Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE BOARD OF EDUCATIONI AND WALES

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION I AND WALES. The report of the Board of Education for the year 1915-16 contains several references to matters of general and local interest. Speaking of evening play centres, it is stated that much concern has been caused by the increase in juvenile offences which has oc- curred during the war. Many of the offences are committed by children still at school, and there is much evidence that, owing to the absence on military service of their fathers, and perhaps even more of their elder brothers the industrial employment of their mothers, the darkened streets, and other circumstances many school children, and especially boys, are suffering from a want of proper care and discipline and are exposed, to serious risk of deterioration. Much valuable work has been done to mitigate these conditions by the establishment of evening play centres, which provide the children with suitable occupation and amusement after school hours. In order to encourage the establishment of these centres the Board in January, 1917, issued regulations under which grants in aid are payable up to half the cost of maintenance of such centres (see Circular 980). WELSH MATTERS. I With reference to Wales, it is recorded that the total number of schools in Wales (includ- ing Monmouthshire) regarded as eligible for grant during 1915-16 was 118, being the same number as for 1914-15. Of these, 12 were controlled by local authorities, 100 were Welsh Intermediate schools, 5 were endowed schools or schools of a similar type, and one was controlled (without a formal educational trust) by a Roman Catholic community. In j these 118 schools there were, during 1915-16, 19,203 pupils (9,149 boys and 10,054 girls) as compared with 18,377 pupils (9,057 boys and 9,320 girls) in 1914-15. In addition to the 118 schools on the grant list, there were four • other schools recognised by the Board as effi- cient during 1915-1G. Of these, one was a Welsh Intermediate school and three were endowed schools or schools of a similar type. In these four schools there were 405 pupils (106 boys and 299 girls) in 1914-15, and the numbers were probably not very different for j 1915-^3, but no figures are available for that year. Thus during the year 19(15-16 there j were in Wales (including Monmouthshire) altogether 122 schools recognised by the Board as efficient, educating about 19,608 pupils (9,255 boys and 10,353 girls), as com- pared with 18,782 pupils (9,163 boys and 9,619 girls) in 1914-15. Under Article 39 of the regulations the Board, in the year under review, have con- tinued the special grant to Welshpool Boys' County School which they began three years previously. This special grant is for the en- couragement of educational work of an ex- perimental or pioneering kind, taking the form, in the case of this school, of a course with a rural bias .specially designed for pupils who may be expected to spend their lives in occupations in the country. The Board announced last August that in view of the national crisis all changes in the Board's I regulations for Secondary Schools were post- I poned and the regulations in force for the I school year 1915-16 would be continued for ¡ the school year 1916-17. At the same time they repeated their announcement that in their administration of the regulations they will give every consideration to the special ¡ difficulties on account of national exigencies. The schools which form a part of the Welsh ¡ Intermediate system are at present 101 in number, and are all included among the 122 efficient secondary schools in Wales recog- nised by the Board of Education. Separate reports on the work of the Intermediate J schools are presented to Parliament annually I by the Board pursuant to the Welsh Inter- mediate Education Act. THE TRAINING OF TEACHERS. I It was noted last year that in four Welsh 1 counties there were up to the date of the re- port