Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
2 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
DEATH OF VISCOUNT 1CLIVE

DEATH OF VISCOUNT 1: CLIVE. It is with profound regret that -P, record the death, which took place r-.ariy on Friday jnorning from wounds received in action, cf Viscount Clive, elder son of the Earl pnd Countess of Powis, and the heir to extensive estates in the counties of Salop and Mont- gomery. News of his death, at the untimely age of 23, reached the tenantry en t, e several estates on Friday, and on all hanJs east, a deep gloom. The sad intelligence was, how- ever, not altogether unexpected, for it was known that he was in a critical condition. The action in which Viscount Clive was wounded took heavy toll of the officers of his regiment. His personal part in that en- counter was doubtless a gallant -n. for Lord Clive had plenty of spirit as was rtcently re- counted in a letter published m the Advcr- tizer from a Welshpool man who fell in the same action. The bullet Lord Clive received f,, ictured his thigh on Monday, September 25. C ] the Thursday he was brought to Southamp- ton, and afterwards admitted to King Edward All. Hospital, where he was X-rayed on the Friday. The following day an operation was performed, and the bullet removed. Some days later he had a relapse, serious haemorr hage from a main artery supervening, and he passed away 18 days after receiving the wound. Viscount Clive was born in London on December 3, 1892, less than a year after his father had succeeded his uncle to the Powis estates. The birth of a new heir to such his- toric lands and titles was naturally an event of no small moment, and on the family estates there were great rejoicings. The little fellow was first brought to his father's principal and most historic seat, Powis Castle, in August of the following year, and on that occasion Welshpool was en fete, about 3,000 people being entertained in Powis Castle Park, while two goblets were presented to the heir. In the OctobA-, too, further celebra- tions took place and a great ball for the towns- people and tenantry was given in the historic ballroom at Powis Castle, the last occasion, .we believe, at which such an event has taken place in the Castle ballroom. He was christ- ened Percy Robert, after two of his noted an- cestors, General Sir Percy Herbert, his grand- father of Crimean fame, and the great Lord Clive, the founder of our Indian empire. He was educated at Eton, where he developed a passion for cricket, and at Sandhurst, where he became a keen polo player. He joined the army in October, 1913, shortly before he came of age, being gazetted to the Scots Guards. The celebrations on the occasion of his com- ing of age are fresh in the memory of our readers. He spent his 21st birthday at the Chirbury coursing meeting, and was there the recipient of an interesting memento from the sportsmen, with whom he always mixed with a free and easy grace. The larger festivities were, at Lord Powis's request, put off until more congenial weather. Those for the Sh jshire estates took place on May 6, when the Montford, Styche and Walcot estates and the Corporations of Ludlow and Bishops Castle, with which towns the family have been closely associated, all marked their esteem and loyalty to the Powis family with handsome presents and cordial good wishes. The gifts respectively consisted of a massive piece of plate from the Walcot tenantry, a silver cigar box and case of handsome design from the Montford estate, and silver inkstand and silver blotter from the Styche estate, which estate actually cherishes the proud fact of being the home of the daring Bob Clive, the one time terror of the Market Drayton tradesmen, whose grit and genius, gave us the brightest jewel in the British crown," our Indian empire. The gifts from the Ludlow and Bishops Castle Corporations consisted of illuminated addresses in book form, record- ing the many benefits those towns had re- ceived from their long associations with the family. Viscount Clive's reply to all these felicitations was a modest and pleasing one, his lordship stating in frank and unaffected manner that he was always reminded of the good friendship that had for ever existed be- tween his ancestors and their tenants and neighbours, and that he trusted that friend- ship would always be maintained. Subscrip- tions