Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
3 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

FOR PRINTING OF Every Description, • TRY THE ¡", "Barry Dock News" OFFICES, Holton Road, Barry Docks. L Despatch: A Speciality! I < ¡ J t 1 '■■■• ■ J ,¡ ;¡.. ,¡ WEDDING CARDS f ) OF THE CHOICEST DESIGNS AND ARTISTIC EXECUTION MAY BE OBTAINED AT THE < Barry Dock News," Holton Road, Barry Docks. Cards from 2/6 per dozen. Cards can be supplied the same day as ordered. ¡.

CALL BIGHTS RRDD I LOVE IN FETTERS II

CALL BIGHTS R'RDD.] I LOVE IN FETTERS II BY I RICHARD MARSH, Author of A Master of Deception," Twin I Sisters," fi I SYNOPSIS. KONAIJ) DENTON has been arrested at Monte Carlo by Inspector Jenner, an English police officer. The two are on their way to Paris when there is an accident to the train. Jenner is killed, and Denton manages with much difficulty to effect his escape. It is night and the country is unknown to him. Carrying two heavy bags, his own and the dead Inspector's, he struggles along a road until he reaches a shed. There he breaks open the Inspector's bag. and having done so, is startled by the sound of laughter. A woman is looking at him. It is her shed. she informs him, and she wants to know what he is doing there, She appears to know a good deal about him, however, for she hints at handcuffs and addresses him as You escaped felon ?" The woman, who introduces herself as Madame de Constal, proceeds to make it clear that she knows all that has happened. She was in the next compartment to Ronald and the Inspector, and witnessed the young man's escape. Threatening to shoot him if he refuses or attempts resistance she demands that he shall 'hand over the letter-case and papers which he took from the body of Jenner. He complies, and the woman discovers the warrant upon which he was arrested. He had told her his name was Robert Dennett, but the warrant enlightens her as to his real name. Ronald does not know what is in the warrant, but when she taunts him he bursts out, I never meant to kill him." It was an accident, he declares, and when he saw the man dead, he could not stay to face the result. The woman also discovers a number of bank-notes, of which she takes possession. Then she off, rs him a glass of drugged wine, and he becomes insensible. I CHAPTER V. I A FAIRY PALACE. When we were introduced to Ronald Denton he had just awakened in a. railway carriage, to wonder where he was; when we meet him again he has just come out of a sound slumber to exercise the same sense of wonder. He could not make out where lie was He was certainly not in a train this i was no railway carriage; it seemed to he a very comfortable room. He was lying on a bed which appeared to be all that such an article ought to be. [ He raised himself on his elbow; it was a charming room. A loftly ceiling; white cupboards all round the walls; a Persian rug in the centre of a black oak floor, which was polished till it shone like a mirror; in- viting arm-chairs; a roomy couch; two tables; and he*%new not what besides. What was this place? Where on earth could lie b, ? He sat up. He felt heavy and stupid; his head was aching; he could not get his thoughts into proper working order-he couldn't .understand the thing at all. Where had he been last night? That part came back to him with a shock; the journey with Inspector Jenner; the awakening out of sleep; the interview in the shed; what had been the finale to that ecene? o He had a vague notion that something queer had hap- pened at the end. When he tried to think just what it was, his brain seemed clogged. How the interview had ended; what had happened afterwards; how he came to be where he was—these things he could not remember. Someone tapped at the door and, without invitation, entered; apparently a man- servant, in an alpaca jacket of what struck him as being an odd design. He spoke in French. "Monsieur would like coffee?" He addressed him in the carefully modu- lated tones of the wdl-trained French ser- vant. Somehow Denton thought how out of keeping the tone was with the man's appear- ance. Broad-chested, bullet-headed, bull- necked, his hair cropped so close that he seemed almost shaven, he not only suggested unusual strength, but there was something sinister about him altogether. His curiosity more on the alert than ever, Denton asked a question. "Who are you?" "I am the valet de chambre; I am Achille. "What place is this?" "This is the house of Madame de Constal, the Chateau d'Ernan. Monsieur would like coffee? "I would like something—yes, coffee." The man was leaving the room. "Wait a moment." The man stopped. Denton had it on his tongue to ask how he got there. Per- haps it was something in the man's bearing which prevented the question being put. He asked something else instead. "I am rather hungry; can I have an egg