Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
LLANGOLLEN

LLANGOLLEN. KG-Q OOIiLBCTTION.—During the week end- ing June 20, the local branch of the League of Honour collected for the wounded soldiers 22B i £ i?s and 9a. 4d in os.. the total collections to b«ix:gr—agga, 27,300; cash, R84 13s. 5d. GOOr; PRICES.-Some good prices were £ «ialised on Tuesday week at Messrs. Jo-n 's and feon'd fotrnightly nuction in .the Smithfield, fat (Patde realising up to E44. A calf from Vivod Lti,ght ;CIO and others up to £6 each. Fat lambs made L3; rams, B4 4s.; sheep, 23 58. Wlilkers, £ 37; calvess, :CW couples (a grand lot from Mr. Phillips, Tynvcelyn), JE3 12s. 6d., JB5 Xt. 5d., and L2 13s.; Edwards and Son, £ 3 6s., t2 14s.: Jones, Ty Cerrig, B2 10s. 5d.; and Roberts, Wern Ddu. L2 1.5e. 6d. HERB COLLECTION.Large quantities of terbs, collected by the local branch of the Den- ighshire branch of the National Herb-growing Association, were received at the collecting Itarion on May 22nd, May 25t:ih and June 5th. The chief herbs brought in were Sanicle, Dan- delion root. Dock root, Coltsfoot leaves, Broom lops, Woodruff, Celandine, Deadnettle, Goose- trass, Mullein leaves, etc.; also 381bs. of dry Serbs were received, bringing the total amount ft) to date to 670 Ibs. since March. OBITUARY.—The death of Mrs. Jane Ed- ITards, wife of Mr. Charles Edwards, Ty'ny- tistyll, Pengwem, which occurred on Thursday "eek, at the age of 53, removes a well known resident of the town and one who was highly tsceemed by a wide circle of friends and rela- tives. The funeral took place on Saturday at fron Cemetery, and was largely attended, the iffieiating ministers being the Rev. S. Owen tnd John Rowlands. The deceased, who was a kative of Llanu-wchllyn, Bala, had been a mem- ber of Penilyn Church and Sunday School for taanv years. DONT MISS THIS.—We are asked to draw ipecial atltention to the advertisement appearing tn another calum,n regarding the al fresco gath- •ring to be held at Plas Newvdd in aid of the Churoh Army Huts. It is not to be held on the 8lst, as announced in the Parish Magazine, but t 1 the 28th, as advertised elsewhere. Tea and tree will be provided free. but the invitation IS extended, "Please bring your own sugar." Full arrangements have not yet been completed so far as the programme of entertainments is con- cerned, but it is hoped that Pte. Stanley Jones, the Welsh harpist, and Pte. Foulkes Williams, the erneinent penillion singer, may be included tm-ongst the performers. PULPIT PRAISE.—Preaching at Castle Street Welsh Baptist Chapel, on Sunday, the Rev. W. B. J ones, Penycae, informed ilia congregation, that he had walked from his house—where his itudy window overlooked the beautiful valley— io Liang-ollan, in order to address them. As he same the storm that was shoufcly to burst, de- yeloped around him, and in eloquent and telling phrases the rev. gentleman illustrated his dis- course, dealing with of dhrietiaa efiort and endeavour, from experiences gathered during his walk. The sermon was most impressive; and not the least effective feature [regarding it waa She jmpreesive aftermath, when the storm burst, in strong force, over the houses of the wor- shippers, after they had separated. Alluding to hiis recent visit to America the preacher said bei-e I was asked "had I seen this; there "had Sseen that." Many of the grandeurs of the West [ may have missed; but nothing, I am ceirtain, comparable to the peace-fml ohorus of the beautiful Vale of Llangollen. A GALLANT CHAPLAIN.—The news that the name of Chaplain A. W. Davies appears in the list of recipients of the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry during the battle of Gaza, has been received with great satisfaction at Llan- gollen. The Rev. A. W. Davies was, some few ye4r,s- back, in charge of the Welsh Wes-Ieyan Church in Cast!e Street, and established a higlh reputation ilocada- not only as a scholarly and cultured preacher, but .also as an all-rounci good fellow, his wife- (nee Miss Owen, Angfcarad, Cor- wen), being also widely popular in denominational circles. From Llangollen, vir. Davies removed to Rhyl and afterwards, on circuit, to Bebhesda, from whenoe he offered hig services*, which were accepted, as chaplain to the Welsh forces. He received the Cross for an act of conspicuous ra.Ua.ntry. Being in company with the stretcher bearers, who came under a hot fire, he carried a wounded soldier, who' could not otherwise have been relieved, across his houlders to a place of aafety-thus two Llangc-Men men have gained the Military Cross for outstanding bravery at the I G4a battle. t PROSPECTING AT LLANGOLLEN.—Dur- ing the past week prospecting operations on a tmall scale, but which it is hoped may ultimately Dave the way for the establishment of an in- dnsrry of some size, have been proceeding at Tynyoelyn on the Tyndwr estate. Those respon- sible for them are connected with a Mold Col- Hery Company, and they are following up indi- cations obtained some years back, when a species of quartz was obtained that is largely used in the manufacture of varnish, and the procuring of which in large quantities is a matter of con- siderable importance just now. Inquiries made 07 a representartive elicit that, although no im- mediate development on a considerable scale, necessitating the employment of labour is likely, it is thought tha,t the enterprise is a serious one and if indications prevailing, when development works were previously attempted, should prove Continuous, more serious operations are not likely to be Jong delayed, as'the neighbourhood is known to be very richly mineralized. A DEATH TRAP.