were raised on the Powis Castle, Lymore and Llymystyn estates, but it was a regrettable fact that in the month of September, when the festivities should have taken place at Powijs Castle, Viscount Clive was one of the small and gallant band who were out in France fighting against nequal odds to stem the on- rush of the enemy on Paris and Calais. In the first year of the war his lordship saw about three months' service, but shortly be- fore Christmas, 1914, he was invalided home suffering from frostbitten feet. Upon his re- covery, his lordship manifested his associa- tions with Wales by transferring from the Scots to the newly-formed Welsh Guards, and it will be recollected that' he was a much photographed figure in charge of the Guards who marched singing through the streets of London and made a recruiting tour to Cardiff and South Wales. He served with the Guards at the Tower of London for some months, and returned to the front in the spring of this yar, and since then, except for occasional short leaves, had been in the thick of it as a- company officer holding the rank of lieutenant. With the men he was ex- tremely popular, showing great Consideration for their needs and hardships, and sharing the risks and fortunes of war in the best British fashion. The young nobleman was in fact in the best sense of the word a thorough sports-, 'man. He inherited rather the love of outdoor life and recreation of his soldier ancestors than the scholastie proclivities of his much respected great uncle, and was never happier than on the cricket pitch, in the hunting field, out shooting, or taking part in other of our outdoor sports, in most of which he excelled. He frequently played crioket for the Mont- gomeryshire and Welshpool clubs, and in par- ticular was a great favourite with the mem- bers. Lord Clive was heir to another peerage be- sides that of the historic and wealthy earldom of Po*vi=. He would also have inherited the gam"- rl'Arcy de Knayth, which was revived in f-. If his mother, the Countess of Powis. rAI;" is and her sister, Lady Yarborough, bo sse? in their own right, furnish the oi i pie in Debrett of two sisters inherit- fj ate peerages. have said, Lord Clive came of a, dis- t-Id and ancient lineage. He was 26th iJ i descent from Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, who riaoe of Powis and sovereign paramount of all Wales at the time of the Norman conquest. It was Bleddyn's son, Cadogan, who built Powis Castle in the 13th century. Together with that historic pile, Viscount Clive would in the ordinary course of events have succeeded to the ownership aud respon- sibilities of about 27,000 acres with a rent roll of about £ 32,000 in Shropshire, and 45,000 acres with an estimated rent roll of about £ 40,000 in Montgomeryshire, as well as Powis Castle, which has been a prized pos- session of the family since the days of Queen Elizabeth. To Lord and Lady Powis in their great loss the deepest sympathy goes out, but their grief will be sustained by the consolation that his sacrifice has been made in the noblest 01 all causes. The heir to the estate is now Lard Clive's only brother, the Hon. Mervyn Hor- atio Herbert (named after his godfather, the late Field Marshal Earl Kitchener), who is at Eton. The news was received with universal sor- row at Montgomery, where the gallant young gentleman was a general favourite amongst the tenantry and townspeople. His courteous dis- position and gentle demeanour had endeared him to all who knew him, and amongst no body of men will his loss be more sincerely deplored than the members of the Cricket Club, with whom he was exceedingly popular from his boyhood up. I A TRIBUTE TO HIS MEMORY. One of those who attended Lord Clive at the King Edward VII. Hospital, Grosvenor-gar- dens, during his last illness, writes: "From the day he was carried into the hospital, grievously wounded, till the end there was never one grumble or complaint. Two things we shall always remember one, his courage, for he never showed the slightest fear of any- thing, and went through three operations with a most unusual composure; the other, his con- sideration for everyone, always afraid of giv- ing trouble, and so grateful for everything that was done for him. He was the bearer of a great name, and he acted up to it, and he has left behind in this hospital an example and a memory that will never fade. I PUBLIC REFERENCES. 