Teitl Casgliad: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
28 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
LEAGUEFIRST DIVISION

LEAGUE-FIRST DIVISION. Results up to Saturday, January 3rd:— Goals P. W. L. D. F. A. Pts. Blackburn Rovers 23 12 4 7 56 24 31 Sunderland 23 11 6 6 42 28 28 Manchester U 22 13 7 2 36 29 28 Boiton W. 21 10 5 6 42 26 26 Oldham A. 22 11 7 4 34 28 26 Bradford City 22 8 5 9 26 20 25 West Bromwi-ch A. 22 8 5 9 24 20 25 Burnley 23 7 7 9 36 25 23 Middlesborough 22 9 9 4 37 40 22 Sheffield United 23 9 11 3 37 37 21 Astoi, Vill-a 22 8 9 5 29 33 21 Everton 22 7 8 7 28 32 21 CheL<.e¡¡, 21 9 9 3 30 36 21 Liverpool. 22 8 9 5 26 38 21 Derby County 22 6 9 7 39 43 19 Tottenham H. 22 7 10 5 34 41 19 Sheffi-eld W 23 8 12 3 32 43 19 Manchester City 22 6 10 6 24 33 18 Newcastle U 22 7 11 4 18 29 18 Pros ton N.E. 23 4 15 4 17 42 12

LEAGUESECOND DIVISIONI

LEAGUE-SECOND DIVISION. Results up to Saturday, January 3rd Goals. P. W. L. D. F. tl. P t s. Hull City 21 12 3 6 40 15 30 Notts County 24 12 6 6 45 24 30 Woolwich A 22 13 5 4 33 22 30 Leeds City 20 13 4 3 48 21 29 Bradford 21 13 8 0 38 30 26 Bury. 22 10 7 5 27 23 25 Wolverhampton W. 22 10 8 4 25 27 24 Barn-sloy 21 9 7 5 26 27 23 Grimsby Town 21 9 7 5 28 31 23 Clapton Orient 20 8 6 6 23 18 22 Fulbam 22 9 9 4 29 24 22 Blackpool 22 6 9 7 20 26 19 Stockport County 22 6 8 8 31 35 20 Br-istol City 21 7 9 5 31 33 19 Birmingham 22 8 11 3 28 40 19 Leice

NORTH WALES COAST LEAGUE

NORTH WALES COAST LEAGUE. DIVISION I I I Results up to Saturday, January 3rd:— GOII.1.. P. W. 11. D. F. A. Pte. Holywell United 8 8 0 0 29 6 16 Bangor 10 5 4 1 22 14 11 Jolwyn Day 6 4 0 2 12 4 10 Rhyl 10 5 5 0 22 23 10 Holyhead Swifts. 8 3 2 3 14 15 9 Denbigh Town 9 3 5 1 16 16 7 Fee tin log Town 7 2 3 2 7 7 6 Uajrnarvon United 9 3 6 0 16 23 6 '^lanrwst Town 8 1 4 3 8 17 5 Llandudno Junction 9 1 6 2 8 29 4 DIVISION II. I Results up to Saturday, January 3rd :— Goals. P. W. L. D. F. A. Pt& riangor Railway Inst. 12 10 2 0 69 13 20 Bangor Reserve. 10 9 0 1 49 9 19 Beihesda United 10 7 1 2 34 11 16 Menai Bridge 9 5 3 1 34 29 11 Llanfairfechan 12 5 6 1 30 36 11 i'enmacnmawr 9 4 3 2 22 13 10 Carnarvon Reserve 10 3 4 3 18 31 9 ilolyhead Reserve 8 3 3 2 20 21 8 Llangefni United 10 2 5 2 13 33 6 tllasinfryn Swifts 11 2 9 0 18 47 4 Dolgarrog United 7 2 5 0 13 32 4 Hechcd Celts 11 1 8 2 11 40 4 Uan beris United 6 0 4 2 6 21 2 Llanberis United have resigned.

NORTH WALES COAST WEDNESDAYI LEAGUE

NORTH WALES COAST WEDNESDAY I LEAGUE. Goals. P. W. L. D. T. A. o.an,gor Weds 4 4 0 0 15 6 8 i-iandudno Celts. 3 3 0 0 9 4 6 .Landudno Cor. 3 1 2 0 8 8 2 ,'olwyn Bay Weds. 3 1 2 0 6 10 2 Ueaumaris 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 L>ld Colwyn 4 0 4 0 1 9 0

SATURDAYS RESULTS I

SATURDAY'S RESULTS. I •uEAGUE- (Div. I.). Derby County 4, Tottenham Hotspur 0. Manchester City 2, Sheffield United 1. Citv 2, Middlesborough 3. Blackburn Rovers U. Aston vma o. Sunderland 1, Liverjjpol 2. Everton 2, Newcastle United 0. Bottou Wanderero 6, Manchester United 1. Chelsea 2. O.cibam Athletic 1. Weet Bronrwich 1, Preston N.E. 0. Sheffield Wednesday 2, Burnley 6. LEAGUE (Div. II.). Blackpool 3, Barnsley 1. Bristol City 2, Bradford 0. Clapton Orient 5, Gloeeop 1. Grimsby Town 3. Leicester Fosse C. Huddersfieid Town 3, Fuiham 1. Leeds City 5, Stockport County 1. Lincoln (i-fcy 1, Bury 0. Notts Forest 1, Hull City 2. Birmingham 2, Notts County 1. Woolwich Arsenal 3, Wolvexhampton w. 1. VORTH WALES COAST LEAGUE—Div. 1. Holywell 5, Llandudno Junction 0. Blaenau Festiniog 3, Llaurwst 0. Carnarvon 7, Rhyl 2. ,(ORIU WALES COAST LEAGUE—Div. II. Holyhead Reserve 2, Llangefni United 2. Lianfitirfechan 3, Liechid Celts 2. (VEI-Sll SENIOR CUP—3rd Round. Abertillery 0, Pontypridd 0. Llanelly 0, Mardy 0. Newtown 1, Denbigh Town 0. Oswestry United 2, Cardiff Reserve 1. Summerhill 3, Bangor 0. Swansea 1, Chester 0. Wrexham 5, Llanidloes 0. JTORTH WALES JUNIOR CUP-3rd Round. Abergele U. 6, Portmadoc Territorials j Menai Bridge 1, Bangor Reserve 1. Penmaemnawr 5, Bangor Rly. Institute 1. FRIENDLIES. LLandegai 6, Bangor Athletic 2. Tregarth Celts 3, Bangor United 2.

