Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

iin ii i yiffl ■MWiiy i wmii t i i n i ii in 111 jn ii a a hi HiiWintinBiniin irfiWBsmn -rrajyywwMffigaaaMsa'ggsaH^ TMMHnftWiOTre^^ HUGH mNEs, '-Q [ HUGH JONES, I | Fancy Article, Book & Stationery I j Depo J "ADVERTISER" OFFICE, j! ? CASTLE STREET, LLANGOLLEN. [j I Stock recently repletecL and Visitors ?ill be delighted with I ? the Latest Novelties in Views, Souvenirs, with Local Imprint, ? Welsh Toys, Leather Goods by the BEst Makers, View j 1 Stationery, Post Cards, Guides, Maps, etc. j I GENERAL PRINTER & PUBLISHER. Î 1 MODERN TYPES, MODERN STYLE, DESPATCH. I MODERATE CHARGES. I ADVERTISEMENTS INSERTED IN ALL PAPERS. n |!B||| M||[|||||||11 |y||||ffnnrf|mff1fm^^ I V

CAMP NOTES I

CAMP NOTES. I I PARK HALL. I 1 understand that some of the battalions in training ihiare will shortly be amalgamated. n » The Expeditionary officers and men belonging to the 5th, 6th, and 7th R.W.F. battalions, to- gether with those of the 4th. and 7,,h Cheshires and the lst, 2nd. and 3rd Welsh Field Ambulance, attended a service at Oswestry Parish Church on Thursday afternoon in memory of those of¡Lt>lr c-omrades who fell at Suvla Bay on Aar. 30. 191f. The Vioar, the Rev. M. B. Lutener, officiated, and gave an inspiring address. The band of -tile 4 th Cheshire Regiment played the Dead Mairch, and at the 01000 of the service the Last Poet was sounded by eight bugliers, under Sorgt.-Drummer Pennington, of the 7th R.W.F. It was an im- pressive scene, and one that will not easily be forgotten, to see this old building', now hung with the Union Jack and the flags of our Allies, filled to its utmost capacity with men who have fa-oed death for the sake of King and country commemoruting, the death, of comrades who have lost their lives in so noble a service. < The garrison theatre, which is being erected close to the Camp Post Office, is growing by leaps and boumcfe, the entire f ramie work now Doing up. Plays will be acted, and variety entertainments given, as well aa the indispensable "movies." Good companies axe expected to come here, and the charges for admission have been fixed a^ prices ranging: from 3d. to 2s. 6d. « « • The se' mess of the 7bh R.W.F. has ry d=ra ted during the past week bee-?i I)r VVhittin e am, W. Tamn?r, T. Row- lands. D. Reese, and G. Jones. The wa.Ma of the l?nds, 1). t!.Cf-.Ily &domed w?tli the emblems and honours of the 1JtaJion. • « A capital concert was given at No. 4 Y.M.C.A. Rut. last week. Pianoforte solos were oontrubuited bv Mi83 Vera Jones, songs bv. Miss Phyllis D-aries, Miss Cissie Jonies, Privates Stephens, Hasty. Moss, and Fox, and monocgues by Miss Gertrude Tutrnley. < At the Y.M.C.A. Canvas Marquee at Dre- newydd on August 8th, Miss Eva Jones and party of Wiwxhaan gave an excellent concert, which was enjoyed by a large number of men. On August b, Private Yerdioix, of the South Lanes. Regiment, the possessor of a magnificent tenor voice, who, I understand, in civilian life is a Drofesaional or dered soloo from ihe "Eiijah," w ly appreciated by the V. DRUM-MAJOR.

THE WELSH HORSE

THE WELSH HORSE. FAREWELL TO LORD KENYON. The report forecasting the disbanding of the 2nd Welsh Horse is incorrect. The second line tire to become regular cavalry, and are to be in reserve for two Lancer regiments. This, unfor- tunately, involves their losing their very popular commanding officer, Col. Lord Kenyon, and all the men very much reg-ret this severance. So long- as they are in this country the regiment will still be Welsh Horse and wear the leek: but, of course, when they go to the front they will go in drafts as needed and will join the regiments for which they are in reserve. Regimental orders by Col. Lord Kenyon con- tain the following extract from a letter from Major-General J. B. Forster, commanding the 57th (West Lanes) Division:—" I wish to convey to your officers and men my appreciation of their work during the time they have been under me. The turns out, conduct and general efficiency have been most creditable, and I have no doubt that they will each and all give a very good ac- count of themselves during the continuance of this war wherever their lot may be cast." Regimental Orders also contain the following report of a brave action:—" At night on July 31, Sergt. Birch and L-Corpls. Madeley and Smith, 2/lst Welsh Horse, found a motor lorry on fire and without its driver. It was loaded with 2-i tons of petrol and bound from London to -—— for the Anglo-American Oil Co. They succeeded in ,emoving all the petrol at great risk to themselves."