1, I Mr. E. B. Moser, chairman of the Shrews- bury After-care Committee, presiding on Sat- urday, at Shrewsbury, at a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Association for the Prevention of Consumption moved a vote of condolence with the President of the Asso- ciation, the Earl of Powis, and with the Countess of Powis in the great bereavement that had befallen them. The Chairman of the Shropshire Quarter Sessions, Mr. R. Lloyd Kenyon, at the sitting of the Court in Shrewsbury yesterday, said they all knew the very sad reason why the Lord-Lieutenant, the Earl of Powis, was not present as he generally was. It would not be in accordance with precedent to move a formal, vote of condolence, but the Lord-Lieutenant stood at the head of the county. Some of them knew in their own families the pain and I grief that had fallen on him, and he was quite sure they would like him, without any formal resolution, to tell Lord Powis that a grief of that kind, which struck him in that way, f struck all of them; that they all felt for him and Lady Powis, and had the greatest sym- pathy for them in the terrible affliction that had fallen on them. At Shrewsbury Borough Police Court., yes- terday, the Chairman (Mr. T. Corbett) said on behalf of the Court he wished to express their sympathy with the Earl and Countess of Powis in the great bereavement they had sustained by the death of Lord Clive. I THE FUNERAL. I The body was removed from King Edward VII. Hospital in Grosvenor-gardens to Lord Powis's town residence in Berkeley-square at 6.30 p.1n. on Saturday. The coffin, draped in the J?ion Jack, and surmounted with the gal- lant officer's sword and cap, was borne on a gun carriage sent from the Army Service Corps at the Church-street Barracks, Ken- sington, and the bearer party' consisted of eight company sergt.-majors and sergeants of the Welsh Guards under Co.-Sergt.-Major Cossey. From Berkeley-square the remains were removed to Welshpool on Monday, and the sad ceremony was the occasion of mourn- ful and impressive ights in the streets of ful an d and Welshpool. A gun carriage con- veyed the coffin from the West-end to Pad- dington station, and it was escorted by a de- tachment from the Welsh Guards, consisting of eight bearers and eight drummers, under Lieut. Menzies. The Earl and Countess of Powis and the Countess of Yarborough tra- velled in the saloon which conveyed the coffin shrouded in the national emblem. The scenes at Welshpool on the arrival of the body by the 3.5 train were extremely impressive. A large but sympathetic crowd had assembled at the station, and there were drawn up in the station square to meet the body a gun car- riage from the Royal Field Artillery at Bettis- field Park and the Band of the King's Shrop- shire Light Infantry at Shrewsbury, under Bandmaster Jones, R.A.M. The coffin, upon which was placed a large wreath of laurels, bound with red and blue ribbon from the officers, non-commissioned officers and men of the Welsh Guards, and, a magnificent tribute of choice flowers from the officers of the Scots Guards, was reverently placed on the gun carriage, and the band then headed the cor- tege from the station square, playing the mournful music of Beethoven's Funeral March. The Countess of Powis and the Countess of Yarborough had preceded the cor- tege to the church, and Lord Powis was the sole mourner who walked behind the gun carriage apart from the chief estate officials (Messrs. Riddell, S. Manford, P. Laithwood, J. Watkin and G. Barnes), the Chief Con- 'I stable (Mr. W. J. Holland), the Deputy Chief Constable (Mr. W. R. Williams" Lieut. Men- zies, and Pte. Lloyd, Lord Clive's orderly. A MOVING SCENE. I The escort of the Welsh Guard, many of whom wore that sign of honour, the little gold bar on their sleeves, walked alongside the gun carriage, which was under Capt. Carson, the riders in charge of the six jet black horses which drew it being Lieut. Brimfield (leader), Lieut. Wilson (centre), and Lieut. Pitt (wheel). The streets were thickly lined with sympath- etic onlookers, and the music, which, after Beethoven's Funeral March, included the well-known hymn tune Now the labourer's task is o'er and Chopin's Funeral March, made the slow procession right up the centre of the town to Christ Church an extremely moving one. By the