—At a meeting of the 't meeting of t,ie Parish Council, Mr. W. Blake, Gronwen, presid- ing, Mr. S. Morton. the clerk, drew attention to a dangerous place in the roadway near Sy- lyllte Bridge, which-he described as a verita,ble 'death trap. On the Saturday before the recent Bank Holiday a ymmgman from Cefn w.? killed when cycling down the steep descent to the bridge. The road takes a very sharp turn at the foot of the Isteep hill immediately before the entrance is reached, and in attempting to negotiate this in the past three casualties have been c\i«sed. riders rushh.g down the descent Into the wall and beÜlg" thrown over the para- pet. into 'the river Dee. Previous complaints on the matter had been nicdo to the County Coun- cil, but nothing had been done. After discus- sion, the Council decided to send -a further letter to the County Council again calling their at-ten- tion to the necessity for action. The Clerk said he had inspected place with a surveyor, and by forming a straight road to the bridge. from the highway across an adjacent feld the danger of the approach might be obviated. LLANGOLXJEN LAD'S GOOT)-BY. st week we announced that Pte Griffith Lloyd, South Lancashire Regiment, of John Street, had been dangerously wounded whilst serving in France, a-nd that Ptc II. Dean, Dee Lane, of the South Lancashires, had also been wounded. On Mon- day morning the sad new reached Pte Lloyd's late home. at Llangollen, that he had succumbed in hospital after the operation which his wounds rendered necessary. ? In a letter to his mof?lic- Pte. H. Dean, who is now in hospital at Brighton, where he haa been iremoved from France, gives some account of the incident that has resulted so tragically. He says: "I have been wounded in the left hand and bruised down the left side. Griffith Lloyd got wouddat the same time with the same aheM., I bad) a letter from h?s father and a packet of cigarettes the day that we got done. He asked me for Grlffiths" address, so I went to see him. He came to send me half-way, &nd just as we were going to b'd each other Good Ni_ght' this shell came and dropped us i bosh. Two or three got killed and several wounded- I don't know where Griffith has been wounded, but I believe he copped it worse than me." It appears that Pte. Lloyd was badly wounded in the legs, and that an amputation was necessary. This was carried out in hospital, the patient failing to rally. The deepest sympathy is expressed on all hands with the family of the gallant young soldier, wiho a;re most highly re- pected in the towm. THE PENYBRYN FAMILY.—Intelligence received at Llangollen that Second-Lieutenant W. Pritchard Dodd, R.W.F., second son of Mr. and Mrs. Dodd, Penybrvn, has been awarded the Military Cross, has caused widespread en- thusiasm, and the family have received many messages of congratulation. During the fight at Gaza Lieut. Dodd was one of the officers in com- mand of an advance party; One by one his I fellow ofifcers were bowled over, but, with a remnant of the party, he gallantly "stuck it" until reinforced, being himself knocked out be- I fore they came up by the wound from which he is now happily recovering at Cairo. The deed I is regarded as a moat gallant -one." Bv the way, Lieut. Arthur Dodd, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Dodd, who was commissioned in De- cember and has been serving for several months with the Royal Engineers in France, had a very active stage in the final stages of the prepara- tions for the "big explosion" that startled the Kaiser and his family a few weeks ago. When the story of the war comes to ,be written Lieut. Arthur Dodd can supply a thrilling chapter on "How we did the rest before the button was pressed." Lieut. A. H. Dodd, R.E., looking in excellent ,health, arrived home quite unexpect- edly from France on Monday night, and was given a hearty welcome by his many friends at Llangollen. He had little to say but what a I smile of confidence expresses regarding what is happening "out yonder." RUABON. CONVALESCENT SOLDIERS. Lance- Corporal Beckitt of the Transport Service (son of Mr. Beckitot, High-street), who was seriously weunded in France last February, and who has been in various hospitals in France and England, has now been removed to Knap Hall, Surrey, and is reported to be recovering slowly. Second-Lieutenant R. Lawton Roberts is mak- ing satisfactory progress. RUMMAGE SALE.—A successful rummage sale, organised by Mr. and Mrs. Batha, was held in the Village Room. in aid of the funds of the parish church, on Wednesday, when £ 28 was realised. The following ladies were in charge of the talls :-Mrs. J. S. Lewis, Mrs. G. Thomas, MKS. Woodford, Mrs. Bodman, Mrs. Lawton Roberts, Mrs. Matthews, Mrs. Fussell, Mrg, R. Leighton, Madame Dorman, Mrs. J. E. Griffiths, Mrs. Thos. Edwards, Mrs. E. Mar, ris, Mrs. J. W. Owen, Mrs. Murless, Mrs. Beckitt, Mrs. Squire, Mrs. D. J. Bo wen and Mrs. Davies, and the Misses Bowen, Nicholas, Roberts, Williams, Cotton and Morris. Messrs. Peter Lloyd and Ralph Jones also rendered valuable assistance. Mr. W. Leighton acted as honorary treasurer.

