Teitl Casgliad: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
28 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
ENGLISH LEAGUEDIVISION I

ENGLISH LEAGUE-DIVISION I. •• Resists up to Saturday., February 14th GoalB. P. W. L. D. F. A. Pts. Blackburn R. 27 15 5 7 64 32 37 8undcrl.a.nd 27 13 8 6 47 36 32 Bolton W. 26 11 7 8 50 37 30 Burnley. 27 9 7 11 41 27 29 Aaton Villa i. 26 12 9 5 43 36 29 Bradford City 26 9 6 11 29 23 29 Manchester U. 26 13 10 3 39 35 29 Oldham Athletio 26 12 9 5 38 35 29 West Bromwich A 26 9 7 10 29 27 28 Middlesbrough 26 11 11 4 45 46 26 Ghcl"ea. 26 10 10 6 35 41 26 Everton 26 9 10 7 36 39 25 Sheffield United 27 10 13 4 41 46 24 MaiK-iheeter City 26 9 11 6 32 33 24 Newcastle United 26 9 11 6 26 35 24 Tottenham Hotspurs 26 9 12 5 41 47 23 Liverpool. 26 9 12 5 30 44 23 Sheffield Wednesday.27 9 14 4 36 52 22 Derby County. 26 6 12 8 43 51 20 Preston N.E. 27 6 16 5 28 46 17

ENGLISH LEAMUEDIVISION li

ENGLISH LEA,MUE-DIVISION li.- ( Results up to Saturday, February 14th:— Goals. P. two L. D. F. A. Pts. Notts County 28 16 6 6 57 26 38 Wooiwioh A 25 15 6 5 37 25 35 fIuJ City 25 13 5 7 45 20 33 Leeds City. 24 14 7 3 57 33 31 Bradford. 25 IS 10 0 44 36 30 FuUM.m. 26 12 & 5 35 26 29 Bury 26 11 8 7 30 26 29 Clapton Orient 24 11 7 6 25 21 28 25 11 8 6 34 29 23 Wolverhampton W. 26 11 11 4 30 39 26 Bristol City 25 10 10 5 36 38 25 Grimsby Town 25 10 10 5 32 41 25 Birmingham 26 9 11 6 32 41 24 Stockport County 26 7 10 9 35 40 23 BLa.ckpool 26 7 11 8 23 30 22 Huddersfieid Town 26 7 12 7 27 33 21 Leicester Fosse 26 9 15 2 34 39 20 Glossop 25 6 15 4 28 47 16 Notts Forest 26 4 15 7 26 55 15 Lincoln City 26 5 17 4 19 41 14

NORTH WALES COAST I LEAGUE

NORTH WALES COAST I LEAGUE. DIVISION I I Results up to Saturday, February 14th:— Goals. P. W. I* D. F. A. Pta. Holy-well United 10 10 0 0 36 10 20 Rhyl 14 7 7 0 35 34 14 Colwyn lhy 8 5 0 3 16 7 13 10 5 4 1 22 16 11 Denbigh Town 11 4 5 2 25 20 10 Holyhead Swifts 8 2 a 3 14 15 9 Festiniog Town 9 3 3 3 16 13 8 Carnarvon United 10 3 7 0 17 25 6 Ham-wet Town 9 1 5 3 9 22 5 Llandudno Junction. 11 1 8 2 9 38 4

DIVISION III

DIVISION II. I Results up to Saturday, February 14th:— Goaia P. W. L. D. F. A. Pta. Bangor Railway Inet. 13 11 2 0 70 14 82 Bangor Reserve 11 10 0 1 b6 9 sl Bethesda United 11 7 2 2 33 12 15 Penmaenmawr 12 6 3 3 32 17 15 Llanfairfechan 15 7 7 1 45 40 15 rloiyhoad Reserve 11 4 4 3 26 30 11 Menai Bridge 10 4 5 1 30 38 9 Carnarvon Reserve 10 3 4 3 17 31 f) Griasinfryn Swifts 14 3 10 1 25 53 7 Llangefni United 11 2 7 2 15 43 6 Liechid Celts 13 1 9 3 14 45 5 JJolgarrog United 9 2 7 0 13 44 4 Llanbem United have resigned, And uitux re- cord has been -xi)unzM.

