Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
ILLANGOLLENI

I LLANGOLLEN. I RECENT RED CROSS SALE.-We should have stated, last week, that the two cheese con- tributed to the sale held on behalf of the Farmers' Red Cross Fund, one of which was sold by auction and realised £ 50, and the other-of which is to be raffled, were the gifts of Mrs.- J. C. Edwards. Thevor Hall. MOTHERS' UNION FESTIVAL.—On Thurs. day, the Mothers' Union Festival took place at the parish church, where service in the after- noon, at which the Rev. J. Hamlet, vicar of Newchapel, -Stoke-on- Trent, was the preacher, was followed by tea in the schools, to which a large attendance of members sat down, the gath- ering being one of the most successful of a very successful series. PARISHIONERS' GIFT.—Mrs. J. B. Jagger, Bache Issa, has defrayed the cost of remedying the dilapidated white altar frontal at the parish church. Some thirty years ago the original frontal was procured for the church by public subscription at a cost of 228, but it had fallen into disrepair, and the original hand- tome embroidery has been re-worked on to a new foundation, the material of which is rose damgsk. The frontal was w use at the harvest festival last week. CHURCH STREET MISSION.-Special services for the safe ingathering of the harvest were held at the Mission Hall, in Church-street. on- Tuesday night. The mission-that owes much of its vitality to the zealous work of Mr. Austin Williams, has a fine evangelising record in a part of the town where such service bears most appreciable fruit and the harvest festival is a special feature of the year's work. The interior of the hall had been tastefully decorated for the occasion, and a special sermo was preached by the Rev. G. H. Howard of Colwyn Bay. The singing of the children was very effective. HARVEST FESTIVALS.—Harvest festivals were held. at LlangoUen last week. On Wed- nesday there was evensong and sermon at St. Mary's, Eglwyseg, the preacher being the Rev. P. Felix, B.A.. rector of Llanfair. On Thurs- day, October 12th, large congregations attended at the parish church, the interior of which had been, beautifully decorated by ladies of the con- gregation. There were mattins at 11 a.m., evensong and sermon at and 7 p.m., the special preacher being the Rev. J. G. Hamlet, B.A., L.C.P., vicar of Newchapel, Stoke-on-Trent. On the following day services were held at St. John's (Welsh) Church, when the special preacher was the Rev. J. Bowen, L.D.. rector of Carrog. DR. BARNARDO'S HOMES.—On Wednes- day week a meeting of the local committee was held to arrange the annual house-to-house col- lection for Dr. Barnardo's Home. Mr. R. Dar- U4 tn the hon. treasurer, said that Llangollen had for many years stood very loyally to the Homes, where so many destitute children had been made into good and loyal citizens. Three children from Llangollen district had been train- ed in these homes, and were now doing very useful work. Nearly 4,000 old boys are serving King and country In the Army and Navy in the present great war, over 82.000 children have been rescued, and there are 7,550 children, under care in the Home's at the present time. The collec- tion in the Llaagollen district will be taken next week BARD'S GALLANT SONS.—Two sons of Mr. William Roberts (Gwilym Ceiriog), chaired bard of the National Eisteddfod at Pittsburg, U.S.A., are now serving with the colours. The younger of three-Pte. T. Roberts, R.W.F.- arrived home during the week-end. He had been granted a permit, by his commanding officer, bearing the endorsement: "Pte. Roberts has been granted special leave as a reward for the, detierinirted, numner in which he carried out orders during the raid on the enemy's trenches on the night of the 28th and 29th Sep- tember, 1916." The gallant young soldier has been ih France for ten months, and was with the bombing section. His elder brother-Pte. P-obert Glrn Roberts-vrb.o was wounded in'the hand, some six weeks ago, has, we are pleased to learn, all but recovered, and is now in camp Ai Litherland. RUABON. I CHILDREN'S COURT.—At a children's oourt, on Friday, two boys from Stryt Issa were charged with stealing lzlbs. of potatoes. They were convicted, and their parents were ordered to pay 10.. each. C R F.N. I OBITUARY.—The funeral took place yester- day week, the remains being conveyed to Llan- santffraid for interment, of Elizabeth, widow of Daniel Jones, Berth. whose death occurred the previous Friday, at the home of her daugh- ter, Mrs. Roberts, Cefrr, Ruabon, at the age of 86. The mourners were Mr. and Mrs. Jones, Tyissa Bach (son and daughter-in-law), Mrs. and Mr. Roberts, Cefn (daughter and son-in-law); M. Burns, Wigan (daughter); Mr. E. D. Jones, Connah's Quay (son); Mr. John Jones, Aber- mule (brother); Miss P. Jones (grand-daughter); Miss C. Davies (grand-daughter); Miss S. Davies (grand-daughter); Mr. E. D. Jones, Shrews- bury (grandson); Mr. D. T. Jones and Wynn Jopes, Tyissa Bach (grandsons); Mrs. Jones, LJettygwilym, Llanfair (niece); and Messrs. T. and J. Jones, Cefnmawr (nephews). The bearers were Mr. Price (Abertanat), Mr. J. O. Cadwaladr (Church View), Mr. J. Lloyd (Lletty), -rid Mr. Evans (Railway Cottage, Llanfechaxn) the deceased waa a faithful member of the Con- =n3l Cliu Uli and highly respected in the iMtttCt. At the house at Cefn, the Rev. J. .fiowen officiated, and at the churchyard the ser- vice was conducted by the Rev. Evan Jones and J. M. Edwards (Sarnau). I I PENTRE BROUGHTON. 1 WAR SAVINGS.—On Thursday, a public meeting was held at the Quarry Road Schools, Brynteg. Mr. Ellis Hughes presided, and, on the motion of Mr. Rees, seconded by Mr. Wil-, liams. it gas decided to form .-a ..War,.Savings Assodiation.-mr. Ellis Hughes was elected Ohairman, Mr. D. E. Rees hon. treasurer, and Mr. Lemuel Edwards hon. see. PENYCAE. I HO"-NIE ON LEAVE.—Pte. Samuel Evans late organist of Tainant Church), Pte. J. Mor- cia Wmiams, Avoneitha, and Pte. Arthur Jones, son of Mr. J. O. Jones. .1