0 Corwen Board of Guardians i Corwen Board of Guardiansj

0 — Corwen Board of Guardians. i Corwen Board of Guardians. j Friday present, Messrs. E. D. Jones chair- man, R. J. Chapman, Thos. Williams, Thos. Jones, R. J. Jones, R. O. Roberts, W. Williams, E. P. Jones, Geo. Evans, Samuel Williams, E. M. Edwards, W. P. Williams, D. W. Williams, R. E. Pugh. and Miss C. Walker with the Clerk (Mr. E. Derbyshire.) the Medical Officer i Dr. H. Walker) and the Releiving Officers (Mr. R. O. Davies and -Air, D. L. Jones). POOR LAW INSPECTOR'S VISIT. j Mr. H. R. Williams, Poop Law Inspector, paid his periodical visit to the Institution and, after making a tour of inspection round the establishment, expressed himself highly grati lied with what he had seen, and with the condition of the institution generally. He made one or two suggestions- notably as to the desirability of brightening up the infant's room at the workhouse—to which due atten- tion is being paid by the House Committee. Mr. Williams alluded, at some length, to the recent meeting of the Exceutive Committee I of the North Wales Joint Vagrancy Commit- i tee, at which Corwen was represented by the! Chairman and Mr. R. J. Jones. At this con- ference the letter of Lord Rhondda, the then I President of the, Local Government Board, making certain proposals in regard to the fut. ure provision to be made for vagrants at a j smaller number of centres was considerer, and! it was decided to approve the measure, which provides for the closing of a number of casual wards and the keeping open of others (of which Carwen is one), the expenses of the Board of Guardians, who contribute to the funds of the North Wales Joint Vagrancy Committee, incurred on the relief of casual paupers, to be pooled to make the cost of the relief of the vagrants a charge upon the whole area of the Vagrancy Committee. This proposal and the manner in which it will operate so far as! Corwen is concerned, was fully explained, and I a f resolution was adopted, approving of the action decided upon by the Rhyl confenence, thanking those who had taken part in it, more especially the members who had represented I Corwen Board of Guardians. j VARIA.. I Cheques for outrelief were signed": Mr. R. O. Davies £ 70; and Mr. D. L. Jones 956.-It was decided to adopt measures to obviate thej possibility of overerowdinr in the sick wards. i