British Credit and War Debtl

British Credit and War Debt'l The Chancellor of the Exchequer stated in the House of COIÍlmons on Thursday, that it W;,3 estimated that Britain's total indebted- ness '-Cuw be ?3.440,000,000 at the end of March next. Of this, ?800,000,080 represented loans to Allies and Dominions, our net indebt- edness being £ 2,640,000,000. The net amount would be j out equal to one year of our natioual which might be put at £ 2,000,000..Ltd not one-sixth of the total national weHH", which was estimated to be £ 15,000,000,000. We should be able to pay out of existing taxation the interest on the debt and a considerable sinking fund, and still have a large margin for the reduction of tax- ation. Thera was not the slightest doubt that we should be able to maintain our credit to th., of the war, no matter how long it I ciight last.

No title

 ? It is a free country. No man is bound to I. answer ? letter," said the Judge a.t Clerken- I ?eU County Court last week. I >

I SCENES IN THE FIRING LINE1

I SCENES IN THE FIRING LINE.1 I WELSHPOOL BANK CLERK'S 1 INTERESTING DESCRIPTIONS. I Pte. Arthur H. Williams of the Bankers' Bat- tallion of the Royal Fusiliers, son of Mrs. Wil- liams, School House, Bwlchycibau, formerly a clerk at the Welshpool and Llanfair branches of the National Provincial Bank, sends an inter- esting description of life at the front in a letter to the Welshpool Manager, Mr. John Williams. Pte. Williams, who joined in April, pluckily vo!- unteered to be one of a draft a month later, and has been in France since May. Writing on the eve of the big push, after thanking Mr. and Mrs. Williams for gifts sent out, he says" I will try to give you a few details of how we live here, without getting into the censor's bad books. We left our camp in northern France a month ago, and have been at the front ever since. The part of the line we hold is the most advanced part Held by the British army. It is in the shape of a norse shoe, so you can guess what sort of a time we get from the Huns. We have a sort of a semi-rest camp a mile behind the firing line, and we are in the firing line for six days and out in the rest camp for six days. It sounds quite. 1 a sensible idea doesn't it? But in practice it is far less rosy than it appears. When in the firing line we are on the qui vive all night and are working practically all day, so that we get about five hours out of the 24 to sleep. When in the rest camp we get very little more. So far, we jiave had three gas attacks; but we have all come through them successfully. Our trenches are in zig-zag fashion, and divided into bays. There are about five men to a bay. At the exact spot where I am the Huns' trenches are 200 yards from ours; but immediately on my right and left they are only 50 yards apart. At night, we send out listening, reconnoitring, and mining patrols. If you are lucky enough to come across a German patrol on the same job there is a lively two minutes with bombs, etc., and either we or the Germans go unaer. This little expedition is not without risk as we are often between our fire and that of the Germans; and we are not sorry when we clamber up our parapet and drop down into our trenches. Last night, I was out with a trenclwli^ging* party and was up to my knees in mud. I got stuck two or three times, and my puttees are just like boards now. When in the trenches we are not allowed to take off our boots, puttees or any particle of equipment. I hope you will excuse the untidiness of this epistle as I am writing it on my fire step with my rixe between my knees, and when a shell comes across it is liable to give one a slight shock." Writing on July 28, Pte. Williams says We are still in the trenches, and being worked as hard as ever. Mr. H. L. Hughes (also formerly a clerk in the Welshpool Branch of the N.P. Bank) is in the machine gun section. Did I tell you that I met Hargest (formerly a clerk of Lloyds' Bank, Welshpool) as I was coming over here. He is in the Welsh Guards, and we came lover on the same boat. At the present moment I am on gas guard on the fire step of my baY1 and a few rifle grenades are varying the mon- otony, so that it is impossible to concentrate one's efforts on letter writing."

