Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Bryn-y-grog Wrexham. STUD OF HOaSES. FOR 1917. THE THOROI (. H B R E i > STALLION BLAYNEY. Height. 16-3 £ Dak Brown. Foaled 1900. Sire: Castle Blayney. Dam: Shira by Sir Charles or Sir jBevys (winne. of the Derby). g datn •. Gipsy by Buccaneer. Premiums wo- ir 1909 i 1: Reserves 1912-13- SERVICE FEE JE220. IF PAID FIRST TIME OF SERVICE JEl 1 0. GROOM'S FEE 2/6. BLACK PONY STALLION: r HOLYPORT RUBY. i* 10263. ) Height 13-3. Foaled 1906. Sire: Ruby 1342. Dam: 11789 "Encore by Sir Horace 5402. This Pony ..5 one of the most brilliant actioned Ponies in the world and has already made his name in the Show Ring, winning his classes at, the London Hackney Show in 1908 and 1909; 1st and Cup, Ferndale, 1911; 1st and Cup, Ferndale, 1913. SERVICE FEE £33.0. GROOM'S FEE 2/3 BLACK SHIRE STALLION CRISPEN MANNERS. 31357. Height 17-2. Foaled 1912. •. Sire: King of Tandredge 24351. Dam: 26998 Forest Rose of Tandredge by King of the Forest III. 23407. The above Horse is, one of the rising horses of the day and is certain of getting good stock. He is winner of numerous prizes. SERVICE FEE P,5 50. 'ROOM'S FEE 51- NOTE.—Registered Mares only, or eligible ior registration in the Shire Stud Book. THE DOUBLE CHAMPION BRED HACK- NEY STALLION, 44 FLASH A WAY," 12352, Late "ROYAL STAR." Inashaway is a beautiful rich chestnut, 10 ears old, stands 15-3, on very good short lexs, with plenty of good bone, Sat and clean, also full of quality, and absolutely sound. PRIZES WON 1913. Second Ferndale, Second Tnnypandy, First Naesteg, beating several well-known Show Winners, including Wood Hatch," Presi- dent," and several others in very strong CSa-s»es. Plashawa-.v is by t.hat wonderful horse, Double CD ampion Royal Danegelt" ( £ 785), who has sired more Ohampions than any other horse. G.S. Danegelt" (174), the best horse for all time, for whom Sir Walter Gilbey paid 5,000 Guineas, when 15 years of age. Dam (16205), 11 Sister to Gantry," by Gany- mede" (2076). Flashaway's dam is own sister to "Champion Gantry," the well-known Show Winner. Sire, Champion Ganymede" (2076), sold for 2,000 Guineas. Dam (6611), Duckey Bell by H Star of the Past" C793) j TENANT FARMERS, jB2 2s GROOM'S FEE, 5s. ROUTE, MONDAY.—Leave Brynygrog 10 a.m. for Wynnstay Arms Hotel, Wrexham, until noon, leave for Cross Keys Hotel, Mold, for the night. TUESDAY.—Leave Cross Keys Hotel, Mold, at 9 a.m. for Ilawk and Buckle Hotel, Den- bigh, for the nígLt. WEDNESDAY.—Leave Hawk and Buckle Hotel, Denbigh, at 10 a.m. for Wynnstay Hotel, Ruthin, for the night. THURSDAY—Leave Wynnstay Hotel, Ruthin, at 9 a.m. for Crown Hotel, Corwen, for the niffht. FRIDAY.—Leave Crown Hotel, Corwen, at 10 a.m. for Grapes Hotel, Llangollen, for the night. SATURDAY.—Leave Grapes Hotel, Llangollen, at 10 a.m. for Brynygrog, until Monday morn- ing. All Fees for these Horses will be collected the last week of the Season, or 10s: extra will be charged for Collecting. Communications to be addressed to G. VEASY, Stud Groom, Bryn-y-grog, Wrexham. L. COOKSON, Bryr- y-grog. d 4—e 24. 5ates by ?nfii?M. ARrnUR ?VERY, AUCTIONEER & VALUER. Sales of all Description and Valuation lor Transfer, Mortgage or Probate made. BAunm under the Law of Distress Am endment Act. SALEROOMS- The Pantechnicon, BERWYN STREET, LLANGOLLEN. ——— Rooms are always open for the reception of Goods for Sale. No Storage Charges. "PLAS GERAINT," LLANGOLLEN. lito BE SOLD BY PRIVATE TREATY, con- taining:- Entrance Hall. 2 Large Entertaining Rooms. 