WHEN LIFE WAS SIMPLER LIFE WAS LONGER

WHEN LIFE WAS SIMPLER LIFE WAS LONGER. When the organs begin to weaken, whether early or la,te in life, the hard-working kidneys I usually tire out first, and should have first consideration. Failing eyesight, stiff, achy joints, rheumatic i pains, backache and distressing urination are often due only to weak kidneys. At the first sign of weakness give the kidneys ?proin.pt a-tteiitioii. Drink water freely to fluh the kidneys, and use Doan's Backache Kidnev Pills to strengthen them. Go back to the Simple Life, to the sensible habits of your. boy- 1 hood days. Eat less meat, avoid over-work excesses and worry, and take more outdoor exercise, rest and sleep. Everybody dreads kidney trouble, but this sensible 'treatment will keep the kidneys in condition, lengthen life, make it easier, and perhaps avert altogether the more serious kid- ney diseases. Llangollen people have recommended Doan's Backache Kidney Pills to their friends and neighbours for over 16 years. The good they do and the continual use of home testimonials inspires an ever increasing confidence in THIS SPECIAL KIDNEY MEDICINE. « All dealers, or 2/9 a box from Foster- PlcClellan Co., 8, Wells Strer4 Oxford Street, London, W,

I Behind the British Lines

I Behind the British Lines. I WHAT MR. DARLINGTON SAW IN FRANCE. The latwior ol the Town Hall at Llangwflen was crowded to its utmost capacity on Friday u'g-k-. to hear, at first ttanci. from Mr. Ralph I>ariin^ton. F.R.G.S., the story of his recent tour behind tbe British lines in France. The story took she form of a lantern lecture, the entire proceeds to be devoted Co the funds of the Llangollen Cottage Hospital which, this year, stand in special need of strengthening," owing to we exceptional calls which war organisations inave made upon the public. Ca!pt. W. Best, R. W.P., presidtd, Mr. Dariington's lecture: took about an hour In dieiiveiry, coveiedi a very wide range of ground, and dealt with a multitude of matters that are, just now, of tfUTpaiseLng interest. The most ineffaoafole im- pression which, his visit had, madie upon hIm, be said, was the horror of war; and the abiding hope that he brought away was. qtibat this might be the final resole to so terrible a means of settling inter- national quarreOs. The wOitidetiful e.c.p'rtt die corps of the Army, whom he had seen going In their thousands up to the firing line, with laughter and fonsg on their lips, couldl never be forgotten. He explained bow it came to pass that the British Arany in France and Flanders wa,s the best led and the cleanest Anny on any of the. war fronts, and his descriptions of the Commissariat and the Army Service branches of the foces,, were wonderfully informative, showing precisely how these neswlts are achieved). Then, after the carei for the living, came the attention to the woundjed and the dytag; the complicated organisation that is at work to undo, so far as may be humanly possible, the terrible mischief of war; and a finely conceived series of descriptions oj baspital treatment as he had observed, it led up to a tribute to the care and rerve:r- ence which mark the treatment of our dead, in such striding contrast to tlsiat with wtideh tie Germans axe reputed to be dealing with theirs. To those who have tost near ones and dea.r ones in the war the assurance that their remains when it Is human- ly possible to do so, treated- with all reverence, and the pictures thrown upon the screen of the well- ordered and carefully tended cemeteries, with the increasing number of crosses above the graves of the "unreturniing brave," must. have come as a solace and a comfort. Mr. Darling ton also defcribed the work that is being done by,tht, Veterinary Corps attached to the Army, and the abounding skill that is devoted to the task of Ie,- storing the horses t;liat are maimed on the field of, battie. A vivid -series of word-pictures of the Arras Battle, accompanied by indications of wha/rr it aimed at securing and. wlll,,t It secured, pitceded by an able explanation, rendered all the more helpful toy some very interfcit.in-g diagrams, of the submarine peril, how Germany has developed under-seia war- iare, the type of craft she is utilising, and all that, its effective subjugation rae,anstc) the Allied1 cause., A brief allusion to fights in the air, and the various forms of flying machines in use behind) the lines in France, and also by the enemy, enabled Mr. Dar- lington's hearers to form clearer views regarding this method of warfare; and a fine character sketch of Sir Douglas Haig, the Commander in Chief, who Mr. Darlington met during his tour, brought what may he alluded to as the descriptive portion of the lecture to a. cLos-e..M.r, Darlington, however, giave us, not only the observations be bad made, but the deductions they enabled him to draw. He went to France, pielpared to be included amongst the doubt- fuls, but he returned convinced that the victory of the Allied cause is als absolutely certain as that night follows day. In his opinion, tbe war is already won; and the only question of tima remairuing is how long the Ge;r-mian high command will be before they realise it, and -how long it will be before the German people realise the i'act for themselves. Mr. Darlington did not assume* to take a place with those who predict, wiith some degree erf exactness, wben the wa,r will end, but he abated that it would terminate wihen that spirit of Prussian miilita.rim, which was responsible' for its b.eg,inning; and the ultimate aim of which was to ,,ma-h the British Empire, had been completely destroyed. Before closing, be alladed to the untiring work of those at hoiae; who have done so much to help the m-en at tjbe front to bear the, beat and burden of the day by providing them with and comforts and, in this connection, he made special reference to What Mrs. Best has been chiefly instrumental in getting done in connection with the War Guild, and County Comforts Association, to Mrs. Aikin's en- deavours- and the good results achieved by the League of Honour, to the labours,- in the good cause, of the ^Ponybryn Hall ladies, and to many ¡ other forms {if practical usefulness, all of which have been in est thoroughly useful and helpful and I enthusiastically appreciated by the men at the, fron, (Cheers). At the close of the lecture Alderman W. G. Dodd I proposed a very heianty vote of thanks to Mr. D«ariiE;gton for hilS sible and! generous effort, made I on behalf or the most useful locaal institution in .which they wei.e all deeply interested; and! this was seconded by Mr. Sidney Richards and carried with .applause, a vote of thanks to the Chairman for presiding, and to :t1". Allen Lettsamei, the; manipula- I to r of the lantern, bringing the proceedings to a close. The financial result of the lecture Is tSo 5s. M,,