TOMORROWS FIXTURESI

TO-MORROW'S FIXTURES. I ENGLISH CUP—Third Round. Astoa Villa v. West Bromwich Albion. Birmingham v. Queen's Paxk Rangers. Blackburn Rovers v. Manchester City. Burnley v. Bolton Wanderers. Sheffield Wednesday v. Brighton and Hove. Miilwall Athletic v. Sheffield United. Sunderland v. Preston Nort-h End. West Ham United v. Liverpool. ENGLISH LEAGUE—Division 1. Derby County v. Everton. Newcastle United v. Oldham Athletio. SNGLISH LEAGUE—Division II. BarneLey v. Bristol City. Blackpool v. Notts Forest. Fulham v. Bradford. Huddersfield v. Grimsby Town. Hull City v. Leeds City. Leicester Fosse v. Glossop. Lonooln City v. Woolwich Arsenal. Notts County v. Stookport County. Wolverhampton W. v. Clapton Orient. SOUTHERN LEAGUE. Bristol Rovers v. Coventry City. Exeter City v. Gillin-ghani. Cardiff City v. Norwich City. Merthyr Town v. Crystal Palace. Plymouth Argyle v. Southampton. Portsmouth v. Southend United. Swiii-don v. Watford. NORTH WALES COAST LEAGUF-DIT. II. Carnarvon Y. Llandudno Junction. Holyhead v. Cod/wyn Bay United. Rhyl v. Blaenau Festiniog. NORTH WALES COAST LEAGUE—Div. II. Glasinfryn Swifts v. Carnarvon Reserve. Llanfairfcehan v. Dolgarrog United. Llangefni United v. Liechid C-;>lts. WELSH AMATEUR CUP—Fourth Round. Holywell United v. Bangor. Gwersyllt v. Johnstown. Cardiff Corinthians v. Ynysddu. Pant v. Ba-la Press. :roRTH WALES JUNIOR CTJP—Semi-final. Menai Bridge Y. Penmaenmawr. Bangor.

HOLYHEAD PROTEST AGAINST ABERGFLI

HOLYHEAD PROTEST AGAINST ABERGFL I Mr Henry Lloyd presided over a meeting of the North Wales Football Association at Llan- dudno Junction on Wednesday evening to con- sider a protest lodged by Holyhead against Aberg"ele players on the ground that the I-atter were associated with the Prestatyn and Dis- trict League, which they alleged was for senior teams, in the semi-final for the Junior Cup won by Abergele. After hearing witnesses the Association rnianirtio.ns.1y declared that the protest failed because the Prestatyn League was affiliated -vith the Association as a junior league. The Council, however, returned the protest fee to iTolyfaead feeling that they had cause to bring forward the protest.

CARNARVONSHIRE GOLFINGI UNIONj

CARNARVONSHIRE GOLFING I UNION. j THE ANNUAL CHAMPIONSHIP V, IRTING. I At a meeting of the Carnarvonshire and Dis- I '.riet Uolfing ]Utiilon a!c Carnarvon on Saturday, ,lr Arthur Owen prs.siding, it was arranged at ioki tho annual championship meeting at Port- nadoc on June 6th, 8th, and 9th. It was agreed i o affiliate with tho Union of Golfing Union. It that Carnarvonshire was the only •Jounly Golfing Union yet formed in Wales,

Advertising

fa     1Jf. jgar The food proved ?? to possess a body- building power -.tf 10 to 20 times the amount taken. :#T f" < F;

