Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CAMP NOTESI

CAMP NOTES. I PARK HALL. -1 Since the inspection of the troops by Lord French, the following has appeared in Brigade Orders :—" The Field Marshal Commanding- in-Chief desires to express to Lieut.-General Sir W. P. Campbell his satisfaction with the condition of the troops inspected in the West- ern. Command during the past week. The excellent turn-out and state of training of the men, of whom many were very young soldiers, could not have been achieved unless great and continuous effort had been maintained by the Commander-in-Chief himself, and by the General and Commanding Officers and their staffs under him." The Field Marshal Com- manding-in-Chief is also desirous that the fol- lowing remarks should be conveyed to the Welsh Reserve Bi-igade: Whilst inspecting. the Brigade at training the vim and energy S displayed by all ranks, and also the very thorough system of training, were particularly noticeable to me." # The second of a series of weekly concerts was held in the Regimental Institute of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on Thursday. Colonel Gavin and other officers being present. As usual, "night ops" prevented some of the artistes from turning up, but in spite of this an excellent programme was presented. Sel- ections were given by the regimental band, which is one worthy of the musical traditions of Wales, and plays magnificently. Bandmaster Owen of Blaenau Festiniog, the conductor of the 4th Reserve Royal Welsh Fusilier Band, was,, on Sunday morning pre- sented with a suitably inscribed ebony and silver baton in case by the members of the Band, in appreciation of his services as bandmaster. Another concert was given by Mr. James and party from Chester in the Cheshire Regi- mental Institute, on Wednesday. During the performance the lights failed, and the concert concluded amidst the dim glimmer of candles. ###><* The artistes known as the Camp Enter- tainers" visited this Camp, Prees Heath, and Ardmillan V.A.D. Hospital during the week. On Wednesday evening they gave a concert in No. 2 Y.M.C.A. Hut, which was packed to the doors with an enthusiastic audience, many of the soldiers accommodating themselves'on the refreshment buffet. it » I I am sorry that owing to exceptional pres- sure on space this week, I am obliged to omit detailed notice of the Various football matches in Camp. A summary of the results appears in another column. DRUM-MAJOR. ————

SUBSTITUTE FOR FARM V HAN DS

SUBSTITUTE FOR FARM V HAN DS. DEFINITE SCHEME INTRODUCED BY THE MILITARY. The new scheme of providing substitutes for farm hands under 30 years of age, who the War Office are determined to have in the army when they are fit for general service, is now being introduced to the notice of the tribunals. If properly carried out the scheme promises excellent results, for applicants who have hitherto been accused of unpatriotically hanging on to their single sons and farm hands, on being assured that substitutes would be found for them, readily said they were prepared to release the young men. At Caersws, on Oct. 16, out of 90 appeals, 40 were refused, the men to be called up on January 1 subject to substitutes being found for them. Mr. John Richards, the military representative, "fn describing the scheme said that the military representative had instruc- tions that they were not to fail to press for men under 30 years of age, and an additional method of substitution had now been adopted by the authorities whereby soldiers of lower categories should be exchanged for fit civilians. At present he was confining his attention more particularly to men under 25, and of the 40 refused nearly all were under that age. Mr. Richards said he had a specific undertaking that .substitutes for agricultural hands under 25, where they were indispensable, would be found. Mr. Arthur E. Evans, county military re- presentative for Denbighshire, writing to us On the question, says, being personally inter- ested in agriculture, he would like to call the attention of the farming community to the fact that men under 30, who are physically fit, are urgently needed, and the tribunals are in- structed not to give exemption to these men in any but very exceptional cases. Unless these men are forthcoming under the present system other measures will most certainly be adopted to secure them. —————