j I IHarvest Beer

j I Harvest Beer. FARMERS SEEK PERMISSION TO I BREW. I The Welshpool Farmers' Union, on Monday, passed, by a small majority, a resolution call- ing on the Food Controller to allow farmers and cottagers to buy malt to brew beer, more 1 especially for the harvest time. Mr. George Macque-en (secretary), opposing, j I said that experience in England and Scotland had taught him that more and better work was done on water, and that the taste for beer, acquired on the harvest field developed into drunkenness in many cases. The Rev. Edward Davies said it was ridicu- lous that the worker in the field could get no drink, while the idler in the public house could. Other members said beer was the best and cheapest drink for harvest time. ———— .—————

No title

The" Koelnische Lokalanzeiger" states that five million forged bread tickets are in circulation and that, as a consequence, 364,000,000 kilogrammes (over 350,000 tons) of bread has come into improper hands. The Victorian Government has purchased 500 acres of land near Romsey, portion of the Glenbridge Park Estate. The land is inten- ded primarily for the settlement of soldiers and to be subdivided into blocks of 20 to 25i acres.. It has been suggested that licences for the lifting of potatoes should be granted after in- spection of crops by the local authorities or th3 Board of Agriculture, but the Food Pro-! duction Department, when consulted, believed that the patriotic common sense of the growers might' be left to deal with the question. It should be made clear to all growers that potatoes wherever possible should be left in the ground long enough to produce a full -orop.