The MerionethshireI Territorials

The Merionethshire I Territorials. IN ACTION AGAIN? I Renewe d anxiety to the relatives and Jriends of I the men in the R.W.F., who have been en- camped in Egypt since the evacuation of the Gallipoli t Peninsula, has been occasioned by the I report that the regiment-or part of it-has been in action again. So far, there is no mention of the regiment in any of the accounts of the fight- ing, and the news that the Mont- gomeryshire and Merionethshire County Regiment is again "doing its bit" is contained in a letter from Co.-Sergt.-Major J. A. Rees of Bala. who, in a letter to his aunt at Henblaa Bala, writing from Camp, says:- Our battalion have again gone into action in I the desert; but I was away from headquarters when they left, and I have been left in charge of the detachment here." The latest news received by the relatives of Welshpool men comes from a sergeant who re- cently returned after a month at home on fur- lough. Writing on July 23, he says: Disem- barked on the 19th and was given ticket to J to rejoin unit. Was strandr e the night, as the battalion were, c move; caught them up next day. Have 1 "1-:king the last two days and are now el ,:3 in the desert. Some of the guns hav into position. Frightfully hot here; bir the worst. The Turks are doing nothing-. ;;he came over this morning, and I have "rd that it was brought down about eight n ay. All the boys are well." Writing two d:, teV the same writer mentions that his brother. ■ ^ora he was with on the 23rd, was a long way rfr at the time of writing, and adds: "There is no scrapping going on here, but the aeroplanes are busy. Scarcity of water is the chief draw- back. None to spare for washing."

No title

Monday's Russian communique reports that the enemy droppejd bombs from an aeroplane on the Amur hospital, behind the Russian front, killing two sisters and a hospital O'd""Tly and wounding others.

I It v 11 I THE CHURCHES k i i

 I It v 11 I THE CHURCHES. ¡  k-, i -i -) I The Rev. Robert Evans, the senior mission- ary attached *o the foreign mission of the Cal- | vinistic Methodist Church of Wales, is returning home owing to the state of his health. He is expected to arrive in this country to-morrow. j The Rev. Elvet Lewis, minister of King's Cross Tabernacle, London, has been appointed to represent the non-Anglican and Welsh-speak- ing denominations of Wales on the Advisory Board Mr. Lloyd George is setting up to deal with the appointment of chaplains to the forces.

EJECTMENT ORDER AGAINST LOCAL PREACHER

EJECTMENT ORDER AGAINST LOCAL PREACHER. At Wrexham Borough Police Court, on Monday, before the Mayor (Councillor Row- land), Messrs. Wr. J. Russell, B. Owen, J. F. Edisbury, and Dr. Drinkwater, Mr. Hopley Pierce, on behalf of Mr. T. J. Parry (agent for Mr. Savage), applied for an ejectment order against Alfred Brimiield. fi, Princess- street, and said they were proem .iing against defendant on the ground that he had been guilty of conduct which i was a nuisance or an annoyance to the adjoining or neighbouring occupiers. De- .notice to quit for the fendant had been under notice to quit for the last two years, but they had been unable to get rid of him and his family. Defendant him- self was a very decent man. It was his wife who caused the trouble. They had been al- lowed to stay on until the position became in- tolerable. Defendant did not appear.—The Clerk said lie had received a letter signed S. Brimfield. stating that the writer was unable to attend the court owing to a relative's illness. It is chiefly through a neighbour, named Roberts, No. 3," the writer proceeded. She is the cause of it. and the others are influenced and put to do things by her. They are persecuting us every hour of the day, and we have to pay the price for their doing. If I send the child- ren on an errand they come back with their mouths bleeding or their bodies bruised, and we must take it all and say nothing, and the quieter we are the more we are put upon. We put up with things for nearly two years, and never said anything. Mr. Pierce will know that the wife of a Wes- leyan local preacher would not be beneath inerrseU to row -with local people without it was in eeU-dieltoce." The letter .concludled with a request for time owing to the difficulty of obtaining amotber htfuse and a statement that no remit was owing.— Mr. Pierce submitted that- the. letter had really no- MIring to do with th^. ease. He would prove the an- noyance that had been caused to the neighbours-— The notices to qutt havlng been proved, Mr. Pantry's collector said that he had received) compilaants about Mals. Brimfteld annoying the neighbours by making a noise and he hart continmlly warned her. No r rant was oiving.-Allore Roberts, 3, Pr-inceM Sti&et, said she had lived at her pre sent address for seven years. She had, had cause to complain of the Brkufields' conduct for four years. They were bfiin- maring the walls and no one could sleep. Her eons wens colliers and sometimes they had to go to bed i in the day time. Mils, BTrimfteiIidl had bean, calling her offensive names. She spoke to Mr. Brimfield about it and he said "AWTO you right. You slic-uld not take any notice of it. "—Mrs. Harriet Jones, 7, Princess Street, said she lived next door to de- i fenåant. She had lived there far 13 years. Slie had complained about the Brimfield;: 50 or 60 Ume: They were a general nuisance, and one could not live next d'oor to them. They we.e haraimeirirtg the house down. The house waS as bad as being in Fnaa&ce! She had eompliwinedi about it. They call ed her 