The Late Miss Harriet Cunliffe I

The Late Miss Harriet Cunliffe. I The funeral took place 'day, at Wrex- j ham, of Miss Harriet Cunliffe. Miss Cunliffe, who was 86, died on Saturday at her residence, 12, Grosvenor-road, Wrex- ham. Her sister, the late Miss Alicia Cunliffe, only died a week or two ago. The only sur- viving daughter of the fourth baronet now is j Miss Emily Cunliffe of Bournemouth. The coffin was covered with the beautifu I purple and white pall given to the parish church by the late Miss Alicia Cunliffe. The? Rev. Canon Davies and R. M. Williams offi- ciated at the parish church and the Vicar of .Wrexham at the cemetery. The choir chanted the 90th Psalm, and funeral music was played by the organist, Mr. Frank Pullein. The mourners present included Miss Emily Cun- liffe (sister), Mr. R. Munro (nephew), Mrs. Vise (niece), Sir Neville Cunliffe (great nephew), Surgeon-Major Vise, Mrs. Munro, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Yorke, of Erddig, Dr. Geoffrey Williams, Nurse Kirkpatrick, Nurse Lilley, and the household servants. ————— ,—————

No title

On Monday, the horse attached to a cart containing several children who were being driven to Gresford school, took fright and bolted. The children were iirown to the ground, and the injuries sustained by one of them rendered it necessary to convey tLe child to i L. ■U 5.. V'l-ivi i

MILITARY BOXING AT1 OSWESTRY

MILITARY BOXING AT 1 OSWESTRY, EXCELLENT CONTESTS AND I CAPITAL SPORT. The excellent programme arranged by Lieut. and Quartermaster Preston of the 7th King's Liverpool Regiment for Friday evening at- tracted an enormous crowd at the Drill Hall, Oswestry, and at the close everyone came away well pleased with the excellent fare pro- vided. At the top of the bill was a 15-round contest between Kid Carney of Oldham and Boyo Vasey of Liverpool. These lads had met twice before, and each had a win to his credit. This, therefore, was to have been the decid- ing bout; but, unfortunately, Vasey, who is engaged on munition work, was unable to get the necessary release, a wire to this effect being received from him during the course of ) the afternoon. Pte. Jack Charnley of the Loyal North Lanes., just home from the trenches, deputised for him, and put up a very good fight indeed, much to the surprise of Carney, who thought he had rather a soft thing on, especially considering that the sol- dier was out of condition and was at the same time conceding a good bit in the matter of weight. Charnley revealed himself an excel- lent fighter, with a terrific punch. Several of his blows, however, were mistimed, while he also showed himself slow in getting to work, Carney profiting more than once by this. The contest went the full distance, and the Old- ham lad was given the victory on points. The pair, however, are to meet again next week, Charnley intimating his intention of going into training in the meantime, so that a really good fight might be expected with every confidence. THE FIGHT OF THE EVENING. 1. But the fight of the evening was that be- tween Pte. Kirkham of the Loyal North Lanes. and Pte. Gibbons of the 8th Irish. There was no mistaking the earnestness of the contest- ants, for both started off at a great pace, and it was evident that the bout would not. go the full distance. In the first round Gibbons landed heavily with his right on Kirltliam's chest, and during the next meeting both were down, Gibbons first for a count of six and Kirkham, a minute later, for eight, the gong going in time to save the situation. In the succeeding round each got home some heavy body blows, Gibbons having to be cautioned for holding. In the next round Kirkham got the measure of his man and at once started to force the pace, and had Gibbons in a regular mix up on the ropes. The latter recovered himself somewhat towards the finish and swung a terrific backhander on his antagon- ist's body just as the gong sounded. The fifth round proved to be the last; the pace proved to have been much too fast for Gib- bons who, after receiving a terrible pummel- ling from Kirkham declared himself unable to continue the fight any longer and retired in Kirkham's favour. As the referee re- marked in declaring Kirkham the winner, it was by far the best contest ever witnessed in this building. I ENGLAND BEATS WALKER. I Another good fight, and fought as keenly as I the last-mentioned, was that between Pte. Alf Walker of the Manchesters and Young England of the 8th Irish. Walker entered the ring as the winner of eight fights and an I hitherto unbeaten man. England, on the other hand, had taken part in 30 engagements of which he had only lost two. The fight was arranged to go 15 rounds of three minutes, and both started off in real earnest, Walker getting home first with a straight left on England's chin which stunned him for a moment. Walker was slow in following up, and some in-fighting followed, England hav- ing to be warned for administering a kidney punch, which was barred. Taken altogether it was an even round. There was much in- fighting at the next meeting, which went in favour of England, who had his opponent down for a count of nine in the next round, the gong eventually going with Walker dis- tinctly groggy. A thoroughly game lad, Walker came up again to receive more punish- ment, England landing repeatedly on his body. The Manchester lad was down for a count of nine, and met the floor again a few seconds later, when the referee stopped the fight, and declared England the winner, with the re- mark that it was no good letting a game lad be punished unnecessarily. Pte. Gellis and Pte. Boland, 4th King's Own, had a tough six round bout, Boland being declared the winner, on points. L.-CorpL J. B. Tolley again refereed to the satisfaction of contestants and onlookers alike. During the evening, Kid Carney threw out a challenge to box any seven stone four boxer in England, and Pte. Pierce at the same time challenging the winner of the Eng- land-Walker fight. In our report last week we inferred, quite unintentionally, that the Basham nippers were the proteges of the welter weight cham- pion. We should have made it clear that they are the very clever and promising sons of Sergt. Hannan of the 4th R.W.F. A CAPITAL BILL FOR FRIDAY. I I A first-rate programme has been fixed up for next Friday night. The evening's sport will open with a 15 three-minute round contest between Young England and Eddie Harvey, Barrow-in-Furness, two very clever boxers, who will put up a fight worth travelling many miles to see. They will, be followed in the ring by Corpl. Abbot, R