FOOTBALL I

■ FOOTBALL. I I ;.1 PARK HALL CAMP. ¡ &ÃTURDAY'ULTS. I ?. -? ? -?ATURnAY'S RBSULT& G Á It R ISO N LEAGUE. Mt L.N. Lanc3. ,(4) v Herefords (0) v. A S.C, (0). Regime tit (4i v. Monmouths (0) Welsh R.A.M.C. (6) v Cyclists (4)' y, 4th it.o.R.L. Regiment (3) COMPETITION lOth K- L. Reginient (6) v, 7th K.L. Regiment (0). B.W.F. (17) y. Yeomanry (0).

No title

The death occurred on Saturday of Mr. W. Cardea of gyton, at the age of 63.

ILLANGOLLEN WELSH LITERARY SOCIETY

I LLANGOLLEN WELSH LITERARY SOCIETY. THOMAS CHARLES OF BALA. The veteran Pedrog had promised to at- tend and read a paper at the opening of the session of the Welsh Literary Society at Llan- gollen, on Friday night. His own illness and the recent death of his wife, however, inter- fered with this arrangement; but Mr. A. P. Morgan, the zesourceful hon; secretary of the Society, succeeded in making arrangements, in accordance with which the Rev. T. Shank-1 land, B.A., the erudite librarian at Bangor University, consented to the date at which he had promised to lecture to the members on Thomas Charles of Bala being changed to meet the exigencies of the case, and a large and representative gatheringpomder the chair- manship of the Rev. Rhys Jones, attended, on Friday night, what proved to be a most inter- esting and instructive lecture, and a most auspicious opening of what, it is hoped, may prove a most successful session. At the outset Professor Shankland reminded his hearers that the two greatest personalities of eighteenth century Wales unquestionably were Thomas Charles of Bala and Morgan John Rhys. So far as Wales was concerned the eighteenth century might be divided into three parts—(1) the period of awakening; (2) the Methodist revival under Howell Harris; (3) the period of reconstruction. Without doubt the great awakening came from Oxford. He had been looking through the registers of the University, and no doubt Oxford in the 17th and early 18th centuries was, morally, in a very bad state indeed; in fact, he could not use too strong words to describe the irreli- gious atmosphere of Oxford. Thomas Charles came upon the scene during the period of re- construction, and it was to that period, in the 18th century, that they owed all their great I establishments in religion and education, so I far as their beginnings were concerned. All the great Welsh establishments were to be traced back to the 18th century; and, before [ that time, what little there was done in Wales I wa.s done by individuals; but from what he termed the period of reconstruction people began to work in societies. Many who had already written of Charles of Bala asserted that he was born at Pant Twm, St. Clere, Carmarthenshire. This, however, had been proved to be wrong, but he was born at Long- moor, quite near, the family subsequently moving to St. Clere. He attended a famous school at Carmarthen., and went from there to Oxford, and, upon leaving the University, became a curate in the Church of England. His first curacy was under the Rev. Henry Newman, a jolly good fellow, who rode straight to hounds, and was a typical example of the old-fashioned school, that cared very little about the religious condition of his parish. j WHY HE LEFT THE CHURCH. I Thomas Charles, however, rapidly attracted large congregations, with, the result that his zeal speedily provoked resentment, and he was told by his vicar that, if he could not get another place, he would lose ?10 of the 125 per annum which he received as salary. As a matter of fact, he was working too hard and too well and successfully to suit the spirit of the times; and lie speedily came to realise that work within the Church with which, from his early childhood he had been associated, could not he made productive of the best pos- sible results. He then became associated with men outside the Church, earnest men, with deep-seated convictions, and