express wish of the Earl and Countess of Powis, who desired to have everything simply and quietly performed, the short service on the reception of the body into the church was exclusively confined to the members of the family and the cortege, the general public being excluded from the church- yard. The body was met at the churchyard gates by the Vicar (the Rev. Canon Grimaldi Davis, D.D., archdeacon de- signate of Montgomery), the Rev. A. 1,1. Thomas, and the surpliced choir, the Vicar reciting the opening sentences of the burial service. Mr. T. M. Price, R.A.M., presided at the organ, and played appropriate music as the coffin was borne into the church on a bier, and placed at the foot of the altar steps. The short service that followed included two of the prayers and the hymn Now the labourer's task is o'er." After the service Lord and Lady Powis and the Countess of Yarborough stayed for some time in the church after others had left, and subsequently they walked through their private entrance into the churchyard up to the Castle, later proceeding by motor car to Walcot, as Powis Castle is closed for the time being. The coffin remained in the church over night and estate workmen acted as a watch guard. THE FINAL OBSEQUIES. ) In keeping with the mournful occasion, the interment on Tuesday was made in sombre weather; dull skies and persistent rain add- ing to the gloom under which the remains of a beloved and popular heir to great traditions, cut off in the flower of manhood, were com- mitted to the earth. As on the previous day when the body passed through the streets, Welshpool, W'lvose welfare for generations time out of mind has been so iiiti ul ateli- i-nected with the Powis family, showed it's sympathy and respect in appropriate manner, All business was suspended during the time of the funeral service, while the flag floating at half-mast and the drawn blinds and shut- tered windows betokened the sympathy ex- tended to the sttfciken family. A plot on the south side of Christ Church had.been chosen for the interment. The family vault, which li-es directly under the alter of the ancient Parish Church of St. Mary's, in which lie en- tombed many generations of the Powis family, including one of the Dukes of Powis, is now full and after the interment of the much venerated third Earl of Powis in 1893 the vault was sealed up. Interment, therefore, was appropriately made in the burial ground of Christ Church, bordering and overlooking Powis Castle Park, which burial ground, to- gether with the site for the church, was made a free gift of by the third Earl to the Eccles- iastical authorities a number of years ago. The plot selected for the grave lies close to the church wall and the south entrance and adjoins the grave in which Major-Gen. Wm. Henry Herbert, fifth son of Edward, second Earl of Powis (of the new creation) was laid to rest on January 29, 1909. The grave had been bricked and made beautiful by a lining of moss, studded with choice deep red and pure white dahlias and silinium. Log before two o'clock, the hour fixed for the service, the tenantry, townspeople, and others began to assemble in the church and the building proved quite inadequate for the large congregation that- attended the mournful and impressive service, the tenantry attend- ing from the Shropshire as well as the Welshpool estate. Resting against the coffin in the chancel and facing the congrega- tion was a magnificent cross of lilies bound with the 'colours of Viscount Clive's regiment and bearing the simple inscription From Father and Mother." The two choice wreaths from the Welsh Guards and the Scots Guards reposed against te sides of the coffin and en the top was a. plain wreath of laurels relieved by a few white lilies, bearing ths inscription "From Mervyn and Hermione." Another beautiful wreath of white lilies, violets and white chrysanthemums "WitJl deepest sym- pathy from his loving aomt Ma«rcia," with the touching words "God rest his galllant soul," re-sted against the foot of the ooffin. Other affecting tributes by the coffin were simply in- scribed "From Granny," and "In loving mem- ory from Vincent, Domingnez. your "fag, 7, Tilney Street, Park Lane, W." The many other beautiful wreaths sent, which offered a fragrant insence during the service, were laid against the choir stalls and on the chancel steps in choice profusion. The