ILand for Service Men

Land for Service Men. DUKE OF SUTHERLAND'S GIFT. I Mr. Tennant announced to the House of Com- mons on Wednesday that the Duke of Suther- land had offered to the State the gift of an estate of 12,000 acres. The farm land was to be used for soldiers and sailors who had volunteered for foreign service, and hadg-ood records. Not less than half was to be offered to sailors. Prece- dence would be given to men of good physical condition, though partially disabled men would not be excluded. The first settlers (as to the selection of which the Duke is io be consulted) were to be I treated considerately, because of their services at the Front. Five or six thousand of these acres would be afforested by the State, and em- ployment would thus be available for the small- holders.

Motoring Accident near Chirk j

Motoring Accident near Chirk, j Mr. Norman Cooke, auctioneer, Newtown, accompanied by Mr. Whitney, was motoring between Chirk and Cefn on Friday, when a cyclist coming down a hill to meet him lost control of his machine, and notwithstanding all efforts on the part of Mr. Cooke to avoid collision, the cyclist dashed into the car and had his leg broken. He was attended by a doctor and taken to Oswestry Cottage Hos- pital. The car, by the sudden application of the brake, skidded and was overturned, but, Mr. Cooke and Mr. Whitney, although thrown out, were unhurt. ————— .—————

Howells School DenbighI

Howell's School, Denbigh. The Drapers' Company of London have ap- pointed Miss C. E. Robinson. M.A., a former headimietrasa of WeJiShpool County School, to the position of headmistress of Howell's School, Denbigh, in succession to Miss M. T. Beloe, re- signed? Miss Robinson was educated at Chelten- ham La-dies' College and Bedford College, Lon- don, and took first-class honours in her London B.A. and her M.A. in mediaeval and modern lan- guages. The Drapers' Company have recently added a new wing to the school.

I The Llangollen Advertiser in America

I The "Llangollen Advertiser" in America. By 'recent Censorship regn --n. newspapers can only be posted to neutnd .•••nines, includ. ing the U.S.A., in publishers' wrappers and by special permit of the General Publications' Censor. Readers desiring to send papers to the United States will be glad to learn that we hold a permit for their transmission direct from our office, where orders will receive prompt atten- tion and papers thus sent will be assured of punctual delivery. Newspapers ordered for transmission from publishing offices which do not possess the necessary pennit are liable to be iHd up in the post.

i SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST i CERNEY YOUTHS

"i SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST i CERNEY YOUTHS. COMMITTED FOR TRIAL. I At Wrexham County Police Court, Tuesday, before Mr. George J. Findlay and other magis- 1 tEtes, three youths—Samuel Rocke (18), Pleasant View, Cerney, John Henry Matthias (lb). 23, I Crosses Row, Cerney, and William Edward I Jones (17), 26, Crosses Row, Cerney, were I charged with assaulting Sarah Jane Matthias with intent to have carnal knowledge of her.— D.C.C. Tippett prosecuted and Mr. J. B. Mar-ton defended.—Sarah Jane Matthias (aged 16 years and 11 months), daughter of Edward George Matthias, Ffrwdd Crossing, Summerhill, said on the night of July 27, as returning home from Brymbo Vicarage she saw the accused with other lads. She knew Rocke by name, but she did not know the others. When she got near them rhey all got up. Matthias followed her through the gate, and said Now for it." Witness tried to get away, but lie would not let her go. She told him she would tell her uncle, who was working at Brynmally Colliery. Matthias said "I do not care about your uncle." The other two men came up, and the offence complained of waa committed. Matthias held her down. The other two did not hold her down, but her nose and mouth were bleeding because they had been beating her. She got away by rolling down a steep bank. On the following Saturday, July 29, her father called her out of the house. When she went out she saw acciised Matthias and Rocke standing by the yard gate. She pointed to Matthias and said "Y ou are the one that caught hold of me first." He said I know I did." She said "What right had you to catch hold of me at all." He said "I thought you were a stranger." Witness said Strangers aren't, to walk the roads it looks like." Edwin Thomas (17), 27, Bryncoed Road, Cerney, said Matthias put his arm round the girl and threw her down. Then she got up and ran [llong the path towards the colliery and passed out of his sight. When the girl was thrown down Rocke ran up to the place, but when he got there she had gone. Rocke and Wm. Ed. Jones were not with her when Matthias threw her down. At this point Thomas was treated as a hostila witness, and was cross-exa.mined by D.C.C. Tip- pett as to a signed statement which he had made to P.C. Lewis, and a portion of which he now denied. By Mr. Marsion Wm. Edward Jone? remain- ed. by she sfbide while- the other accused. Ma.tthiiaa and Rocke were away with the girl. When the girl went through the gate she "was followed by s Matthias, and Rocke ran up afterwards when she had got up and gone. Wm. Ed. Jones had i.othins; to do with it. He did not hear any } screaming. As soon as the girl fell she got up and ran towards the colliery bank. The affair j only lasted three minutes. Further evidence was given by Robert Grif- fiths. Garden-road, Moss, who said the girl had ) blood on her hands when she ran up to him, i and stated that five boys had had her down on the ground, Edward George Matthias, Ffrwd j | Crossing, Sumraerhz'l (who said Matthias and Rocke came to his house and asked why he was summoning tham any more than the others). Dr. MacSwiney (who said the girl had not been raped), P.S. Howells and P.C. Lewis. Mr. Marston, for the defence, said the case rested 011 the uncorroborated testimony of the girl, and he submitted it should not be Qnt for trial because no jury would convict. The magistrates decided to commit the accused for tirial to the Denbighshire Quartci&r Sea- j sions. Bail was allowed.

