Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
GLEAN IN GS j

GLEAN IN GS. LIGHT GRAIN CROPS. w, The condition of the crops at the beginning of July ia on the whole less satisfactory than was the case at the advent of June. The past month, till near its close, was brilliantly fine, but a deficient rainfall discounted the influence of the sunshine and high temperature, especi- ally on the light, porous soils, where burning OJ ia the chief hindrance to bountiful production. Thaa class of land is amenable in most respects, but its susceptibility to drought baa hot yet m ordinary practice been effectively countered, aJ- though "if the labour were obtainable and it could be shown that the result justified the means, it is suggested that a, remedy is available in the dry farming system of arid regions. The June record of work and plant growth is exceedingly varied, but in the majority of cases the rainfall has been insufficient either in quantity or in distribution for the immediate needs of the crops. The heavy downpours of last week will be of the greatest value, although it is feared they were too late to save the spring com in the early dis- j triota and, of course, a great proportion of the hay was already in stack or in swath. SUNSHINE AND TREEN CROPS. The green crops have had a hard struggle to I withstand the burning euns of the past few I weeks, and have betrayed the need of urface moisture. The mangolds as a rule made fairly good progress, but they will benefit equally with t.he swedes, turnips, and the cabbage and kale families from the shaking rains of the past iew days. The conditions that stimulate the culbi- [ vated crops also induce a vigorous growth of weeds, and unless the latter are held in check by hand and horse hoeing the growth of the young plants will be restricted. The potato crop appears to be the most uniformly promising of the season, and active growth will be prolonged as a result of the rains. The effect of the change from bright to moist weather, however, will not be an unmixed advantage, since the latter, es- pecially if the tempers;ture rises, may bring with it the disease against which g,rowers have been i constantly warned. So far the health of the crop j is good and the growth of haulm almost ab- normal, but the tendency of mild, moist con- ditions with a limited amount of sunshine to encourage the Phytophthora infestans must not be overlooked. Spraying is now seasonable, when the weather and crops are dry, and may be or urgent importance to avert the greatest danger that can menace the crop. THE HAtf HARVEST. I The grass land, both meadow and pasture, saitly needed the rain. In some disitricts where little rain has fallen for five or six weeks the hay gathered is of only about half the normal bulk. and the pastures have been corresponding- 1:1 bare, with the result that fields enclosed for had to be grazed and cake used freely. There 18 this great difference betv^een the grass and usable, however, that in the case of the former there is always a possibility of retrieving earlier ajijfortunes. An exuberance of aftermath cr Ieaond crop may not atone in every respoct for 4 deficient firwt crop, but it greatly minimizes I the ultimate result. The iswond grovy-th may be Baved as hay, made into silage, or eaten off With stock, bu-t in any case a liberal growth is of the greatest importance, and there is a pros- pect of abundant keep for the herds and flocks fcx sam# we4m to ?onM and of a surplus to lay ?3 for winter. In view 

I Breaking up Grass Lands

I Breaking up Grass Lands. 1 4,250,000 ADDITIONAL ACRES FOR CEREALS AND POTATOES. Copies of letters written to War Agricultural Committees by the President of the Board of Agriculture and Sir Arthur Lee (Director-Gen- «rai of the Food Production Department), on th") agricultural policy of the Government of breaking up 3,000,000 acres of grass land for the harvest of 1918, were issued as a White Paper Recently. It is pointed out that this task will have to be taken in hand at the earliest possible foment practicable. Sir Arthur Lee, in his communication, points that in selecting the land to be ploughed, <*wnmittees must constantly bear in mind that it ^ul not be enough merely to secure that their qUota of grass land is to be ploughed up. The taak; is to grow enough food to render ,ua inda- fiandenifc of imported supplies, and for. this pur- 0-0 the I-and to be ploughed must be such that wiU produce at least average crops of oom and Potatoes. In a further communication, Sir Arthur Lee the eat importance of obtaining as ^ar aa P;:= 'th, vuntary co-operation of 44n&wr,em and farmers. But," he ?tatp:, if the total area of ¡nus land which' owners and uwers are prepared to break up voluntarily :ls ?r ShOl't of The Qaota allottd, roe Boa? '?UME tb?i: the beet course will be to enge Wcrfeasional burveyors, v?luer?, or land agents, ?Oo shouM be instrucVd to sedect, in co-oper- ?on with the practical farmers on the district ????t

Needs of Welsh Agriculture

Needs of Welsh Agriculture. I&JLu16 House of Commons, on Monday, Mr. ?T?eraon, Under Secretary for War, ques- ti ned by Sir Herbert Roberts, said that in- tt;tucuons had been issued to military repre- a?&?!. in W?Ies, %8 in England and Scot- nxI, ?? t men employed on farms were not 16 be taken for the army without the consent ? the Agricultural Executive Committees.

