Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

E. R. PARRY, Ladies & Gent's Tailor, Hatter, Hosier and Outfitter, 19, CASTLE ST., I LLANGOLLEN. Spring Suitings and Ladies Costumes li all the Latest Styles. Ladies and Gent's RAINPROOF COATS By the Best Makers. ?re you making your Plans A b a New Suit or Costume f ALEX M. PHILLIPS, 12, BRIDGE STREET, LLANGOLLEN, is now showing the Latest and Best Goods for 1915. M, y aim is always to fit the Clothes to one's personality, as much as to the person, that is why my clients look different to others. Side lines of Merit: BURBERRY'S COATS. DUNN & Cals Famed HATS and CAPS. LADIES & GENT.'S RAINCOATS in all Best and Reliable Makes. COLLARS, TIES, HOSIERY, etc. Inspection Appreciated. ESTABLISHED 1880. MESSES. JONES & SON '1':1. .¡A'. f to 4.1 wcys J. JONRS-R. HUGH DODD), Agricultural & Genera! Auctioneers, Valuers & Estate Agents. Sales of all Descriptions Conducted, and Valuations tor Transfer, Mortgage or Probata made. j under the Lac* of Distress Amendment Aot iswpta to. fcni Alliance Assurance Life aud Fire Co., "Mid the Fotsb Tnsurane* Company, London. SALES OF LIVE STOCK — MONDAY at WBEXHAM SMITH FIELD. Every alternate FRIDAYS at ROSÐTT SMITH FIELD. The and Fourth TUESDAYS in oaoh month LLAN 90LLEN SMITHFIELP. Auctioneers' Offioes- Central Buildings, Llangollen, Tol. 53. Exchange Buildings, Wrexham, Tel. 88. (1401 LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELB (THE BEST AUCTION IN NORTH WALES). TUESDAY NÉXT, JUNE 8th, at 10 30. All Classes of Stock in great demand. Fat Cattle, Sheep and Lambs especially wanted. Highest Prices guaranteed. JONES & SON, Auctioneers. Wrexham Horse Repository. (Situate olose to the Railway Stations.) ESSRS. JONES & SON will hold their ill. next Sale of HEAVY & LIGHT HORSES On THURSDAY, JUNE 94th. Entries Invited. Highest Prioes, assured. Closing date for Catalogue, June 18th. 450 HORSES. Next Week. ————- THE NORTH WALES REPOSITORY, WREXHAM. FRANK LLOYD & SONS will Sell on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9th-200 Hunters, Harness Horses, Cobs and Ponies. THURSDAY, JUNE 10th—250 Powerful Mares and Geldings, Lurry, Van and Young Horses, uv. A genuine selection direct from the]Welsh Breeders. Sales at 12 each day. Catalogues upon application. (h802) Aliens Restriction (Amendment) Order, 13th April, 1915. REGISTRATION FORMS and REGISTERS For usa in Hotels, Inns, Lodging Houses, etc., etc Alien Registers, 3tf. each. Registration Forms, £ d. each, or 25 for 6i. NOW ON SALE AT HUGH JONES, Bookseller & Stationer, "Advertiser" Office.

NEW ISSUES I

NEW ISSUES. I June publications of the Religions Tract Society are sn unusually interesting parcel. The ,]Joys' Own Paper appears in a gorgeous wrapper, depicting Birds of Paradise, and is supplemented by a finely. coloured presentation plate related to the Waterloo Centenary, showing the advance of the whole line at that memorable victory. There is the usual amount of matter relating to the War and an article on German Airships, by Mortimer Butler, will be read with great interest.. The Boys' Own Hobbies'" page, and the Workers of the Red Cross," by Raymond Raife, showing how the wounded are looked after on the battlefield, are notable contributions. There are long instalments, of three serial stories, which include For England and the Right," a tale of the War in Belgium. The Girls Own Paper and Woman's Magazine is quite as up to date as usual. The cover design is a study of a kitten from a pastel by Persis Kiruise, and the decorative feature animal studies from photographs. There are long and interesting instalments of "Bathina" (by Temple Bailey) and The Independence of Claire" (by George Da Home Vaizey). The Editor's page is full of sound information, and there are many novel and inter- esting features. The Sunday at Home is unusually rich in well- informed and deeply in!eiesting articles illuminat- ing some aspect of the War and the people engaged in the titanic struggle, Notable among these we find-"With Our Fighting Men," by Chas. Linooln "The War in Limerick," by Canon F. Langbridge While London Sleeps," by Harry Cooper Serbia aod the Serbians," by W. LI. Williams; "A Night in a Military Hospital," etc. There is also a wealth of stories, pictures and other articles, all helping to make the June number of this favourite magazine an ideal budget of family reading. Great Western Railway Magazine.-The June number of this finely printed and excellently edited periodical is full of suggestions regarding war matters and news of the manner in which railway interests are affected by the great conflict. We are reminded that, approximately, twelve thousand members of the G.W.R. staff are now serving with His Majesty's Forces and the Toll of the War in casualties is brought up-to-date. Illustrations are given of Women Ticket Collectors at various stations on the line and there are capital portraits of G.W.R. Commissioned Officers. "Staff News" is a very interesting feature; and, amongst numerous other articles of interest, is one on "Swindon Works," by A. J. L. White.

