Teitl Casgliad: Barry Dock news

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

  N sS??SEsNB f !m!!?? |ga Hsat"T"M A N'S BALSAM 1 CURES 111 COUCHS&COLDSB Invaluable in the Nursery softietll3 & 3 I OF ALL CHEMISTS AND STO S. N THE MOST -———— P| [] PERFECT PAINT [] m Expenence can make or jfl ■ money can buy, is the CAMBRIAN BRAND Lg |HJ j (of Guaranteed Materials) Bl Q IN 54 RICH STRONG COLOURS. L| R Ask yqur Ironmonger, or ?} Dmomor to show you I l J j the Cambrian Paint II Tint Card. jfl See that the name H ■ CAMBRIAN BRAND is ■ W\ on the tin, and ensure t? | 1 absolute satisfaction. t 1 I I hi ■■ .1. MAMOFACTUBED MY ■ L 1 ? MME?M'S<'BMST? j LARGE quantities of Yellow and Red WALL FLOWER PLANTS FOR SALE. WREATHS and CROSSES sent any Diitance at Shortest Notice. S. WOODBH & SON, Wholesale & Retail Fluit Stores, 108, HIGH STREET, BARRY. Telephone 374. vV H A RTON-STREET SALEROOMS CARDIFF. m S. A. 8ETCHFIELD will SELL" by L' AUCTION no THURSDAY NEXT a Large Attsemblage of Superior HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE AND EFFECTS. removed for convenience oi Sale, comprising Pianofortes, Walnut Sideboards and Over- mantels, Dining and Occasional Tables, Wal- nut and Oak Hallstands, Clocks, Bronzes, Dining and Drawing-room Suites, 8 exoellent Tea and Dinner Services. Carpets and Rugs, Onrbs and Brasses, 6 Bedroom Suites is varioug woods, All-Brass and other Bed- I steads, Wire and Wool Overlays, Chests of Drawers, Wash stands. Tables. Toilet Ware, to. h. Sale at 2 o'clock sharp. No reserve. REDOING, KEEPER, & ENGAGEMENT. RlfcTGS. FINEST SELECTION AND BEST VALUE H. B. CROUCH'S, 18 St MARY-STREET, 48, QUEEN STREET 9, High-street Arcade, Cardiff THE CITY' JEWELLERSE Guaranteed best Value In the Principality A Handsome Present given to every Purchaser naming this Paper.

I BOOKS AND MAGAZINESI

I BOOKS AND MAGAZINES. I HISTORIAN'S MISTAKE. I There is an amusing. article- on "boam Literaxy Blunders" in the "Oxford and Cam, bridge Review." In the course of it.. the author. Dr. Smythe Palmer, says:- Lord Macaulay, we know, was a very eleven man indeed, but he made his share of mis- takes. One of these is apparently due to his not understanding the older English. It is well known that he drew a very disparaging picture of the status of the clergy during the 9= period—that they were, in fact, little better than a kind of upper servant, in the house of their patron, or retainer. He says, the clergy were regarded as, on the whole, a plebeian class. And indeed, for one who ma.d the figure of a g-entleman, they were mere menial servants." No doubt they were de- scribed as menials, but not in the scn-e lie thought. The word has now got mixed up with .the word "mean," so that it connotes something servile, low, or degrading. But that idea was not properly in the word at all. "Menial originally meant, belonging to the meinee, or meynee-be., a household, the con- tents of a mansion. Anyone residing in the liouae of his lord, or master, however high his office, would be called a "menial," or domestic --e.g., a lady of the bedchamber to the Queen (though a duchess) or a lord-in-waiting, would be correctly described as a "menial" of the Court. Now, almost every nobleman and squire formerly had a domestic chaplain in his house, and such a one would be ex-officio a "menial." So far, indeed, from being a dishonourable epithet, the-poet Oldham, in 1680, applies it to the glorified spirits in the Ileavenly home— "There all Thy family of menial Saints. Now, on Thy throne, for ever wait." But Lord Macaulay, not being able to free biuiself from modern associations, and imagin- ing that a clergyman, to be menial, must be on a par with the servants of a great house, had bis judgment warped, and was led into ab&u'd < ?ag?erattMt. I uilO'tÝe.ratMi- I i »

