Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE HONOURS LIST I

THE HONOURS LIST, I In addition to those recorded in last week's :cc Advertil er," the King has been pleased to approve of the following rewards for distin- guished services in the field :— TO BE MAJOR-GENERAL. I Birch, Lieut.-Colonel and Bt. Col. (temp. Major-Gen.) J. F. N., C.B., A.D. C., Royal Artillery. Son of the late Major R. F. Birch of Maes Elwy, St. Asaph, and a. brother of Mr. R. E. Birch of Bryncelvn, St. Asaph, who, with his wife, figures so creditably in the findings of the recent military inquiry. TO BE BREVET MAJOR IN RES. OF OFFICERS. Green Wilkinson, Major and Bt.-Lieut.-Col. (temp. Brig.-Gen.) L. F., Res. of Officers, late Rifle Brigade. •General Green-Wilkinson is mentioned above in despatches. MILITARY CROSS. Cooke, Sec.-Lieut. Wilfrid Edward, Royal Field Artillery. Son of Dr. Cooke, Town Hall, Shrews- bury. Three times wounded, the last occa- sion being on July 16. Hill, Ca.pt. the Rev. Eustace St. Clair, South African Chaplain's Department. From 1896 to 1898, Mr. Hill, who was curate of St. Mark's, Wrexham, also played a clistinguished part in the South African war. At the battle of Belmont, he went with the Northamptons while they stormed the kopj e. Amid the hail of bullets a man beside him was shot down; in fact, a' score fell dead or wounded at tke same momerit. The padre," as all the Tommies call the chaplain, took out his prayer book, and, standing where no other dared show himself administered the last Sacrament. An cfficer cried, "Lie down, you have no business to risk your-life in that way." Mr. Hill's re- ply was, "This is my place, and I am doing my special business." Williams, Temp. Captain David Llewelyn, R.A.M.C. Dr. Williams is mentioned above in de- spatches. MILITARY MEDAL. Deries, Pte. Owen H., Canadian R.A.M.C. Son of Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Bryneglwys, Welshpool, Pte. Davies is thus honoured for: his gallant condrci- in his attention to woujided under heavy shell fire. Before joining the army, Pte. Davies u$as an cleo- I trician on the Canadian Pacific Railway, His brother, Sergt. W. Trevor Davies, who is serving with the same contingent, was, formerly teams' organiser and lecturer for the St. John Ambulance Brigade on the; same railway. There are three other brothers serving, one of whom was,seriously wounded at the Dardanelles. Lewis, Corpl. Harold N., King's Liverpool Regiment. Corpl. Lewis is the only son of the late Mr. W. H. Lewis, Oswald-road, Oswestry, and of Mrs. Lewis. Bronderw, Helsby, and a. nephew of Mr. E. D. Nicholson, Porthy- waen, and Miss L. A. Nicholson, headmis- j tress of the Infants' Council School, Oswes- try. He joined the K.L.R. on the outbreak of war and has been twice wounded. j .White, Sergt. Robert, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. I Sergt. White, whose home is at Firwood, j Welshpool, where his wife resides, receives the decoration for conspicuous gallantry on November 13. Wounded early in the morn- ing, he continued fighting until 4 p.m., when j he was again wounded by a shell. He re- l cejved in all seven. wounds. He is now In; hospital at Norwich, and is inaking good! progress. Corpl. H. G. Bushnell, Corpl. H. W. Chap-! lin, Pte. T. Clarke, Pte. T. Johnson, Pte. J. j Pooler, Corpl. G. R. Protheroe, Pte. D. P. Ratcliffe, and Pte. S. Robinson, Royal Welsh I Fusiliers. i I Pte. E. C. Jenks and L.-Corpl. L. Teal, King's Shropshire Light Infantry, the latter receiving a bar to the Military Cross awarded j him on June 3. ) A SERBIAN DECORATION. I Lieut. Reginald W. Dowell Lee, Dorsetshire I Regiment, who was wounded in Serbia and I was mentioned in despatches, has been i awarded the Serbian decoration of the White I Eagle for gallantry and devotion to duty dur- I ing the fighting on the Struma. Lieut. Lee is i the eldest son of the Rev. Dr. Dowell Lee, of j Deytheur School, near Oswestry, whose second son, Liout. Audley A. Dowell Lee, Leicester- shire Regiment, was awarded the Military Cross in the recent New Year honours for gal- i lantry on the Somme, as announced in last I' week's" Advertizer." L.-Corpl. John Dutton, A.S.C., of Spring- field Farm, Marford, has also been honoured by the King of Serbia, being awarded a silver medal for devotion to duty in the field. I