with 1113, The man inclined his head and went. Di- rectly ho was gone, Denton said to himself: "Of all the rascally looking gentlemen! If nature writes a clear hand, what a trea- sure he must be! Madame de Constal? Who is Madame de Constal, and what is the Chateau d'Ernan, and how come I to be here, anyhow?" He racked his brain. "Madame de Constal? Wasn't that the name of the woman in the shed, or, any- how, didn't she say that it was? If that's so-and I believe she said that was her name—what sort of place is this she has got? If this is a sample of the rooms, it must be quite a palace; and how come I to be installed in such an apartment?" Achille returned so quickly with a. well- covered silver tray, that one might be ex- cused for wondering if he had found it out- side the door. There was coffee; there were all sorts of rolls; delicious looking bultA; boiled eggs; various samples of those agree- able confitures which sometimes accompany a French "little breakfast." As Achille put the tray upon a small table and carried the table to his bedside, Denton thought what an appetising looking tray it was. "By the he asked, "where are my clothes? And—Surveying his person he made a discovery—"Where on earth did 1 get these pyjamas? They are not mine." "Monsieur should know better than I." Achille's voice could not have been suaver; tot a muscle of his visage moved; yet Den- ton suspect d him of smiling. Achille went on: "As for monsieur's clothes, here is mon- sieur's dressing-room; monsieur will find everything ready. Monsieur will have a bath-hot or cold ? Achille, opening a door which Denton had not noticed, revealed on the other side what seemed to be quite a pleasant chamber, in which masculine garments of all sorts were displayed, as if for their owner's inspection. Denton felt confused; this was almost too much. Were those clothes his? How could they be? Yet it was hardly a question which he could discuss with a valet de chambre. "I'll have a cold bath when I ring. Is there a bell ? Achille pointed to a small silver bell which was on the tray, and went. Denton, alone, looked about him with bewildered eyes. "Of all the queer tiirts, this is the queer- est. I euppo-se I am awake, and that these things aren't happening in a dream. The room seems real enough, and the man seemed real enough, and, by George, there's no mis- take about this coffee; it's delicious. But how come I to be in a place like this, in another man's pyjamas? I swear they're not mine, though they fit me uncommonly well. J and a dressing-room which -seems chock full I of clothes, which aren't mine any more than these pyjamas, though that fellow seems to take it for granted that ilipy are. He seemed to take a good-deal for granted. I I wonder how much he knows; how much he could tell me if he liked? I'll het a trifle II that he knows more about me than I do about him. But it's rather awkward to I to put questions of a. certain sort to a biack- visaged ruffian who tells von he is a valet de chambre. I doubt if he'd answer if I put them. I'd better wait till I see wher-P this adventure is leading. This coffee cer- tainly is excellent." He di(I justice to the "little breakfast." It refreshed him; it seemed to el-par his head, to give him assurance, to make him niore of a man. He got out of bed and bo- gan to walk about. A pair of quilted, sky- blue slippers were by the b-ed; lie had never I worn such things in his life, yet, with a. 1 smite, he put them on J they seemed to be in keeping with the room. It was certainly eaquisitely appointed; there were all sorts of odde and ends which pointed to both taste and money.. Achille had drawn the I enrtains which hung before a big window ¡ which ran almost across one side of the l'oom) It was a casemented window. Open- ing one of the casements, he leaned out. The view was superb. It seemed that the house stood on a slope; from what he could see of it, it was a nuge place, in spacious grounds. The March sun, shining in a cloud- less sky, suggested spring. The air was sweet and fresh; it did him good to breathe it into his lungs. He admired, and wondered all the more. "What on earth is this place, and how do I come to be in it?" He went into the dressing-room. It was not large, but it was charming, a dressing- room for a true exquisite. And the clothes which were displayed-and in the cupboards there were more—dozens of pairs of boots, treed, on shelves. "I might be able to get into another man's coats and trousers, but I doubt if my feet will fit his boots." At one end of the apartment, screened by a curtain, was a bath, of a kind quite un- usual in a French private house. "Is this a nalace seen in Allasta's vision Shall I presently wake up and find myself— goodness alone knows where? There's a trick about it somewhere, that I'll swear. I think I can manage without