whilst at Oxford and also whilst holding curacies he had had many friends amongst Nonconform- isls. He had hoped to work in the Church. despite the fact that lie could see that the attitude of, the bishops and clergy was all against evangelising the country; but, gradu- ally, the fact was forced home to him that if he were to achieve any results of the kind for which his soul yearned, he would have to go outside the Establishment. It was after this great decision was arrived at that he came to Bala, and became associated with Simon Llwyd, and eventually married Sallie Jones. He received many tempting offers to accept other positions irl Wales, but his, wife was the great restraining force that held him at Bala. Upon definitely leaving the Church he allied himself with Calvinistic Methodism, and was with the first in North Wales to realise the future and the great use of the travelling school on the lines of those established by the exertions of Griffith Jones in-South Wales. THE SUNDAY SCHOOLS. After getting schools established, Thomas Charles next saw the absolute necessity for books, especially for the country districts, and he set himself to provide them, setting up a printing press for the purpose at Bala. Then he became associated with the London Mis- sionary Society and also with the London Sunday School Society, and these people saw that he was a very exceptional man, who would be a great leader, and so they made him, praotically, the superintendent of the Sunday School Society in Wales. Though he was not, as some erroneously supposed, the originator of the Sunday school, he became the chief instrument in the foundation of Sunday schools in Wales, and, of course, he became the chief agent. He afterwards became con- nected with the Bible Society, and it was largely through his influence that. the British and Foreign Bible Society was founded. He advocated, with unflagging zeal, the provision of Welsh Bibles for the use, of people in Wales; and when he did so a member of the committee asked: If a Bible for Wales, why not a Bible for the wojrld?" Beibl i bawb o bobl y byd." Professor Shankland then pro- ceeded to deal with the literary achievement of Thomas Charles, ,nd exhibited a number of interesting books from the Bangor collec- tion, including first editions of the C.M. Catechism, in use to-day, and of which inter- esting work there are over one hundred differ- ent editions in the Library. He also alluded in high and appreciative terms to the Bible Dictionary of Thomas Charles, which remains to this day the best dictionary of its kind, for j the simple reason that the compiler, does not theorise, and what he has done is to give a summary, under different headings, of all that is stated in the Bible regarding various mat- ters. It could not be called a theological work and accurately described, but so long as the. Bible existed the dictionary of Thomas Charles would remain a work of inestimable value to students and others. Although the great spiritual revival of the 18th century ex- pandecf- and worked outside the Church, there was also a very real revival inidHo the Church of that period, the history of which had never > been written, and this was a matter for con- j tinual regret. It was carried on with as much S vigour within the Church as was that of Howell Harris outside. Amongst other dir- ections in which Professor Shankland said they owed a great debt of thankfulness to Thomas Charles was the establishment of Sundat school meetings, and his efforts, were largely responsible for paving the way for the Welsh Cymanfa Ganu and Cymanfa Ysgolion; for at all the meetings that he assisted singing and catechising were regarded is being of out- standing interest. At the close of the add-ress-which occupied an hour and a half in delivery-Professori Shankland was heartily thanked by the mem- i bers of the Society. j I