a The Weston Rhyn Shooting Case

a The Weston Rhyn Shooting Case. At the Shrewsbury County Police, on Tues- day, before Mr. Thomas Cooper, Lance-Corpl. Wm John Thomas, 1st Monmouthshire Regi- ment, stationed at Park Hall Camp, was j brought up in custody charged with attempt- ing to murder Sarah Ellen Tomkins by shoot- ing her with a revolver, at Weston Rhyn, on December 16.. P.S. Jones, Morda, said accused had been remanded several times, but the doctor now considered that Mrs. Tomkins would be able to attend the Oswestry Police Court on Tues- day next. He, therefore, asked for a further ¡ remand.—Accused was remanded accordingly until Tuesday at 11.30. I

From Mexico to Bettisfield I

From Mexico to Bettisfield. I At Overton Sessions, on Saturday, Archi- bald William Webb, one of the Y.M.C.A. workers at Bettisfield Camp, was charged with not reporting himself for military service. I Defendant said he came from Mexico to work for the Y.M.C.A. and was sent to Bettisfield. J The Bench held that he was not ordinarily I resident in the United Kingdom, and was not ¡' therefore liable to military service. They therefore declined to make an order, hand- j ing him over'to the military authorities.

No title

Commander Noel Laurence, who has just received a bar to the' D.S.O., was presented! on Saturday l'ith the honorary freedom of-I Maidstone. [