No title

On Saturday a Red Cross train, conveying, ,80 wounded soldiers, arrived at Wrexham. The men were taken to the Croesnewydd, Roseneath, and Chirk hospitals. At a meeting of the Qefn Nursing Associa- tion, on Friday, Alderman Christmas Jones presiding, it was decided to make another apt peal to the works in the district for inscrip- t!OP=

NAVAL AND MILITARYI PENSIONS

NAVAL AND MILITARY I PENSIONS. DENBIGHSHIRE COMMITTEE I AT WORK. Operations under the Naval and Military War Pensions Act began in Denbighshire on October 1, and at the first meeting of the local committee for the county held after that day, namely on Thursday, the Chairman, Mr. D. S. Davies, of Denbigh, moved the follow- ing resolution, which was unanimously agreed to That the local committee for Den- bighshire, on taking over the work hitherto carried on by the representatives of the Sol- diers and Sailors Families' Association and the Soldiers and Sailors' Help Society in the county, desire to place on record their up- preciation of the valuable services rendered' by these voluntary agencies since the out- break of war, and to express the hope that the visitors and officials connected with these organisations will continue to give the local committee the benefit of their experience and help. The new agencies through which the various supplementary separation allowances and temporary grants will be made in future are now getting into working order. In the borough of Wrexham the payment of these grants is made at the Guildhall at a fixed hour, instead of by visitors as in the past. In East Denbighshire the existing system of payment through visitors in each of the vill- ages is being continued. Most of the ladies who have carried on this useful work since the war began are remaining in office, and will co-operate with the members of the new committee who have not yet had time to gain ¡' experience of the work. At Denbigh and Colwyn Bay the central office is being used to make the payments for the urban cases, and the remaining claims are dealt with through visitors in the outlying parishes or direct to the beneficiaries. The regulations as to the award of (1) sup- I plementary pensions to disabled officers and men, and to the widows, children and other dependents of deceased ofifcers and men to whom a State pension ha-s been granted, and (2) special allowances in certain cases where no State pensions has been awarded, have only been issued a few days, and the work of administering them is only just beginning. The Special Disablement Committee set up to make provision for the care and training of disabled soldiers and sailors have began their work. Employment has been found for a number of disabled men, and a very large number of employers have promised to assist the committee in its work of helping men broken by the war. A scheme for establish- ing a training home at Trefnant in connec- tion with the Vale of Clwyd Toy Industry i under consideration and m connection with the provision of institutional treatment, the committee have received a kind offer from Lady Trevor, who has offered to provide at her hospital at Chirk three beds for Denbigh- shire and two for Shropshire for hopeless cases. «. —

