life, for the great moments, and not for the du-ty and dull days of common life. She heard herself pleading for herself with a sense of aloof wonder. Was it pos- sible that it was she, Diona Markham, who had always kept her pedestal with men, or thought that she had, who was assuring Pat that she loved him and drsired nothing so much as to stand by his side through good and evil? Pat was comforting her, putting her away from him and consoling her, as though it were she who stood in need of consolation. At last it was all over. Pat had taken his ring from her finger and laid it on one side. "Perhaps," he said, "when you have made the other, man happy you will wear this again. I shall have no iHe for it. Tho other things. You must keep the other things, Di. It would hurt me horribly if you were to send them back. I Bliall never forget your goodness to me. It is good-bye, dear. As soon as I have finished up things here I am going away. I am going to look for mv mother. You know she has been lost. I shall have no happiness till bhe is found." "Dear Pat," said Diana, through her tears. "I hope she may be found—since you care so much." IK* wiped her eyes with a careful tender- ness. Then, when she was fit to face her world once again-or at least to face it with the help of the dusk iu the room and the shadows of her big feathered hat over her face, he rang the bell and ordered tea. At the same time he ordered the carriage to take Mis* Markham home in half an hour's time. He had carried it through with flying colours. Diana need never know what it had cost him to put her away out of his life. Father Peter, coming in answer to the tea-bell, helped them through the difficult half hour. He was full of curiosity to know what had been happening, but there was no trace of it in his manner as he talked to Diana of places they both knew abroad, and such safe, general topics. Presently the hour was got through and the carriage was at the door. Father Peter stood on the steps to see Diana enter the carriage. He saw Pat lift her ungloved hand to his lips. Then, as the carriage began to move, by the light from the open door, he saw Miss Markham lean back in the darkness of the carriage. "Poor children! poor magnanimities!" he said to himself, feeling that there was nothing he need be told. He asked no questions but that day and the next Pat was busy with papers and letters. All manner of things were sealed up; some were addressed an d posted to Bickerdyke and Harmer, Lincotn'is 0 Inn. Others were put away in safes and locked drawers. The next day they were at Fenmoor. A letter lay on top of a little pile of corre- spondence. There were Italian stamps on it. The postmark was of a little Umbrian town. Father Peter opened it quickly, pushing off Mousquetaire. who was fawning on him, making frantic demonstrations of delight. It is for you as well as for me, my son," he said. "She lives; she is well." I There was an immense relief in his voice. His worst fear was set at rest. "Toll my eon," she had written, v that I am at peace and in shelter. I am in the I hands of God. He is not to grieve because I have left him. He need never know that I was his mother. As for you, Father Peter, may God reward you! This is my farewell." CHAPTER XXVI. AND LAST. I THE END OF THE SEARCH. I Three years had passed over since Cuth. bert Luttrell's death, and Grayes was still standing as it had been, awaiting the master who delayed in coming. Saxham had almost forgotten its dread of having to re- ceive Millie Luttrell. Perhaps because of its relief it was quite prepared to receive Pat with open arms and let bygones be by- I gones. But Pat was trudging up and down the world, following clues which broke off in his world, becoming niuch older for the search and the disappointment, yet never giving up the hope of finding that undesirable per- son, his mother. Sensible people were agreed among them- ¡ selves that Millie Luttrell had done the one possible thing in the circumstances in tak- ing her shadow off her son's life. But, what if he wished for the shadow? Even 'Father Peter had urged on Pat to give up his search. She has found pcace," he said, in some convent or other. Let her be My son, you know she wished to disappear. She might not thank you for disturbing her." Pat smiled—one of his rare smiles. He had left his radiant youth behind him for ever. His smile said that for once Father Peter had spoken a foolish thing. He had come and gone at Grayes, had stayed there now and again for short inter- vals, just long enough to let the servants feel that the master was not dead, to throw the dogs into raptures of gain after loss, only to overcloud their days too soon with the, I shadow of renewed loss. Some changes had taken place. Diana was now Lady Halstead, had been for some two years or more. She had not worn mourning long for Pat, said the critical people, who were not confuted by Pat's friendship with the Halsteads. Kitty Harland, despite many suitors, was still unmarried. Her father and mother seemed to have lost their love of globe- trotting and to have found solid earth at the Chase. Major Harland had taken to breeding race horses and found abundant occupation for his leisure hours among the beautiful creatures that fed in his care- fully fenced paddocks; the silky thorough- bred mothers, the foals wild and slender, who came to be petted and were off like the wind. To produce a Derby winner was ad- venture enough even for Hugo Harland. He had already had success in some of the smaller races. But he looked to the time when the Blue Ribbon of the Turf should be his. Kitty, who had spent the first two decades of her life in hot foreign towns, among vineyards and olive trees, further afield even in Asia and Africa, vowed that she had had enough of other countries and could never tire of this green England, whatever the season. Mrs. Harland was a born country- woman. It was an unacknowledged relief to Major Harland that his daughter had no desire for gaieties beyond what dull Saxham could provide. Saxham had been less dull of late since the coming of some new families with young people, and since Lady Halstead led the fashion in entertaining. I wonder when Kit will grow tired of turning down eligible young men," said Major Harland, on the day when Kitty had sent young Nicholas Pomfret, of Raynham Abbey, a parti, and a good fellow to boot, young and good-looking and very much in love with Miss Harland, about his business. Mrs. Harland looked up at her husband from under the shade of her gardening hat. She was a great gardener, and the