No title

Q It is reported from Stavanger that a large steamer bound for Stettin with a luable cargo of ore ran aground on the Oegian coast and was lost. to It 1s announced from Adelaide that the pas- toral prorpects m South Australia are parti- cul a -i y bright. There has been a record lamb- Sg, and there will probably be 15,000 bates of more than last year. i.,

IOFFICIAL RETURNS OF MARKET PRICES

I OFFICIAL RETURNS OF MARKET PRICES. The offwm MtnTne of market pUcea foi th? vs?ek j ending June 27, compiled from the reports ece1ved j from the Board of Agriculture's market reporters, i give the following iniotmatlon.- Faife Stock have been in shorter supply tibas week, especially sheep and pdgs; the numbers for all classes were well below the average in the corresponding • week of the three previous years, whale the total j numbers during the six m ontlls of the current Xear at the markets included in the return ahow a distinct I tailing off from the tStaee-jear average. Cattle. show an advance in price, the chief changes being at Leicester, where ail classes of Shorthorns were lid. per Jib. dearer, while at Leeds, Lincoln, N ewpcrt (Mon.), and Newcastle-on-T jne prices advanced. id., at Ipswich, Basingstoke, Northampton, Nottingham, | Peterborough, and Wakefield ió., and at Dorchester and King's Lynn id-, per Jb. At London, where 723 | cattle were offered, against 697 last week, although j trade was Slow, last weeks prfces were about main. tained. The average over all markets this weak is f 10s. 10d. per 14-lb. stone (17d. per lib.), against 19s. 6d:. per stone (161d, per Ib.) last week. With regard to live weight quot?tj?aa. rarioea at Cairlls? aed Oavestwy advanced &I., at York 25. 6d., and at Wolverhampton 28., but at Darlington bY declined I Is., and at both Shrewsbury and Welliingtan (Salop) [ about fis. per owt, Grass-feds are not coming out í -very well, many reports indicating that they aT« being marketed in an unflnished condition, owing to the shortage of gflass as weli as feeding Owing to the shorter supply, both sheep and lambs Elhow a stllgbt Tecoverj- from the easier trade reported last week prices marking an advance in the case of fcheep of fully Jd., and of lambs Jd., per lb. At Birmingham, where 3,086 pigs were offered, against 4,103 last week, bacons declined in price 4.d. per stone, but at several othler mqrike-ts trade was better at Hull, for instance, prices for both bacons and porkers advanced Is., and at L!Ilooln,2,s. per stone, while at Nottingham bacons were 2!&d. per stone dearer, causing the average over all markets in the case of bacons to be M., end porkers 4d., per stone higher than the previous week At Oswestry on Wednesday all classes of fat stock were in good demand; cattle of the best quality averaged 91s., and inferior forts 70s., per live cwt., with a ready clearance, while sbeepa-nd lambs of heap quality made lad- and 20d. per lb. respectively. Pigs about 3d. per stone dearer, bacons making from ]3s, 6d. to 15&. M., and porkens 14s. to 16s., per 14-lb. stone. Store Stock.