TOMORROWS FIXTURES I

TO-MORROW'S FIXTURES. ENGLISH CUP-First Round. Liverpool v. Barnsiey. Swindon Town v. Manchester United. Wolverhampton W. v. Southampton. Bradford City v. Woolwich ArsenaL Hull City v. Bury. Blackburn Rovers v. Middlesbrough. Bolton Wanderers v. Port Vale. Plymouth Argyle v. Lincoln City. Gloseop v. Everton. Sheffield Wednesday v. Notts County. West Ham United v. Chesterfield Town. Gainsborough Trinity v. Leeds City. ■ Portsmouth v. Exeter City. Huddersfield Town v. London Corinthians. Sunderland v. Chatham. Aston Villa v. Stoke. Birmingham v. Southend United. Swansea Town v. Merthyr Town. Manchester City v. Fuiham. Newcastle United v. Sheffield United. Preston North End v. Bristol Rovers. Clapton Orient v. Nottingham Forest. Queen's Park Rangers v. Bristol City. Leicester Fosse v. Tottenham Hotspur. Oldham Athletic v. Brighton and llove. Derby County v. Northampton Town. Millwall v. Chelsea. Burnley v. South Shields. Bradford v. Reading. Gillingham v. Blackpool. Crystal Palace v. Norwich City. West Bromwich Albion v. Grimsby Town. .I.ORTH WALES COAST LEAGUE-Div. I Rhyl v. Holywell United. NORiH. WALES COAST LEAGUE—Biv. II. Bangor Railway Institute v. Holyhead Ree. Carnarvon Reserve v. Llechid Celts. Llanfairfechan v. Llangefni. Penmaenmawr v. Glasinfryn Swifts. tVELSH AMATEUR CUP—Second Round. Brymbo v. Summerhill. Colwvn Bay v. Denbigh. Uolyhead bwifts v. Carnarvon United. landrindod Wells v. Newtown. Pant v. Llanfyllin. Pwllheli v. Bala Press. Rhos Church v. Rhos. iORTH WALES JUNIOR CUP-3rd ouril. Bangor Reserve v. Menai Bridge (re-play). L. and N.W.R. TEMPERANCE SHIELD. Llandudno Junction v. Carlisle.

SCHOONER BLOWN ONI ST PATRICKS CAUSEWAY

SCHOONER BLOWN ON ST. PATRICK'S CAUSEWAY. TWO LIFEBOATS TO THE RESCUE. During a gouth-westerly gale on Tuesday after- noon the Dublin schooner "William Martin," with four hands aboard, was seen in Cardigan Bay displaying signals of distress, and the Bar- mouth and Pwllheli lifeboats proceeded to the rescue. The weather was very cold, and a high sea was running, and both boats had all the force of the gale against them. When they got to the windward of the sea end of St. Patrick's Cause- way, they saw a schooner blown on the Causeway. They got as near as possible to her, and offered to take the crew off, but the captain preferred to stick to his ship. For hours the boats stood by in case their services were required. A Hoy lake steam-trawler arrived, and after several attempts got a hawser aboard ajid pulled tho echooner into deep water and towed her into St. Tudwal's Roadstead. It seems that the vessel was caught in the gale whilst in the Iriah Channel, a.nd made for St. Tudwal's Roadstead for safety, but was unable to get sufficiently to windward, with the result that she was forced by the wind in tho direction of the causeway. The Barmouth boat returned about three o'clock on Wednesday morning, and the Pwllheli boat at eight o'clock. Both crews suffered intensely from cold. Their boats behaved admirably.

MENAI BRIDGE LICENCEE I FINED

MENAI BRIDGE LICENCEE FINED. SINGULAR EVIDENCE. At Menai Bridge Petty Sessions, on Monday, before Colonel Bulkeley Price (chairman), Messrs Eric J. W. Platt, H. R. Davies, R. W. Roberts, J. G. Bacon, and Richard Evans, the licencee of the Prince of Wales Vaults, Menai Bridge (Wm. Jones Owen) was Charged with allowing the con- sumption of intoxicating liquor at the vaults du- ring prohibited hours, and with keeping his pre- mises open during closing hours. Rice Parry and Owen Owens, both of Menai Bridge, were also summoned for being on licensed premises during closing hours. Mr J. B. Allariso-n prosecuted for the police, and Mr Gordon Roberts, Holyhead, defended. Evidence was given by Sergeant Roberts that he went to the back of the vaults at 11.25 on December 9tlh, and through the window he saw Rice Parry taking what was apparently a glass from a table and consuming the contents. He asked Parry what he was doing there, and he explained that he was waiting for a doctor. Owen Owens was alo there. The licencee, when ques- tioned, said the men had not obtained any drink, whereupon witness pointed out that he saw Rice Parry drinking. Parry said "I admit it. I will tell you the whole truth. I had a bottle of stout." Arnd the liocncee added that that was correct. Owen Owens explained that he was at the inn on business to see the licencee about going to Man- chester the following morning. Witness told the licencee that, he had to report the case, and the lioencee replied You can summon me if you like. I don't care, and I shall not appear, as I have nothing to say against you. I don't care if I am off to-morrow. You knew long ago that this has been carried on." Witness told him that • they were not the only two men he had seen on the premises after closing hours, and the licencee asked whether he could prove it, and witness re- plied that ho could. Rice Parry asked witness not to report the case, adding that they would make it up all right for him." Witness replied that if he was given C5 he would not refrain from reporting the case. Questioned by Mr Gordon Roberts, the officer 'st.atcd there was no attempt at concealement. Witness did not notice the label on the bottle on the table, and he did not know it was a sample bottle. There was no mention of payment for the stout. Witness was at the vaults only two minutes. He did not suggest that Owens was served. Both men were perfectly sober. Wit- ness would bo surprised to learn that the licen- cee often closed his premises before 11 o'clock at night. P.C. Wm. Williams (19) gave corroborative evi- dence, and added that the licencee told the see. geant it was a pity he bad nothing better to do than pick up a trifling case of that kind. THE DEFENCE. I Mr Gordon Roberts, for the defence, said that Rico Parry went to the vaults for tobacco, and the other man wished to see the licencee about going to Manchester the following day for a motor-car. Owing to the strike in Dublin, the licences could not obtain Guinness' stout, and a sample bottle of stout by another brewer was sent to him in order that he might endeavour to sell it. This sample bottle was placed on the table for customers to taste, but no one seemed to like it (laughter). The licencee asked Parry to taste it, and ho did so, but spat it out again, saying he did not care for it. That was what the police saw from the rear of the premises. The prosecution must satisfy the Bench that the vaults were kept opan for the consumption of drink. The licencee gave evidence that the two men did not ask for drink, nor were they served. Parry simply tasted the contents of the sample bottle. When that took place, it was not 11 o'clock. The last sale at the vaults took place at 10.50 p.m. There was not the slightest attempt at concealment. He often closed the vaults be- fore closing hours. When the officer said he would report the case, defendant told him there 'had been no sale. In answer to Mr Allanson the licencee said his oustomcrs always left tho vaults before 11 o'clook. Were customers leaving the vaults at 11.30 p.m. the night before?—No. In reply to further questions, defendant said it was not true Parry admitted having a bottle of stout. The officers were, alleged defendant, tell- ing a lot of lies. There was no sale of drink. Mr Allanson: You are not charged with it. Rioo Parry, Uxbridge-square, Menai Bridge, said that he called at the Prince of Wales Vaiults for tobacco, and had a ohat with Owen Owens. The licencee asked him to taste the sample bottle of stout, and he did so. r Cross-examined, witness denied having offered something to the sergeant not to go on with the oaoe; he had nothing to" give him. Mr Allanson: You might give him the coat you are wearing. Witnees; It would not fit him (laughter). Owen Owens, cycle dealer, Menai Bridge, gave