that fellow's help. I can set my own bath, and without i assistance get into another fellow's clothes, or try to," He bathed and dressed, amused to find that every garment fitted as if it had been made for him, which was not so strange as he supposed. He was of average height, slightly built, a stock figure. He was un- aware that he might have gone into the first cheap tailor's shop to find that the first suit the shopman offered fitted as well as if it had been made for him. What amazed him was that the boots should fit his feet, being ignorant that there are stock sizes in boots, as in clothes. As he surveyed himself in a long mirror, being completely arrayed, he decided that the result was not so bad; all the things he had on were of excellent quality, made by good craftsmen, for whom- ever they might have been intended. His toilette completed, he rang the bell. Achille apneaied. "I have bathed. As you see, I am dressed. Now what next?" Achille's face was inscrutable. "If mon- sieur will descend," he said. He held the door open. Ronald Denton passed through. "If monsieur will permit," explained Achille, "I will lead the way." Denton permitted. Achille led him through wide corridors to the head of a splendid staircase; then down it. Half- way down, Achille, pausing, drew aside, to permit someone to ascend. Ronald Deuton, confused, tongue-tied, amazed, beheld a lovely creature coming up the stairs. She just glanced at him as she passed, that was all, then went on. Achille continued to des- cend. Deuton, all agitation, would have liked to ask him who that dream of femi- nine beauty was, but he refrained—he fol- lowed where the other led. Across a fine hall, a fire of logs blazing in the great, old- fashioned fireplace, to a doorway screened by silk curtains. He drew the curtains aside, held the door open. "If monsieur will please to enter." Monsieur did please. Ronald Denton found himself in an apartment, not of large dimensions, panelled in black oak, iiolished like the floor in his bedroom, till each panel shone so that one seemed to see into the very heart of the wood. 11 TMa, monsieur," said Achille, "is what here, in the chateau, we call the room of other times.' Achille went. Though he was no connois- seur in such matters, Denton, as he glanced about him, understood what the man had meant. Every article the room contained had a history, one felt sure of it; it was so old, and had played a part in so many scenes. In the open fireplace, framed in the panels, blazed another fire of logs. Denton, as if conscious of a sudden sense of chill, warmed his hands at the blaze. "This certainly must be a palace in Al- lasca's vision." As he said this to himself the door opened. A lady, entering, approached to where he stood. "Mr. Robert Dennett, I am Madame de Constal; welcome to the Chateau d'Ernan. Now at last I really keep my promise, and you see me. It is not necessary that I should. hope that you slept well; I can see it in your face. What a good-looking boy you are." CHAPTER VI. HIS HOSTESS. What lie had expected to see he could not have described; it was not what he actually saw. A woman, above the average height of her sex, full-breasted though slightly built, a siuuous something in the outlines of her form, which not only gave grace to her figure but conveyed a suggestion or sup- pleness, of quickness, strength, agility. She stood very upright, on the balls of her feet. rather than on her heels: her skin, though dark to the verge of sallowness, was clean and healthy; her black hair was dressed in such a fashion that it seemed to bring into relief the nice contours of her shapely head. At her age he could not guess; she might have been, possibly was, past thirty. W in; J ever the exact tai e of her years, she was in her prime; youth, ardour, health, energ' y, ac- tivity- these things were hers; hers. also, was the joy of life for life's own sake. This wa?. in every sense, a. strong woman. Ronald I)e?n' to'nn would have said, if you had asked him, that he knew as much r bout- women ..as most men, young men do say that, but his knowledge was less than lie supposed. He realised, as he stood there on the ether side of the fireplace, a smile lighting her velvety eyes, giving a glimpse of her even, white teeth, that this was altogether a new type to him. She was exquisitely dressed, though he could not have said" by what means the effect was produced. Ho was confused by her appearance, by the manner of her address—she was so clearly poking fun at him. He was at an age at which young men do not care to be laughed at by women; it was clear that she laughed at him. 0 H You will forgive me, my name is not Dennett, it is Denton." She laughed outright, as if at the stiffness of his speech and manner. o ?' You will forgive me also—I prefer Den- nett. There is about that other