-Re-ports from practically all markets indScaite an easier trade for store cattle; at the special sale at Shrewsbury, where nearly 1,800 beasts were offered, prices for the best quaUty ranged from 73s. to S2., and for others down to 65s per live cwt., but the reporter states that very few lots got sold at tshe latter price. At Gloucester trade for good quality two-year-olds was slightly I dearer, but at most other places the demand was very Blow. Grain and Meal.—London.—Wheat.—The English old crop is nearly eochausted in the counties from which London mainly diraws supplies; a few poultry i loW are obtainable at 75s. to 76s. per 4801bs., natural weight. Imported wheat is a quiet market, with the commoner kinds much more plentiful than strong and I hard wheat. A very fair supply of new Indian in- cludes good Bombay, Deltii, and Calcutta sorts, which were not obtainable at this time last year. Barley. -Trade is better for 44Slib. descriptions at 84s. to 87s. (1ós. to T7s M. per 400tbs.) under permit. ?eed- ing bailey at 6&s. p?T 'OOibs. factors' price 1s neg- lected. Peed barley ia obtainabl% 42s. to Ms. per <'wt being the eMh pr?ce. Oats.-oW crop EngUsh is very scarce at 00a.3d. per SNIbs. (56s. per 3121 bs.) factors' price. Scotch and Irish are unobtainable, CMlian at to 69s. per S20lbs. (63s. ad. to 67s. 3d. per presents wider choice of type than, usual. American and Camadian are sold at 65s. to ¡ 66s. per 320ibs. (68s. 3d. to 84s. 3d. per 3121bs.), but tha natural: weight is only 2881!bs. to StHlbs. Tbeae aire buyers for oat husks and hulls at R7 per ton. ita.ize.—There is a supply of inferior maize released I for horse food and this sells readily. The prices aaked I just now are very irregular, extra payment being I made for free maize immediately deliverable ex London warehouse. Government kiln-dried makes 74s. per 480Ibs. Pulse.—A moderate trade is passing at 100s. to 102s. per &32ibs. for English beans, 283. 6d. to 24s. per cwt. for Chinese amd Manetouiian beans 83s. to 102s. per 5041bs. for English peas, 130s. per 604 lbs. for Indian white peas, and 100s. to 106s. per 4801bs. for dari. Ifeal.-Rice meal is in good request, and the price of rice flour has reached tBs. per 280-lb. sack. Rice offals sell at 200s., and oat husk meal at 210s., per ton. Oilcake.—There is very little business passing in linseed or decorticated I cake; th? less expensive oneticgs include Egyptain cottonseed eak? at 916 10s., pa4m nut cake %t £ 17, good mixed &oy and cotton cake at £T 105., &Dd &wme rather poor coconut cake at £16 i7b. 6d., per ton. Gaound nuts sell at 32s. to 3813. per cwt. Brewery and distillery gioins.-Tllve by-products, where in second hamds, are rather expensive; inquiry should be made ol local breweries by intending buyers, but the producers are. seldom able to give any promise in advance as to probable surplus. M.liik.—London (Euston and Stations). —There is still a full supply of milk, and only few platform sales have been eSectedv w most dealers I have sufficient for their requirements. Birmingham. --guppues plentiful. Man.chester.-A few fots were I sold at the week end, but there was no demand j aftea-wards.