Chase gardens were in those days such things of beauty as no hired gardener, unaided by someone's love for the gardens, could make them. There was something curious in her ex- pression which made him ask: "What is it, Kate?" If you don't know," said Mrs. Harland, stooping over her roses. Oh—you think still it is Pat. You think that is still going on in Kit's mind? Well, we are a queer pair, you and It Kate, to be discussing with equanimity our daughter's fancy for a young man with Pat's antecedents. We, of all people in the world Could you bear it, Hugo? He laughed, a little shortly. "Oh yes, I could bear it-if it must come, for Kit's sake. But, Pat has not been near us for a year. I hoped Kit was forgetting. I'd rather have a husband for our only daughter who had not that story behind hi m." A month later Mrs. Wynne died. It was bright and beautiful September weather, after a somewhat cold and broken summer. Lovely weather to die in she had said, only the Sunday before, lying awaiting her release. Sax ham was in mourning for her. She was such a wonderful personality that people said the place was not the same, would never be the same, without her. She belonged to the old life, the old history. Her like was not made, not seen in these later, smaller days. The day of the funeral was as beautiful a day as heart could imagine. Kitty Har- land, with her father and mother, sat in the church in a pew facing the open side-door that led out into the graveyard. The whole place was bathed in sunshine so brilliant that the cool shade of the church was wel- come. Hearts were heavy for the dear old friend who was gone. It was terrible to think of the open grave, the sad procession coming nearer the church, the coffin, on such a day. K.tty Harland, with her hands covering her tac1, wept in the quietness of the church and looked up to see the sunshine lying over the graves like a benediction and a promise. The coffin came into the church, borne on men's shoulders. Kitty hid her face. Im- possible, impossible, to think of the kind old friend as lying there! The words of the burial service began, magnificent, solemn, the grandest heritage of the English Church. She felt herself being uplifted by the com- piling words, as though someone had taken he.I' by the hands and drawn her upwards. Her heart was being lifted up. She heard the magnificent promises above the lowness of our mortality, read with simple impres- siven-eis by an old friend of Mrs. Wynne's, who had taken the burial service. She lifted her face wet with her tears; sho saw the green and the sunshine without and peace descended upon her like a dew. Not there, not there were the great brain and the great heart. There was nothing there but the worn-out garments of the spirit that had slipped from them and was away to the Land of the Young. She lifted her head and she was aware that someone had come into the pew, who had not been there before. Her eyes fell on the hands, and she felt her heart leap in her breast. The sensitive hands-she would have known them anywhere for Pat's. Then was not much belonging to Pat that she did not carry in her heart. She looked higher-to Pat's face. Pat was lean, older-looking: the last three years had been working upon him, writing a whole history of care and suffering on the face that had been so smooth and young. But Pat was beautiful still, though it would never again be the careless beauty as of the pagan world that had lain over Pat's youth. He was dressed in deep black for the old friend, of course. Kitty wondered where he had sprung from, how he had heard. There had been no news of him at Ornyos for a long time back, although the servants' kept the house ready ajt i!uv,iwti he might come any hour of the dny or n :<>ht. Kitty and Pat went back across the fields, walking slowly—the September heat was ti-y:ag—talking of the old friend who had just left them. They dawdled through the woods: there was plenty of time. She would have said it was so kind of a in tl you to come;" said Kitty, smiling faintly. You know how she used to say: But how very kind As a matter of fact, I did not know till I arrived at Grayes at half-past one o'clock —]u«t in time to snatch a hasty lunch and get to the church." But-this?" said Kitty, putting a shy hand on Pat's arm. It is for my mother," he said, and turned away. his head. "I found her only to !i}i'{) her." "Ah Kitty's expression of sympathy was like a little moan. Sit down here and I will tell you about her, Kit." He indicated a fallen tree-trunk by the woodland path, and when she had sat down he flung himself on the mossy herbage beside her. "I have had three years of it, Kit, three years," he said. Some time I will tell you about those three years. It is a long story of hopes and disappointments. I am glad it has come to an end. I know now that she is safe. After all, my love could not have kept her from hurt. My poor little mother! She will never be hurt or lonely or afraid any more." "How did you find her?" she asked softly. Oli, she had covered up her tracks well. If she had not let us know at last we should never have found her. She has been fo." the last three years in a Convent of Poor Clares right in the heart of London, while we were searching the world for her. When she knew she was dying—oh, she was very careful that her shadow-her shadow, God help her I-should not fall on my path —they wrote to Father Peter. He had to re- call me. I was in the Appenines when his letter found me following a lost clue. I ft-j w her—every day for the little while she stayed. They did away with the solemn enclosure for me. I was able to be with her. She died in great joy, because she had erased to be afraid of my eyes. She used to laugh, Kit—the poor shadow, with such young eyes and such a smile—and then she would repent, because she was so impeni- tently gay that she could laugh even then. .Kitty, she was just a poor child, my mother." He turned about and laid his eyes on a fold of Kitty's skirt, and she did not with- draw it. He put his hand inside his coatand drew out a small packet. He took off the wrap- pings and disclosed what it contained. It was the copy of the miniature of himself in childhood which he had had made for his mother. "She said you had the best right. Kit," he said. "A foolish thing. She was dying, Kitty. I am not for any woman. All the world would tell yifu that, Kit. The only thing would be-if you cared." He turned and looked at her and his eyes were wet. She opened her arms, and with a cry he let her take him, comforting him, with his head on her breast. [THB END.]