BY THE WAYI

BY THE WAY. I On Having to be Funny, I Our village Mutual Improvement Society, having fou: some difficulty in filling its new season's programme, owing to so many of our local celebrities being at the front, .J fall.m back upon asking me to open a discussion on "Newspapers," "into which," the secretary naively euggests, I shall "be expected to in- troduce some of my character] humour." "Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking," such a venture would in any cas., UJ om; thing of an ordeal, but when, to the task of soberly discussing "Newspapers," is to be added the experience of knowing that J. am "expected to be humorous" I flee from in horror. For, valuable as a k sense of I humour undoubtedly is in the equipm "it of a journalist, nothing is more calculated to quench the flow of merry thought than thn obligation of "having to be funny." Nor, indeed, -is the possession of a, sense of humour necessarily the bs-st qualification for creating mirtb in othars. I dare say (says Mr. Edw;R J. ugh), that Dickens has caused as much mirth as any other author, and yet his sense of humour was curiously defective. It seems to have played scarcely any part in his private life. Certainly, it did not save lii- fr,. taking I himself far too seriously at times, or from occasionally making himself rather absurd, as a fuller sense of üumour would. He Lad ex- uberant a,nimal spirits, and that fondness of practical joking and buffoonery which one usually associates with that least humorous of young animals, the schoolboy; but he had not as Thackeray had, that faculty of self- eriticism and seif-restraint, and that IHtM- sad, half-whimsical attitude tc !ar Li1 life-in- the-large which betokens a richer ancl pro- founded sense of humour, and which is, in- I deed, more rarely found in the profession-tl | fu??ny man than the man of the world. 1 '1 1 The professional funny man, in fact, though he may be a huge success in the drawing "ooni i or on ti.e" satge (where lime-light grease paint render their adventitious aid) is gener- ally a dismal failure in the Press. At any rate, my experience is that those journalises | who share the unenviable lot of Jac\ Poyncz of being "paid to be funny" aue the most dis- mal and dolorous of mankind. You remem- her, perhaps, that there is noth.u-i; more mel- ancholy in the reflections of Charles Lamb than when, looking back on his youth, he tells us how even >' in those days every Morning Paper, as en essential retainer to its establishment, kept, an author who was bound to furnish daily a. quantum of witty paragraphs. Sixpence a joke, and it was thought greatly high too I —was Dan Stuart's (o' the "Morning Post") settled remuneration in these c;v :s. The chat of the day, scandal, but, above alt, dress, furnished ?the material. The length of no paragraph was to exceed seven lin(':¡.1 Shorter they might be, but they must be ¡ poignant. I I believs the rate of remuneration lie, man since then, but the labour of compulsory I humour is. no less "slavery" than tha-t condi- tion of mental making of bricks without straw, or at all events with only --ie thinnest wisps, ¡ under which poor Lamb served his a;entiee- ¡ ship to Letters. A friend of mine who still: includes among other duties, as a member of ] the staff of a 'Ili-eai daily journal published in j tha North of England, the provision of half-a- dozen jests in a day," tells me that there is no part of his work which gives b:, greater I trouble, or leaves him, when acnmplish51, with severer headaches! A second writer, who still more rashly essayed to furnish ,n- other morning newspaper with a whole column of facetiousness per diem, abandoned the ¡ task after a short trial, but not e had taken to drink, either as an inspiration or a consequence; while even the weekly purvevor of humour has been known to "wear thin" in the course of time. Dr. Oliver Wenckll Holmes, it is true, proudly declared "I never diire to write As funny as I can." which makes us wonder what'he 1 ave I done 'in the unrestrained atmosphere of the Press; but then. after all, the Doctor was not a journalist, but a Poet, and poets, as we know, need only write when the mood ;,S on tfcem, and under those elastic conditions we might all think of some witty paragraphs oc- casionally. The newspaper man who has to be funny, has to be funny every day. He has to be funny when it rains. He to be funny •when the landlord writes for the rent, wb.:r:h is overdue. He has to be funny when his wife wants a new fur coat, which she assures him is "cheap at seventy guineas." He has to be as funny on the day on which he has the tooth- ache as on that on which he tear that his uncle has left him £ 1.000. And, as he gropes about for new material on which to sharpen his wit, he is ever painfully conscious that subject ^matter for professional humour- mal-lcc is daily becoming more rare. La.ab (if I may return for a moment to ou. mutfoT.), tells how. at one time, he made ? temp r- arv success with delicate references to a new fashion in pink "hose, but the mode was tran- sient and easily worked bare, and the ankles of our fair friends m a few weeks bearnn to reassume their whiteness, and eft us scarce a leg to stand upon. And so it is to-day. Objects of ridicule pess out ef,olir reach, sometimes wit. Hlt cause for regret. Time was, for instance, when ny professional funny man could raise a gi.ig,le at tihe expense of the drunkard.. There are still theatrical comedians who cling paths'jic- ally to the paraphernalia of the red nose and the hie cough, but their efforts (UnIL: excep- tionally artistic) are more apt o 1TLke us yawn than to laugh. And, as for the Press, as an eminent journafist, has recently reminded us, "Phil May was the last of a long line of artists who'depicted the humours of drink in 'Pun Vh,' Drink is no longer a laughing matter; it has became a problem." P bably we have ost no real humour in this particular change of popular attitude, ..)ut I am not quite isure whether, otherwise, in these strenuous days we are not in some danger 