Advertising

4 FOR Printing OF EVERY DESCRIPTION TRY THE 'Barry Dock N ews,f HOLTON ROAD, iiRlf DOCKS. THE 'Barry Dock News" IS PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY.. PRICE ONE PENNY THE 'Barry Dock tfewa1 IS ON TIIE LIST FOR PARLIAMENTARY ADVERTISEMENTS •" V i

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED LOVE IN FETTERS

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.] LOVE IN FETTERS BY RICHARD MARSH, Author of "A Master of Deception," Twin, Sisters," &c. He's nfver touched u;on the subject eirce. except in elusive liiuts, so of course I don't like to think that he's found trouble before he had a fair thaisc-' of |ouvi:g" out his heart to me. And it ceilaiiiiy is tt fact that the inquiries I made about him of the rodi- vidual who brought as ottr little breakfast i didn't meet with the sitcee's I was entitled j to expect. lit- didn't seem to know any- thing about Mr. Spragg at all--didn't even seem to know that lie .had over "been in the house. What that man didn't seem not to know about Spragg fhadn't time to dis- cover. "Here's Mme. de Constal," said his wife. "We shall be able to ask her." Mme. de Constal, her face framed in black lace, greeted them while she was still at a distance. 1 "WfIL my children, what do you think, of the Chateau d'Ernnn in the dtyli-lte "Lovely," said Miss Chovlstcn. "Too utterly sweet," said Mrs. Stacey, but Mr. Stacey asked her as soon as he judged her to be near enough: "I was wondering, Mme. de Constal, what had become of Mr. Spragg? There's some- thing I particularly wish to say to him, and he don't seem to be on view anvwlaere. If he's in his room, can you tell me which it is? Mme. de Constal ceased to advance. She turned towards the expanse of country which stretched out below the terrace. She waved her hand. "Nearly all that is mine-alinost. as far as you can see. Sometimes my heart swells with pride when I think what a large p.cec of the world I own. What was that you were saying about Mr. Spragg?"^ She smiled at Mr. Stacey. "I was just-wondering if you could tell me which room he occupies, so that I could go and have a chat with him." "Didn't you know? I thought you knew." "Knew what? You must remember, Mme. do Constal, that I'm an ignorant man." "But since Mr. Spragg is ar friend of yours, I thought he would have told you." "If you'll let me know where I can find bim, perhaps he will tell me." "But that's just it—he's gone. "Gone?" It was Mr. Stacey who spoke, but the others joined him in .staring. "He emed to hint to me last night that he C?t be? staring here quite a while." "Of that I know nothing." A messenger came for him early this morning, and dis- turbed the whole hoye, and it seems he went with Iiiin. I don't wish to seem to (ritici8e a uest, but I cannot help thinking that Mr. ?pragg was rather inconsiderate. You see that spire over there among the trees, that's the church of Saint Enogat. It's got some very curious glass there. I don't know if either of you care for that kind of thing, but if you do, it's quite worth eeeing." CHAPTER XXIII. SUSPICIONS. By the time Mme. da Constal strolled away, nearly all. her guests were assembled nn the terrace. Mr. Stacey said, the moment ehc had on& "I do]a rt -,v*t to insinuate a word, but of all the 8trari..yt()rie8. that of hers about Spragg is a little bcvond me. It's funny ?,. I should have heard what I did 1œar; considering that he* told me only last night that he might be here for a week, and per- haps more. That yarn of hers about a mes- senger coming in the middle of the night makes it funnier still." "I hope," sighed Lady Chorlston,. "that I've not been deceived in Mme. de Constal. I don't know if you noticed with what extra- ordinary persistence I seemed to lose last night-a persistence which requires ex- planation? Her daughter glanced at Ronald. Mr. Krauss spoke next. I just came up In time to near waat- sue said about all this fine plaee being hers, as J far as the eve can reach. I happen to know 1 that every foot of it is mortgaged up to the i hilt, and that at this very moment the mort- gagees are threatening to foreclose." "Are you one of them, Mr. ErausaF" The question came from a grey-haired man, who seemed to have a knack of keeping himself in the background. Mr. Krauss looked at him, rolling his cigar round between his lips. "Suppose I am, Colonel Gardner, would you like to take my share off my hands at the price I paid for it?" "No, Mr. Krauss, no; yo. spoke with such an air of certainty that I merely wondered." "Wondered what I knew of Mme. de Constal? We all know something about her, don't we? I fancy you know as much about her as anyone, only you're one of those re- tiring men, colonel, who leave others to do the talking." Just then Mme. de Constal, coming out* of the house, waved her handkerchief to them as if it were a signal, and called: .'•'Mr. Dennett! May I speak to you- one moment, please?" Ronald hesitated, conscious of an almost .flingidar reluctance to go to her. Mme. de Constal is caHing to you," said Mias Chorlston; "don't you hear ,.r "What is it?" asked Ronald. "I can't speak to you at that distance," replied his nortess. "I don't want to bawl. Will you come for just one minute, please?" Ronald went, still reluctant. The others watched him, Mr. Stacey indulging in com- ment as soon as his back was turned. "I wonder what that young gentleman's 14sitiou is at the Chateau d'Ernan. Is he the lady's spy, or—what is he? I'll swear his name wasn't Dennett the last time I saw him., He left Monte Carlo in a great hurry, .without saying, good-bye to any of hio friends, or even sending tlipm a card, and no one seemed to know where he'd gone to. it's a surprise to find him here as Robert Dennett. Ronald, having reached the lady, showed a. disposition to hear what she had to say there. "I CM't possibly speak to you here, my dMi boy. I don't want all the world to iiear. You must come into the house." (When* he hesitated, she added: "I have f