I Exemptions for Land WorkersI

I Exemptions for Land Workers. I  A meeting of the Welsh Parliamentary party w?a held oh Tuesday week to consider the ex- clusion of Welsh A:,kricultural Executive Co?m. mittees from the recent order under whipR the War Office agreed not to tak'e for the arm y any more men already employed on IfarmswJithout the concurrence of such committees. Sir Herbert Roberts, M.P., chairman of the party, reported that he had received a message from the Prime Minister that -it hi&d been de- cided by the War Cabinet to apply the order to Wales and Monmouthshire as well as Eng- land and Scotland. This entirely met. the views of the members of. the party. We understand Mr. John Owen, the Welsh Agricultural Commissioner, lias official author- idly for saying that the OHer has now been modified and will apply to Wales as well as to England and Scotland. The Montgomeryshire War Agricultural Com- mittee ask farmers to acquaint them if any of their men aire called up, and they point out that any man lea,ving his employment on a farm will at once have his protection, cancelled.

Food Controllers New Powers

Food Controller's New Powers. By am Order an Council the Food Controller has been given powers, such aa are possessed by the Admiralty, the Army Council, and the Ministry of Munitions, to requisition output at prioea based on cost of production, plus a reason- able pre-was- rate of profit.

No title

l Two tenants have been given short notice to leave by the Herefordshire War Agricul- tural Executive Committee, as their farms were I feundi to be is a bad state of oultivstiou,

THE CORN BILL

THE CORN BILL, THE AUSTRALIAN EXAMPLE. When Mr. Hughes, the Premier of Australia, was in this country some months ago, we were bidden to take note of the way Australia dealt wi?h war ptotblema and follow in her footsteps. There are certainly s&me things in which the Dominions have had wider experience than we in the Motherland, and one of them is the en- couragement of the cultivation of wheat. The Imperial Government, as our agricultural readers know, are prop or ig to offer inducements to farmers in this country to plough up more land in the shape of fixed prices. Mr. C. G. Wade, who has recently returned from Australia, writ- ing' in the Times," compares this haphazard policy with that successfully adopted over there," and his viewa are of special interest at the moment. Mr. W&de, im the course of his i letter, says:- In the first place, it is proposed to fix certain j minimum prices for the sale of wheat and oats i based upon the number of quarters produced j and said—not produced alone. I take it that the object of this measure is (1) to secure an incre I in the quantity of home-grown cerea-b; (2) to in- crease the demand for rural labour; and (3) to make the coiit of securing these objects as light as practicable to the taxpayer. The above basis provides no guarantee of any substantial increase in the production of bread- stuffs. There will be some increase, no doubt, but whether to any extent seems doubtful. On the other hand, there are not only individual landowners, but districts, and possibly counties, where all the arable land is as far as practicable now being utilized. In such cases fixing prices would not increase the area under cultivation, but, the taxpayer will be under the burden of finding an increased amount to meet the extra price per quarter payable on the yield from ex- isting areas. Again, with respect to productive wheat land which now gives a heavy yield, the iryoreased price for wheat will add largely to the profits of the occupant at the expense of the tax payer, but without fulfilling the objects of the Bill. I venture to suggest that the desire of Parka, merit, could be met by a provis I-or, to the effect that the fixed price be applied to wheat or oats grown on new" land. In this way the diffi- culty above mentioned would be obviated. There should be, sumcien-t stimulus to break up pasture land for agriculture; the community wi31 obtain an increased yield of cereals and with the new acreage under the plough grows ainrol- tai,e.,ouply an increased demand for labour. I may add that this expedient was adopted m New South Wales after the outbreak of the war, and it resulted in a substantial increased area of cultivation with a minimum of departmental friction. Ag?ain, with regard to the mll1W:lUHl \1 wage for workers, Auetrahu hM had much ex- perience of tribunals fixing wages and hours of work; but difficulties arise in the application of this machinery. The rate of wages cannot be I fixed adequately without determining also the hours of work, and there is the inevitable tend- ency for the minimum wage to become the standard wage. This leads to a demand for ('s- I tablishing a standard wage in every grade of ea.ch industry. Generally speaking, the higher- grade lwbour bears a certain relation to the least I skilful, who would be the recipients in the first instance of the minimum wage. Onoe the ad- vantages of such wage fixing are learnt every grade in the trade or industry demands an I award for a staaidiard wage. The trouble is further accentuated by the fact that the Chair- man of Starte Tribunals is generally some person ou???de the trade. In the ordinary course, where I, adjustment of wages conditions is arrived a? be- tween employer and employeea alone, extrav- a.gnt dean&i gre routed and n?ver attempted, but with a chairman from outside there is the temptation, on the one hand, to prefer exorbit- ant cwms; on the other to meet them with ex- ¡ travagant counter-claim, each side hoping that' in the deadlock created by equal voting on each side the chairman may be induced to split the difference; hence a mass of evidence and n- accurs,te results. It has occurred to me that these difficulties migh/fc be obviated and the end desired achieved da « more expeditious way by providing tha.t the increased selling, price shall be paid to those producers only who pay their employees a reasonable living wage." Therein lies a great advantage, that the need for a detailed inquiry into the wage for each district is not essential. In the majority of instances the wages paid by -the employer will oarry on the face of it evi- I dence that the lowest paid enj oys a living wage. Further, detailed adjustment would not then be necessary. The tribunal could judge without trouble whether the lowest wage is substantially I above or below the broad standard of a living I wage, and in a few instances only when the difference between the two is minute need a detailed inquiry be entered upon. Generally speaking, every farmer who opens up now areas for agriculture will avoid the risk of losing his bonus by first of all securing to his men a wake that will be beyond reach of ad- verse criticism and within his means. I take this idea again from Australian precedent. The doctrine of new Protection which was initi- ated some years ago in the Commonwealth pro- vided for increased prices to certain manufac- turers who paid their employees a reasonable wage. I

