Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE BROKEN WELSH WARRIOR

THE BROKEN WELSH WARRIOR, NORTH WALES JOINT COMMITTEE. A meeting of the Joint Committee of the I North Wales War Pensions Committees was held at Chester on Saturday to draft a scheme for the grouping of the six counties of North Wales for the purpose of providing for the treatment and training of disabled sailors and soldiers. Mr. D. S. Davies presided. A letter was received from Sir Ivor Herbert, stating that the Minister of Pensions intended to hold a conference at Shrewsbury to dis- eusa the question of a national organisation for Wales. The MontgomeryshireLocal Committee, who were represented by Mr. A. W. Williams Wynn,, Mr. J. E. Tomley and Mr. T. R. Bridgewater, intimated that they were not empowered to take part in the pre- paration of a scheme that did not treat the whole of Wales as a unit. A letter was received from Mr. Cyril Jack- son of the War Pensions Stautory Commit- tee, London, dealing with the question of a scheme for North Wales. Mr. Jackson wrote The idea of the Statutory Committee has been that localities were better able to pre- pare schemes with their own knowledge of their own districts than any central body. We have at present only one scheme sent in by any of the new joint committees, for cer- tain counties in the south-west of England, Glouce.st.er-s hire .tc. It is not, however, in any sense » model scheme, and has not been approved by the Committee at present owing to certain parts of it needing further con- sideration. On looking at the population for i,bi- six counties in the North Wales area, I see that of the adult working population 35 per cent. are engaged in agriculture and 20 per cent. in the mines and quarries. Pro- bably all those engaeed in the latter industry will desire to return, and I am not aware as to whether any training is possible for men disabled, for their former occupations in that industry. It is no doubt a matter on which employers and the miners' representatives would give advice. With regard to agricul- ture, we notified to all local committees in Circular No. 17 that Holmes Chapel Train- ing College, Cheshire, and the Madryn Castle Farm School, Carnarvonshire, had agreed to take in men for training. Holmes Chapel has since been closed and students trans- ferred to another training college. I am not aware if the Carnarvonshire scheme was car- ried out. But it would appear that seeing the very large numbers of men engaed in agriculture in North Wales some form of agricultural training, either in a farm insti- tute or in actual farms, carefully selected, where real training could be given, should be worked out by your committee. Doubtless the proposals of the Welsh Town Planning and Housing Trust are well known to you, and will be considered by. your committee. irou could then see how far in your opinion these proposals wou d meet your needs in North Wales, The Statutory Committee have always sugested that it is necessary that town and country should unite, so that townsmen who need country work owing to various dis- abilities which necessitated their giving up previous employment in town, might be trained for country pursuits, or the country men who need any technical education should nave the ad.vantage of any facilities offered hi the towns. I think your Committee has doubtless communicated with the technical inspectors of the Education Department in Wales, With reference to the industries in w hich training could be given, you will doubt- less collider the openings available in the different parts of the area. For examp'e, in 'and about Wrexham it appears from the ei-nsua there axe a few hundred. men employed in the skin and leather industry and a rather larger number in iron Id steel. In both these industries there may be an opening for training selected men, and of course the employers and trade unions should, be con- salted. There are also, doubtless, openings in Wrexham and Colwyn Bay for a few men to he trained for commercial pursuits. In Flint there seem to be a certain number of men employed in tool making and alkali j works as well as a small textile population. The various trades which it is suggested dis- abled men could enter upon are being worked out by the Labour Ministry, and we are send- ing you out the first of a series of papers on tliese trades. The disabled man can under- j take light processes of machinery, and, in the country, many of them may be in a posi- tion, if they are trained, to understand the j mechanism and working of machines, and. there will doubtless be a development after the war in the use of agricultural machinery. L r-egret that I cannot give you a model i seheme, because such a scheme does not exist. I hope your Committee will be able to collect information as. to the number of men requir- ing training in the area and the trades for which they desire to be trained. When the ioeal committees are able to say that there is a demand for- training in certain directions and yowr -Committee are satisfied that after training the men would be able to secure employment there is little doubt but that the ) Stautory Committee would agree to any | i£.hme "you put forward. There are various ] minor industries in which it is conceivable < some men -might be trained and find. useful employment. For example, boot repairing is required iu many villages and small towns, but there 16 a great danger that unless there are definite openings known the supply of boot repairers may be greater than the de- i mand. The special trade advisory commit- 'tee is being established to consider this in- dustry. In the Vale of Clwyd there is a toy j Industry, which the Statutory Committee has already approved. It is one in which a few selected disabled men might well be employed, but it could not be considered as taking any large number, and the aim of the Committee will doubtless be to fit men for such indus- tries as are likely to show the largest indus- trial developments and the greatest number of opportunities after the war." Upon consideration of the matter, the Joint Committee decided to pass a resolution wel- coming the proposal of the Minister of Pen- sions to hold a conference at Shrewsbury to discuss the question of a national organisation for Wales, and recommending each local com- mittee to send delegates to the conference. A draft scheme for North Wales prepared by Mr. Ll. Hugh Jones of Wrexham was then considered, and it was decided to sub- mit it to each of the coonty committees for approval.