MENAI BRIDGE LICENCEE I FINED

evidence that he was at the vaults at the request of tho licencee on business matters, and he had a chat with Parry, who sampled the bottle of stout before 11 o'clock. Witness was not sup- plied with any drink. Mr Allanson: You are a good customer at the vaults? Witness: The vaults is a good customer of mine (laughter). Dr. R. M. Williams, Menai Bridge, stated that on the evening in question Rice Parry called at his surgery at 11.25 p.m. Sergeant Roberts (recalled) stated that the bottle of stout he saw on the table of the vaults was empty. The Chairman stated th-at the Bench had de- cided to dismiss the first case, but for keeping open the premises during closing hours the licen- œe would be fined £ 1 and oosts. Rice Parry amd Owens would be fined 5s and costs. The Bench wished to add that the back door of the vaults should not be used for trade purpose^

I THE WELSH OUTLOOK

I THE WELSH OUTLOOK. "The Outlook," the new threepenny "monthly journal of national eoc?al progress," cOI1!t.ai.ne I 44 pages of readimg matter in clear type, cleanly and neatly printed on good paper, and five pages of illustrations on art paper, bound in a grey coloured paper cover, wnich bears the title in bLack. ine Editor's ideal ia high. In a foreword he asks whether a small nation of two million people can main- tain any semblance of its ancient self in the presence of the all-pervasive influences that surround the Welsh at present. "Wo hold," he sayB, "that the assertion and maintenance of our nationality is justi- fied; that our moral and political and social traditions are a precious inheritance, the loss of which would impoverish humanity, and that local patriotism is not incompatible with im- perial loyalty. Holding this faith we wish in these pages to witness to the unity of our national life, and to deepen and enrich it. This we would do not by refusing what other nations offer, but by taking of their best, making it our own and returning it with in- terest. We believe we can make some con- tribution. however small, to the common trea- sury of the nations if we have the courage to be ourselves, and to put our trust in know- ledge and discipline rather than in rhetoric and intrigue." The principal subjects dis- cussed include tho religious outlook in Wales, modern Welsh literature (by Mr T. Gwynne Jones), the medical outlook in Wales, a.rt and national life, some recent Welsh plays, per- sonality of towns, and English nursery rhymes There are Notes of the Month," a few pages devoted to "Wales at Work," and two com- petitions, in which prizes are offered for a critical examination of M.r E. T. John's "Home Rule for Wales," and for the best translation to Welsh of an English passage by a County School boy or girl.

IBEFORE THE DAYS OF KING SOLOMONSI MINES

BEFORE THE DAYS OF "KING SOLOMON'S I MINES." Prominent among the fiction by famous novelists in the January Wurador Magazine, is to be found a large second instalment of Srix H. Rider Hag- igard's fascinating" new romance from the career of his famous hero, Allan Quatermain, "The Holy Flower." This, it is interesting to note, is the record of tho strange adventure of the famous hunter and explorer, Allan Quartermain, on his perilous mis- sion into an unknown region of Africa in the dlaye before his remiatrkaibLe experiences which are now histonoal in that modern okseic "King Solomon's Mi nee," and still further before the subsequent ady-oraurce cihmm-oled in his later story. At the opening of the present narra- tive, Hunter Quartermain, while shooting tng game in South Africa, met one of tho strangest characters thcin known in all South Africa, an American gentleman, who wa/s a doctor by profession, but for some years past had wander-ed about South and Eastern Africa collecting butteirflies and flowers, his safety being estab- lished by his reputation for mad neess, which, ooupLed with his medical skill, enabled him to travel alone unmoleoted. To the natives he was known as Dogeerbah, but white people usually called him "Brother John." From him Allan Quartermain first heard of a wonderful plant with blooms of extraordinary size and marvellous beauty, with a monkey's head outlined on every bloom, which he proclaimed to be tho most mar- vellous cypripedium on the whole earth. A h-ealthy root of this plant, he maintained, would be worth at least twenty thousand o pounds; but all he could show was a single bloom, without any root. This bad, come into his possession in the country of the Mazitu, a warlike race whom no white man had ever visited, beyond the east- ern boundary of whose territory was a large and fertile land, supposed to be an island in the midst of a great lake, with a mountain in the centre. The name of both this territory and its lninaib-itants was tlongo, which wa6 also the native name for gorilla, and the god of the Porugo people was said to be a gorilla, whose worship was combined with that of tho wonder- ful orchid. A further touch of mystery was added by tho rumour that the worship of the holy flower included the attendance of a white womam as priestess, though no one could sur- mise how such a woman should bo found in that unexplored region Here was iust the story to appeal to the d'aring spirit of Allan Quartermain, not only for the salto of adventure into the un- known, but also for the possible riches to be gained by the discovery and subsequent sale of so wondcrfuJ an orchid. How the story de- velops forms the theme of the new romance.

I THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS I

I THE "REVIEW OF REVIEWS. I The "Review of Reviews" for January enters upon its twenty-fifth year of publication, and oooasion has been taken to present the first num- ber of the new volume in a fount of type of great clearness and legibility, which will no doubt be appreciated by its readers. The classification of the articles lias also been improved, and alto- gether the magazine bears the impress of actuality and all-round improvement. A new feature is noticeable—the production of "a speciallv-drawn cartoon, the subject being Mr Lloyd George, who is represented as a "Modern Moses." In an address to his readers tihe Editor says that tho working policy of the Review of Re- views" is to present impartially the ideas which imply progress in the many departments of human activity, and points ut that, as a magazine cir- culates in every part of the world, this is an assurance that the work thus attempted is fairly well accomplished. At the same time, however, the idea prevails in some quarters that in home politics the Conservative view-point does not re- ceive full acknowledgment. Being anxious to treat all shad-es of opinion as fairly as possible he offers five guineas to any writer who sends in competition an article of 2000 words giving an expression of the opinion of the average Conser- vative voter. A Conservative of repute will act as adjudicator, and tihe winning essay will be printed in the Review." Many interesting special articles, several pages of Continental and British cartoons, a voluminous array of extracts (together with comment), from the leading magazines, a critical survey of the literature of the month, and a number of illustra- tions and portraits, make up the remainder of the contents of the magazine. Readers are there- by provided with a magazne which keeps them informed with world-events of importance, aa well as presenting them with the'views of the foremost writers in the domain of social and literary affairs.