Advertising

W. P. WILLIAMS, I Stone, Marble & Granite Monumental Works, ABBEY ROAD, LLANGOLLEN. TOMB RAILINGS, ETC. MONUMENTS, (feO., BHPADBBD, All Orders punctually attended to, and at ressonab.I charges. Designs and Photphs on aograpplioation.

REGISTRATION OF ALIENS I

REGISTRATION OF ALIENS. I THE authorities attach very great im- portance to the Registration of Aliens at Hotels and Lodging-Houses and those to whom the provisions of the recently adopted Order in Council apply at Llan- gollen would do well to bear constantly in mind the requirements of its pro- visions. These are clearly defined and can only be ignored if the party who takes lodgers beneath his or her roof is prepared to face the possibility of a fine of £ 100 or six months' imprisonment. It is the duty of every keeper or manager of any hotel, inn, boarding-house, lodging- house or apartments to ascertain and enter in a register kept for the purpose the names and nationality of all persons who are aliens, together with the dates of arrival and departure and such other particulars as are prescribed. A case was heard the other day in which a landlady said that she had the necessary forms but did not think it was needful to get one filled up for the one night two Americans stayed at her house, and omitted to do so. She was let off with a light fine, but this was only because the case was the first of the kind dealt with. However, very heavy penalties will be imposed in future. It is a well-known fact that alien enemies, sometimes with English or Scottish names, are moving about in Denbighshire and it is up to the lodging-house keepers to see that their movements are duly noted and to the police to see that, if they do not comply strictly with the letter of the law in this respect, they are promptly brought to book.

V CRUEL CUSTOM CONDEMNED AT COR WEN

"V CRUEL CUSTOM CONDEMNED AT COR WEN. WHEN experts disagree who is to decide ? This is a point of view that must have appealed to the Corwen Magistrates last week; and the decision they evidently came to was that common sense must be relied upon. A farmer was accused of cruelty to a sheep-dog by placing a ring through its nostrils and attaching to this a piece of wire the result, as stated, being to cause the dog unnecessary suffering. Mr. R. Platt, of Llangollen, who we all know as a capable authority upon Veter- inary Science, stated that the effect of so treating a dog's nose would be to cause it acute pain whilst his fellow-practitioner, Mr. Richards, of Corwen, failed to see where the cruelty came in, contending that, in time, the dog would adapt itself to the ring in its nostrils and, finding it pain- ful to worry sheep whilst it was there, would refrain from biting them. He also stated he could see little difference between ringing a dog and ringing a pig; and Mr. Platt, whilst condemning the former practice had nothing to say against the latter. He contended, however-and here is where common sense comes in-that, whilst a dog's nose is a highly sensitive organ and therefore much susceptible to pain, a pig's snout is, owing to its nerve- less composition, in another category altogether. What is torture to the one would scarcely be felt by the other. This was the view the Magistrates took; and it is to be hoped their decision will be followed by the speedy abandonment of the cruel custom wherever it is practised ♦

CERTIFICATES OF EFFICIENCY

CERTIFICATES OF EFFICIENCY. IT is impossible at the present juncture to centre attention locally upon matters affecting the education of the rising gener- ation or even very closely upon religious organization for the simple reason, as we have before stated, the finest work for education is being done and the best form of divine service rendered by our heroic troops on the plains of Flanders. Hence the recent conference to discuss matters pertaining to secondary education in Wales, recently held at Llandrindod Wells, at which Alderman W. G. Dodd. of Llangollen, was one of those repre- senting Denbighshire interests that, in ordinary times, would have caused quite a stir in Welsh educational circles, scarcely attracted any attention. The question of whether the junior certificate of the Central Welsh Board shall be abolished or retained is a matter of very little im- portance to-day as perhaps the experts who foregathered at Llandrindod might have realised if they had assembled, say at Louvain or Malines, where the possi- bilities of what may happen to our own educational system, unless every ounce of British strength is forthcoming to prevent it, are so strikingly illustrated. Would not all these wise people, Uni- versity Professors and the rest of them, have been much more patriotically occu- pied discussing how best to assist Mr. Lloyd George to increase the output of munitions of war, for shells" are to-day the finest possible- certificates of educa- tional efficiency ?