MILITARY BOXING AT OSWESTKY i

] MILITARY BOXING AT OSWESTKY. I Four good bouts filled the programme at the Drill Hall, Oswestry, on Friday evening,! i all the contests being refereed by CorpJ. J. B. Tolley. At the top of the bill was a iifteen rounder between Mick Gordon, St. Helens, j well known as the fighting collier who, having I participated in over 200 fights against some j of the best men in the country, can claim that he has never been knocked, out, and Bom- i badier Yeomans, Royal Field Artillery, who, since fighting Walsham in this hall, has gone to close decisions with Arthur Tracey and Johnny Koran. Gordon was much too good for the soldier, and compelled his retirement i at the c'ose of the tenth round. An interesting contest was that in which; Pte. Johnson, R.W.F., figured with Corpl. Tommy Wright, King's Own Royal Lancaster f Regiment. The pair were well matched.. Johnson led pretty well all the way to the sixth session. He blacked Wright's eye in the opening round. Wright, nevertheless, fought on with dogged determination, his per- severance eventually getting its merited re- j ward, for although Johnson continued to score with his left leads up to the close of the fourth round he unwisely discontinued using his left, relying mainly on his right. This change of tactics led, to his undoing, for Wright, game to the core, man- I aged to return blow for blow, and at the same time to surprise the Fusilier by his powers of recuoeration. Scarcely had the sixth round started than Wright, after accepting a swing from Johnson's right, slashed in with two severe jolts to the chin which so discom- fited the Welshman that, amid the plaudits of the a,udience, and much to the surprise of Wright himself, he signalled to the referee his withdrawal from the contest, Wright being proclaimed the victor amid loud cheering. Pte. Ashe, King's Liverpool Regiment, and Corpl. Clarke, Liverpool Scottish, embarked on a ten rounder. The latter was much the better of the two, and, in the sixth round sent Ashe to the boards with a right upper cut to the chin. He was counted out, and Clarke was returned the winner, j In taking on Fighting Dai Lewis, of the Welsh Field Ambulance, Pte. Tiger Davies, South Lanes., found himself up against some- thing as impossible to shift a.s a haystack. It was scarcely a fair match, and Lewis, who was much the heavier, experienced no diffi- culty, in sending Davies down for the full count with a left hatf-arm jab to the chin. In our report last week we inadvertently named Arthur- Gee, Warrington, as the win- ner of the contest with Pte. Bridge, of the King's Own. The contest went the full 15 rounds, and the victory was awarded to; Bridge by a narrow margin of points. j I ————— —————