I WHY ARE MARRIAGES ON THE J DECREASE

I WHY ARE MARRIAGES ON THE DECREASE. I think that people marry less often because tho oost of things keeps going up, and even "lov? in. a. cottage" is much more expensive than "love in a eawge" ?s MILX-, i l more expen-s"vc than it used to bo. Poverty, seems to bo coming in at the door unless a chauffeur can drive up to it in some vague, cheap suggestion of a motor- bar; and love stands ready to bolt out of the window urieeo it can bo curtaincd with the most charming muslin and cthiratz. There seem to be so many more things in the world to wqnt than there ueed to be, go natural- ly we walnt them, and, therefore, it takes more courage for a poor man to propose to a pretty girl than in days when all novelists had to end their Stories with an engagetnent, or a wedding. Besides, of course, young women have a better chance of finding work which is fairly well paid than they had ycare ago so they need not marry juat for the sake of being married. Perhaps, therefore, if peoplo are marrying less often, they may be marrying more happly!-Mra C. N. Williamson, the well-known novelist, in the Janu- ary Strand Magazine-

MARKET GARDEN CROPSI

MARKET GARDEN CROPS. I To all engaged in market gardening the vol- ume entitled "The Maniuring of Market Garden Oops," by Mr Bernard Dyer and Mr F. W. E. Shrivell, will be most useful. It records a series of interesting experiments, from which valuable results were derived, and the information as to manuring and the use of supplementary fertilisers will icnab-o market gardeners to utilise their land to tho best possible advantage in the production of crops. (Vinton and Co., Ltd., 8, (Bream's Buildings, Chancery Lane, London. Price Is).

AGRICULTURAL ORGANISATION SOCIETY I

AGRICULTURAL ORGANISATION (SOCIETY I An interesting report has been issued of the visit paid to Holland by Messrs Press and Meyer, the Agricultural Or- ganisation Society organisers, and they deal with the methods adopted by some of the co-operative societies in the Netherlands under- taking the disposal of fruit and market garoen produce. The report brings together compre"be.n- sive information and data which cannot fail to be of .interest to those concerned in the move- ment in this country.

PUBLICATIONS RECEIVEDI

PUBLICATIONS RECEIVED. "Musical Herald," which contains an interest- in,ginterview with Mr Cyril Jenkins, the Welsh composer. Wo:h National Museum; annual report, con- taining several fine illustrations and a list of donations to the Museum during the year.

I EMPLOYMENT GUARANTEED

I EMPLOYMENT GUARANTEED. I No risk about Australia. A special feature about the assisted immi- gration of British farm labourers, ladf between 16 and 20 years, and domestic servants to Australia is that every assisted person gets a definite Government guaran- tee of employment upon arrival. This means, that those who are lucky enough to be accepted by the Government for a cheap reduced passage run no risk whatever. Work with good employers awaits them immediately they land in either Victoria or New South Wales. The Government- takes particular care to see that every assisted immigrant receives a comfortable situation at a high rate of wages. The figures for emigration to Australia for 1913 are not yet available, but it is known that upwards of 50,000 British peo- ple left the United Kingdom for the happy and prosperous citizenship of the Common- wealth. In 1914 special offers are again to be made by New South Wales and Vic- toria to farmers, farm workers, lads of all classes and callings between 16 and 20 who wish to engage in farm work, and domestic servants. The ordinary third-class fare to Sydney or Melbourne is A18. The Government, how- ever, grants special reduced passages to farm- ers and farm workers at 48, to lads at £ 7, and domestics at from A 3 to £ 6. The voyage is made in large, comfortable modern steamers, which provide excellent cabin accommodation, ample deck space, and an abundance of whole- some food. The journey is almost entirely through warm, smooth seas, under clear skies, and is one of the most delightful trips in the world. For a few pounds the immigrant trav- erses half the globe, calls at many delightful strange ports, and at the end goes to certain em- ployment at wages which are from 50 to 100 per cent. higher than those prevailing in the United Kingdom. They become citizens of the health- iest country in the world, and have unique oppor tunities for advancement. For full particulars about this offer readers should apply to The Assistant of Immigration for New South vtTale8 and Vic- toria, Melbourne Place, Strand, London. Adrt.

Advertising

New Colonization Scheme. OWN YOUR OWN FARM IN ALBERTA, CANADA. A Practical Farmer of Alberta, Canada (Mr. Hal Carleton), and Lecturer on Canadian Agriculture, wishes to take back with him a few Farmers to form a Colony I in Central Alberta, located round a Model Demonstration Farm under his Superintendence. Mr. Carleton's advice and help on mixed farming lines will continually be at the service of the New Settlers free of charge. Mr. Carleton will be at the CASTLE HOTEL, BANGOR, North Wales, 20th to 24th Jan. A to give full particulars, or Mr. Henry Ayres, the local Manager for A. E. Chant & Co.'i of 360, High Street, Bangor, North" Wales, will make appointments for Mr. Carleton to visit any prospective Settler in any part of Wales. ———- —— ——— — CANADA M there are ample rewards for JV honest work. Government guaran- ■ tees work on the land and for Domestic Servants. I Life on your own land fir in Canada is easil ^realized and is wortII r ij '?  Jiving. < For Otlicial Literature, Advice, Jk 4 and Information, apply to the 1 JJ k m CANADIAN GOVERXMKKT tt N AGENT. Adrian Court, Usk, Mon. jffi or 10 the Assistant-Supcriiileiidtat //< of 11-12 Charing Cross, Londol4 S.W.

NEW COLONISATION SCHEME IN WESTERN CANADA

NEW COLONISATION SCHEME IN" WESTERN CANADA Great interest is being taken at the jnc»cnt • time by farmers in England and \Ynk*« in a new programme that Mr Hal Carleton, a well- known Canadian farmer and lecturer, luus &ct out to aocolupiish. Idr Hal Carleton was in this country the greater part of Spring of last year, and took out with him to Canada at the end of March, 1913, farmers and fami- lies numbering over 200 souls. In an inter- view with Mr Carleton, he stated that the programme w hieh he is carrying out is on^ tho following i-ines:- "] intend to colonise a tract of land con- taining some fourteen thousand acres lying adjacent to the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway main line between Edmonton and Saskatoon, in the province of Alberta, Canada, ana within from one to nine miles of the railway station of Kinsella; and in order to attract the man without agricultural experience or one who wishes to send a son out West t

Advertising

-z- I- 11 A cit tfO, EE dl & I MTALOGUD FROM LOCAL -,EALER PR 86, QUEEN VICTORU STREET, iiONDOjSj

I MOTORING NOTES I

I MOTORING NOTES. I "Well, that's really very kind of you. I was always under the impression that your Guides and your Touring Bureau were only for those motorists who fit your tyres." This remark recently made by an acquaintance of mine in the course of a conversation of which you guess the import, threw light upon an error, which ifl, I (have since ascertained, in- dulged n, quite unknowingly, by large number of motorists. Suppose a car manufacturer, out for a rum, were appealed to by a brother motorist in trouble —for a drop of petrol may be, or for informa- tion which would put him on the right road to where he wished to go. And suppose that car manufacturer refused the ami-stauce sought, simply beoause his comrade in sport didn't hap- pen to be driving a ear of his (the manufactur- er e) make. There is a certain iow caste quad- ruped which, that manufacturer would resemble very cLosely indeed—isn't there? The Michel in touring office is for the free use of any and every motorist in, coming into, or going away from the British Isles. Make of tyros be blowed! If a man prefers to walk 100 miles in dancing pumps, well, that's his and his feet's affair. The boot trade isn't going to boycott him; nor is any pious cord- wainer going to force him into hobnail boots. But any being with a spark of the spirit of sport my, with an atom of common decency—in his make-up, ie going to tc-ll him all he knows about the best road to take and what good cheer—and boot-makers' shops the way-ekte offers. I ask nothing better, therefore, than that you, motor- ists one and all, make full w-id free use of the Miohelin Touring Office. Here are large soale maps complete with every road detail a motorist oan desire; (here are de- tailed itineraries of complete runs, for consulta- tiond a copy of any of them fair-typed to take away with you for the asking-. A library of Guide Books is here, too-and an armchair for your greater ea.se while reading. Attendants are at your oomplete dispoeal for giving you all in- formation upon any tour you wish to take, abroad or at home. Then, your enquiries satisfied and you havo an hour to spare, why not smoke a cigarette over the latest il-lustrated (papers, or write a letter or two? Pens, ink, paper, and a piller-box are all at hand, and the attendant can supply you with stamps.