no candidates for recognition as pupil teachers or bursars. This year the same can be said only of three counties, one of the authorities having in the interval re-intro- duced the pupil teacher system. The number of areas, counties or county boroughs, which show an increase in pupil teachers and bur- sars in 1916-17 as compared, with 1915-16 is six, as compared with seven which increased their production in 1915-16 over 1914-15. In eight counties and county boroughs no pupil teachers, and in six counties and county boroughs no bursars have been proposed this year up to the present time. Six areas pro- duced both pupil teachers and bursars, and as pointed out last year, speaking generally, it is the authorities of these areas who take seriously the duty placed upon each local education authority of producing its full share of recruits for the teaching profession. Since the new regulations for rural pupil teacher, were issued in 1913 till this year only three authorities in Wales and Monmouthshire availed themselves of the plan of training pupil teachers in rural schools and instruct- ing them otherwise than in secondary schools or pupil teacher centres. The number of rural pupil teachers recognised was SO in 1913-14, 34 in 1914-15, and 22 in 1915-16. Only a few applications for recognition have yet been received, for 1916-17, but as recog- nition may be granted in the case of rural pupil teachers from the 1st of any month applications may be expected to be received throughout the year. It. is encouraging to note that this year for the first time a fourth authority has taken steps to introduce the j system into its area. During the past year the attention of the authorities proposing t rural pupil teachers for recognition has been drawn to the need for supplementing the in- struction which all such pupil teachers obtain I from the head teachers of their public ele- i mentary schools, by some system of additional i instruction. As the number of the pupil! teachers continues small there are obvious | dimculties in the way of arranging for such ] instruction, but the local =on author- ities mainly concerned who have been in eon- j sulfation with his Majesty's inspectors will now, it is hoped, make some progress in the 1 d&sired direction. j PUPIL TEACHERS. I: In recent years in Wales and Monrno^th- I shire there has been a steady recovery fmm the ;OW-wRtèr mark, which was reached in 1911 !2, iu the nambcr of pupiL teachers ?nd ?uraa? proposed for recognition under the ;oard's regulation. The increase w" ra id? .in 1914, since when the numbers have tenN4 :) remain stationary in the current year a ?mall ckcreMa is a?owu- The numbers of pupil teachers and bursars recognised each I year during the tive years preceding the pre- sent year were 570, 605, 682, 764 and 765; in the present year the number of pupil teachers I and bursars recognised up to the date of this report, together with those whose applications I are still under consideration, is 724. The í number of student teachers who have not; been bursars continues to increase, the figure I already reached this year being 97. As ex- plained in last year's report, the increase in I this class of intending teacher is particularly welcome, as it represents the spontaneous contribution of the localities to the supply of teachers.. So far as general conclusions can be drawn from the results of the 1916 examination the change appears to hav.e led to an improve- ment in the work of the candidates in the compulsory subjects, which was on the whole better than in previous years, especially in the important subject of English. There were a few cases in which candidates who failed to obtain the required aggregate of marks in the j three compulsory subjects did exceptionally good work in one optional subject, and ] cases. Most of them were cases of candidates from Welsh-speaking districts whose English was not quite up to .the standard ordinarily required, but was compensated for by speci- j ally good work in Welsh.