Gi hinds G IINDS

Gi./ :• hinds. G ?;? ) ?-,IINDS. Tb n'ni; c.f his badness is » better .7::L siua tU* itiun who is ashamed OF K>" go'-d/ICSW.EAV. T. Vi. JAJHMOH. A DELUSION. I I: r. '^l-'sion of; hasty and untrained fL k: I zv.iv- .ftdv-jtxof> by each other's h-elp !i o/er 

THE VOLUNTEERS RECOGNISED AT LAST

THE VOLUNTEERS RECOGNISED AT LAST. To thousands of men throughout the I country, the Volunteer Bill will be re-I garded as a charter giving them a de- finite place in the defence of G/eat Bri- tain. They have had to wait a long time for the imprimatur of official ap-I proval, ?nd to face many difficulties and discouragements. At last, recog- nition has come, and members of the Volunteer Force will feel that all the: marching and drilling., and shooting, which they have undertaken has not J been in vain. Under the Bill, Volun- teers become soldiers oi the second line. They will have to sign an agreement i to serve until the end of the war, and will be subject to military discipline. For instance, a Volunteer will have to attend forty drills in the-first three months, and afterwards ten drills a I month, whilC" he will render himself liable to punishment if lie is absent without leave. The conditions of drill are to be made as elastic as possible, to suit different districts, eyid as they will take place in the neighbourhood of a ¡ man's home, he will be able to attend without interfering with his civilian employment. This is an important consideration at a time when every trade and industry is suffering from a shortage of labour. -"Uniform and equipment are to be provided for effi- cient members of the forcs. M'my units already possess uniforms, and in these cases they will be taken over at a proper value. No age limit has been imposed. So long as a man has not organic disease, and is able to' ma-roll five miles, and to stand garrison ser- vice conditions, he will be accepted, and will not be called away from home except for actual service in the ova-it of an attempted invasion. Doubtless there are some volunteers who, owing to the nature of their ob- ligations, will feel unable to give the undertaking required, but probably these withdrawals will bo few. The majority will sign on for the duration of hostilities, realising that if the Volunteers are to become efficient, the conditions could not be made less onerous. Many battalions have aJ- ready rendered excellent service in guarding vulnerable points, loading and unloading munitions, and reliev- ing the Royal Defence Corps and if more responsible service in new direc- tions is demanded of them, they can be relied upon to respond. Viscount French has recently reviewed groups lof Volunteers numbering in. the aggre- gate over 100,000, and his tribute to their general bearing and appearance is very gratifying. Their enthusiasm and patriotism have been proof against all official rebuffs, and deserves un- gruding acknowledgment. One result of the elevation in the s.t.atusof the Force should be an increase in the numbers, for, just as the Territorials stood between us and disaster in France, while the new Armies were training, so the Volunteers may, in a certain contingency, stand between this Country and an enemy invasion.