I PONKEY

I PONKEY. MOUNT PLEASANT OHAPEI.Su-nciiy School anniversary services were held on Sun- day, when Mr. Gilpin? Johnson-street, presided over the morning service, and Mr. T. L. Jones, I Lower Moreton, opened the meeting with prayer. The following took part:—John H. E dwards, Isaac Thomas, Annie Williams, Edith I Smith, Ruth James Eva Ellis, Gwennie Jones, Mr. Esau Edwards and Mr. Tom Banks. The afternoon meeting was opened by Mr. John William^, Bryn Gardden, and recitations and solos were contributed by Martha Roberts, Millie Jones, Lucy James, Willie Jones, and Violet Matthews. A trio, God be merciful," I wa.s sung by Miss Blodwen Perry and Messrs. J. H. Jofles and E. Edwards. The children were catechised by Miss Dorcas Daviea. In the evening the choir gave a performance of the cantata, The Battle of Life," under the lead- ership of Mr. Ishmael Jones, Ellis-st-reeit. The Rev. J. P. Griffiths, pastor, presided. The choir were assisted by Messrs. Wm. Phillips, Arthur Wakefield, George Edge and J. W. Thomas. OVERTON. I -auuiumYj..—as ictin uuncan, the son of Mr. Duncan, the Rhewl, was taking milk to the station on Saturday the horse stumbled and fell breaking a shaft of the trap and cutting its knees. Luckily, the boy escaped unhurt. SALE OF WORK. A sale of work and a rummage sale proved very successful on Thursday and the proceeds were diividjed between tSie S.P.G. (Western Canada) and the Leeewood V.A.D. hospital. The stalls were in charge of Mrs. Glelarid, Mrs. and Miss M. Eyton, the Hon. Mrs. Tighe, Mrs. and Miss Jiackson, the Misses D. SeymoMr, A, Stokes, M. Phillips, H. Jones, Vera Wright and E. Foulkes. Several side shows added, to the attractions. An exhibition of Morris dancing, prettily executed, was given by Mrs. Moreton and the Misses M. Eyton, D. Seymour, Wilooxon, Cleland, Simpson (2), and Walmsley (2). The excellence of the arrange- ments reflect much credit on the Rector and Mrs. Elliot Simpson. In the evening the B4tiodeld n?A pit?y?d for u=oing on the Rectory lawn.