RUGBY

RUGBY. 'VAP.SITY -v. NORMAL COLLEGE. These local opponents met for the third tune this season on Wednesday afternoon, on the V ai- sity Ground, Ffriddoedd. Mr Alec. Wiiliama acted as referee. The usual contingent of stu- dents were present, and both lota urged on their respective toean-ia. The grovotd. was on the soft side, and from the start it was evident that the game was to prove disappointing from Che spec- tacular point of view at least. The game started with the 'Varsity playing up the slope. From the kick-off the Normals gave the 'Varsity players an anxious time, but the latter successfully kept their gliard intact. As the ground was so soft it was difficult for cither pack to show to advantage in the numerous serums, but throughout the game the "reeling out" by both packs was well done. After about five minutes stubborn attack, the Normal for- wards heeled the ball, from a soruni to their half, and after a good bit of passing, the ball crossed the line, and Ted Hughes touched down. The try was not converted, however. For a time the Normals again attacked, but the three- quarters on occasions tiied to drop goaLs when it would have been more advisable to endeavour to securing tries. Offs>ido afforded the 'Varsity a glorious oppor- tunity for scoring from a free kick, but the re- sultimg kick proved futile. Pressure was even- tually relieved, and play was transferred to the other end, but the 'Varsity men were bent on keeping down the score, and naif-time arrived with a solitary try to the credit of the Normals. Half-time Normals: 1 try, 3 pts.; 'Varsity, nil. After the resumption the 'table", were turned," and the 'Varsity men had the advantage of tho slopo. As usual, they did most of the pressing this ilia If, but, their forwards did not piay the spirited gsnic tfhey pLayed in the first half, or else we would have a different tale to tell. They now attacked with vigour, and seldom did the NormaJs cross the half-line, yet the whole Normal team played with cageirness, and time after time ti-aey repulsed the attacks. The tackling was very good, and it was exciting to watch the 'Varsity men beijig brought to earth within a few inches of the goal line. It seemed an anxious moment when the 'Var- sity wore awarded a free kick in the vic,inity of tho Normal goal, but Tim Williams mossed to score—merely a matter of inches, however. At this juncture the Normals broke away, but the 'Varsity full back cleared his charge, finding touch well down the field. The 'Varsity were awarded two or three free kicks for oflside in quick succession, but they were too far out to score a penalty goal. The Normals only made a few rushes up the field, from now till the end, for they had theilr work cut out for them to keep the 'Varsity out. A few minutes before time the 'Varsity made a dangerous rush, and all but scored. iiowver, the final whistle sounded, and all the thirty men filed off the field, all—without exception cov- ered with mud and glory. Final: Norn-Lals I try 3 points, 'Varsity nil.

IHOCKEY

I HOCKEY. WALES v. IRELAND. The above match was played at Whiter arch, neau- Cardiff, on Saturday last, and .resulted in a victory for Ireland by 2 goals to 1. The weatheir conditions were most -unfavourable, but a fast and interesting game was seen, each side press- ing in turn. Ireland led at half-time by 1—0, the goal being scored by Si nuns. Early in the second half Simms scored again for Ireland, but during the last 20 minutes Wales exerted press- ure, and soot ed through Cooke. This ended the flooring, but with ordinary hiok Wales ••iiouid have drawn level, and migtit easily have won. Tho Irishmen were qu'eker on the ball, and in this respect only were superior to the home players. Result: Ireland 2, Wales 1. Teams:— IRELAND: Goal, R. Hayes; S. McViekara, J. Petersen; R. Beatty, J. Williams, D. Row- lands; G. Meidon, A. Pearson, A. Jackson, H. C. Simms and R. C. Morrison. WALES: Goal, W. Ritrko (Cardiff); H. Stephens (Llaaishem), Morris Dalies (Warwick- shire) P. G. Elias (Rhyl), J. D. K now ling (Swansea), B. Turnbull (Cardiff); R. C. Cooke (Llarxshen.), H. H. Swce-t-Escott, mpt. KCIarcliff), J. M. Tucker (Llanis'hen), W. Huaiter (Willt- chuirch) and W. Pallott (Whitchurch).