Welsh Party Meeting I

Welsh Party Meeting. I DEPUTATION TO BOARD OF II EDUCATION. j A IwrgeJy attended meeting of the Welsh party was held at the House of Commons on Tue&day night week. A resolution was passed urging aga'n that Wa.!e? shomid have due representation on Parliamentary Committees, with special refer- e.nœ to M.l'. L. Haisllam h;ng- p1aœq on the Public ence to Mr. T,. hg a?slam b?o;n- on the, Public .A(.,

ERBISTOCK f

„- ERBISTOCK. f & ROSE HILL.—A srarder fete in aid of the funds of the Royal Weilsh Fusiliers' Prisoners of War Fund will be held here on Friday week, by bind permission of Mrs. M E. Lloyd, to whom articles for the sale should be sent. The band of the R.W.F will p" ay selections for dancing, re- fresihments will be served, and there will be other entertainments.

No title

By the decision of the Egyptian Govern- ment to remove restrictions by which certain! areas are usually deprived of water until late in the summer, an improvement in the yield from 1,800,000 maize-bearing acres is expected.

Advertising

i Our portrait is of Mr. Newman, of 19, Fan thill Road, Finsbury Park, London, N., whose mothI writes:-— "My son suffered from Tubercular Right HÎT., and was in and out of hospital for eighteen months. After undergoing thftse operation#, which did him no good, we decided to try your Clarke's Blood Mixture. After taking the first bottle we noticed an improvement in him, so we kept it up, and now we are glad to say he is qmt.e cured. Everybody we meet marvels how ho got well, and we are always glad to say it is your Clarke's Blood Mixtura." Sufferers from Diseased Hip, Bad Legs, Ab-cesses, Ulcers Glandular Swellings, Piles, Abscesses, Boil?, Pimples, Sores and Eruptions, Eczema, Rheumatism, Gout or any kindred complaint, should realise that lotions, ointrnente, etc., can but give tem porary re. ii* ef-to be eure of a cure, complete and lasting, the blood must be ther- oughly cleansed of the impure waste matter, the true cause of all such troubles. Clarke's Blood Mixtture quickly attacks, overcomes and- expels the impurities. Pleasant to take, and warranted free from injurious ingredient. Ask for and see you get Clarke's Blood Mixture "EVERYBODY'S BLOOD PURIFIER." 01 all Chemiste and 2.i. 9d. W.1: Battle.

THE CHURCHES

THE CHURCHES. The Rev. D. R. Owen, Acrefair, minister of the Zion Welsh Baptist Chapel, Cefn, has accepted the pastorate of the Castle Street Baptist Chapel, Llangollen. Captain the Rev. Arthur W. Davies, chaplain, Rovat Welsh Fusiliers, has just been awarded the Military Gross for conspicuous service in the field. Before joining the Army, Mr. Bavsos was a Welsh Wesleyan minister at Bethesda. He is a brother of the Rev. Edward Da.vies, minister of Mount Zion Woish Wesley ail Ohurch, Prince's Avenue, Liverpool. Welsh Wesleyan Stations. The following is the list of stations made at, the, Welsh Methodist Assembly, held at Ab,eTdOVey THE FIRST NORTH WALNS DISTRICT. C,orwen.AneurAii Lloyd Hugfi.es, Thomas Griffith Ellis (GeirrigyclruitiioiL); Uvea Hugiit'i, supernumer- ary- Llangollen.—lihys Jones. Cffin 31a. wr (Jttuabon).—Joan Smiflh, John. Lloyd Jones (Rhos, liuaJbon). Coedtpo&th (Wrexham).— Plm^p Pi.,ice (fifth year), Henry Moirion Davies (Brymbo, Wrexham). Charles Jones (Wrexham), E. Godfrey 'Turner (Bwlchgwyn), Robert. G. Hughes (Tanytron, Wrexfram), Thomas J. Humphreys, Richard Hcpwood (Wrexham), super- numeraries. Llanfyllin.—J>avtid Morris (ftfth year), Gwilyra R. Roberts (Llaafechafln, Oswestry); X. Kictoo&ls Roberts, sup em um er a.ry. L&anrhaiadr (Oswestry).-Euward Tegla Davies, Evan Roberts (Oswestry), Richard Owen (Tregeariog, Ruabon), Llewelyn. Keiiwklclc (Llensilin, Oswestry); John Cadvan Davies (Oswestry), supernumerary. Llanfalr (Wels'hpool).—'Wiitom .Fries, David J. Williams, B.A. (Meifod). Newtown.—'William Eiohandi "Roberts.