I CORRESPONDENCE

I CORRESPONDENCE. (WE DO NOT WECESSARJl.y SHARE THE OPINIONS EXPREBOVII I 81 Wantits IN THIS COLUMN, j HOUSING AND TUBERCULOSIS. Sip.Tlie Health Insurance Committee of the County of Carnarvon is conducting an investiga- tion into the effects of bad housing upon tuber- culosis, and information IS being collected and S scheduled regardng the home conditions of all consumptive patients m that county. The im- mense value of such an investigation will be evi- dent to all your readers, and I would strongly recommend that similar inquiries be instituted by the Insurance Committees of all other countiesJn Wales and Monmouth sib 1 -re The number of members of such committees an the Principality runs into hundreds, and I trust that some of the&e will move in the matter at the next meeting of their respective autharitie..i.-I am, etc., EDGAR L. CHAPPKLE,, Secretary, Welsh Housing and Develop- ment Association.- 38, Charles Street, CWdiff. j THE TEACHING OF WELSH IN. I EAST DENBIGHSHIRE. 1 SiR,T am given to understand! that the teach- ing- of Welsh in the Eastern portion of the County has been seriousliy engaging the attention of the County Education Committee, and that the por- tion of the subject in the curriculum of many of tlie schools is not regarded as satisfactory. Some years ago, a scheme of instruction in Welsth was adopted whereby the schools were divided into three classes. (1) Those situated in purely Wekh districts. (2) Those situated in purely English dstricts. (3) Those situated in bi-lingual districts. According to the scheme, arrangements were to be mudo for instruction to be g-iven in Welsh an all the schools in classes 1 and 3. It appears, however, that it has been found exceedingly difficult to carry out the sdheme in its tnt'rety I owing to the Pack of teachers capable of giving instruction in Welsh. For the coming year, how- ever, a determined effort is to be made to secure some improvement, and I am told that no scheme of work wall be accepted by the Committee in schools situated in Welsh speaking district". and bi-1ing-ual districts unless adequate provision is made therein for instruction in WeSah. This ap- pears to me a step in the right direction and I sincerely hope and trust, that the Committee will secure the hearty co-operation of all managers and teachers 111 their attempt. I understand that all sühemes of work are to be submitted to the managers before they are sent to the Local Education Authority, but for some reason or other. very little attention has, up to the present, been paid by m-a riagei's to this most important part of their duties. I sincørelv hone and trust that they will insist upon the insertion in the sdheme of a course of instruction in Wels(h suitable to the requirexnents of the various districts. In addition to managers and head tea chore 1 would appeal to t;he clergy and ministrs of all denominations for their assistance in this matter, especially as regards the co-ordination of the work as between the day and Sunday schools. The Sunday schools in Wales have done magnificent work for the preservation of the Welsh language, but fit would appear that latterly the Sunday stihools have declined both in numbers and in- fluence to the great loss of the spiritual and in- tellectuallife of Wales. I underst.and that the County Education Committee are making an earnest appeal to all clergy and ministers and also to all Welsh Societies (of which there are many in Wrexham and neighbourhood), to exercise their influence in their respective spheres on behalf of the movement. There are in Ehe Llangollen, Ruabon and "Wrexham districts many clergymen and i-niiii.,item of high academical distinctioIl,, some of them having taken the highest honours in the older Universities. I feel sure that tihese gentlemen could give the movement assistance of the greatest possible value, and once an. apnea! is made to them, I trust that a ready and hearty response wiffl be forthcoming. I would also caM attention to the position of Wrexham. Wrexham possesses schools of which any town might well be proud; but unfortunately it is, unless I am mistaken, the oniy town of any size in North Wales where no instruction an Welsh is given 111 the schools. It is difficult to explain this omission. There is a large Welsh speaking population in Wrexham. and it is high time that they should insist upon their rights of having instruction in Welsh provided for their children. In Rhosddu, for example, there is, I undenstand, a great influx of Welsh population. The (headmaster is an excellent and enthusiast-io Welshman, and I roe-I sure that arrangement* could be made for a considerable amount of Welsh instruction in the school The subject of bi-Kngualiism is receiving just now the serious at.tention of some of the highest educational authorities in the world, and I tihfink the following quotation expresses the opinion of most of them "I think .that bi-linguais,^ like the Welsh, whose education is carried on in two languages, must get more from the-.r elementary schools than the scholars of a country like England, w here only one language is used in school." The quotation is from a book on education by Stanley Leath-es, fellow of Trinity College, Cam- bridge- one of the editors of that monumental bridge the C&mbridgo  dern I- ;sto'ry an d cn? work, the Cambridge Modern TT:sto

No title

Thomas Boddm?toD, 11, a North&mP? schoolboy, had three fingers blown off Ms rigbt hand by a live bomb. His seven-year'?" brother picked. the bomb up in a field used bl' the miHtarv a we?k aero and bad carried it about in his pocket. The accident bapps0?g as the eMer boy was about to throw the b?- away. Printed and publ ed by WILLUM 9.or wres, ha.m, and CHARLES PENRHYN GASQCOISB, of cewe$Ol" under the style of WOODALL, MINSHAIA, Taog,,is Co., at the Carton Press, Oswestry, aima on every Friday morning at tihe "Advertiser" °: Ca.stie Stoeet, LlangoUen, and of all All advertisements and communicatiom quested to be ad-dres-sea to the "Advertiser" 0 Llangollen, Of to the 0 ax ton Prl?<, OsMStSf ITJDAY, JUJTE 512. JOT.