T TO AID DENBIGHSHIRE REORUITING

• T TO AID DENBIGHSHIRE REORUITING. I EXCELLENT results are anticipated from I the latest departure which the authorities I have decided upon which a view to r stimulating recruiting in Denbighshire. The County Council have agreed to devote Y,150 for the purpose of helping the Fourth Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers (Territorial Force) to obtain recruits; and, at a conference between officers of the Battalion and a Committee of the County Authority, it was decided to increase the fund to Y,500 by means of collections, this being the amount to cover the cost of route marching and billeting. We under- stand that a company one hundred strong will take part in the route marches and that it will be accompanied by a band, and Llangollen is one of the places that will be visited. The effort will be very generally welcomed, and all the more because it furnishes a clear indication that, in the opinion of those well able to know, the possibilities of voluntary en- listment, in the area to be covered, have by no means, as yet, been exhausted. It must be borne in mind that "the Fourth" have suffered terribly in recent heavy fighting and that, unless Denbighshire men come forward and come forward rapidly., it may be impossible to retain the corps as a separate unit at the front. The absortion of the Denbighshire Terri- torials by another force is a possibility that should ensure the success of the coming recruiting campaign. ♦

I THE MARCH TO LLANGOLLEN I

I THE MARCH TO LLANGOLLEN. THE route march should be all the more successful inasmuch as it will take place immediately after the publication of the detailed description of the stirring story of the part which the Royal Welsh Fusiliers took in the fighting at Festubert, on May 16th, which was released by the Censor a few days ago and permitted to be printed. This story has caused a thrill of pride throughout the Empire and should serve as a trumpet call to Denbighshire men to join the colours. We understand that, by order of Major A. E. Johnson, the march will commence on June 7th and, after visiting Marchwiel, the company will proceed, via Ruabon, to Cefn Mawr for the night. On Tuesday the route will be via Acrefair and Trevor, where one party will branch off and march through Garth and the other through Vron, both sections returning to Trevor for lunch; and from there they will come to Llangollen for the night. Information as to arrange- ments to be carried out in the town, or as to how the appeal will be made to men of military age will, in a few hours, be forthcoming; and it is to be hoped the troop will arrive before the farmers have dispersed after the fort- nightly fair, as the necessity for stimulat- ing recruiting in the rural districts is undoubted. On Wednesday the route will be to Glynceiriog where the company will halt for the night, and afterwards other parts of the county will be visited.

THE REGIMENTAL GOAT AT YPRES

THE REGIMENTAL GOAT AT YPRES. A CORRESPONDENT contributes some in- teresting particulars regarding the regi- mental Goat of the Welsh Fusiliers to a contemporary. He says that the custom of marching with a goat at the head of the regiment dates back for one hundred years, hence the regimental nicknames of The Nanny Goats and The Royal Goats." When the Welsh Fusiliers returned home from foreign service in 1834 the Colonel applied to King William IV. to be allowed to have the regimental goat officially recog- nised, a request which was readily granted. The origin" of the practice of having as mascot a regimental goat, with the regi- mental badge and shield and garlands on its norns ana lea at, tne neaa oIthe arums, is not known. Donkin, a military writer of the last century, says that at Boston, before the American War, a drummer-boy who was bestride the goat-a practice thereafter discontinued-was flung upon the mess table and killed by an undiscip- lined goat when marching round the table with the drums at the ceremony of dis- tributing the leeks on St. David's Night. When the Welsh Fusiliers went to the war they took their goat with them. In the fighting at Ypres the goat strayed out of the trenches to get a meal of fresh grass. The Germans were also in search of a good meal, and it was shot by them. That night the enemy (according to the story of a wounded soldier) made an attempt to cap- ture the dead goat for food. Twelve of them were shot for leaving their cover on such an errand, and eventually the body of Major was brought back to the British trenches and was buried with military honours. The goat was only two years old, and was brought from Malta. The King has since presented the regiment with a goat from Windsor Park.

IFREE CHURCHES AND THEI WATERING CART

I FREE CHURCHES AND THE I WATERING CART. IT is very difficult to understand, let alone appreciate, the point of view taken by members of the Denbigh Free Church Council. Last week we find they protested to the Town Council against the streets being watered on Sunday morn- ings, stating that they considered this form of labour detrimental to the morals of the town. What, in the, name of all that is remarkable, has the watering .of the streets to do with the morality of Denbigh ? How is it possible for any- one, outside the particular institution for which the ancient borough is notorious to imagine that it has, passes the bounds of sane comprehension ? In a very old book, with which presumably the Free Church Council have at anyrate a passing ac- quaintance, we find high authority for the statement that it is not evil to do good on the Sabbath; and who shall say how much may not be accomplished in the direction of preserving the health of scores of people-of far more value than dozens of oxen that fall into pits— by sending round the water-cart to lay the dust germs even on the Lord's Day. Why the man in charge of the cart is a peri- patetic physician and, when at duty, even on the Sabbath, by the work he performs, is acting, as fully as may be humanly possible, up to the highest precepts in- culcated in the Sermon on the Mount. This is how he is regarded at Llangollen, and it is good to know that the Denbigh Town Council will not discontinue the. watering operations. ♦