name a sug- gestion—of what I do not care to talk about." lie flushed at the hint her words conveyed, which seemed to add to her amuse- ment. "You are very English, Mr. Den- nett. lias it not struck you as odd that of all ]wople in the world 'the Englishman is th.e one whom it- is the least possible to mis- take. I have often met people who have made me ask myself To what country do you belong?' Among them there has never been an Englishman." lie wondered of what nationality she was. There was ill her voice the faintest flavour of a foreign accent; she spoke perfect English. Either his features revealed his thoughts more plainly than he.supposed, or her per- ception was unusuallv keen—she read v.hat was in his mind. "You ask yourself to what- country I be- long. It may amuse you, but I can hardly I have in me a little of so manv countries. Nearly all my relatives have belonged to el "icrcnt nations. It M>UJKSS droll put like but it t .,I v father was a Pole, hi.s mother was a German, her relations came from Spain. My mother was French; she had cousins who were English, with whom I have lived a great deal—you see I speak English pretty well. Her mother was born in South America, and, oddly enough, married ,t, e'lizen of the United States. Is not all that vfry droll ¡; The riddle is, to what ceiuitr" v do I belong? You, Mr. Dennett, you | A BOplainly English, and I-I am what; Under ordinary circumstance Ronald Den- ton would have been affected by this woman's face, her humour, the indescribable sense of charm whieli invested her whole per- sonality, and, sincft he was not by any means a stupid youth, he would have met what seemed to be her friendly advances at least half-way, and would have proved very quickly that he was not without agreeable qualities of his own. But the circumstances were not ordinary—he was awkward, stupid, tongue-tied, a condition which was not les- sened by her laughing comments. "Are you always so full of conversation, Mr. Dennett? Are you always so quick with a polite answer? Do you always leave vour hostess to say all the pretty things? He made an effort to pull himself to- gether, uncomfortably conscious that to ill.3 fine lady he must seem an utter fool. "I'm aware that I'm not the brightestj person in the world, and if I seem to you to be even peculiarly stupid, it is because I feel myself to be in such an utterly fabe position the fact being, indeed, that i tie not even know what my position is. You are so courteous that I hardly like to as I you what it is." That is better; you are getting on a little oil, and maybe the machine will move easily, without so much as a creak. Briefly, i Mr. Dennett, your position is that of my guest." "It is very kind of you to say so, but—I i am really afraid that that does not cxpla in much to me. I do not wish to seem over j curious, but how do I come to be in this house at all? "Oh, that's very simple, you were carried here." "Carried here?" She smiled, but he looked serious enough; which seemed to make her smile still more. "Last night. You see I had drugged you, which seemed to be the easiest way of getting you here. Do vou not rcmeli¡1¡<:r the glass of wine in which you were to have drunk my health; which you emptied—and after that I should think that you re- member no more? That is the position, Mr. Dennett." "You drugged me? It seems a little hard to believe; but I suppose if you say so— you at least are frank." > "Oh, yes, I am always frank. With me it is a rule; candour is such a fine thing, don't you think so, Mr. Dennett? "I have already told you that my name is not Dennett-it is Denton." "And I have already told you that i h 1 is a name I do not like. If you intend to advertise yourself under that objectionable name, then you compel me to tell you that at the Chateau d'Ernan there is no room for a murderer. You look offended." "Can you conceive of any man as being pleased to be addressed like that?" j "I have already told you that I am frank, j it is my rule. If you are Ronald Dent011 you are a murderer: is that not true") You wince, you change colour, you lock angry; frankness does not please you. It is you who are to blame. I know no Ronald Denton the gentleman I know is Mr. Robert Dennett, who I am pleased to VI-II- come to the Chateau d'Ernan as my guest. 1 That, once more, is the position." "Why should you wish to have me as your guest, such a creature as I am? "That is my affair." "Your affair? You have curious ideas." 