I Interesting Nantyr Wedding

Interesting Nantyr Wedding. PARRY—FRANCIS. A wedding that caused considerable interest and attracted a large gathering; of relatives and friends of the two families concerned, was sol- emnised at the, Welsh Baptist Chapl, Castle- street, Llangollen, on Monday, the contracting parties being Mr. HerbeTt Henry Parry, youngest son of Mr. John Thomas Parry, Wool- pack Inn, Pandy, and Miss Nellie Francis, only daughter of Mr. Thomas Francis, Ty Issa, Nantyr. Tile ceremony was performed by the Rev. Rhys Jones (Glyn Ceiriog), assisted by the Rev. E. O. Parry (Llansilin), iincle of .the bridegroom,. and in the presence of Mr. R. 0. Davies (registrar)' The bride,, who looked charming', was given away by her father, and wore a dress of royal blue taffeta silk, shot black and- a white lace hat. lined with pink silk, and trimmed with ostrich feathers, and roses. She was accompanied, as bridesmaid, by Miss Florence May Parry, sister of the bridegroom, who wore a navy blue tailor-made costume, and a pink chenille hat trimmed with champagne silk. Mr. W. H. Parry, Ty Newydd, cousin of the bridegroom, acted as best man. Afier the ceremony, a reception was held at the Grapes Hotel, Llangollen. Amongst those attending the reception were Mr. and Mrs. T. Francis (Nantyr), Mr. John Thomas Parry (Pandy), the Rev. E. 0. Parry (Llansilin). Messrs. F. M. Parry, the Rev. W. Rhvs Jones,' Mr. "and M r-. David Davies (Gelli), Mrs. Williams (Ddol). Mr. Ivor Parry Williams and Miss Myfanwy Wil- liams (Ddol), Miss Pollie Davies (Geni). Mrs. and Miss Bertie Davies (Fronheulog, Nantyr) Miss Sara E. Parry (Ty Newydd),, Mrs. F. W. Parry, and son (Wrexham), Mrs. K. Austin (Nantyr), Master J. ■ Ceiriog .Hughes .(Ty Isa), Mr. Thomas Jones and Miss Jones (Tyny- pistyll), Mr. and Mrs. Henry Jones (Tynycelyn, Nantyr), the Misses Evans (Pehbedw); Miss Gladys Morris (Gelli),' Master H. -P. Williams (Hen Hafod), Mr. R. 0. Davies and Mr. H. Phillips. A number of congratulatory speeches were made after the wedding breakfast by the Rev. Rhys Jojies and E. O. Parry, Messrs. Thomas Jones, Tynypistill, R. 0. Davies, Henry Jones, Tynycelyn, and David Davies, Nantyr. Later in the day, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Parry left for Colwyn Bay for the honeymoon, the bride's going-away costume being of Scorch tweed trimmed with fur. and she wore a nigger brown hat and veil.

I HARVEST FESTIVALSI

I HARVEST FESTIVALS. I I 1 GLYN CEIRIOG. 11 I On Thursday at the parish church. The in- J terior of the buildiiig was as usual tastefully I decorated with choice flowe«, vegetables, grain, etc., supplied by Lorl Trevor, Mrs. Storey, Mrs. Parry-Joccs, Mrs. Betsy Morris, Mrs. Jones, Tynycelyn, Mis! Edwards, Mrs. Hackett, Mr. R. W. Evans, the Misses Davies, Plas Einion, Miss Williams, Mrs. Workman, Miss B. ft. Evans. Mi's. Reado, Miss Maude Jones. Mi"* Bun*en Roberts, Mr. Hugh Grif- fiths. Miss P. Ellis, and- the National School e'ÜL1n"1. Tlir « services wore ]¡iJd. ,At 8-0 n.m. tiu.re- was a celebration of the -Holy Communion. At 2-30. p.m., an English service was held. 1hfi .preacher being the Rev. E. Evans, vicar of Holy Trinity, Oswestry, ind the reader of the les- sons Limt. Douglas. The anthem sung was, "While the c'atth remainerh" (Mtutnderi. t'n» soloist, being Miss BIod wen Roberts, and the organist Miss Pattie Jones. A Welsh service was held In the evening. The preacher was the Re f. James E. Jones, vicar (If Rhosygwalin. and the lessons were read by the Rev. J. R. Evans, racior of Pontfadog The anthem was "Clod- foraf yr Arglivydd" (Rogers), Mr. Rob.erii Ed- wards presiding at th? organ. Both services were intoned by the Vicar, the Rev. D. R. Evans. The church was well filled, and the singing was bright and hearty. The offertories, in -id -t I the Chirk Cottage Hospital, totalled £ 3 4s. 7d.. -■ 1 JOH-NSTOWN. I I I I At St. Mary's Simrch yesterday week, when I I the Rev. Jenkyn Jones, Gvfeiliog, preached. I