Advertising

I Michelin T yres One Ouality The Bea. Only I I

I I GOLF1

I — I GOLF. 1 I CHRISTMAS COMPETITION AT OAKWCOD. Visitors to the Oakwood Park Hotel, Conway, were mom numerous than ever this Christmas, and the golf competitions, which are arranged arumiaLy by Paxton, the professional, attracted many entrants. The weatlier was not conducive to good goli, but oome excellent oa.rd6 were re- turned. The competitions opened on Wednesday morn- ing with a mixed foursome. Eighteen cards were taken, out, the best returns bcwig G. H. N. Mies J. Edmondson & R. McKonna 96 17 79 Mrs Lloyd Jones & H. W. llulnie 90 7 83 Mies Lloyd & J. Asàoon. 1()3 15 88 Mies Oartiand & W. Ryan 105 15j 89i Mr and Mrs Jones 115 222 922 Mr and Mrs Oliver Bird 119 212 972 OAKWOOD PARK CHALLENGE CUP. I The Oakwood Park Challenge Cup was played for on Bjxing Day, when there was a great deal of wind, which considerably interfered with the py. In the semi-final, Mr T. P. Harrison (2), beat Mr C. D. Weston (13) by two up; whilst Mr W. B. Edmondson (8), beat Mr John William- son (15), by two and 3ne. There was a keen struggle in the final between Mr Harrison and Mr Mimondoori, tho former eventually running out two holes to the good. Twenty-two cards were taken out and the best returns were:— G. H. N. J. Clarke (disqualified) 106 20 86 John Williamson 106 15 91 C. D. Weston 105 13 92 W. B. Edmondeon 101 8 93 T. P. Harrison 96 2 94 Fifteen cards were taken out on Saturday in a mixe d foursome competition, and the best rcr turns were as follow :— G. H. N. Mr and Mri Moore 106 24 £ 81 £ Mrn Williamson and B. MoMonies 110 20 90 Mitts 1 lid me and I-I. Hulme 105 15 90 Mr aM kirt3 Lioyd Jones 105 13 9H

I HOCKEYI

I HOCKEY. I IMR-S LLOYD'S XI. v. MRS BURTON'S XI. I This match was pla-yoa at Beaumaris on New Year's Day, the ground being in a very muddy condition. The two teams were very equally matched. Miss Burton won the toss, choosing to play against the slope. The Beau- maris team pressed very hard, and after a few minutes' play C. H. Owen broke through the defence. 'J home team soon profited by another goal by the same player. M. Owen and G. Coulthard played strenuously through- out the game. The home team monopilised the pLay in the first half. Half-tume: Mrs Lloyd's XI. 2, Mrs Burton's XI. 0. After the restart the opposing team pressed very hard and were rewarded with a. goal. The Beaumaris team in turn pressed, but could not get through owing to the fine goalkeap- in of Mrs Chad wick. The heme defence was led by E. W. Davies and N. Hope, who saved their side many times. The- homesters ran up and the centre torward scored from a pass by M. Owen. The opposing team then retaliated by a very good goal. The game was very fast, but when full time came Beaumaris deserved the lead. Final: Mrs Lloyd's XI. 3, Mrs Burton's XI. 2.

I THE FLINT AND DENBIGH HOUNDS I

I THE FLINT AND DENBIGH HOUNDS I I Thursday, January 8th Bodelwydd

1 THE ANGLESEY HARRIERSI

1_ THE ANGLESEY HARRIERS I Wednesday, January 14th Cae'r GLaw. Saturday, January 17th Penmynydd. Wednesday, January 21st. Rhosgooh. Saturday, January 24th. Pentraeth. Each day at 11.45 a.m. I L. WILLIAMS, Master. I

THE LIE OF THE LAND I

THE LIE OF THE LAND. I On many a waste and common in Wales there is to be seen what the Welsh call a Ty Un-nos—a one night house. Whatever may have been the origin of this Ty Un-nos custom, it has been generally held in rural Wales t-hat a hastily constructed hut put up in one night on a piece of waste land gave a sort of squatter's right to the enterprising land-jumper. But, it was considered vital to the suocesti of the venture that emodce should issue from the chimney at break o-f day. How- ever flimsy and unfinished, whether it was built of mud or sods was quite immaterial, so long as there was plenty of smoke about! Smoke, and plenty of it, was the one great clement that secured the saioeess of the venture. Well versed in old Welsh customs, Mr Lloyd George has startled the rural world with his Ty Dn-nes land campaign. Having enclosed the Commons with golden chains paid for by the patient, long-stUfering taxpayers, he has suddenly put up hits Ty Un-ncs land campaign on the waiste caused by the Budget, Parlia- ment and Insurance Acts. Flimsy, muddy and unfinished, this latest Ty Un-nos is as smoky as any one put up in any age. With the traditional bad temper of the housewife of a amoky house, the modern land-jumper rails at everything and everybody from a pheasant to a landlord that dares to peck at or criticise this smoky Ty un-nos, with its acre of mangel wurzels. "Why should they criticise my handiwork and peck at my crop?" scoffingly cries our modern land-jumper, as, carefully wiping away a big tear caused by the rapt contempla- tion ct a badly peeked turnip, he shouts, "Can't they see the smoke? the smoke! the smoke! it is the smoke that counts." Yes, the land-jumper means to rely on the .'jinoks to-day as in the past. Ho relies on the smoke to blind the farmers and labourers, and hopes to smoko the landlords off the land. DetMe, black, suffocating smoke at present encircles the land campaign, and it will pro- bably end in smoke. But will it blind the ejectors ? Hardly, for they have not yet forgotten that a million pound.s or so of their hard-earned money has been smoked away in salaries by an army of officials created by the Budget. ALso the continued licking of Insurance stamp gum has given the electors such a bad taste in the mouth that they can hardly enjoy a smoke with good tobacco. No, smoke as a vote catcher is not likely to appeal to the country folk used to fresh air. Stamp gum has already set up an irritation as is likely to be made acute by the smoke of this Ty Un-nos land campaign. But we must not sit down to "wait and see," but must endeavour to clear away the smoke, so that the electors can see for themselves the lie of the, land plainly and clearly. Porimad(-o. RICHARD PURNELL. J