CHARACTER I

CHARACTER. I We may judge a man's character by what he Ions-what pleases him. If a man mani- fests a delight in low, sordid objects, the vulgar song and debasing language, the mis- fortunes of his fellows or animals, we may at once determine the complexion of his character. On the contrary, if he loves purity, modesty, truth-if virtuous pursuits engage his heart and draw out his affections -we are satisfied he is an upright man. When we see a young man fond of fine clothes and making a fop of himself, it is a Bure sign that he thinks the world consists of outside show and ostentation, and he is certain to make an unstable man, without true affection or friendship, fond of change and excitement, and soon weary of those objects and pursuits which for a time gave him pleasure. No temper in the world is so little open to reason as the ascetic temper. How many a lover and husband, how many a parent and friend, have realised to their pain, since history began, the overwhelming attraction which all the processes of self-annihilation have for a certain order of minds!-Mrs. Waird. A friend is worth all hazards we can run, says Young, the poet. But in plain fact, there is ono hazard that no friend is worth, and that is the hazard of doing wrong. A friend who requires us to accompany him or her into doubtful or evil ways is a friend better lost. PERSUASION BETTER THAN FORCE. I Deal gently with those who stray. Draw them back by love and persuasion. A kiss is worth a thousand kicks. A kind word is more valuable to the lost than a mine of gold. Think of this and bel on your guard, ye who would chase to the grave an erring brother. We must consult the gentlest manner and softest seasons of address; our advice must not fall liko a violent storm, bearing down and making those to droop whom it is meant to cherish and refresh. It must descend as the dew upon the tender herb, or like melting flakes of snow: the softer it falls the longer it dwells upon and the deeper it sinks into the mind. If there axe few who have the humility to receive ad- vice as they ought, it is often because there are few who have the discretion to convey it in the proper way, and who can qualify the harshnees and bitterness of reproof, against which human nature is apt to revolt. To Erobe the wound to the bottom, with all the Cldness and resolution of a good spiritual surgeon, and yet with all the delicacy and tenderness of a friend, requires a very dex- terous and masterly hand. An affable de- portment and complacency of behaviour will disarm the most obstinate; whereas if, in- stead of calmly pointing out their mistakes, we break out into. unseemly sallies of paør sion, we cease to have any influence. As to being prepared for defeat, I cer- tainly am not. Any man who is prepared for defeat would be half defeated before he commenced. I hope for success, shall do all in my power to secure it, and trust to God for the red.-Admiral Farragut. Judging other people harshly is not a sign of growth; judging ourselves more and more severely is, however, an infallible one. Robert Louis Stevenson says somewhere: "There is but one test of a good life; that the man shall continue to grow more diffi- cult about his own behaviour." Satisfaction I with oneself, self-righteousness, is the deadliest of enemies to Christian growth." THE MIGHT OF EXAMPLE. Example is one of the most potent of in- structors, though it teaches without. tongue; it is the practical school of man- kind, working by action, which Í8 always more forcible than words. V_Ireoept may point to us the way; but it is silent, con- tinuous example, conveyed to us by habits, and living with us in fact, that carri es us along; good advice has its weight; but with- out the accompaniment of a good example it is of comparatively small innuenoe, and it will be found that the common saying of "Do as I say not as I do," is usually re- versed in the actual experience of life.— Smiles. Be cheerful. There is more pleasure is the world than pain; more of the beautiful than the unattractive; more of the genUe tfcftQ the toryibl*. God reigns.