No title

The Danish Government has permitted "the" export of 3,000 horses to Germany in return for the import of seed of sugar beet sufficient for the 1917 sowing, a four months' supply of soda, benzol dyes, and various commodities required by the State railways. I ANSWER IT HONESTLY! I Are not the opinions of Llangollen Residents better than those of strangers? The above is a vital' question. It directly concerns Llangollen people. It can't be evaded or ignored. The Llangollen, man who speaks here, speaks for the good of the district. Read right through for yourself, and acknow- ledge the truth of these facts. On July 26th, 1912, Mr. M- Wood, of 6. Mill Street, near the Bridge, Llangollen, said:I have a lot of sitting to do at my work as a tailor, and this comes hard on the back. When I first had touches of kidney complaint, I suf- fered with dull, heavy pains across the lower part of my back, particularly in the mornings, and the urinary system was disordered "I h.,id heard a good deal about Doan's back- ache kidney pills and so I thought I could not do better than try them. I am pleased to say I derived great benefit from these pills. They took effect from the first, and a short course of them quite cuied me. I enjoy good health now, and shall always be pleased to recommend Doan's pills. (Signed) M. Wood." On December 22nd, 1915-OVER THREE YEARS LATER—Mr. Wood said:I cannot possibly speak too highly of Dean.9 pills, for the bt ,ueys. Doan's backache kidney pills NOT for constipation, liver complaint or stomach trouble. They are SOLELY for the kidneys and bladder —disorders such as gravel, dropsy, sediment, urinary troubles, backache, lumbago, rheum- atism, and uric acide poisoning. They relieve the. kidneys and bladder like laxatives relieve the bowels. Of all dealers, or 2s. 9d. a box, from Foster- I McClellan Co., 8, Wells Street,- Oxford Street, London, w Don't ask for backache or kidney rills I' ask DISTINCTLY for backache kid- ney pills, the same as Mr Wood had.

Fallen Heroes I I1

Fallen Heroes. I I 1. Kifie.iii.an T. EDWARDS, Weisii Regiment. P,Ilttm,a.n Edwards was the husband of Mrs. Ed- wards, Walnut Cottage, D¡¡yw,,1! Gobowen. He leli in action on Sept. 1, at tli-a age of 22; his utat-h b-eing in»tiantajae. ous. 'He joined- the army 15 months ago and had only been at the front five weeks when he -tell. He linked up with the 'Monmouth Regiment but was- transferred to the Welsh Regiment- in the I field. His brother, Wil. liam, aged 24. was killed 12 months ago. His mother lives at Argoed, Newport, Mon. Pte. J. fTTZHEXEY '■ Killed in actio-n on Sept. 24,-at the age of'24, Pte., PitzHenry waa a nat: vc oi Welshpool acd. joined the arimy when ha was 18 years; oi age. He ba-d be<ón on active servo ice for 2 years! His viCiCTf resideis at 108, Willow St., Osw e sti y. An officer, in a Jetter to Mrs. FitzHenry, writes: "I' always found him very brave and ready to do anything that was wanted-, %• ;.ait :eam« time be was cheemful aod a great help to < q companions