I BANGOR CITY COUNCIL

I BANGOR CITY COUNCIL. I THE WATER SUPPLY: ENGINEER'S REPORT. I INTERESTING DISCUSSION, The monthly meeting of the Bangor City Council was held on Wednesday evening, his Worship the Mayor in the dhair. There were aJao present Aldermen Sir Henry Lewos, W. P. Mathews, W. Bayne, H. C. Vincent and Ed. Jones, and Councillors Joseph Davies, Cbas. Pozzi, Owen Owen, W. Thomas, G. F. Ainiger Williams, John Roberts, Thoe. VaJJance. X>r. J. E. Thomas, Dr. R. Rowland Jones, T. J. Williams, C. C. Cooil, O. R. Hughes, John Williams, J. L. Vamghan, G. R. Grierson, R. Jones Roberta, and the town clerk (Mr J. Pentir IWilliams), the surveyor (Mr John Gill), the boirougih accountant (Mr Smith Owen), and the electrical engineerand gas manager (Mr Price White). I THE BANGOR WATERWORKS. Each member of the Council had been sup- plied with a printed copy of a report by Mr J. Parry on the Bangor waterworks, and a synopsis of the voluminous correspondence which had taken place between that gentle- man and the Borouorh Surveyor on the sub- ject, extending over 1 Long period. The Press, itow,ever, had not been supplied with copies of the report, and hence it was impossible to follow the earlier stages of the discussion, especially the lengthly remarks niadeiby Mr Owen Owen on the correspondence, extracts of which he quoted and commented upon. At the outset Dr. Rowland Jones moved the adoption of the report, and Alderman Mathews i seconded. Then followed Mr Owen Owen's comments, in the course of which he emphasised the assertion that the faults and diefects pointed out by the expert ought (as the expert had said) to have been ascertained and remedied without expert assistance. At the conclusion of Mr Owen's speech, At-a JONES ROBERTS said it was only fair to himself and everybody else to relate a few facts in connection with this matter. They all knew that Mr Owen Owen and himself had from the start been strongly opposed to the reservoir recommended by Mr Gill, and many persone seemed to be under the impres- sion that they did so sim.ply for the sake of opposing it. But it had been a satisfaction to them to know that they had discovered the mischief, and that things were as they had anticipated, and he must ask the Council, when there was any opposittion to anything by Mr Owen Owen or himself in the future to admit that their opposition was sincere (hear, hea.r). He would never do such a small and ridiculous thing as that unless his convictions were deep and strong (hear, hear). He trusted that when there was a difference of opinion they would give each other credit for sincerity (hear, hear). As a proof of hie own sincerity in the matter he mi,ght mention the fact that he had gone to the expense of getting these letters printed and sent to every householder in Bangor. IIo did not want to have any credit for himself, but he thought the real facts ought to be made known. MR JOHN ROBERTS referred to a state- ment on page 4 at the report in which Mr Parry pointed out that "if from any cause such as a fracture illl any part of the many miles of main from the River Llafax to Ban- gor or a defect im the valves or other appli- ances, or for cleansing purposes, the water had to be temporarily shut off the 8000 people referred to would for the time of stoppage be left entirely without water. There was another practice which Mr Parry condemned on page 15 of his report with re- ference to the hocuses in Menai View-terrace, in which paragraph Mr Parry expressed the opinion that "the w.c. 's, etc., ought to be fed from a storage system." Would that apply to the whole of the town? SIR HENRY LEWIS said he was sure Mr Jones Roberts need not have assured the Coun- cil of his sincerity in these matters (hear, hear). However much they might sometimes differ from him, they none of them questioned his sincerity (hear, 'hear). He further agreed that he and Mr Owen Owen had some cause for congratulation upon the results of Mr Parry's report. The report was a very satis- factory one so far as he was able to judge, but it gave very little idea of the long con- tinued inconvenience, irritation and loss which had been caused to a great many fami- lies in Upper Bangor for many years. As one who had Buffered himself he was entitled to say so, and therefore that report was par- tioularly interesting. He had. only one obser- vation to make. After all they had gone through it was little consolation to them to be told at the end of the report that this sort of thing could be and ought to be traced by your own waterworks staff following the usual methods of examination." He main- tained that that sentence contained a very grave indictment against their waterworks staff. lif?ey had  g ainFA their waterworks staff. They had been writing and complaining for many years of the scarcity of water, and now they f^und the cause could have been and ought to have been discovered long ago by the ordinary metheds of observation ty their own waterworks staff. He hoped they would not be troubled again, and that no further shortage would be experienced in Upper Bangor. He thought they owed a great deal to Mr Parry and that he deserved a very hearty vote of thanks. MR T. J. WILLIAMS said he also had had something to do with this matter in his time in the Council. A proposal for a large reser- voir was brought forward 15 years ago. He failed to see then, and he was still of the same opinion, that a reservoir was required. But he found several members of the Council were ready to rush on with the idea, and they were told practicably that they were doinig very wrong in apiposing any suggestion by their engineer. They had a very great respect for their engineer; they had no more con- scientious servant in their employ (hear, hear). At the same time, he was not above making mistakes, and he (Mr Williams) had no doubt that in this matter he (the engineer) was mistaken. DR. ROWLAND JONES; What matter is it? MR T. J. WILLIAMS: The intake reservoir. DR. ROWLAND JONES: I hope that ques- tion won't be discussed to-night. The MAYOR hoped Mr T. J. Williams would not proceed with that question. MR T. J. WILLIAMS, proceeding, said that apart from that, lie was pleased to find that Mr Parry from the very commencement had put his finger on the weak spot, as far as the information at his command permitted him. They would find in the correspondence that Mr Parry could not give an opinion om cer tain points because he had not had the neces- sary data. Fcr example, Mr Parry suggested there might be a i •< fcrucMon iJ. GLaorafo. Mr Gill opened the pipes there and found an obstruction only a little distance from the epot Mr Parry had suggested. Now, Mr Parry had done his work, assisted very cheer- fully by their own engineer, and now he (Mr Williams) was convinced that the cause of all the complaints had been removed when the obstructions were cleared. With regard to the Sanitary Committee he might say that he had never seen a committee which dealt more sincerely and energetically with any matter. It might be said they had taken a long tinie, but the report would explain why. MR BAYNE hoped the Council would be cautious in dealing with this matter. The idea got abroad about 12 months ago that their difficulties were solved. But he would like to say that it was all very well to be wise after they had found the remedy, but what had the oommittoo done as a committee to find the remedy? He did not think it was fair for the Sanitary Oismmittets to claim credit for something it had not done. They had not bought a,pparatus nor impresse d the engineer with their determination to have the pipes cleared. If they were so wise why did they not see that the pipes were obstructed? They had never done so. It might have been discussed, but it was pointed out that the apparatus would cost E-50. Some members of the committee, Mr Ccoil more than any other member he thought, insisted that the pipes should be cleaned or new ones laid down. That was a very sound position. But Mr Parry said different. He said if the pipes were clean and kept clean," and if the committee had to do that they