arra-ngeinelit, for the seating of the overflowing congrega- tion in the church were in the hands of the estate agent., Mr. J. Edmonds. and the Cfyiwehwardens—Messrs. H. E. Harrison a.nd W. Bishop, the general public, irrespective of class., being admitted 10 the building after the family had taken their seats in the family pews. The service was choral and following the choir to the cha.neel, where the Bishop of the Diocese and the Vicar, the Rev. Canon Davis. who officiated, and the following surpliced clergy: the Rev. G. Williams, Pool Quay, E. A. Drew, Leighton, Gwynne Vaughan, Castle Caereinlon, W. L. Richards, LIangyniew, E. I. Watson, Bettws- ycrywen, D. Stephens, Trefonen, M. B. Lutener,Oswestry,F. H. Hawkins and T.Jones, Guilsfield, and O. LI. Thomas. Mr. T. M. Price, R.A.M., was at the organ, and the ser- vice opened with the hymn, 0 God, our help in ages past." The Vicar afterwards in- toned the well known verse, Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay'down his life for his friends" (St. John, xv., 13), and the 90th Psalm, Lor(-I, Thou hast been our refuge was afterwards chanted. The' lesson from Corinthians was feelingly read by the Vicar, and the hymn, "Through the night of doubt and sorrow" and the prayers, intoned by the Vicar, concluded the service in church. N.C.O.'s of the Welsh Guards afterwards bore the body from the church, the Dead March from "Saul" being played meanwhile. Around the grave a cordon was drawn for the chief mourners by the firing party, composed of 100 men of the King's Shropshire Light I Infantry. The service at the graveside, which was conducted in a pitiless downpour of rain, was taken by the Bishop, and the hymn, Now the labourer's task is o'er hav. ing been sung with great feeling, the choir being under Mr. R. H. Thomas, the firing party, under Capt. Luke, discharged three volleys over the grave, subsequent to which the "Last Post" was sounded by the buglers of the Welsh Guards. THE MOURNERS. I The chief mourners were the Earl and Coun- tess of Powis, Lady Hermione and the Hon. Mervyn Herbert, Lady Yarborough (aunt), Mr. T. and Lady Margaret Cholmondelev, Pantyochin, Gresford (uncle and aunt), Maj;r General R. A. and Mrs. Montgomery, Oswes- try, Mrs. Edward Herbert, Major Edward Herbert, K.R.R., Colonel Graham Herbert, Sir Powlett Millbank, Sir Watkin William* Wynn, Major-General Sir Francis Lloyd, eomi manding the London District, his A.D.C., Lord Stamford and Lady Lloyd, Col. Lore Harlech, Welsh Guards, and Lady Harlèch. Colonel Doyle, K.S.L.I., Capt.Lord Cochrane, representing the Scots Guards, Mr. Parked Jervis, Grenadier Guards, Sir Wm. Curtis* Colonel Sandbach, Mr. Arthur Williams Wynn, Coedymaen, Major Sykes, represent ing the Colonel, officers and men of the 2-1 Montgomeryshire Yeomanry, Sir John Hen/ niker Heaton, Welsh Horse, and Lieut* Keith Menzies, Welsh Guards. Among the large gathering present were thi principal tenants of all the estates, and tb( Mayors and Corporations of Welshpool, Mont* gomery, Ludlow and Bishops Castle, anal representatives of many public institutions^ They included Mr. Alfred Herbert, represent ing the directors of the Cambrian Railwayot Company, Lieut.-Colonel S. Williamson, gen- eral manager, representing the officers of the Cambrian Railways, Sir Wrn. Rouse Boughton, Sir Wm. Curtis, Colonel J. Patchett, Colonel Cholmondeley, C.B., Colonel Twemlow, Peats- wood, Major H. L. Heber-Percy, Colonel E. Pryce-Jones, M. P., Mrs. Pryce-Jones, and Mr. W. E. Pryce-Jones, Mr. J. Marshall Dug.. dale, Llwyn,. Major J. Lomax, Bodfach, Mr. J. Edmonds, Mr. and Mrs. W. Forrester, Addie, the Rev. Alfred Kenvon, Ludlow, Mr, W. Swire, Mr. Sampson and Miss Giovanetti. Lieut. Parker Jervis, the Rev. A. D. Bevan, Clunbury, Mr. Reginald Salt, Shrewsbury, Mr. Clifford, Market Drayton, Colonel Leake, Colonel Rivers Bulkeley, Mr. Harry LloyCl Verney, Cloehfaen, Mr. G. D. Harrison, Froxv llwyd. Mr and the Misses Verdon, Llanerch* ydol, Dr. Crump, Messrs. F. E. Marston, W< C. Peppe, and John Richards, Welshpool, Mr, Walter Marcliant, representing the Earl oi Bradford, Mr. Alfred Darby, Adcote, Messrs. W. K. Minshall, G. C. McDonald, and Herbt. E. Jones, Oswestry, the Mayor of Welshpool (Mr. T. J., Evans), the Town Clerk (Mr. C.; Pryce Yearsley), Alderman Wyke, Councillors G. Macqueen, J. P. Jones, J. Pugh, R. McClelland, S. C. Rogers