IMNTGOM ERYS HIRl QUARTER SESSIONS

IMÙNTGOM 'ERY'S H'I'R:!l  QUARTER SESSIONS. SHEEP SrEALING CHARGES. Montgomeryshire Quarrel Sessions were held at Welshpool, on October 12, were two cases for trial. There were on the. Bench Messrs. Rd. Lloyd, ot-iairman,. W. B. Jones, F. E. Marston. R. Gillarr. Ed. PowpH./f. M.1 Jones, J. C. Hilton, W. Pritchard, and Dr. R D. Thomas. -• CIVIL BUSINESS. The visitors of the licensed houses for the re- ception of lunatics and "the representatives; under the Mental Deficiency Act were re-elected.—Mr. T. S. Jones was elected on the Licensing Com- pensation Authority. in place of the late Mr, Shuker. A PATHETIC PLEA. •Margaret Jane, Davies (46), Pantgwyn. Llan- gurig, pleaded guilty to a charge of ^killing and stealing a sheep on September 23, belonging to Edward Davies, Lower Clochfain, Llarigizrig, whose farm adjoins the small holding occupied by defendant and her husband.—Asked ilcfhe had anything to say why. sentence should not be passed upon her, defendant replied: I did fc because I had no food in the house for my child- ren.The defendant, was bound over and dis- charged after being severely reprimanded by the Chairman, who said that poverty was no excuse for stealing. THE PENYBONTFAWR CASE. Wfttkin JUloyd (M), farmer, iynycaeau, feny- bontfawr. surrendered to bail and .pleaded »-iot guilty to a charge of-stealing, a ewe of the. Talne of 25s., "the property of Thomas Hughes, Cwm- gwvnen, a neighbour.—Mr. T. E. Morris, in- structed by Messrs. Prtghe and Jones/ Llan- fvllin, ijrosecuted, and Mr. Ellis Jones Griffith, K.C,. M.P., instructed by Mr. Martin Woos- nam. defended.—The evidence at the magia- terial hearing, fully reported in "The Advfr- tizer"; at the time -was repeated, and after a long hearing Llovd was found not guilty and discharged. The. •• men have sheep w.tlks.tidjoin- ing each other. A sheep -was found' with Hugbes's ear mark partly cut away and accused** ear mark freshly cut in. The dèfence wastnat. accused had bought some strange sheep, and as he was short-sighted he in mistake, altered the ear mark of one of Hughes's sheep which strayed among them.

CREWE HORSE SALE

CREWE HORSE SALE. The went. autumn horse sales oi. aessm, Rem Manley and Sons, Ltd., have been the most suo. oessful the firm have ever held, especially for cart horses, pedigree- shires and shore foals.. The first weoEik cart harwes realised as high as' ISOgs. At- th* shire sales there was am enormous attendance of breeders from all parts of the country, purchases being nrade for nearly all t-b° Wel$h counties, the 15'(" of Wight, Kent, Surrey, D«yon, etc., the salee foimimg a striking contrast .to-others recently held, in that practically every useful shire mare or filly, or foal changed hands. Mare and fillies made 400, 150, 125, 110, to and 101, a;n4 I-ocal shire horse breeders had a field dlay at the foal show and sale, foals by the: Crtwe Society'# h-ors.e "Klngr or Tandridge" making up to s(ioi#. The champion foal of the day, Mr. Egertoh Ormè., slued by Childwick Champion, made 200gs. wlw'le a Somersttshlre breeder, who sold lour caxt: geldings the previous week, for 411gs., gave 2fi0gs. for Messr*. FarnwoTth's l,te,ieive champion Eat. cliffe Forest King. Other breeders' foals inide from 80 to 120gsi., while non-pe-digTee foals' sold "up ta as high as-Slgs. Following upon the h:gh "prices revised for ''ilnc V of Tandridge" foals has come requests to the lfiOaii society for nominations to tbe'horse for from bree,&Ts in .a..1i1:part;9 of .Hb»..cBm3uj-VAl.

LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELD

LLANGOLLEN SMITHFIELD, Messrs. Jones and Son conducted' their third breeders' sale in conjunction with their usual sale of fat and store stock on Tuesday week. when an excellent supply of stock of aN classes was offered. There was also a very large entry of store sheep and rams from noted breeders in the district. The following are, wme-' of the prices madeCow and calf, Mr. Lodwipk. Llyn, £ 40; and Mr. Roberts. Dee Farm, J650 10s. Calvers made us to £ 28 17s, 6d., and stQre cattle tip to JBll. There was a ve17fij-:e hQW of fat sheep and lambs, Mr. E.jw-U. PIa. Offa, selling at £ 2 5s., Captain Best-f- -z.. and MI". Jones. Finger, at £ -2 Is.; other urig- irig from 24s. a Carrog, 25 at £1 19s. ltams: Mr. ten rams, ranging from E3 ls. to £,. (1 CaBtai.n Best, £475..6& and £ 4.' ,Fai. .? well, the highest prices obtained being and smaH.pigs, 21..13s. The next,;aue ■ adverHsed in another column for Oct. 24n. P"—>M»p—■Mguam ■ Printed and publMhed by Wt?HAM .TpOMAS, of W?e? ham, and CHARLES PB,'iJtg:IN- GASQUOLNH,Of- under the style of Woodau, Mixshau, Thomas & CO"at the -C?axto*.?,,Pres,% Cdx-,a e /v-i'y Friday morning 'at the "Advert1" O?ec,' Caitje Street, Llanjgollea,-and of -all' neT?ssfieatg. Ail ii