would have to go to very considerable expense. Mr Ocoil suggested anotller reservoir, and Mr Parry was very strong on the surne point, but the committee had never considered it. The 8000 people re- ferred to were supplied from the main and if the main were to burst they would have no water. It was a matter the committee would soon have to face. MR COOIL said that nearly t-lirc-2, years ago he had pressed for the 4-inch main to be thoroughly cleaned. But everyone had his own idea and they could not agree to any- thing. They ought to have instructed Mr Gill what to do and not talk for years. MR VINCENT said he rather deprecated a discussion on this matter by the Council be- cause it seemed to make several members take credit for the excellent report received from Mr Parry, a credit to which, with every possible respect, he doubted if they were entitled—(applause and laughter)—and to lay a great deal of the blame upon members of the Council who were not members of the com- mittee. He did not think that was fair (iiear, hear). Mitght he ask the Council to consider the matter from the point of view of a person like himself who had never been a member of the Sanitary Committee? He had never advocated the erection of a new reservoir at all as far as he knew, nor had anybody else (applause). But they did receive a report í from their own engineer much was sufficiently serious to oblige them to take notice af it, in 1908, The only resolution passed was that the whole matter be referred to an expert, and that came before the Council in 1908. Coun- cillors Owen Owen and Jones Roberts were claiming a very great deal of credit from the report because, they said in effect, it sup- ported the view which they took tibat the new reservoir was not necessary, and that all that was necessary was to clean the pipes. Might he say at that point that he was a complete convert, atfteir MT Parry's report, to that view, and he thought a thorough investigatjpn of the pipes would do away with the evil. But it was rather a curious thing that those two men should claim credit for that report, be- oause; although they were right in their theories, they both opposed, and very strongly, the obtaining of this r'OTt. I In a letter written to the North Wales Express, a copy of which he received that morning—he sus- pected from Mr Owen Owen—(laughter)—Mr Men said, "I strongly opposed the giving of 25 guineas to a stranger for coming here." MR JONES ROBERTS (in astonishment) Who said that? (laughter). MR VINCENT: Mr Owen Owen (loud laugh- ter). And, curiously enough, Mr Jones Roberts adds ainother letter of his own, in which he says: I entirely agree with Mr Owen Owen in oppos- ing getting this report" (great laughter). If thoso gentlemen were entitled to claim credit for the fact that they were right, they surely were not entitled to take credit because they opposed the very means whereby they ascertained who were the true advocates (applause). He (Mr Viinoent) deprecated the laying of blame in this matter on members of the Council like himself, who acted solely with the object of ascertaining what was good for the town. Mr Jones Roberts was claim- ing sincerity for hie actions. They all willingly conceded it. But they all claimed tine same (hear, hoar). Was there anything but sincerity in what their Engineer said We must have a new reser- voir?" Was he (Mr Vincent) not entitled to ask them to believe in his (Mr Vincent's) sincerity when he advocated that? He thought he was (applause). He did not think these gentlemen were right in blaming others for asking for some more certain proof than their mere ipse dixit (hear, hear). Neither did he think they were r,gh,. in claiming credit for the result of the re- port which, if lie was rightly informed, they op- posed getting. MR JONES ROBERTS requested Mr Vincent to allow him to see the paper in which the state- ment quoted by Mr Vincent appeared. Mr Vinmnt did so. MR OWEN OWEN Admitted that he had strongly opposed the appointment of an expert because lie was satisfied that they had an abun- dant supply of water if the pipes were clear. He (Mr Owen) had explained the very thing they were pointin.g out. Mr Parry said the same thing as he had been saying. MR JONES ROBERTS said the statement in Mr Owen Owen's letter, quoted by Mr Vincent, was that he (Mr Owen) "objected to paying 25 guineas to an expert to tell them something they already knew," and what he (Mr Jones Roberts) had said was that he agreed with what Mr Owen Owen had said in that letter." MR VINCENT: When you said "I agree with him" I thought you meant it daughter). MR JONES ROBERTS: Yes, on the water supply. MR VINCENT: This letter is all about the water supply. water OWEN OWEN I never doubted anybody's sincerity. The TOWN CLERK here rose and emphatic- ally declared Mr Vincent was quite right. SIR HENRY LEWIS: The reservoir referred to by Mr Parry is entirely different from the one referred to by Mr Owen Owen. The TOWN CLERK: As a matter of fact the question of a reservoir as such--the building of a reservoir—was never before this Council during the last 15 years (hear, hear). It was disoussed by the Sanitary Committee, and then, because Mr Gill, in the plainest terms, told us we were courting disaster in the form of a water famine unless we built a reservoir, you were advised to take an opinion. You refused that in 1906, but later on, in 1908, you acted upon it (hear, hea.r). DR. ROWLAND JONES said Mr John Ro- berts had asked a question with regard to the supply of water for some 8000 persons in the lower part of the town—practically from the main, a thing which Mr Parry objected to. He (Dr. Rowland Jones) asked the Council to leave that matter to the committee. In reference to the houses in Menai View-terrace, that was a matter which affected those houses only. The one great question before them was whether they, as a Council, were justified in depending on that small stream—the I. la fan-—which came from the moun- tains somewhere between Cam odd Dafydd and Cairnedd Llewelyn, in view of the possibility of periods of drought during the summer. That was the whole question. Mr Owen Owen had said there was enough water to supply the whole of Anglesey. So there was if proper arrange- ments were made. As to the adequacy of the reservoir on the mountain and its mains and ser- vices to supply the higher parta of Bangor, Mr Owen Owen seemed to put the blame on the ser- vice pipes. If Mr Owen Owen had said the main also, he would have said Mr Owen Owen was right the whole time. He (Dr. Rowland Jone6) wai Kurti tW_commit £ ee had done its utmost to keep this question to the front. They did not claim to be experts, but the corrosion was a very small matter. Mr Parry referred to corrpsion at Snovvdon View, and said that-was sufficient to account for the failure of the supply to Victoria Park. The committee had facts which disproved that view. As the result of information supplied by Mr Gill, Mr Parry was led to suggest that.an obstruction might be found at Glan'rafon-Siill, and that prcved correct, but it was not found by Mr Parry, but accidentally by Mr Gill. Still, he considered Mr Parry had rendered immense ser- vice in assuring them that their reservoirs and mains were adequate to a full supply to all parts in Upper Bangor. MR BAYNE: If clean. After further discussion., DR. ROWLAND JONES accepted the following resolution, drafted by the Town Clerk, and moved it:—" That Mr Parry's report be accepted, and referred to the Sanitary Committee for further consideration." In this form the reoolution proposed an hour oreviouslv was unanimously adopted. I EXPERT'S FINAL REPORT. I In his final report, dated October 25th, the Consulting Engineer 6aid:— "I visited Bangor on the 5th ultimo, and, as a first step in the investigation, asked Mr Gill to cut out two pieces of piping for my inspection. This was done, on tilie following day, and, at one of the points selected (a passitge at the back of Snowdon y icw). I found the iron pipes in- crusted to an extent that fully accounted for the complaints received from the inhabitants of Vic- I