f OneMan Businesses

f- — One-Man Businesses. AUTHORITATIVE STATEMENT BY MR. MACLEAN. M. P. Mr. Maclean, M.P., chairman of the House i of Commons Appeals Tribunal, made an im- portant statement on Thursday in reference to one-man businesses. He said that illusory hopes had been raised in the minds of many business men and a sense of injustice had. been aroused in many men serving in the army by a misunderstanding of the recent de- cision of the Central Tribunal. In the public interest it was desirable to make it clear that the decision in that case implied no difference either in principle or in the policy of apply- ing that principle. Where serious hardship was proved to the tribunal in the domestic position as much as in a man's exceptional financial or business position, it was just as incumbent on the tri- bunal to grant exemption as it was in the one-man business case. He said that to emphasise what had been said so often—that the one-man business cases did not constitute a privileged or special class. All turned on the degree of special hardship. It was not within the statute in the sense that conscien- tious objectors and ministers of religion were. Serious hardship to-day was a. I different thing from what it was a year ago. As long as the present drain on man power continued the more difficult it became to prove a case for keeping fit men of military age out of the army. I The principles laid down bv the Central Tribunal in case No. 61 for the guidanpe of tribunals in dealing with one-man businesses were Exemption is not justified merely on the ground that a man is the sole proprietor and that the business would have to be closed if he were taken for military service. There must be serious hardship within the meaning of the Act. In deciding this, the following considerations were important:—The fact that he would be reduced in income-even a considerable reduction — was not conclusive evidence of serious hardship. A very large number of persons who were not proprietors of businesses had had to suffer a considerable reduction. Due account must be taken of the assistance that might be received from the Civil Liabilities Committee a.nd other sources. The possibility of carrying on the business through a relative or friend or of installing a manager or disposing of the business bad also to be taken into account. The burden of proof that an arrangement of this kind could not be made rested on the man, who must be expected to make all reasonable efforts for carrying on or disposing of the business. If the tribunal was satisfied that the busi- j ness must be closed down if the man were taken, it might become important to consider whether it could be revived without grave difficulty by the man on his return from mili- tary service. If it could not be revived other circumstances would then have to be con- sidered, such as the man's age and domestic position and the period that the business had been established and the amount of capital involved.

GLYN GEIRIOG

■ ø GLYN GEIRIOG. OBITUARY. After a. long- and protrsuited the death occurred Thursday week of Mr. .William Owen, Wynne Terrace. He was one of the most, highly respected workmen in the Ceinog Valley, having worked for Mr F. E. Rooper at his slate quasries for the past 34 years. He was a deacon of the Wesleyan Church, and a. staunch supporter of the temperance cause. He leaves a widow, daughter, and three sons to mourn his death; two of the sons aire in the Army, and the other an invalid of eight year; standing. The funeral took place on Saturday, when a most impressive service was held at Bethel Oba.pel, the following oiffciating at the services, the Rev. J. Cadvan J>av:es, NN Rhys Jones, n. Vaugihajt Owen. D. R. Evans, and Mr. Jacob Morris. Letters of apology for unavoidable ab- sence were received from the Rev. Evan Roberts. Oswestry, J. Ellis Jones, and R. 0. Owen, vicar of Seaton Hirst, Nortihumberland, brother of the deceased. Mr. W. C. Burns played -N,larwol- aeth y Crition as the cortege entered the ohapel, and Mr. Rcbt. Edwards, Tanygarth. the Dead anygarth, the F);ia March from Saul," as they entered the dhurch. The bea;rers were Messrs. David Hughes, Llovd Williams, P. 0. Williams, and W. C. Burns. Williams, the ohief mourners were Mr. F. E. Rooper, the widow, daughter, two sons, Mr. and Mrs. John Hughes, Festhyog, Mm Roberts, Glyndyfrdwy. aster, Mr. Sv*Ln Owen, Glyndy. fr4wy, brother, the "Miwwai Ow»n, Glyndyfrdwy, nieces, Mrs. E

No title

The Kaiaer and Marshal von Hindenburg I narrowly escaped death at Ghent railway I station on Whit-Monday. A squadron of aero- planea bombed and hit the station buii^LO&s, i