I Naval and

I Naval and. 1 MiUtary Appointments. i Lieut. Francis P. 0. Bridgemaa, R.N. second son of Brig.-General the Hon. Francis Bridgeman, Neachley, Shifnal, is appointed to H.M. ship Victory as additional for Signal School Portsmouth. Lieut. H. H. Moore, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, vomigest son cf Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moore, The Cottage, Wrexham, has been chosen for an appointment in the Indian Army. Cadet n. Edmunds, from Officer Cadet Unit who is appointed second-lieutenant R. F. A., is eldest son of Mr. E. Edmunds, Lea Cross. He served with the Shropshire Yeomanry, from the commencement of the wa> and came to England a short time ago from the Expeditionary Force to obtain his commission. i Cadet Harry Johnson, only son of the late Mr. H. G. Johnson, Copthorne, Shrewsbury, has been given his commission in the R.F.A., and posted to the East Lancashire Brigade (T.F.). Lieut. Johnson originally joined the Army Ordnance Corps, and has already-served 12 months on the western front. Cadet R. F. Prideaux, Inns of Court O.T.C., town clerk of Shrewsbury, has been aDDointed to a commission in the Hants Brigade Heavy Garrison Artillery. Cadet M. Cecil Lloyd, son of Lieut. Maurice Lloyd, Montgomery, has been gazetted second lieutenant in the Army Service Corps, Mech- anical Transport, a,nd given a staff appoint- ment at Bulford Camp, Salisbury, where he will remain until he is of age for foreign ser- vice. Lieut. Lloyd saw active service as a wireless operator on H.M. transports for seven months in the Mediterranean during the Gallipoli campaign and in the evacuation at & r. la Bay. Cadet D. Norman Lloyd, son of Mr. Henry Lloyd, manager of the London, City and Mid- land Bank, Llangollen, has been gazetted as second Lieutenant in the Royal Welsh Fusil- iers. He joined up eight months tgo from the National Provincial Bank, tt Worcester. Cadet Ralph Lee, son of Mr. George Lee of Erddig-road, Wrexham, has been gazetted second-lieutenant in the Royal Welsh Fusi- liers. The fclliving appointments to the Sh.{.p shire Vohi-uteer Regiment are gazetted:-A. H. Bardswell, Oswestry, to be temporary: lieutenant, A. R. F. Exham to be temp. captain (late major 2nd V.B. Strops. L.I.) March 28) Lieut.-Colonel G. G. P. Heywood, T.F.R., to be temp, captain (April 3); G. S. Patchett to be temp, captain (late captain 2nd V.B. Shrops. L.I.); Lieut.-Colonel N. ft. Eckersle;, to be temp. lieutenant (late major and hon. lieut.-col. 3rd Lanes. R.); H. R. Shaw to be temp. lieutenant; F. E. Hllntto be temp, second-lieutenant (March 28). Mr. H. P. Williams of the Alexandra Schools, Wrexham, is gazetted captain of the Wrexham Company of the Denbighshire Volunteer Regiment.

I Pensions for Wales e1

I Pensions for Wales. 1 At the request of Mr. Barnes (Pensions Min- ister), Sir Ivor Herbert, M.P., has written to the two committees for North and South Wales re- Questing them to arrange for a conference to discuss the treatment and traiiiiing of disabled soldiers and sailors The conference will probably be at Shrews- bury, and it is hoped circumstances will allow it to be held within the next fortnight.

No title

l A British destroyer of an older type struck a mine on Wednesday in the Channel ind j sank. One officer and 61 men are missing.