6 Bedrooms. Large Kitchen", Larder. Wash-house, Bath. room. etc. OSers to purchase to be made to A. AVERY. The Pantechnicon, LlangoJlen THURSDAY, MAY 17, at 1 o'clock. HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE at AVONDALE, RHEWL, LLANTYSILIO. JONES & SON, Auctioneers. LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELD. MAY 22nd. 1917. GREAT WHITSUNTIDE SALE of FAT and STORE STOCK. Entries respectfully solicited. JONES & SON, Auctioneers. <8nled bl) JUtettoti WEDNESDAY, MAY 16th, 1917. Sale of Printing Plant, Stationery, Stock-in- rade, Fixtures, etc., at the WOOLPACK PRINTING OFFICE, BRIDGE STREET, LLANGOLLEN. JONES & SON Have been instructed to Sell bv Auction the following PRINTING PLANTHalf-h.p. Gardiner Gas Engine, with Tank, Gas Bag, Demy Folio Cropper Platen Machine, Double Crown Columbian Press. No. I "Gem" Paper- Cutting Machine, Small Hand Stitcher with Wire Staples, Large Quantity of Wood Type, 35 Cases of Plain, and Fancy Small Type, Metal Borders and Ornaments, etc., etc., together with the STATIONERY STOCK-IN-TRADE. Sale at One o'clock prompt. Further particulars from the Auctioneers. Central Buildings, Llangollen. SCALE FOR PREPAID ADVERTISEMENTS One Three Si >< Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. s. d. s. d. s d. 25 0 9 1 6 2 6 32 1 0 2 0 3 6 40 1 3 2 6 4 6 48 1 6 3 0 5 6 56 1 9 3 6 6 6 64 2 0 4 0 7 6 All Advertisements can be sent by post to the publishers, CAXTON PRESS, OSWESTRY, in which cases stamps or Postal Orders, in accordance with above scale, must be enclosed. Announcements of Births and Marriages 1/- prepaid. iNotice of Deaths, with any remarks other than simple facts, 1/- prepaid. No Advertisement booked under 1/6. "Iri Memoriam" and Thanks Notices 2/6 prepaid. GROCERY AND PROY'lSIOSW.—The Stasr Supply vX stores, have a vacancy for a capable, energetic man to manage a Branch. Must have good references and be ineligible for the Army.—W. M. Alteup, 22, Castle Street, Llangollen. e4—18x BRYNCASTELL, LLANGOLLMN.-Elevated, garden, -D detached,, furnished; May 19, mOn-ph or period; 4 bedrooms, 2 entertaining, offices, electilic light; outdoor sanitation. Moderate terms. No children. TO LET, Lyndonhurst, Llangollen, eunny side, 8 entertaining, & bedroom*, bath, h. and! C., w.c's., ground floor basements, gtezed bricks, gas, water; 10 mins, station. In own grounds, about one < acre, two lawns, tenuis, croquet, flower, fruit, kitchen < garciens.-Ap,pl,y, Penybryra HaJj, Jtuabon. ell-25x Respectable GIM. (about 16), Required aa JL? Between-MatM.—Apply, Miss Bandford, Hycroft, Llangollen. ellx THE LLANGOLLEN GA8 Co., Ltd., Require a -L Stoker. Wages Wls. per week.-Apply at the works. el It PIGS ARE OFTEN TROUBLED WITH I WORMS.-Thorley's Worm Powders will clear I same. Sold in Cartons containing 6 powders 5d. > by Agents in all parts; or by Post 12 Powders Is. Id.—96 Powders 6s. 6d., on receipt of re- mittance, by Joseph Thorley, Ltd., King's Cross, London, N. KILL THAT INSECT, TOMMY!—Send your pals out yonder'' some tins of Harrison Nursery Pomade—they'll be very acceptable. When you haven't time to wash there's a big chance you'll have companions." A little Harrison's Pomade kills every insect on hair or body. Insist on having Harrison's Nursery Pomade, Tins of Comf oit," at 41d. and 9d. Sold by all Chemist&-or by post from Harrison, Chemist, Read;nsr.Airept for Llangollen: E. D. Jones. Chemist. Medical HaD. PIG KEEPERS WHO WISH THEIR PIGS to pay should use as a Condiment Thorley's Food for Cattle; keeps Pigs thrifty. Sold in Cases containing 56 packets Five Shillings, by agents in all parts.