I CORRESPONDENCE

I CORRESPONDENCE. The Editor deaiies to state unat he does not nwessftrly endorse the opinion expressed by Correspondent*. II Give me above all other liberties, the liberty to know. to utter, and to argne freely, according to conscience. —John Milton. I lr. Robert B. Miller.—Copy of your letter to the Clerk of the District Coun- cil, re Belgians, to hand, for which we are obliged. A similar letter appears in our correspondence columns this week. Ed. "B.D.N." I A CONTEMPTUOUS NIGGER." If the writer of the letter which we have received, under the above head, will send his or her name and address, we shall be glad to publish the letter-, together with any explanatory comment which may be necesstary from our- selves.—Ed., B.D.N." THANKS FROM CAPTAIN HYBART'S MEN. To the Editor of the Barry Dock News." Dear Sir,—The officers, N.C.O.'s, and men of my husband's Company, in France, wish to convey to all Barry friends their heartiest thanks for the Christmas hamper, and to assure them. that it went a long way towards mak- ing their Christmas a bright and happy time. I should like to express my own thanks for the splendid help I received from the Ladies' Smokes' Committee, who worked hard to secure funds for the purpose; and to the subscribers everyone I say .Thank you" most heartily. j We were able to send 801bs. of cake, 501bs. sweets, 4 gross boxes chocolate, 3,000 cigarettes, and a large parcel o? games. With what the Barry district has already done, I think we may feel satisfied with our efforts. I may say that on Christmas Day 220 Glamorgan R.E.'s shared our hos- pitality.—Yours truly, M. W.. HYBART. Hazeldene, Pencoedtre, Oadoxton. "SICK OF THE BELGIANS." To the Editor of the "Barry Dock News. Dear Sir,-L wrote a letter in Decem- ber last to the secretary of the Barry Belgian Committee as to the hardship some women and children were suffer- ing under the scale allowed by them, and received a reply from the secretary stating that the Committee would be prepared to hear my views at their next meeting. This meeting was held on Thursday last. The chairman (Mr. S. R. Jones)—the gentleman who invari- ably talks of the the right of a Britisher, British fairplay, etc.—refused to allow me to speak, or in any way to state my case on behalf of these poor people, and added that he was "sick of the Bel- gians!" Surely, Sir, a man holding this view should not be allowed to remain on such a Committee, seeing that he is out of sympathy with the work He has been allotted to do by the Council. The Kaiser murdered thousands of these innocent people in Belgium, but is the "British fairplay" man allowed to make these we have on our shores suffer all sorts of humiliation and agony ? In the meeting above referred to, the Chairman, to one of these Belgian men, who had been brought before the Com- mittee; said that he was a scoundrel, and that if lie had his way he would like to horsewhip him. 0/ It appears to many of us, Sir, that men who talk in this way, and say that bread and water is good enough for these people, do not represent the sym- pathy the Barry public desire to show to our guests; and, further, leaders in Church life and Sunday Schools should at least show a little of the spirit of the Master to these unfortunate people who have been shipwrecked on our Island. Yours, etc., O. T. JONES. 17, Welford-street, Barry.

STOP A COUGH IN ONE NIGHT

STOP A COUGH IN ONE NIGHT. Take VENO'S LIGHTNING COUGH CURE. A cough may be due to any of the follow- ing: Catharral Colds Enlarged Tonsil I Influenza Enlarged Uvula Inflamed Throat Bronchitis Inflammation Pleurisy and Croup Stomach Disorders Asthma A cough may be dry and hard, or loosle with much expectoration; it may be catarrhal with a dry tickling in the throat accompanied by partial stoppage of the nostrils and shortness of breatih. Veno's Lightning Cough Cure removes the cause of the cough, not smother- ing it but curing the diseased conditions which produce it. Leading British Analysts speak in the highest terms of Venio's Light- ning Cough Cure, and unfailing reliability has won for it the largest sale of its clJass in the whole world. Veno's Lightning Cough Cure not only radically cures the most stubborn coughs, but strengthens the lungs and gives perfect ease in breathing. Ask for Veno's Lightning Cough Cure, price Hid, 1/3, and 3/ of all chemists.