1 "If I have? I await your comment on- shall we say, the peculiarity of my idea, if you think it becoming to criticise your hostess. In that suit of clothes you look very well. Do you know that they are mine?" i "I am uncomfortably conscious that t hey are not mine. Where is my own bag, if I may put the question?" j "The things that belong to you, and also the things that belonged to Inspector I Jenner. are in my keeping; .and will ecu- tinue there. I am sorry that you should be j so uncomfortably conscious that these j dot hes are got you own. When I said [ that they were mine. I meant in rather a I special sense. I have worn them; they w< ve made for me. You look surprised-or is shocked? More surprising. more cheeking things than that happen in the Chateau d'Ernan. Last night I had you measured, Your measurements are mine. If you "i;! observe me closely, and have ah >t'v(' for ?nch a matter, you will see thal"it need:- but little to make me the figure bf a man. ]';j you not see how slender are my 11: There ar-e times when it suits lill" to be a man: it is for such occasions tluit. those clothes were made. Do you feel more comfortable in them now thaii before?" j "I suppose it is no you that j I am, or, at any rate. that I was, a g< utio- man; and that a gentleman doe- not care—" To wear a woman's clothes. No, vou need not tell me that. You look so red. so cross—it becomes you. There are tire, is j when even a gentleman is not asked for what 110 oares. There are points on v. hh-h your tastes will be consulted while you are my guest; there are others on which they j will not be consulted." "When you say that I am your guest, do you mean that 1 am your prisoner? That's as you please. I have here a large house, a fine house, and spacious grounds. You can go in them whenever you please, and when I feel that I can trust you, can go outride them also. If you have ever been in prison you will know that it is not like that." What is your object in keeping me here? "I have told you already that is my affair. Rather than be my guest, would you wi-h me to telegraph to the police, 'Here is your murderer, for whom you are looking. Come, take him away, and hang him?' soon be an end of you that wav." There was the sound of a gong, Think the matter over; it shall be as you please. In the meanwhile, tuiie me into lunch. 1 he gong auv.oun.ces that it is ready. If your appetite is as good as mine, you are ready ab«o. Let us see if my cook has provide 1 anything you can cat. Your ;>\1. )>ei!i!ott. You ttee to-day I do not mind your .c ,i: dose. Did you not hear me ask vou for vour arm?" He offced it to her. as it seemed to him, wn!y-mny-st;n!y. as if hp would much i'.? her not. As she took if, she laughed at him. I "How unhappy yon 1ook. as if I ".{'}'(> the pi ague, and by a touch should give it you. There :ue men, ev?u quite young men, who we:: Id consider themselves fortunate in ha\:ug even my arm in theirs. This way, \l r. Dennett, the room in which we are about to laneh is. 011 the other side. Do you not admire my hall? There is nothing finer of its Ic ii(I iii a mood to r.dm:>o nothing. If that is so I elnlier.g • Presently > wiij show you something which you will admire. She said it with a little malicious air, as of dcfiance. He felt her fingers press his arm. She drew closer. Do you not notice how exactly of a h :vht- we are? Actually, my shoulder l-.u-hcs yours." It did; a shiver went over him as, for a inoa'cnt, her body was pressed against his. ful, now that you see me as 1 am? Mere is tic room in which we are going to lunch." i"hey entered an apartment in which the tn•>!•.» was laid for a meal. Two jx-rsons st'eid side by side looking out of a window, turning as they entered. "Alice, permit me to introduce to you a new acquaintance, who I hopp will become an old friend—Mr. Robert Dennett. Mr. Dennett, it delights me to give you the of kuowing Miss Hudson." JI-e was conscious that the vision lie had encountered on the stairs was oomin g towards him across the room. He had not supposed himself to be an enthusiastic per- son—young men are fond of thinking that for them the age of enthusiasm is gone, but he had not thought there was anything eo beautiful in the world. She stopped at a little distance from him, looking at him with smiling eyes. "When I am introduced to an English- man I never know whether or not to shake hands. H Yon can shake hands with Mr. Dennett. I feel sure he will not mind." Then—if you really won't mind, Mr. Dennett, I think I will." She not only shook hands, she allowed her hand to rest in his for several seconds. He did not seem to mind that cither. "I met you on the stairs. I suppose you arrived with Madame quite late last night." "^es; what a quick-witted child you are. Mr. Dennett did arrive with me quite late last night, and this morning he is in a mood in which he can admire nothing. I wish you'd find him something he could' ad- mire. "There are lots and lots of things about Ernan which he can't help admiring." "Never mind about the lots and lots; it will be something if he can find one. This, Mr. Dennett, is my very deaf-I li(,,I)e he won't mind my saying, my old friend, Monsieur le Comte de Girodet-Bébé. Monsieur