1FOOTBALL I

1 FOOTBALL. I WELSH SCHOOLS' SHIELD ] COMPETITION. I BAHRY BOYS v. TREDEGAR. II BOYS. Barry schoolboys played Tredegar boys at Jenner Park, Barry, on Satur- day last. The homesters fielded the following tBrum :-L. Thomais (High-street); L. Rrice (Oadoxton) and L. Hayes (County): T. Brown (High-street), W. Vinaiicombe (Hannaih-streot), and R. Sheppard (Oadoxton); W. Butcher (Oadoxton), S. Cruise (County), J. Phillips (Holton), W. O'Shea (Island), and T. Withers (RomiMy). 1 May was on the whole favour of Barry, WJlO iscored twice, through O'Shm and Phillips. Bamy have thus qualified to oiitgr the ^second round of the Welsh Shield Competition.

REOPENING OF BARRY BOXING STADIUM

RE-OPENING OF BARRY BOXING STADIUM. Under the direction of several well- known local gentlemen, the Boxing Stadium, Barry Docks, will be re- opened on Saturday evening next, when a great twenty-round contest, for side- stakes and purse, will take place be- tween Dainny Morgan, Tirphil, and Jack Josephs, Pontypridd. Both men are well-known in the boxing world. and credit is due to the management for having secured so rare a tit-bit for the re-opening occasion. Young Dol- man, Barry Docks, will also meet Young Drisooll. of Cardiff, in a six- round contest. Sportsmen are guaranteed a did exhibition on Boxing Night, when there will be a grand fifteen-round con- test between Walter Osborne, Maesteg, and Johnny Hay ward, Qardiff, 'aiore will be, in addition, a fine six-rc:id bout between local talent,

I CORRESPONDENCE

I CORRESPONDENCE. The Bditor desites to stats yA¡,t; te a job not jecestM>i:; aalorie the opinioll expressed by Correspondent*. CHILD WELFARE AT BARRY. To the Editor of the "Barry Dock News." Sir,—Councillor Beck's suggestion that the health visitors, who are also scihool nurses, should be asked to act as midwives to some of our soldiers and sailors' wives is a dangerous one. I do not tKiilk such a combination of I duties would be sanctioned by the Cen- tral Midwives Board, under whose con- trol even Council midwives would have to work. As lying-in women are so very sus- ceptdble to infection, no nurses who are examining backyards and drains, or working in our schools, where infec- j tious diseases are so constantly break- ing out, should be allowed to enter a lying-in room, much less to act as mid-! wives. The wives of the mien who are fighting for us should not be -exposed to this danger. It is a mistake to say that they have to pay their midwives out of their separation allowance. The! midwives fees are paid through the National Insurance. I- There are many ways in which the • Council could help these and other poor women, at comparatively little cost, if they would only work in co-operation with the midwives of the town, instead of in opposition to them. This would probably not satisfy a few people, who are a.mbitious to become leaders. There are 15 doctors, besides the M.O.H., and 26 registered midwives in the town, and every expectant mother is officially un- der the care of one or other of these, from the moment she books her case, I till i.?e end of the lying-in period, so there is no valid excuse for appointing Comicil midwives. All the midwives have clearly specified rules under which they must advise their patients to see a doctor if necessary, and this is where the Council could v step in, and give financial aid if necessary. The Local Government Board grant is intended to extend and increase the usefulness of practising" midwives. Why, then, is 'there .so much contention over the babies, who can be very well looked after by the midwives, with a little assistance later on, while so many of our poor little children are suffering and dying every year through infec- tious diseases, which should, and could, be stamped out of a .healthy town like Barrv. But no one seetmis to care for "child welfare" in their caso.- Yours trulv. I E. L. WEALE, Pres. Barry Midwives Association.