Fatality at Bersham CollieryI

Fatality at Bersham Colliery. I' Mr. Hopley Pierce held an inquest at Rhostyilen last week on the body of Thomas Hughes, 82, Hill Street, Rhostyllea. Mr. D. H. P. Maffateww, H.M, Inspector of Mimes, w&s present, and Mr., J.' R Wiilu-a-ins wts foreman of the jury. Mr. Edward Hugfaes (miners' 2;6,ent) and Dr. Hlslop wore olgo present. The Coroner said deceased got up the 3.46 a.m. the previous Monday amd was them apparently In good health. He ate a good breakfast, consisting of bread and butter, roast pork and two cups of ooffiee. At 4.40 a.m, he left for his work at No. 2 Pit, BEIf. sham Colliery, and after be had been woTIdug some, hours he collapsed at :jhe pit bottom, death result- tog. He bad recently been attended by Dr. D. J. Williams, ithostyiilen. Mrs. Hughes, the widow, said her husband was QI years of age. She loast saw him" alive. on the Mon- day at 4.30 aAIl., and he then appeared to be iu his usual state of health..He bad a gpod breakfast of pork sandwiches, and two cups of coffee. He bad been under Dir Williams Jatefy, but ahe diid not thin: j,, wias for anything mere serious than a cold. He did not make any cempiaiMt 9D the motutmig in question. Ed. Jones, 68, Chapel Street, PJhostyllen, ilreman at Bersfaam Colliery, said he knew deceased, 41,114 lastt; saw Mm alive at 12 noon on Monday. He was in good health, as far as witness couid judge, entft made no complaints. Subsequently, witness was standing on the top landing, when deceased fell against Mm. Deceased did not say & word, and witness thought he died immediately. He diid not think he caught his boot, as thelre was nothing he could catch his foot in. As fireman of the digfertet witness vialbed the working pLace of deceased wice a day, 9.15 a.m. and 12 noon. On the day ill question dt taased appeared. to be the same as on any other day, and there -was no complaint. About three minutes to two it was usual for ail of them to assemble at the top of the landing to wait for calling time. They bad been dotog this fOir many weeks. On the day in question they were all there and when tbey got the wOTd tbey moved!. Hughes came sides ways, and dropped on witness's legs. Witness said "Hello," but got no answer, he then touched him, put him in a better position, and un- buttoned hda collar, waistcoat, and shirt, and sent for William Jones, but he beAieved the deceased was dead before the, JiaifctcT arrived, although, he was net ma;ny seconds coming. Witness did all he oould for deceased. In answer to Mr. Mathews, witness said tfuey were on the iron tadiing. The landing was about 3ft. square. If deceased did catdk his bead In Hailing it would not be much. Wm..Tones, 128, Wrexham Road, fthostyllea, under hooker .at Bewslnam Colliery, said be was sent for albout 2-3 p.m. He came to the landing and saw Hughes there, and the latter was xhen dead. Ed. Joneis toad him whiat had taken place. He knew deceased well, but had not seen him earlier that, day. In his opinion, he was a good, strong, healthy man, and was veiry regular at his wotdc. Dir. David John Williams, Wrexh.am Road, Rhostyllen, said he knew the daoeiased quite well. He bust saw him alive on June 18. He had been under his caTe for F-me years, off and on, but for the last four or five months he. had attended him pretty frequently. Deceased suffered from chest trouble, and found it difficult to breathe. Both his lungs and heart were affected, He did not tefi deceased, but on June 18 he prescribed for him and advised him to take a fortnight's rest. He had neuralgic pctins. around the heart region. Witness was not surprised when he heard be was dead. The Coroner: Then w

RHOSYMEDRE

RHOSYMEDRE. PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHAPEL. The ounaay School annive-rsary wa.s held on Sunday at the George Edwards Hall, Oefn, when the special pi?Mbeir was the Rev. W. Potter, HaMf&x. In the afternoon a children^ clemonamtion was given entitled Count your blessmgs." conducted by Mrs. Gleor?e Osborne. Mr. R I>ar]ir.ig"fcon was the afternoon president; the choir was oolMtact)? by Mr. John PoweU. and the piamist was Miss (X Parry, Newbridge.

No title

In a hamlet in the Ashford district, which boasts of only nine inhabitants, the following notice is posted:—"In the event of an air raid do not collect in a crowd." ——.——

Advertising

WIITMII— HI—M M,I (.■■■.■■MMIWWIM Our portrait is of Miss Ruth C. Hart, of 129, Our rt;e?et Clapton Park, London, N.E., who Ped,ro "I was. suffering from abscesses tin ohe g?ai>d« under my left arm, having eight or niraa *n suc- cession, and was in such agony I did not kjjow what to do. I was under a doctor forp',ar.v weeks, but did not derive much benefit. Then I was reconnnondled to take 'Clarke's Blood Mix- ture' by a friend who had been completely cured of Rheumatism by it, so decided to try one of your small bottles, and it gave me such TeSi&f it wa.s really marvellous. Having finished it, I bought an lis. case, which completely CU1'«l me. It is now 12 months since I took your 'C'erke e Blood Mixture,' which did not faril." If ir/s any such disease as Eczema, Scrofula, Abscesses, Ulcers, Bad Legs, Boils, Pimples, Sores and Eruptions. Glandular Swel- lings, Piles, Rheumatism, %Ut, etc., don't waste time on lotions or ointments—to be cured permanently you must cleanse the b' >&d of the clogging, impurities, tJhe root cause of ail your suffering. There is no other remedy that puri- fies the blood so thoroughly as Clarke's Blood Mixture, that's why so many remarkable curet stand to its credit. Pleasant to take. irJ five from anything injurious. Ask for and see you get. Clarke's Blood Mixture EVERYBODY'S' BLOOD PURIFIF-R.1, Ot 41 ChemMte •Mm 2ø. w. pw 13aoue. "V '■ <