Llanrwst Solicitors Affairs I

Llanrwst Solicitor's Affairs. I At Oswestry County Court, or. Friday, before Kis Honour Judsre Willism Evans, Mr. Aneurin 0. Evans, solicitor, Denbigh, applied for the release from custody of a Llanrwst solicitor, whose name was not mentioned in Court and who was stated to be in Carnarvon gaol. The Judge said it appeared that debtor at- tended his first examination in bankruptcy. but did not appear at the adjourned court. and was arrested. He had been in prison for three weeks. The suggestion was that on satisfactory bond being forthcoming the debtor should be released. Mr. LI. Hugh Jones, official receiver for Chester and No.rth Wales, said he only wanted his Honour to be satisfied with the amount of the security and the substantiality of the bonds- men. He would like to point out that this young man owed over £ 4,000, of which n considerable sum represented clients' moneys. There were at least seven substantial debts running into three figures. In face of that the excuse of the debtor going- away on a holidav instead of turning up for his adiourned examination was nothing. The Judge: The amount spent on a little holi- day cost a lot—about £ 120. Mr. Hugh Jones: The little holiday was at the best hotel, and from a bill I have it would appear that for two days he was paying for two persons. It was not necessary for a man in his position to pay for a friend's accommodation. The Judge: I should have waited for someone to ask me. His Honour made an order for the debtor's release subject to the production of two or three sureties to the totnl amount of £ 500, the sureties to be subject to the approval of the official

Denbighshire Police Committee I

Denbighshire Police Committee [ I This committee met at Wrexham, on Friday, Mr. Wynn Griffith presiding. The Chief Constable reported increases during the quarter of 31 in indictable offences, 25 in non-indictable offences. and £ 70 6s. 3gd. in thp value of the property stolen. He' also reported the death of P.S. David Lewis, and it was de- cided to vote his widow a pension of B33 9s. 2d. per annum and his only child a pension of £ 6 13s. lOd. until she attains the age of 15. The committee formed regulations with re- spect to the places where and the conditions 'under which persons might be permitted to collect money or cell articles for the benefit of charitable or other purposes. It was decided to accept a tender amounting to jS12 10s. from Messrs. B. and W. S. Hughes, Wrexham, for supplying dark blinds for the Wrexham County Buildings, and to provide the Chief Constable with additional office accommo-- daijon.The Chief Constable said the present accommodation was inadequate, and he had de- layed the matter as long as be possibly could. Mr. Seymour Jones condemned the policy of spending- money on the existing County Build- ings at Wrexham, and said he thought the County Architect should consider the question of an entirely new building on the present site to be erected after the war was over. He objected to any further tinkering with the present building. The Chairman said that matter could not be considered without notice.—Mr. Jones. said he would give notice of motion on the matter.

hunting JVpymntuunts

hunting JVpymntuunts. THE NORTH SHROPSHIRE HOUNDS will meet [Thursday, October 19 Coton Hall (9.30). Saturday Oct. 21 8hawbury WMte GaMs (9.30). Mcrn'diay 'Oct. 23 Peplow Station (10.0). Monday'(October 27 rppinc'tcn Hous? non).