HUNTING

HUNTING. SIR W. W. WYNNS HOUNDS. ACCIDENTS. Hounds again resumed operations after the first at Horsley on Friday week, when there were out Lady Palmer, Mr. Rooper, Mr. Fen- wick, Miss Owen Phillips and Mr. Goswell. The Horsley covers were tenantless; but a fox was found in a cover near Borras, which ran I vrey fast by may of Vicarage Gorse to Acton, where hounds killed. Ben Griffin cover prov- j mg blank, hounds were taken to Llwyn- ottea, where a sprightly fox romped out, and, dashing through Rhosnessney bolted down a drain at the Wrexham slaughter houses. At Hanmer, on Saturday week, the Hanmer Hall covers failed to supply, and hounds were taken to Llanbedr, where finding they raced their fox to ground at Bronington. A Grape "tvood fox at Gredington ran to earth in the Big Wood. There was a nice meet at Barton on Mon- day week, when there were out Lord and Lady Kenyon, Lady Palmer, the Marquis of Chol- mondeley, Mrs. Barbour, Miss Owen Philipps, Dr. Parker, the Rev. J. C. Austin, Mr. John Jones, Mr. Dyke Dennis. Mr; GoswelI and Mr. Thelwll. Finding in Garden Cliff, hounds ran their fox hard through the Hooks, thence right past Hares Wood to Tilston and, leav- ing Low Cross on the right, made Edge his point, where he hoodwinked hounds. Resum- ing, hounds got to work with a fox from Glut- ton, which ran smartly to Hollowell, where, turning sharp right-handed near the railway and leaving Broxton station on the left, he sped to Garden, and in close proximity to the Cliff got to earth. Tom Iron, Mrs. Leech's Gorce, and Crewe cover were drawn blank. At Erddig, on January 2nd, there were out Miss Williams Wynn, Miss Stevens, Lady Palmer, Mr. Rooper, Mr. Ernest Peel, Mr". and Miss Fitzhugh, Mr. Dyke Dennis, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Rose and M*. F. Cotton. Finding in the covers near the hall, hounds hustled their fox through the pleasure ground and the covers until it grounded, the game proceedings being repeated with a fox found at Marchwiel Hall cover. But a different sort of a customer was the one ousted from Randies Gorse, for no sooner was he set going than he took himself at a fine speed across Mr. Peate's farm and upon reaching the Dee boldly grossed it and disappeared in Gwernhaylod Wood at his own leisure, for Morgan stopped hounds from crossing the river. On Thursday hounds were at Hinton, when a good field included Lady Ursula and Lady Mary Grosvenor, Lady Creighton's son and daughter, Colonel Bulkeley, Mr. J. Jones, Mossfields, Capt. Lambert, Mr. C. H. B. Pool@, Mr. Wigland, Miss Wilson MacQueen, j Mr. and Miss Vernon, and the Rector of Whitchurch. Finding at Hinton, hounds pur- sued their fox to Marbury thence sharp right- handed and again threading Peel's Gorse forced the fugitive' in the .direction of Osmere. Away the chase next led past Marbury Hall and Quorseley, then over the canal leaving the Stock cover on the right, away to Chol- mondeley, where hounds lost after a very good hunt of 65 minutes. ^.sh Wood then met the requirements, and this fox took his pursuers over Ash Wood farm, leaving Stokes Wood on the left, as far as Sliavington Park Walls. The course then lead through the Brickyard, when the fugitive executed a sharp right-handed swerve, and, running in iine style past Cloverley Gorse and through the Belt with the Square Wood on his right, he took his pursuers through the Long wood at Ash, and soon thBy were passing Oak Cottage, the home of Colonel Rivers Bulkeley. The J fox still forged ahead, and by We time Com- j bermere was reached hounds had to acknow- i ledge defeat after a really nice hunt. A good company welcomed hounds at Broughton Hall on Saturday, which included Miss Williams Wynn, Miss Stevens, Lord -and TorIu Tfonvrm T.arhr Pn l moT If, Tnh, i .i-.IU\A. "Jio.¡'J.vJ.J,i'1.J .L _J.JJ.I-, .I.I.J.. VV;"J.L.l-J. Miss Hoard, Mrs. and Master Fitzhugh, Capt. Victor Hermon, Mr. Dyke Dennis, Mr. Patrick Dennis, Mr. Frank Cotton, Mr. and Mrs. Rose, Mr. Rooper, Major the Hon. H. Gore,- Mr. John Jones, Mrs. and Miss Wilson MacQueen, Mrs. and Miss Dawson, Mr. Rd. Weaver, Mr. J. Weaver, Master Weaver, Mr. I and Master Noel Mnrless, Master Piggott, Master Huxley, Mr. G. Thelwell, and Mr. G. I Goswell. A fox found in the Oak Walk at Broughton ran oat through the Caenant up to IVIulsford Hall, and thencS swerving round sharply ran back to the Caenant, where he was beaten. Hounds were then taken to Broughton Gorse, where they came across a badger, which was soon downed. After ex- ploiting Castletown and Grafton unsuccess- fully, hounds found the needful in Larges, and a good chase ensued to Chorlton, then away through the Gorse and on to Clutton. Edge was soon passed and so, too, were Mill Wood and Low Cross; but by the time Fens- dale was reached the fox was a missing quan- tity. At a meet not so long ago Miss Cotton, the only daughter of Mr. Frank Cotton, Penley Hail, was thrown when taking a fence, near the railway bridge on the Whitcburch road, a mile from Bangor, and broke IKM- leg. Miss Cotton is considered to be one of the finest horsewomen in the county, and everyone will be pleased to hear she is going on as well as possible. Following the meet at Erddig on January 2nd, Mr. Roger Fenwick, the younger son of Mrs. Fenwick, Plas Fron, and a student at Sandhurst Military College, was thrown from his horse when taking a fence at Rafidles' Gorse and broke his wrist.