toria. Park. These jncrustcd pipes should be taken up at once, and new pipes substituted. The next places inspected was opposite to the entrance to St." James' Church. A piece of pipe laid about 18 years ago was cut out, and was free from serious corrosion. As the same time Mr Gill explained to me that a le.ngth of about 50 yar ds of old 3-ineth pipes had been left getween the top of Glan'rafon-hill and Ffriddpedd-road. This short length of 3-inch pipes should be taken out and replaced by 4-inch pipes, because, apart from any question of impediment to the flow for ordinary demands that, in the event of fire, you should maintain undiminished the full oapacity of the 4-tncih main.. During the re-charging of the Upper Bangor ma,in after these stoppages, I noted the changes in pressure, and observed an effect produced upon. the 5-inch pipes at Belle Vue, which the circum- stances did not satisfactorily explain. I asked Mr Gill to take a further set of day pressure and nig'ht pressures, on the 4-inch main, and this he did on Tuesday, the 9th ultimo. Following this I obtained a statement of cor- responding pressure taken on the 11th and 12th ultimo, cm the 5-inch main supplying the lower zone. The results led me to ask Mr Gill, on the 18th ultimo, to try the experiment of -tlirowin. the two mains (4-inch and 5-inch) together, to ascertain the effect of supplying the whoLe of Upper Bangor as one district mstead of the usual division into two zones -upper and lower. The pressures obtained under these conditions (i.e., with the two mains working together) were sent to me on the 23rd ultimo, and on the same day, Mr Gild wrote to say that on the 17th Ire had found considerable obstruction of ^toncs at a bend in the 4-inch main at Lonpobty. If 1 had not re- ceived this information I would have been greatly puzzled and misled by the pressure readings on t'w 13th a.nd 21st ultimo, which gave uniformly better results at high points tnaji those received wLer. the supply was obtained exclusively from the 4-inch main. I then, asked for the pressures to be taken from the 4-inch main under the ordinary conditions of working. They revealed a decided improvement over the state of things under the same condi- tions on the 9th ultimo, showing a.n improvement effected by the clearances at Lonpobty. It is evi-rfont that you are getting better re- sults from the 5-inch main laid in 1354-5 (nearly 60 years ago) than from the 4-inch main laid in 1835 (28 years ago), but further tests are requiTed to show how you can b^st utilise the two sets of mains, and whether yon would not get increased efficiency by joining the two togetlwr." After cai/ing attention to some defects requir- ing rectification in connection with private houses, and slating that the essential and ruling fact to be kept in view is that a 4-inch main is of sum- cient enpaflty to furnish a satfactorv supply to the small popuiation. residing at high elevations in Upper Bangor, the report proceeds- "As to providing another service reservoir I have no evidence that any such provision is re- quired, nor am I satisfied that it could be filled during the period of drought witiiout an exten- sion of mains. Further, if, as appears, the ob. ject is to meec complaints from a few houses at high levels, the owners of these houses should be called upon to provide storage cisterns, and, if this is not practicable, it would' be better for your Corporation to incur the comparatively small expense involved, and fix the cistern at public expense. If you could notiill the cisterns at nigiht vou could not fill a reservoir." I" COMMITTEE'S RECOMMENDATION. I The report was considered at a meeling of the Wa-oor Committee, held on Ootober 24th, aind it was resolved:— "That the 3-inch main at the rear of Snow- don View be re-laid at an estimated coet of JE70. "That the 3-inch main from the rear of the Infirmary to Ffriddbedd-ioad be re-laid with 4-inch pipes, at an estimated ooet of £ 35." I THE HOSPITAL. I I The minutes of the Sanitary Hospital, and I I Watec Committee cofQ?Hied t,,fouowing.- 1 Tbe consideration of the letter from the Local Government Board, re observation block, was deferred. MR BAYNE asked why, and till when? MR T. J. WILLIAMS said the Local Govern- ment Board had called the committee's attention to the fact tibat they admitted more cases into the HciT-ital than they had a right to dol accord- ing to tho premises made by the committee some seven years ago, which promise was renewed by the Council three months a-go. It appeared the committee had only accommodation at the hos- pital according to the Local Government Board's regulations, for twelve patients, whereas it ap- peared that in other places they would have been able to accommodate 20 or 25 persons in oases of emergency. The committee were in that fix. The Local Government Board would not grant them the loan necessary to build the Observa- tion Block unless the Council gave them another assurance that their regulations would not be contravened. So the committee were in a fix. They did not see how they could promise such a thm', That sugget3te d thae ydiono gu ld promise suo h a thing. That suggested adding another block to the hospltaft, costing perhaps thousands, in order to get over the difficulty. The matter would be considered again, but no date had been fixed. The minutes wero adopted. I THE KING EDWARD MEMORIAL. The MAYOR explained that owing to the in- disposition of. Alderman Vincent, the committee had not met. The TOWN CLERK said he considered the committee was defunct, as the m-embers had not been re-appointed at the proper time. Still, the Council could, if it wished, re-elect tho same committee. On the motion of MR JOHN ROBERTS this was done. MR VINCENT said that he could present a report that evening, but euch a km? correspon- dence was involved that it would be better to defer it at that late hour. I DEPUTATION TO MARKET HALL TRUSTEES. The MAYOR said the deputation appointed to meet the Market Trustees had met at Mr John Pritchard's office, when a conversation took place in whioh it was suggested that more use should bo mado of Waterloo-street for the loading and unloading of carts. No reply had been received from the Market Committee. The TOWN CLERK said a long letter had been received from Mr Pritchard on the subject, of which the Town Clerk gave the Council a lengthy summary, in which several suggestions for dealing with the congestion of traffic in High- street were considered. Among these were that unloading should be done in Waterloo-street in- steaki of High-street; that through traffio from lower High-street should be diverted at the town clock. Mr Pritchard stated that the Market Halll Directors had considered several other schemes, which had been found impracticable. It was sug- gested that the police might give a little more assistance to minimise the congestion, and that vehicles should be asked to move after a stay of 20 minutes, etc. The letter was referred to the committee. RE-ASSESSMENT OF THE UNION. I A letter from the Llanfairfechan Urban Dis- trict Council, requesting the Council to appoint r,opreaentatives to. meet representatives of other authorities in the Union to consider the advis- ability of having a rc-a.ssessment of the Union made was read. MR JOSEPH DAVIES said most of the other authorities had appointed representatives, and proposed that the Council should do so also. MR JOHN ROBERTS hoped the Council wouid not do that. The letter ought first to be considered by the Finance Committee. It was all very well to raise the assessment of every Union in the county, but to raise the assessment of only one Union in a thing which would be attended by serious evils, which he did not think should be stated in open Council. For example, tihe raising of the assessment in only one county would have the effect that residents in that Union would have to pay more, while the residents in the other Unions where tho assessment was not raised would pay lees, at the expense of the people resident in the Union whose assessment had been raised. The letter was referred to the Finance Com- mittee.