o MYSTERY OF THE BERWYNS

o MYSTERY OF THE BERWYNS. STILL NO TRACE OF GLYN CEIRIOG SCHOOL GIRL. THEORIES AS TO HER FATE. During the paet, few days our correspond ept has again been making enquiries in the Glyn Valley and neighbourhood! with a view to obtaining facts to help in the elucidation of the mystery In which the dis- appearance off Ccridwen Price, a school girl, twelve years of age, still remains shrouded. It was on March 21 that the little girt left her home. at Gart;h Obry, a cottage fitua-ted between the viMiage of ttlyn Celriog e:64 Chink, where the resided with let parents, respectable working people, and two other children, undeT circumstances already reported. OUT oorreEipdndient conversed with several partlee who, residing on the spot, have taken fbe, keenest interest in the search, but they lhave little in the way of practical suggestions to make, whilst all agree as to the remarkableness of the fact that, in thare days of rapid communication and official activity, it shouldi be possible for a. child to dis- appear in such a manner andi remain undiscovered for so long & period. One theory advanced! is that the ehfld may acct. "dentally, in the Winding snowstorm that must have speedily enveloped; her after she. had left home, have lost her footing and rolled down the steep bank, in- to the Ceriog stream. Of course, the raver has been carpfnlly and frequently gola-Tched, and dragged; but, as one who knows it well states, there are "whirl- pools in the Ceirlog"-tb,at is the quaiint way In which he describes a deep pool, overhung by shelv- ing Tocks that have never yet been fathomed. Still another theory centres round the Oeiriog lime kilns tbat atmt on the sMe of the roadway, and which the eb-ild must have passed daily on her way to and from school. It is thought that she may have sought shelter in these Kins with tragic results. j

I TREFONEN J

TREFONEN. J TEMPERANCE.—A meeting under tho j ausnices of the N.W.W.T.A. was held in the i Cilvinistic Methodist Chapel on Monday week, a napar on temperance being read by Mrs. Weller. Others who contributed to a pleasant j evening were the Misses Janie Morris, D. Symonds, M. Davies. M. L. Gift ins, Clara Git- j tins, Gladys Davies, Sydney Williams, and Mr. J. Gittins. Pte. S. Weller, London, adjudicat-ed on an impromptu speech on sugar," the prize being divided between Miss Clara Gittins and Mr. Howell Owen. Mr. W. Breeze presided and Miss C. F. Davies acted as accompanist. < • •