WAR TIME FARMING INI MONTGOMERYSHIRE

WAR TIME FARMING IN I MONTGOMERYSHIRE. Montgomery-shire War Agricultural mmfttee mt at Welshpool Monday. Mr. W. Forrester Aes. Mr. David Pryce: We shall take stringent | measures when necessary but let us carry the:. farmers with us if possible. All of theni don't re- alise the tJ osition y,et.-Tbe,Dba.i'l.'lIXlan: These, men | have been accused of dieting the Committee.—It was agreed to hear the explanations offered, which I weire: lack of labo-ur, hoTse-s And Implements. Mr. John Roberts: It is treeless to ask them to j plough now. The question is what adnoti shall be. j taken to bring them to book.—Mr. Vaugham: These who have failed! to do any spring pilcughlnig should! be ordered to do an extra amoxsirt for t.h-e autumn.. -The Chairmin: Penali-Fo them?-U,f. Vaighan: Ye —The Secretary: It is not fair-to the farmers who have mat the requests o? the Committee. W, ¡ should see thast the Tecalcitrant ones have to plough ) an extra amount over and aDa-ve the owliinary re- { qxvrements in the -ut-a,mn.-T,he Chairman: We will make a note «f it.—The expianatioivs were accepted I but the two fanners were warned tbat they would- be required to plough for the autumn. A TENANCY TERMINATED. It was reported that the necessary order had been received from the Board of Agriculture author king 1 the landlord to terminate the present tenancy of I Lower Cefn Harm, Beiiriiev.-It was stated that he j had a new tenant to go In. 1 SEED POTATOES. I The Agricultoal Organisiatfion Society wrote that they have 100 tons of seed potatoes available ai an increased price of 7s. 6d. per ton, of which two to ten tons are available for Montgomerysbire.-As 27 1 tons of the county's original order are still to be I delivered, no action was taken. SOLDIER- WOPlIt. In reply to a question, it was eatedthat the leave of eol'dter-workmen might be stall further extemded on application audi Mr. John Soherts said that it might be possJWe to get the lower category men transferred to Teserve "W" and thus retain their services Indefinitely. PROPOSED DAIRY SOROOL. An effort is being made, it was sta.ted, to start a co-operative dairy Echool at Pcol Quay for the summer months, for the purpose of making as mueli cheese as possible. Mr. Green's dairy at the MMsydti ? was being used and the necesisary vat equipment 'w

I IFOOTBALL r

I I FOOTBALL. r A matefh wits played on the Oswestry tommar Sdhool ground on Saturday between the Oswestry LDoois. an d the South 12?9b .OT tweeii th 'D ob "W -'xy Loooa. and the South, Lanoas. battalion from Park Hall Camp, befoe a fair attendance. The soldiers won the toss and elected to play with the wind at their backs and soon began to press home the attack; but owing- to exowollt goail- keeping and the fearless tackling of Hampson, it was not until 35 minutes had gone that their inslide left scored a beautiful goal. It became the turn of tiha Locos to attack, and they di dso only to find that the soldiers' ds-fenoe was too good for them The South Lanes, again advanced, and by some pretty short passing the same player added a second goal. 'Resuming after an interval, the Locos surprised the onlookers by scoring a goal, but this was all they could,, do, and the South Lanes ran easy winners by four goails to one. Mr. D. Lodwiok controilted the game to the satisfaction of all. The teams were as fol- lows?—South Lanes.: Lut. U nderwoodi; Seirgt. S.ankey and Pte. Brittain; C. S. Ellis, C. Q.M. S. Dobson, and Lmce-Opl. Orritt; Opl. Wharton, Sergt. Harris. Pte. Tunnioliffe, Opl. Smith, and C.S. Anderton. Oswestry I.,ooo&- H. Robeirts; W. Roberts and G. CavvIeF C. Jones, E. Williams; tIJncl M. Thomas; J. Lincoln, 0. Milfe, J. SIills, F. Hampson and B. Cawley.

No title

President Wilson hils accepted the offer of Colonel Roosevelt to act as Brig acuer. General to take American troops to Europe, and to arrange for financing the expedition without expense to the Government.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE

THE FOOD SHORTAGE. 12,000 ADDITIONAL ACRES TO BE PLOUGHED IN MONTGOMERYSHIRE. The seriousness of the food situation of this country has been ably laid bejpre tha agriculturists of Montgomeryshire by tha chairman of the Montgomeryshire War Agri- cultural Executive Committee, Mr. W. For* rester Add.ie, in & report published in these columns, and which is being reprinted in leaflet form. The statements made by Mr. Addie are fully borne out and amplified in a circular issued by the Food Production De- partment and read at Monday's meeting of the Committee. The circular is marked' Confidential," but the Chairman and other members thought that in view of the fact that Montgomeryshire has to get under pJougll fof the 1918 harvest an additional 42.000 acres, that its contents should be presented to agri- cuiturists in necessarily censored form, so that titey may have full opportunities of real- ising the gravity of the situation and so put their shoulders to the wheel in the vital work of making the country self-supporting. The circular states that in view of the great and increasing peril of the submarine campaign national safety demands that the United. Kingdom should be made self-sustaining in the matter of food supplies, and particularly of breadsluffs, at the earliest possible moment. Fortunately, this is not an impoa-, sible task, and if the special efforts already made are developed to the utmost, the goal of national safety may be reached by next year's harvest. It would be the height of improvidence to assume that the war will not continue till then or -that the submarine cam- paign will not develop sid: fluther, but oven though the war should finish to-morrow it is certain that the shortage of food and especi- ally of breadstuffs, not merely in this ^^atry but all over Europe, will become inereaa; igly acute during the coming year, and it is im- possible to count upon anything like an ade- quite improvement of food supplies from over- seas for a long time to corn?. This scarcity will he due to two causes; the surplus over local requirements grown in foreign countries is bound to diminish yearly, and for the next two years at least, even if a surplus exists,, there will be a shortage of ships to carry it. It may well be that in the future no country which is not self-sustaining will be safe, so that apart from immediate peril our con- tinued existence depends upon a sumeiency of home grown foods, and to make us self-sup- porting is the most urgent measure of national defence to which our energies can be devoted. For 1918, 8,000,000 acres of grass land must be broken up in England and Wales, and not less than 5,000,000 acres in all must be under wheat, with 1,000,000 acres under barley and oats, and an additional 200,000 must be de- voted to potatoes. Provided, all this crop is used for human consumption the programme should make the country self-supporting and safe from its greatest peril. This is a formid- able programme to accomplish within a year, and will require not only a great increase in the farmer's present resources in the way of labour, horses, machinery and money, but a. great amount of organisation and energy. Every possible assistance will be afforded by the Government, but it essential that every county, every parish and every fmshouldt. pull its full weight in this great patriotic Cal-npa,ign.

No title

There is a very serious shortage of paper in the country to-day owing to the lack of raw materials. Mills have shut down. nd paper cannot be bought in the market. There is every probability of a further reduction in the size of many newspapers in the near future and an increase of price. The wife of a railway guard living at 01., chester-avenue, Manor Park, London, Ho is a somnambulist, left home at midnight, walked half a mile in the direction of Ilford, and then into the river Roding. Hearing >z" cries, Police-constable Broderick jumped into the water, and rescued her irl -aD exhausted condition. Ie

Advertising

Our portrait is of Mr. W G. Ho^re, of Kmgsley Avenue, Daventry, Nort-hants, who writes;- "I had one of the most severe attacks of Eczema on the face that any man, I should ù1';nk ever saw, my face being one mass of sores iron* ear to ear. I was under medical treatment for some time, and, getting no better, began to hat downhearted, when a friend persuaded me to try, 'Clarke's Blood Mixture.' I found myself getting; better before I had finished the first bottle, so l continued with it until I had taken I should have written before, but I wanted to bQ' sure it was a permanent cure first. It is now; some years since I was cured, and I have nevee had the slightest signs of any return." Clarke's Blood Mixture is composed of ingredi. ents which quickly expel the impurities from the blood; that's why it can be relied on to giva speedy relief and lasting benefit in all cases of Eczema, Scrofula, Scurvey, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Boils, Pimples, Sores and Eruptions, Piles, Gland ill ar Swellings, Rheumatism, Gout, etc. Over 50 years' success. Pleasant to take, and free from anything injurious. Ask for and see you get CJ,arke'sBJoodMixture CURES ALL SKIN AND BLOOD DISEASES. Of all Chemist# ajud Storws, &. 9d. nar Bo&tfo*