and E. M. Jones, Messrs. Wynne, surveyor, T. Sheppard, trea. surer, and C. Galloway, auditor, the Mayor of Montgomery (Mr. Henry Jones), the Town Clerk (Mr. C. S. Pryce), Alderman C. P., Davies, and Councillors Roberts and Mitchell, and Dr. Kirk, the Mayor of Ludlow (Mr. S., H. Valentine), the Town Clerk (Mr. Williams), Alderman Sheldon, and Councillor E. H. Rickards, the Mayor of Bishops Castle (Mr, J. C. Davies), and the Town Clerk, and th< wardens of St. Mary's (Messrs. Gordon Smart.. G. Price, G. Barnett and Robert Owen). The Welshpool townspeople and the P&wU Castle tenantry and officials included Messrs. E. H. Morris, T. Green, The Bank, J. Vaughan, The Moors, D. C. and E. H. Jones, Pool Quay, W. P. Hole, Crowthera Hall, Wm. Evans, Buttington Hall, J. Wat- kins, G. Barnes, P. Laithwood, J. Riddell, S. Manford, W. H. Morris, R. E. Owen, G, E. Evans, Sinclair Jones, T. Simpson Jones, J. W. Wilson, G. M. Parry, John Williams, John Evans, R. S. Roberts, J. La-mbert, R. C. Benwell, W. M. Ireland, representing the Shropshire Union Canal Company, A. H. Jones, W. Evans, Miss Grace Jones, West- wood, Messrs. W. Baker, Thomas, Garbett. Hall, John Lloyd, Gate Farm, E. Willis, Syl,. faen, Jones, Derwendeg,Wm. Pritchard, Maes- hafren, David Rowlands, WelshpooJ, the Rev. T. Griffiths and H. O. Grimes, Knighton, J., Meacham, Clun, H. D. Bevan, G. W. Houns- field, Marton, and J. C. Christopher, Messrs* Townsend, Alfred Hamer E. G. George, Oswestry, late of Welsh Guards,R. E. Hughes, Oswestry, Highwood, Styche, W. Everall, Shrewsbury, E. E. Sargeant, T. F. Kynners- ley, Lieut. Tatton Warter, J. Bushell, J, Watkin, Oswestry, J. Birch, Styche, Pryoe Hall, Forest, Humphreys, Folly, Hotchkiss, Chirbury, Graham, Montford, J. Shuker, Churchstoke, E. Bromley, C W. Morris, Montgomery, Sergt.-Major Evans, K.S.L.I., Beeston, Oldfields, Highwood Styche, J. Wil- liams, Buttington Hall, Everall, Alderton, Tr Hiles, H. Smith, G. Griffiths, and H. Morris, Welshpool The Lymore, Chirbury and Montgomery tenantry included Mrs. Wynne Jones, Walcot, Messrs. W. H. Morris, W. H. Langford, T. Howard, Bailey, Cound, Ditches, T. Kilvert, Davies, Meadows, Evans and Pryce, Lymore, T. E. Kinsey, Winsbiiry, Jones, Keighley, W. P. Jones, Rockley, Ward, Woodmore, R. H. Bunner, Montgomery, Holloway, and Davies, Dudston, Jerman, Ridge, Pritchard, Chirbury, E. T. Davies, Checkers, Davies, Stalloe, Nor ton, Holloway, Gwarthlow, Venables, Penyw gelli, Pryce, Sutton, and A. Vaughan, Court Calmore, The Llymystyn tenantry included Meesr? D. Hughes, Garth? T. H. Vaughan, Llyssun, D. Hughes, Garths beibio, Mackintosh and Evans, Macs, Lvm-? ystyn, J. B. Jones, Cann Office, Jones, Parkj, Llangadfan, and Davies, Tynyfedw. Amomr those present from Bishops Castle and Walcot were the Vicar, Dr. Hale Puckle, Messrs. Greenhouse, Gwilt, Lee, R. H,, Newill, Hamer, Brampton, Norton, Brunslow Kilvert, Kempton, J. Breareton, Norton, Lvdbury, Hotchkiss, Bank, Lydbury North, M. Williams, Home Farm, R. R. Parry, Lyd. bury North, E. Edwards, Bailey, R. N. Grice, Price, C. Morris, and G. Townsend, Clun, R, Pennall, J. Norton, and Kilvert, Wilcot. The tenants present from the Montford es-4 tate were Messrs. R. Everall, W. Everall, J. Everall, Hughes, Jones, J. Minton, Brom- ley, E. C. Tanner, Mills, Timmis, Jones, and F. R. Gregory, while a large number also at-t tended from Styche, Market Drayton. Sir J. Bowen Bowen-Jones, Bart., was en. gaged .rirt- at an important conference in London, and unable to attend the funera4

No title

At a War Savnigs Conference in London at letter was read from Mr. M'Kenna emphasis- ing the absolute necessity of personal example in economy on the part of the well-to-do. Patriotic civilians should reduce their stand- ard of living to the minimum needed for health and efficiency. Herr von Batocki, the German Food Dic-i tator," has recommended the local authorities throughout Germany to increase the tax on dogs, as these animals consume much valuable food. Berlin has responded by raising the ta.x to £ 2 10s. for one dog and fA for every additonal dog kept by one owner. A verdict of "Accidentally drowned" was returned at a North Wales inquest in the body of See.-Lieut. John Evan Mathias, who on a dark and windy night walked into a deep, un- fenced pond. Mr. Mathias, who was 37, was the son of Alderman Mathias, of TJytijcjminei; Hall, Porth.,