IThe Ethics cf Compulsion

I The Ethics cf Compulsion. We publish to-day, in addition to the recent Royal Proclamation, a more direct and personal appeal from Lord Kenyon, addressed through our columns, to the public of the Welsh border on the urgent necessity of con- centrating on the saving of bread and the checking of waste. We have already printed other similar pleas from authoritative sources, and though they, no doubt, have nad material influence on many of our readers, there is, we believe, still a large section of the public for whom some form of legal compulsion is necessary to secure the desired effect. Reluctance to impose such a measure is easy to understand. It is admittedly a cumbrous and expensive system, and the experience of Germany goes to show that it does not necessarily result in equality of treatment, and even in the assurance of sufficient supplies to go all round. It is bound to involve the creation of a horde of new officials, central and local, at a time when the growth of the power of bureaucracy is causing the utmost alarm in the minds of many thoughtful students of sociology, and it will set up in our midst what will hardly be disguisable from a system of espionage, not only in the public eating house, but tho private dining room and kitchen. Then why should it be necessary ? The answer to that question, we think, is worth more than a superficial consideration, and is not to be adequately supplied by the merely obvious conclusion that it is 4ue to the failure of a large proportion of the public to respond to appeals for voluntary rationing, however infiuencial and effectively phrased. It brings us at once to the further question why have those appeals, to a large extent, failed ? It is not, we believe, entirely due to pure selfishness, though want of thought which amounts to something even more reprehensible than pure selfishness at such a time as this, is probably partly responsible. But, in an even larger degree, we venture to suggest, it arises out of that strange habit of mind which has more than once during the war found expression in the paradoxical phrase we prefer to be compelled. We met with it during the later stages of the Derby enlist- ment scheme, when many potential recruits declared, without any desire to shirk their share of military service eventually, that they were "waiting to be fetched." When they were fetched they went quite willingly, and have in most cases since made excellent and well-disciplined soldiers. We have witnessed the same mental phenomena more recently, in connection with the National Service campaign, amongst those who, while failing to enrol on their own initiative, would gladly welcome "some form of compulsion." It is not that they are fundamentally unwilling to serve the Stace. It is simply that they need the incen- tive of a superior force to impel them to an issue. Philosophers may tell us that it is an extraordinary state of mind in a nation which has hitherto prided itself on its love of personal liberty; but the wisest philosophy is that which takes things as they are and not as they might be in a wholly logical world. For the fact is that we are seldom logical. However sincerely we cherish the ideals of freedom of thought and freedom of action, in practice we cling no less resolutely to a form of national government which largely circumscribes them both. The very idea of "government," indeed, pre-supposes restraint or constraint; and, so far from resenting the enforcement of the authority of the State uprn public conduct provided, of course, that such authority rests, as it must necessarily do if it has to have moral weight, on a basis of equity and necessity-we believe that the considerable failure of the large section of the community to respond to appeals for voluntary rationing is due to their need for some more direct and disciplinary rule of conduct than pure volition provides. At any rate, it seems to ns to furnish a far more satisfactory explanation of such failure than any other. We should, for instance, be extremely sorry to think any citizens, in spite of the knowledge that some more drastic economy in food consumption is imperatively necessary, had flagrantly refused to do their duty in this direction. The nation certainly might have been given fuller knowledge by the Government of the critical situation with which it has for some time been faced in consequence of It he serious shortage of wheat supplies, and, had this been done, no doubt there would have been a rather more general as well as an earlier response to the Ifood Controller's appeals. But we still doubt whether the peculiar psychology to which we have alluded would have been materially affected by this means alone, since those who "wait to be fetched" or who wait to be forced seldom move until actual compulsion comes. Hence, while the King's Proclamation most earnestly exhorting and charging all those of our loving subjects, the men and women of our realm who have the means to I procure articles of food other than 'n especially to practice the greatest economy and. frugality in the use of every species of grain M must, in any event, prove an arresting docu- ment, those who study official precedents will not have failed to note the significant fact that royal messages of a corresponding character heralded both conscription and the Government control of the liquor trader Voluntary rationing may, therefore, be said to have thus been given its final chance, and though its universal adoption would be of great service to the nation and save us from many administrative difficulties, it is not astonishing that the Government are busy preparing the machinery for imposing a compulsory system of bread tickets.