THE CALL FOR FURNISHED HOUSES

THE CALL FOR FURNISHED HOUSES. IN the course of their activities the Llan- gollen Advertising Committee have discovered what appears to be a decided local want; but, so far at anyrate, have not hit upon any means of supplying it. The hon. secretary of the Organisation is constantly receiving letters, from various parts of the country, from people who are contemplating visiting Llangollen and making a more or less protracted stay in the locality, for a list of furnished houses available, or for the addresses of parties who desire to find tenants for their residences during the Summer months. Obviously it is outside the scope of the- Association's enterprise to prepare any list of the kind suggested; but they indicate, as a possible means of meeting the admitted want, that furnished houses to let, or apartments owners desire to bring under the notice of intending visitors, should be inserted in our adver- tising columns, and to all parties who apply to the Committee for information of the kind indicated a copy of the Llangollen Advertiser will be posted. It is, therefore, up to" those who desire to obtain visitors to make full use of the official means thus brought within their reach. We have only to add that our advertising rates should prove no bar in the way of their doing so.

I LOCAL DISTRICT NEWS

I LOCAL & DISTRICT NEWS. Mr. G. Edwards, of Pentre Ucha, Llantysilio, left, estate valued for probate at £ 983. Congest,ulations to Mr. W. Clair. the* veteran North Wales C«alowaer, on the attainment of his, eighty-eighth birthday to-day. Mr. Craig resides with hia on, Mr. Donald Crsig, at The Court, Wrexham. The Railway Executive, replyir g to an appeal for the restoration of week-end tickets to heahh resorts, states that if these facilities are granted to any particular districts all will demand them, siadin view of the difficulties at present the Executive regrets, that it caunot restore cheap travelling facilities. At Wrexham County Sessions, on Tuesday, Ben jamin Yearsley, Cae LJeweJyn, Vron, was summoned.—A sample of milk purchased by In- spector Price from defendant's wife was found to contain 5.8 grains of sediment per galloi., of which more than half wascow dung.: Defendant said he did not carry milk out but he sold it to customers who came to the house. He only sold about a quart a clajl. On the morning in question he had to get up earlier than usual to milk the, cow because his wife had met with an accident.—Fined 25s., plus the ad- vooate's and analyst's fees. At the Ruabon Police Court, on Friday, before Messrs. R. R. Jones and C. Morgan, Thom as Richard Williams, Tanlan, Ruabon, was charged with stea 1- ing a tilver watch, value 15s., the property of the re- presentatives of Caroline Griffith.-Mary Ann Piles said the watch belonged to her mother who died on May llch.—Defendant lodged at the house.—Robt. Gracie, pawnbroker, Rhos, said defendant offered the watch in pledge on May 20th, but as he failed to give a satisfactory account of it, witness informed the police. P.S. Fox said he arrested defendant on warrant and charged him with the theft. Defendant said he found the watch on the floor in the house and he kept it for safety. He intended to return it to the owner but she died.—Fined j61, or one month.

an Memoriam

an Memoriam. THE LATE MB. DAVID ROBERTS. The remains of the late Mr. David Roberts whose death took place, after a lingering illa see, on May 25th, were interred in St. Joku's Cemetery, on Thursday last. The deceased was a very old inhabitant of Llangollen and, many years ago was- well-known as a gardener in the locality, living at Tregwern, where Mra. Roberts, who pre-deceased him, carried on a laundry business, that has long since been closed. The deceased had three children —a son, who died some years back, and two daugh- ters, one of whom is Mrs. John Worthington (wife of Inspector John Worthington, now of Abergele, and recently of Llangollen), and the other Mrs. David Hughes, of Glynceiriog. The Rev. D. R. Davies(curate) officiated at the interment in St. John, Churchyard, Inspector and Mrs. Worthington, (Abergele), Mr. and Mrs. David Hughes (Glyn- ceiriog) and Mr. Evan Roberts (Denbigh) brother of the deceased, being the chief mourners. The funeral arrangements were in the hands of Messrs. John Roberts and Sons, Market and George-streets, Llangollen.

Advertising

PAPER SERVIETTES, Id. and 6d. per pkt p Dish and Dessert Covers, Id., 2&, Md 6d. per pkt.; Pie Dish Frills, ld. each; Ham Frills, Id. per Outlet Frills, 6d. per pkt.; Tinted Embossed Laoe Shelf Papers, Id. per IJàt., at HUGS JOIUISlir Advertiser" Office,