ILand Settlement in Wales

I Land Settlement in Wales. ¡ CONCESSION TO WELSH PARTY. The Earl of Crawford has been in communica- tion 'with a committee of the Welsh members with reference to their amendment to the Small Colonies Bill which demanded the provision of more land in Wales for the settlement of ex- soldiers. As the result of a subsequent interview I with the chairman of the Welsh Party, Sir Herbert Roberts, the President of the Board of Agriculture has now agreed to the acceptance of an amendment to the Bill allocating at least 1.500 acres in Wales. It is suggested that the Welsh Agricultural Council, together with the members on the Welsh M.P.'s Committee dealing with this matter, should be made responsible for the selection of ¡ the site of land in Wales. A meeting of the Welsh party was held last week, at which it was made clear that the Earl of Crawford made a fair arrangement with the Welsh members. As to the prospects of the Bill, it may be found necessary to adjourn its last stages to the autumn session, but it is now unlikely that the Bill will j be dropped. -0.

I A Productive Field of Wheat

A Productive Field of Wheat. An "Advertizer" cot-respondent was interested at M&rchwiiei lasr. week seeing thr^e gentlemen in a motor car admiring a field of wheat in the vicinity. Evidently interested in agricukure. vi_ cinitsya.i. d that in four d?ys .hey had t-rav?lie.? through Chashire, Lancahâ¡l"e, Staffordhi;re, Shropalure, and across country from Oorwen ?o Barmouth, thence on to Liandudno and back bv way of Mold. They pulled up at Marehwiei to look at a field of wheat near the village, and, inciuixing who it belonged to, saad thev isac wten nothing like it at home or during their travel of four days. They were informed that the field belonged to Mr. Humphrey Moms. a tenant of Mr. Philip YOTke, of Erddig. The gentlemen estimait.ed the crop at 50 bushels to the acre and 45 cwt of straw. On further enquirv, we find that this field was broken up from very poor pasture about four years ago. This shows the advantage which we have long advocated, of breaking up worn-out turfs, and that a change of tillage beneficial to both landlord and tenant, as well a. the country. This particular field is producing at least four times the value this season it ever did oefore.

Kighiiug Lqu Ziable

K-ighiiug Lqu Zi-able. We give below the hours of sunrise and sunset all Greenwich. Lights generally are required on vehleleo and cycles from half an. hour alter sunset until ball an hour before sunrise. a.m. p.m. Friday, August 18 5 S2 8 16 Saturday, Augusit' 19 .5 54 8 14 Sunday, August- 20 5 55 S 12 Monday, August 21 6 66 8 10 Tuesday, Augmst22 6 56 8 8 Wednesday, August 28 (3 0 S 0 Thursday, A uguSit 24 a 1 3 S [Tbe hours given above are "legal" time.1)

No title

The War Office possesses information show- ing that large quantities of has have now been released for the use of d. i1 consumers ia Ireland. A telegram received in New York from ,Chicago states that a feeling prevails there that the Allies may open the Dardanelles before the next corn crop is ready. This-has had the effect of steadying and holding dowa the prices of wheat, in spite of the American drop shortage re-port.d.