PERSONAL

PERSONAL. ¡ Earl Brownlow has arrived in London from Scotland. Lord Kenyon succeeded Viscount Valentia. as lord-in-waiting to the King at Windsor Castle on Wednesday. The wife of Major David Davies gave birth to a daughter at 9, Mandeville-place, London, on Thursday. Onslow being closed till the end of the war Mrs. Wingfield has moved into Shrewsbury. Her address for the future will be, Mrs. Wingfield, Senr., 3, Claremont Buildings. The Rev. C. A. Alington, head master of Eton, and formerly head master of Shrews- bury, and the Hon. Mrs. Alington had the honour of dining with the King and Queen at Windsor on Thursday. The marriage will take place quietly at 11.30 on Monday at St. Mary Abbott's, Ken- sington, of Lieut. George Cunynghame Tylor, R.F.A., younger son of the late Joseph Tylor, of Fir Toll, Mayfield, Sussex, and Frances Hard-castle, only daughter of Francis WoUey Dod of Edge Hall, M alp as. The President of the French Republic has conferred the Croix de Chevalier of the Legion of Honour on Capt. E. R. Kearsley, D.S.O., R. W.F., son of Major Kearsley, late 7th Dragoon Guards,' of Stapley House, Wrex- ham. Capt. Kearsley was mentioned in de- spatches on January, 1916. The engagement is announced between Capt. Prince Alexander Albert of Battenberg, Grenadier Guards, eldest son of Princess Henry and. of the late Prince Henry of Batten- berg, and Lady Irene France Adza Denisom, only daughter of the Earl and Countess of Londesborough. The impending marriage has the King's entire sanction and approval. Captain the Hon. Frederick Guest has been appointed Chief Liberal Whip to the Government, in place of the Hon. Neil Prim- ro..(t, resigned. Captain Guest, who will be 42 next month, has been Liberal M.P. for East Dorset since 1911. He is brother of Lord Wimborne, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and has many family connections with Shrop- shire, whence the Guests originally sprang. Lieut. John Godsal, son of Major Godsal, of Iscoyd, who was recently a patient at one of the Casualty Clearing stations in France, having met with an accident, as a result of which he had to have part of one of his fingers amputated, is now convalescent,1 Lieut. Go& sal, who has been with the Welsh Division since its formation, has returned to duty. He is one of the most popular officers in his Division, and is held in high esteem by all who know him. Capt. J. W. McKill, R.W.F., and brother- in-law of Dr. H. Venables Palin, Crescent House, Wrexham, has been awarded the Military Cross for "conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty." According to the offi- cial account, he commanded a raid, on the night of February 21, in which we took five i prisoners and inflicted severe losses on the enemy. He showed marked ability and cool- ness throughout, not only during the raid but also in the subsequent withdrawal under, heavy hostile rifle and. artillery fire. Mr. Vivian Piercy, the eldest son of Major B. H. Piercy and the late Mrs. Piercy, of Marchwiel Hall, and a lieutenant in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who has been seriously, wounded, is in a hospital in France. He was shot through both legs and his right thigh is badly broken. His friends will be glad to hear, however, that the latest report is that he is going on well, and there is now no further fear of his losing his leg. Mr. Vivian. Piercy, who was mentioned in despatches, had only rejoined his battalion last January, having just recovered from his previous wounds.

ILocal WillI

I Local Will. I Captain E. H. H, Westby, Welsh Regiment* nephew of the late Captain H. M. Westby of Elmhurst, WeLshpool, killed in action in Flanders, left estate of the gross value of £26,712.

Salop Police PromotionsI

Salop Police Promotions. The following promotions have been made in the hropshire constabulary: Inspector Alfred. Evar.s, chief clerk at Shrewsbury, pro- moted superintendent; Inspector Jones, Church Stretton, promoted superintendent of Wem division; Sergt. Phillips, headquarters, promoted inspector at Church Stretton; Sergt. Williams, Wellington, promoted in- etor; Sergt. Buttery, Cleobury Mortimer, and Sergt. Lloyd, Much Wenlock, promoted an r g t. Lloyd, Much Wenloc k 'Hay-a, first class sergeants; Acting-Sergt. Hayes, headquarters, and Acting-Sergt. Williams, Sandpits, near Ludlow, promoetd sergeants.

No title

A Cyclist named Dunham Adlard, of Hat. cliffs, was cycling through Irby, near Grimsby, riding by the side of a traction engine, —hat his frnnt wjieel dropped in a rut, and he vaa thrown in front of the engine, which ran over bim and killed hip.