TROPICAL STORMS

TROPICAL STORMS. HEAVY RAINS IN THE BORDER DISTRICT. LIGHTNING HAVQC. The thunderstorm of Saturday midnight and the early hours of Sunday swept over most of the Welsh border area. It raged with terrific violence in the Annscroft and Bayston HU1 district of Shrewsbury, thunder, vivid light- ) ning and torrential rain lasting for over four. hours. During the storm, a hous6 at Lyth Bank, near Bayston Hill, and occupied by Mrs. fere a dm an., was struck and the bricks of ih* chimney scattered in all directions; Miss Steadman, the daughter, while closing one ol the windows, was struck by the lightning awi lay for some hours in a dazed condition. ÅJ young man lying in bed was aff ected, in the same way, but some few hours later both had recovered. The storm broke over Oswestry during thai early hours of Sunday, Ulorning and raged for a considerable time, but no damage is re- ported., Although there was a drenching down" pour at Llanrhaiadr on Sunday no rain fell i1\ the adjoining parish of Llangvnog, and the Rev. E. Tegla Davies, while cycling to Llaa. gynog to do ministerial duty, could draw « chalk line on the road about a mile out at Llanrhaiadr, marking off those parts of the road which were wet and dry. At Llanyblod* j wel, Mr. Evans, Prydyrfedwen, lost two valu* able horses by lightning. At Cockshutt,on Sunday morning, the flashot of lightning were exceptionally vivid and oon t.inuous. During the height of the storm that electric fluid struck the house known as Stan- wardine Grange, occupied by Mrs. Dickin, and did considerable damage. A chimney pot was shattered, and the chimney, partly de- molished, fell on the roof, making a large hole. Two employees sleeping in an adjacent rooto had a miraculous escape; the lightning passed over their bedroom door, singeing the wall- paper and tearing off the plaster; then it struck a cast iron down spout, taking spintert off the joints. At Overton, on Sunday, Mr. Joe Owea. Little Overton, lost a sheep, killed by light- ning, and a tree on Mr. Wm. Gough's field wftg shivered. At Newtown great damage was done to g1- by the hailstones, which were described as being as big as peas," while five sheep ware struck by lightning at Carno. It is a eurious thing, however, as showing the sharp edge of the storm zone, that while on the eastern side, of the Talerddig watershed torrents of rain fell there was none at Llanbrynmair, and ov the Cardigan Bay coast, save for distant rumbling of thunder about 7 A.m. on Sunday, it was a week-end of glorious and uninterrup- ted sunshine. In the Manafon district 13 sheep, sheltering und.er a hedge, were struck by lightning play- ing on some barbed wire near, and at Meifoflf a bullock was killed. A violent thunderstorm passed over Wrex- ham on Sunday morning.

I i PEERAGES CONFERRED ON ROYAL PRINCES

I i PEERAGES CONFERRED ON ROYAL PRINCES. I GERMAN NAMES- AND TITLES RELINQUISHED. ) The Press Association is officially informed that his Majesty the King has deemed it desir- able in the conditions brought about by the ¡ present war that those princes of his family j who are his subjects and bear German names 'I and titles should relinquish these titles, an4 henceforth adopt Briti$h surnames at the same time, and that consequent upon his decision his Majesty has been graciously pleased to confer peerages of the United Kingdom on tht following: The Duke of Teck, a m uess Prince ALexander of Teck, an earl; Princa Louis of Battenberg, a marquess; and Princij Alexander of Battenberg, a, marquess. ———— ,——.—

IBicycle Trip Frustrated

Bicycle Trip Frustrated. At the Birkenhead Police Court, oA Tu6s. day, evidence was given of an intended trip to Wrexham which was frustrated by t,h4 police. William Jones (16), of Fairfield" Liverpool, and Reginald Alfred Parkes (18), Romilev-street, Liverpool, were charged with stealing bicyeles from the neighbourhood of the Birkenhead, Town Hall. The prisoners, who were seafaring lads, were passing in that direction, and seeing the bicycles outside they thought, as they afterwards explained, that they would have a trip to Wrexnam. TheT. changed their minds, however, and were pro- ceeding over the dock bridges to Seacombe I when the suspicions of the police were aroused and they were M'rested.- They were each fine4 40s. and costa, or 21 days.

WREXHAM COUNTY PETTY SESSIONS

WREXHAM COUNTY PETTY SESSIONS. Tuesday, before Mr. H. Crown, J

OVERTON

OVERTON. PARISH CHURCH-—A Mnfe* for Sapper Bichard Joneo, WhCIH. I9 rem ported in another ooliumn, wm hep* 4jg Friday, whan a Sup and syrojM&iciae sration were present. A topehiag trihms to ibq deceased was aukdo by the Rev. Ulitfk 'i

No title

British prisoners, iuql"Ag X%g" prfaoft era, in enemy eountriop number low ofEcen and 43,194 other ranks; 35,65801 j8tfiBiltU8be4 are in