THE CHURCHES

THE CHURCHES. New Archdeacon of Montgomery. A POPULAR APPOINTMENT. The Bishop of St. Asaph has appointed the Rev. Canon Grimaldi Davis, D.D., vicar of Welshpool, to be the new archdeacon of Montgomery in succession to Archdeacon Thomas, and at the same time he wiE beeomp rector of Llandrinio. The removal of the new Archdeacon from Welshpool occasions great regret among all classes in that parish, where his broadminded and liberal views have made him universally liked and esteemed, but they with Churchmen all over the diocese, will congratulate Archdeacon Davis on the prefer- ment which is merited by long and worthy service in the Church, by a ripe scholarship, and other qualifications ,which eminently fit him for the administrative duties of the new office he will fill. A Carnarvonshire man by birth, Archdeacon Davis is a scholar of Jesus College, Oxford, where he had a distinguished career. In moderations in 1876 he took a first class in mathematics, and he graduated B.A. two years later with honours in the same subject. He graduated M.A. in 1881, and D.D. in 1911. He was ordained deacon in 1878, and in that year was licensed to a curacy at Glanogwen, Carnarvonshire, being ordained priest the following year. He re- mained at Glanogwen until 1881, when he was preferred to a curacy at Corwen, being ap- pointed vicar of Welshpobl in 1887. In 1896 and 1897 he was examining chaplain to the Bishop of St. Asaph, and in 1899 he was ap- pointed a proctor of the diocese, and last year was made a canon. During his 30 years' residence at Welshpool Archdeacon Davis has won the esteem of all creeds and classes by his geniality and broad-mindedness. The archdeaconry carries with it a residen- tiary canonry, with an income of 2350. The value of the living of Llandrinio, which Dr. Davis will take with the archdeaconry, and which includes forty acres of glebe, is E556 gross and 938b net; that of Welshpool, which includes 3! acres of glebe, being £ 275 gross and £24 net, plus P-24 for the living of Christ Church, Welshpool. Dr. Davis has a son, the Rev. Ivor A. Davis, serving in the army. He first joined the Yorkshire Hus- sars, and has since been appointed a chaplain. The Rev. J, W. Thomas. The death took plade with tragic sudden- ness, on Saturady morning, of the Rev. J. W. Thomas, vicar of Llanrhaiadr, near Denbigh. Mr. Thomas, who was one of the most pro- minent clergymen in the diocese of St. Asaph, vaa educated at Llandovery College and Jesus College, Oxford. He was ordained in 1880, and held His first curacy at Llanwnog (Mont.). He afterwards removed to curacies at Llanelidan, near Ruthin, Wrexham and Meifod. He was vicar of Holywell from 1906 to 1915, where he was held in the highest esteem by all classes of the community. He succeeded the late Rev. D. W. Evans at Llan- rhaiadr in 1915, and there also endeared him- self to all the parishioners in a very short time. He leaves a widow and four children.. One of his sons is on active service in France.

New Head Master ofShrewsbury

New Head Master of Shrewsbury. APPOINTMENT OF CANON SAWYEli Canojfr Sawyer, headmaster of St. Bees School, has been appointed tftdmaster of Shrewsbury School, in succession to the Rev. C. A. Alington, the new headmaster of Eton College. The Rev. Harold Athelstane Parry Sawyer who has been headmaster of St. Bees School since 1903, is the third son of the late Bishop of Grafton and Armidale, and is 51. Educa- ted at Magdalene College School and Queen's College, Oxford, of which he was senior scholar and taberdar, he took a second class in Moderations and a second in Lit. Hum., graduating in 1887. He was ordained in 1890, and for two years was a curate at Lewisham. Later, he became a master successively at St. Dunstan's College, Catford, and High- gate School, where he had a house. During his term of office at S*t. Bees the numbers were trebled, and he succeeded in developing a small though well-endowed grammar school into one of the best of our northern public schools. Canon Sawyer has taken an active part in the work of the Carlisle diocese, and he is an examining chaplain to the Bishop, who appointed him to a canonry early in the present year.

Hawarden Union Appointments

Hawarden Union Appointments. At a meeting of the Hawarden Board of Guardians, the appointment of a master and matron was considered, the Board decided to interview the following at the next meeting: Mr. and Mrs. Knight, superintendent and matron of the Scattered Homes, Wrexham; Mr. and Mrs. Cooper, master and matron of the Poor Institution, Tenbury, Worcester- shire Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Smith, porter and nurse at the Whitchurch Union; Mr. and Mrs. Hasty, superintendent of the Mental Hospital, Chester Union; Mr. and Mrs. Middleton, I porter and nurse at the Tarvin Union —————

I I OVERTON I

I I OVERTON. 'I (JOJNCJfiKT.—The schools were crowded on Thursday, when Mrs. Woolley's concert party g-ave an entertainment in aid of the R. W.F. Prisoners' of War Fund. Amongst those who took part were Messrs. Walter Roberts, LL Edwards, Mrs. Arthur Woolley, the Misses May Jones and Jones Williams.

1weighting tt lable

1- weighting tt ^lable. We etv? bek>w the home ct tnnHee MMt sunset -?s I Greenwich. Lights generally are required on vehicton and cycles from ball an hour alter sunset xmtil ball an bour before sunxiw. .w. P.Lu. Friday, October 20 6 S4 4 66 Saturday, October 21 6 S3 4 54 Sunday, October 22 6 S7 4 53 Monday, October 2S 6 89 4 50 Tuesday, October 24 6 40 4,48 Wednesday. October 25 1 4-2 44. n ti r F: dtT. Ortnher 28 e 44 i 44 1 ■■