de Girodet is so old a friend that for many years he has been to me, Bebe— this is Mr. Dennett, of whom I spoke to you. Be to him as nice as you can. Ho is a young English gentleman, alone in a foreign land." Ronald found himself confronting a per- sonage w ho might- have been any age; it was evident that such extreme pains had been taken to preserve for him the appear- atic, of youth. He beamed at lion; Id through an eye-glass. de Constal speaks very good English. I understand what she says; I needs must: but I-I am so French that I beg you will allow me to speak my own language." For the first time a faint shadow of a si-nile seemed to flicker across the young man's face. He acknowledged the iutroduc- tion in fluent French. I have no doubt that your English is better than my French; but as it havens that I have lived in France a good deal, off and on, I daresay we shall manage to under- stand each other." There is no one in the world, I give you my word of honour, whom it is easier to understand—than your humble servant." Denfon wondered. He had a fair idea of his own powers of judgment; yet he doubted if lie would be able to underr'and this vngged and powdered gentleman as easily as his words suggested. I When they had taken their seats at table, he found himself with Mme. de Constal on one side, who, for reasons which were not difficult to follow, made him feel more awk- ward than he had ever done since he had left the days of hobbledehoy hood behind, and 011 the other a young girl, who, for causes which were slightly more remote, completed the work of mental paralysis which the elder lady had begun. Although in general his courage did not fail him whore women were concerned, he hardly dared in look at her. The simplest question which she put to him seemed to make him tremble. Do you know Ernan? Have vou ever been in this part of the world before?" Perhaps it was because he looked so awk- ward, so nonplussed, that Mme. de Constal answered for him. "I think, Alice, that Mr. Dennett never has been in what you call this part of tlio world before; but he is going to stay here a long time now that at last he has come." (To be Continued.)

ANOTHER NAME FOR IT

ANOTHER NAME FOR IT. The work of bearing the white man's frzrden too often takes the form of filling the white man's poeket.-Mn. BKYCB. THE REAL TEST. Many a man who can be brave while the nation looks on falls prostrate before the bothers and frictions of every day busin-ese. -Dit. A. C. DIXON. ACCORDING TO SCALE. The public school is like a huge trlmminj* machine that cuts or lengthens people to a standard fixed centuries ago.-MB. DBa- MOND Co KB. IMPATIENCE A VIRTUE. Patience conquers all things, but once in < while a little touch of impatience will shorten the fight.-Mu. H. E. ZimnnuiAH. THE ROOT OF REVOLUTION. A desire to have some part m the govern- ment of the country has been at the bottom of almost all the domestic disturbances and civil wa.rs.-Sm JOHN COCKDURN. THE TEACHER WHO SUCCEEDS. The successful teacher is the one who can disooTer in the child something that dis- tinguishes it from all other chfldren.- BiaHor or BIRMINGHAM. EDUCATIVE THEATRES. German education is essentially au educa- tion of leisure: German theatres are the red continuation schools of the people.—MB. F. J. ADKINS. A TRIBUTE. My native Scotland was to me a land flow. ing with milk and honey all the time I lived there—I left it when I was two months old! --SIB GEORGE REID. ENGLISH COOKING. A painful subject for a Frenchman in this country is the great virtues ?f plain cook- ing. I do not believe in them, and it is only when a Frenchman comes to England that he 6Dd8 he hM a liver.-M. Exim LISAGE. GREAT EXPECTATIONS. We put fourpence in the offertory box, and expect a full-blown vicar, two good- looking curates, and a peal of bells wherever we go all over the world.-BisHop O. LONDON. PERJURY IN THE COURTS. Human nature being what it is, if people are allowed to lie with impunity about money matters in a law court, they will con- tinue to do so, and with every successful evasion the evil grows. At present, owing to the cumbersome character of the pro- cedure, no judge can secure the prosecution of an admitted perjurer with any chance of success. I hope before long to see an emendation of the law of perjury, by which a judge will be enabled to commit a person accused of perjury, and direct him to be tried before a court of summary jurisdic- tion.—JUDGE EDGE. j OUR DEFENCES. It will take a long time to build up the military forces of the country to what they ought to be, but I hope that, with an efficient Navy and a thoroughly organiseel Army, we can take care of ourselves. It is with this faith that I ask my hearers to turn a deaf ear to those who say that with- out compulsory service, tho country cannot fee defended.—LoEi) HAXDA^JS,