I j IULCER AS BIG AS A TEACUP I i ii

I ..j I ULCER AS BIG AS A TEACUP. I i ■ ■ ii ONLY ZAM-BUK COULD HEAL 1 THE TERRIBLE SORE. J — • From a Yorkshire home comes fur- j ther striking proof of the value of Zam- J Buk. "Four years ago," said Mrs. M. J Huggins, of 131, Huddersfield-road, Dewisbury, to a reporter, I felt an itching, burning sensation on my left leg. "There seemed nothing to account for it, but in spite of different cooling lotions which I applied, it grow worse. A red angry-looking patch then ap- peared, and soon the skin broke. In a short time there was an ulcer on my leg nearly as big as a tea-cup, and the agony was something to remember. The wound was one mass of corruption, and the discharge scarcely over ceased. It bled freely, too, but it was dark bluish" unwholesome-looking blood. Doctors said it was a bad case of ulcerfated leg, but in spite of constant care and attention the wound grew deeper and deeper. I took a long holi- day, for the doctors told me absolute I rest was necesisary, but it was no use. My leg was bad like this for three years, and I was in despair. Then I read of a splendid cure by Zam-Buk in a case very similar to mine, and I got a box of this wonderful balm. The first few dressings enabled me to get a decent night's rest, and as I kept on using Zam-Buk the discharge gradu- ally cleared away, and the inflamma- tion went down. When Zam-Buk had quite healed the wound it formed new healthy skin, and in time there was no sign whatever of the ulcer which had caused me so much suffering and anxiety." Nothing but Zam-Buk with its re- markable helalmg power could Have made an impression on her bad case.

IIBARRY BOYS AT SALONIKA

BARRY BOYS AT SALONIKA. A DELIGHTFUL TIME ON CHRISTMAS DAY. WITH THE KING'S MESSAGE TO CROWN ALL. In our last issue we published a delightful description of Christmas morning in the Near East, by Lieuten- ant Cyril Lakin, of the South Wales Borderers, in a letter to his parents, Mr. and 1f11S. H. Lakin, of Cadoxton- Barry. Continuing his interesting let- ter, Lieutenant Lakin stated:- Butt my Christmas also had its practical side. Practical,' you know, out here means either eating or work- ing, generally both. I told you that we were determined to have a good day, so we had sent several wagons back to Salonica to get extra food some days before. Though the journey is not a long one, the rood is terribly bad, and specullation was rife as to whether the food-rally would turn up. But it did, and early on Christmas morning I was sorting among the fresh meat, bread (what a luxury after biscuits), vege- tables, flour, and currant, with which we were going to fill the men. Hap- pily there were also cigarettes, and plenty of ram, with which we were to make rum-punch. Then I went to look after our own little goodie-goodies. What a feast! From macaroni to Johnny Walker," and from almonds to a real live turkey! You would not believe what it meant to us after living for three weeks on half-rations of bully- beef and biscuits. Can you imagine how willingly we did that two hours* \vork? We were all laughing and jok- ing and hard at work, each one of us. You would have smiled to have seen Down with a pick, and myself with a shovel, as good a pair of navvies as ever rolled up shirt-sleeves After our work, and our holy communion, came the preparation for the bumper. It was truly a great feast for both officers and men. A seven-course dinner at the Savoy is good, but our bumper was far better. Not that we overdid it. Oh, no If you had been three weeks on .short rations. I'll bet you would put a little bit away for the rainy days which will probably fallow. In the evening we had a concert, a splendid one, with the usual votes of thanks to artistes and to the officers. But though they are usual, I'm glad to say they are also genuine, and I am sure there is not a better company in the Army than ours as regards the con- fidence placed by officers in their men, and vice-versa. We had our Christmas carols, and a splendid message from the King to finish up the night, and we all went to bed as happy as could be. So you see we had a real good time. Tc-day is Sunday, but that makes no difference to our work: we are hard at it. I do hope your day was as happy a,s mine.

I FOOTBALL i

I FOOTBALL. Barry, four goals: Mid-Rhondda, one. At .Tenner Park on Sa.turdav. Fred Sheldon (2). H. Woodward and D. J. Jones scored for Barry, and Car- michaol for Mid-Rbondd^