Hum ting Jlpp ointments I

Hum ting Jlpp ointments. I SA W, W WYNN\S JIOC.NDS Wl. mot*, Friday, JanueCry 12 (Plann-0-9) Cancelled. Saturday, January IS Bangor. -lionday, January 15 Maesfen Wednesday, January 17 Hardwiek. Friday, January 19 Flannog. ait 10.45. TANAT SIDE HARRIERS. will meet Saturday, January 13 LIanymyB?ch (11.30) I Tuesday, J?&ry M Tref?nen (ii.W,i

CAMP NOTES 4

CAMP NOTES. 4.. BETTISFIELD PARK. Owing to the small number of men in Camp at Christmas time some of the festivities, etc., arranged by the officers and the Christmas concert planned by the Y.M.C.A. were post- poned until the New Year, when a good pro*, gramme was got together by Gr. Meredith., Sergt. Harris presided over a crowded audii ence. The Inter-Battery Le.ague was brought to a conclusion on Wednesday, D Battery winning, B Battery taking second place with a slightly- inferior goal average. The results of Wed- nesday's games are, B Battery 8, C Battery 0 { Signallers 4, D Battery 1; 53rd D.A.C. 3, Artificers 0. Another interesting Rugby game was played at Bettisfield on Saturday between the Gun- ners and the Welsh Field Ambulance from Park Hall. A one-sided game ended in a vie- tory for the Ambulance men of 2 goals 5 tries to nil. IPARK HALL. The Catholic Hut Council propose to erect a recreation hut in the Camp on a piece of ground near the Anti-Gas School (which was formerly the R.C. hut). It will be under the direction of the Catholic Women's League. The R.A.M.C. Rugby xi. (who are as yet unbeaten) are open to play any Rugby side chosen from the Park Hall Camp on a sports ground at Oswestry, on a date that can be arranged almost immediately, the proceeds to be handed over to the Military- Hospital, Gobowen. Address, Secretary, Welsh Field Ambulances, North I., Park Hall Camp, Oswestry. r The following are the results of Saturday's league matches: Liverpool Scottish 19, v. King's Own Royal LaB-casters 0; Welsh R.A.M.C. 3, v. Herefords 2; Monmouths 6, v. 5th King's Liverpool 2; Loyal North Lanes. 6, v. Cheshire 0. The Mons. had their first taste of victory in league football this season, and the Hereford team, which is at the bottom of the League table, also played a better game on Saturday. There is a possibility that the Scottish team may not be here to play another match, and if so Saturday's triumph is a fitting close to their glorious football career in this Camp. "IE- The 7th King's received a visit from the now famous team of the 4th Royal Welsh Fusiliers on Saturday, and though they could hardly hope to snatch a couple of points from such doughty opponents, yet they stepped up to the playing arena with every hope of making the boys from Wales go the full ninety minutes, and, if possible, to steal at least one point and thereby enhance their position in the league chart. In this, as events subsequently proved,, they were disappointed, for the Fusiliers won, and with a very comfortable margin to sparli —15 goals to nil. The Welsh are looking for- ward to further increasing their remarkable goal average when they meet the Herefords at home, next Saturday. tl- The "Cheshire Cats" scored another huge success on Friday evening, when they gave an. entertainment at the Hereford Regimental In- stitute to a crowded audience, who heartily appreciated the various items. On Sunday evening "The Cheshire Cats" will perform at the Garrison Theatre. # A dinner was held at the Regimental Insti- tute by the Cheshire Corporals on Wednesday. After dinner, a musical programme was con- tributed by several of the company. R.S.M. Whiteley presided, and the officers present were Mujor Musgrave, Capt. Snape, Capt. Dickson and Lieut. Smith. DRUM-MAJOR. ,o-+-