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLICi AMUSEMENT

LOCAL PLACES OF PUBLIC AMUSEMENT. THEATRE ROYAL, BARRY. Topping the. programme, at the Theatre Royal, Barry, during the first three days of this week was a three- part drama, "The Convict King," which told of the consequences of a big contractor who employed convict lajbour, thus earning the title of "The Convict King." The other pictures were Charlie Chaplin, in "Disturbing the Peace," "Phoney Teeth and False Friends," and the "Third Christmas." The popular serial, "The Diamond from the Sky," was continued to episode 28. "On the Wings of the Morning. Raphe's Animated Gazette and the latest war pictures were also included in the programme. To-niglit (Thursday) the bill of fare promises to be a. strong one. The fanmous Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Drew will appear in "Childhood's Happy Days." "The Evangelist," a thrilling drama, has been. secured, together with the comedy picture, "Harmony hi a Flat;" and a Mary Pickford film, "When we were in aur 'Teens." This week sees the teitmination of the super-serial "Peg o' the Rimg," and everyone is advised to see how this story ends. A special holiday prograimirno has been arranged for next week, coantaioue- iing on Boxing Day. The mJagnificent picture, Infelice," has been secured by special arrangement. The story is by Augusta J. Evan Wil, authoress of iSt. Elmo," and features Peggy Hyland. Other attractions are A Christmas Story," Tank Cartoons," and a continuation of The Dia.mond from the Sky." ROMILLY HALL, BARRY. "The Little Breadwinner," the prin- cipal film shown for the former portion of the week at the Romilly Hall, Barry, deserved all the praise which the large audiences present nightly showered upon it. This evening .Thursday) and for the remainder of the week, Charlotte Wal- ker, the cinema star, will appear in "Kindling," a. sensational four-act Lasky dram'a. Of human interest. Kindling" is a film well worth see- ing. A Triangle Keystone cornic, "A Janitor s Wife's Temptation," will also be shown, and is. an amusing ^'arce. On Tuesday and Wednesday next (the hall will be closed on Christmas Day), Marguerite Clark will appear in the romantic drama. "Gretna Green." The title is indicative of the type of film to expect the best. The popular and versatile Fatty will appear in "The Other Ian." a Triangle Keystone I comedy showing how Fatty falls in love, and incidentally becomes jealous. I On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday the one and only Mary Pickford will be presented in "Conderella," the ever- green Yiiletide story.

THE FARMERS TROUBLESI

THE FARMERS TROUBLES. I The searchlight of public opinion is playing very strongly upon the farmer just now. He is charged, on the one hand with holding back food products, and on the other with demanding exor- bitant prices. At the same time he is blamed for keeping his sons and men out of the Army, and for not increasing the production of the soil. Some of the arguments used against. him are mutu- aJlly destructive. For example it is folly to criticise him for allowing so many acres.of land to be fallow, a.nd at the same time to take away his labour- ers for the Army. There can be no question tha^the supply of workers is bedow the scale, and those who remain are not equally distributed. Some far- mers have still something like normal staffs, because 1 their employees hap- pened to be over age, while others have lost nearly all their helpers. There has also been a reluctance amlong many agriculturists to employ women, though that antipathy is being generally broken down. One thing is becoming clearer. The agriculturati industry must not bo allowed to drift from bad to worse, and the Government must take a firmer hand in the organisation of the home-grown food supplies.