NATURE NOTES

[ NATURE NOTES. RAINFALL AT PENTME BriGUGHTOiM. Rainfall at Pentre Broughton Boys' Scheel fair December, 1916:—.3 .16; 4 .01; 6 .03^ 7 .35: S .12; 9 .01; 11 12.02; 13 .01; 14.01; 17.01; 18,10; 20 I I(i: 21 .05; 2i 23 .23; 24 .08; 27 .03; 28 .10; 38 SO .02; 31 .03; Total 1.93 inches. D. E. REEí. I I I RAINFALL AT OVERTON. i I?ainteli a,t Fa'xteigib, Overton, for December, 18111 i 3 .08; G .02; 7 .37; S .10; 9 .05; 10 .09; 11 .04; 13.02. | 18 .27; 20 iOS; 21 .07; 22 .10; 23 .17; 24 .08; 27 .01; 28 .08; 29 .15; 30 .01; 31 .01; Total 1.80 inches on 19 days. Tot-al for 1916, 24.21 inches on 178 days. Dec.. 1915, 5.80 inches; total for 1915 30.18 inches on 172 daya. Averaae for yearns 1904—1915, 20.78 inches. B. J. E. WEIGHT.  i RAINFALL AT RHIWLAS The rainfall recorded at BMwlas, School dwdng [December was as follows :-4 .06; 7 .Bi; 8 .!S; 10 .24; j 12 .Q3; 13 .01; 14 .01; 15 .01; 21 .42; 22 .07 24 .38; i 29 .42; 31 .17; Total 2.13; coTrp&pQTi.riing month itt i 1915, 7.38. Rainfall for the year, S7.40; for 1915 1 40.76; 1914, 43.07; 1913, 43.62; 1912, 40.70. I J. G. JONES. I

a IGLYN CEIRIOG

-a GLYN CEIRIOG. OBITUARY-The funeTal tcok place on Tueadar It Mr. Edward Hughes, whose (kath, after fl 3hc.1t, ;Jg„ n,e-s, occurred the previous Saturday. Asrtd had lived his whole life in t'he ncigbbourrwod sr'd for the last 33 ye-ars had farm-ed at Maesyifvr.on. The officiating ministers at the house were the He" J. E. Jones and J. T.ones, "Rhoisdd'U. at Scar Chanel, of which he was a deacon, by the Rev. 'J. E Jones, pastor, R? B. Jones, J. T. Jones, and W. R..?f,p? and at the grave by the Vicar, the Rev..D. It. Evan*. The bearers were Messrs. T. Roberts, N. Tones. J G. Jones, and" W. Griffiths, and the mowrnsrs rdefl the widow, Messrs. D., J., T., and R. Hughes (sons), Mrs Jones Ge-fu lTcha and Miss M. Hughes (dauglh. tars); Mr. and Mrs. Davies, MeMon Bouse; Mr. aag Mrs. Williams, Garth. Trevor; Mr. and Mrs. Evaag Blaen Bache; and Mr. and Mrs. Tfiomas, TyiiygTOto (daughters and 'so--nF-in.law) Mrs. Hughes, Peny. bryn (daughter-in-law); Mrs. Edwards, Llmgoilens Mrs. Bugtoeis, Cefn; Mrs. M. Morris, Garth: Messrs. J. Hughes. Garth; W. Heywood, Oefn; and E. Davie.. Cefn (nephew-s and nieces); Mabel Williams, Gertie Davies* Maggie and Nancy Jones, Harry Jones X. W. Williams, Lily Evans.- Grade Hughes, and Trevoy Lloyd Hughes (grand-child:en). Much sympathy Is felt for the family who within a month .havo lost father and two brothers. Mr. Edward Hughes, jun:s- aaed 43, was buried on the previous Saturday, and another son-Dan,iel. aged 40, was buried a mODm. ago.—The funeral of Mr Thomas Jones, of Penjrgraig. also took place the same day. Mr. Jones was q and was the eldest brother of Mrs. Wynn, graigj