THE SIXPENNY EGG IN SIGHT

THE SIXPENNY EGG IN SIGHT. With eggs at 4d. each, and the pos- sibility of the price rising to 5d and even 6d„ before Christmas, poultry farming should receive a tremendous impetus in this country. Now, if ever, the keeping of hens must be a profit- able enterprise, and every householder who possesses a suitable garden, or can hire a small plot of land, has a power- ful inducement to go in for this hobby. The Board of Agriculture recently published a leaflet showing how, even in a small way, poultry farming might be made a paying. concern, and if it is undertaken on. a large scale, the ex- penses are, of course, proportionately less. There is no reason in the world why we should depend, as we have done so largely in the past, upon for- eign countries for our egg supply. The present abnormal prices, which make fresh eggs a luxury, will not, it is hoped, endure for long, but with pre- sent prices for corn, even at 1/6 or 2/- a dozen, the production of eggs may yield satisfactory profits.

GOOD MANNERSi z I

GOOD MANNERS. i I I have. Men manners that make a similar impression with personal beauty, that give the like exhilaration, and refine us like that; and, in memorable experiences, they are suddenly better than beauty, and make that superfluous and ugly. But tlicy mU!ilt be marked by fine perception, the acquaint- ance with real beauty. They must always show eelf-oontrol: you shall not be facile, apologetic, or leaky, but king over your word; and every gesture and action shall indicate power at rest. Then they must be inspired by the good heart.-R. W. Emer- son. » REVERENCE FOR AGE. I ..Bow low the head, boy, do reverence to the old man, once like you; the vicissitudes of life have eilvered his hair, and changed the round, merry face to the worn visage before you;, once that manly formstaled promptly through the gay scenes of pleasure, the beau ideal of grace; now the hand of time thatwithera, the lfowers, of yesterday, has bent that figure and destroyed that noble carriage; once, at your age, he possessed the thousand thoughts that pass through your brain, now wishing to accomplish deeds equal to nook til fame. But he has lived the dream very nearly through; his eye never kindles at old deeds of daring, and the hand takes a firmer grasp of the staff. Bow low the head, boy, as you would in your old age be rever- t enced. .1 CHOICE. r Not what we live, but what we use, Not what we see* but whit we choose; These are the things that mar or bless The sum of human happiness. The thing near by, not that afar, Not. what we seem, but what we are; These are the things that make or break. That give the heart its joy or ache. Not what seems fair, but what is true; Not what we dream, but what we do; These are the things that shine like gomm6 Like stars in fortune's diadems. Not as we take, bilt as we give, Not as we pray, but as we live; These axe the things that make for puoe, Both now and after'time shall cease. 111 I GENIUS AND TALENT. I Rere is the distinction between genius and talent. Genius is that which is good for play, talent that which is good for work. The genius is an inspired man, a man whose action is liberty, whose creations' are their own and, and joy. Therefore we speak, not "Of the man's doing this or that, but of the man's genius as doing it; as if there were some second spirit attendant, yielding him thoughts, senses, imaginations, fires of emo- tion, that are above his measure—lifting him thus into exaltations of freedom and power that partake of a certain divine quality. Talent, on the other hand, we conceive to be of the man himself, a capa- city that is valuable as related to ends and uses, such as the acquisition of knowledge or money, to build, cultivate, teach, frame (olities, manage causes, fill magistracies. He who is much alone with his best self, will not long be under the sway of his lowei I' self. i