CRICCIETH UNIONIST CLUB

CRICCIETH UNIONIST CLUB Mr F. J. Lloyd Priestley presided over a crowded attendance at the adjourned ni-ecting of the Criccieth Unionist Club on Friday naght, to further co-nsider the acceptance of sites for the new chib, offered by Lord flar- k,(1 and Sir Ilugli Ellis-Nanney, Bart. After full d'.ecussnon the meeting was unanimous in provisionally accepting the site offered by Lord Harlech opposite Berea Chapel. Th-i?,ro is a strong feeling among the members that the building should be a substantial one of stone, and even if the raising of the .neceeea.ry funds would involve the delaying of the scheme for a time it is generally felt that such a course would in the end be more tbaii justiflc,,d. e The principal speakers woro the ChaLrrri-an Canon Lewis, Mr J. E. Smtth, Councillor J. g. Grif- fith, Mr E. E. Owen, Mr Walter Jones, Coun- cillor Bowc.il and Captain Drage.

ECZEMA IN RED SPOTS

ECZEMA IN RED SPOTS. Bungay Cottage, High Path-road, Merrow near Guildford, Surrey, England.—" The com- mencement of my uzcim was a few red spots appearing on the eidc of each of my legs below the knee which rapidly got worse. The irrita- tion caused me to scratch the places and I could not boar my stockings over them. After a few weekvs the places were raw and the discharge was dreadful. The irritatIon then was almost unbearable, especially at night when in bed. I could get no rest. Later it broke out on my neok and ears all discharging the same. The itching and burning were almost unbearable. I had the eczema for about two years. "I tried several sc-called cures and had two treatments but gained no relief. I saw where a oaso similar to mine had bee

PUBLIC COMPANIES

PUBLIC COMPANIES. IXJNDON AND NOItTH-WEKTETl.N The London and North-Western Railway Com- pa-ny announces a dividend of eight per cent, per annum on the ordinary stock, with JEIOO,000 placed to the general reserve and a bout £101,000 car- ried forward. As the interim dividend was six per cent, per annum, this makes seven per cent. actual for the year. The traffio returns indicated an increase of £ 795,000. For 1912 six-and-ilalf per cent. actual was paid —that ie, five per cent. per annum for the first half (the period of the ooal miners' strike) and eight per cent, per annum for the second half. The net addition to the reserve for tiiat year was £ 160,000. CAMBRIAN RAILWAYS. It is announced that interest will be paid on the debenture stock for 1913 at the rate of two- and-haif per cent., which compares with two per cent. for 1912. A sum of £ 2500 has been placed to engine renewal fund, and the balance of the permanent way, bridge, and rolling stock renewal suspense account to 31st December. 1908, amount- ing to £14.602, has been written off, thus closing this amount. The amount credited to this ac- count in 1912 was £ 7000. The balance carried forward to 1914 is approximately £ 2000, excluding the scheme surplus of £ 6134. GREAT-WESTERN RAILWAY. Tho directors recommend a dividend at the rate of 8 par cent. ,pcr annum on the ordinary stock for the second half of 1913. placing £ 2OO,CO0 to reserve, and carry forward £ 128.009. A year ago the dividend was at the rate of 734 per cent. per annum, with £ 133.430 carried forward. The r distribution for the whole of 1913 is 64 per cent, as compared with 5i per cernt. for the whole of 1912. IIALKYN DISTRICT MINEi?"DRAINAGE The balance brought forward was C8150 arid the profit for the six months ended December was £ 6610, making £ 14,760. It is proposed that a dividend of five per cent. per aoinuin (free of income tax) be paid, leaving a balance of F,12,870 less directors' remur.ration. In suggesting the rate of dividend, the directors have in mind that it will be necessary to make coneiderable pay- ments in connection with the New Deep Level tunnel before issuing new capital. The returns show an increase of 440 tons in the quantity of lead gotten, and an increase of 15 tons in the quantity of blende gotten, as compared with last half-year. The preliminary arrangements for the extension of the Milwr tunnel are now com. pleted, the agreement with the Holywell-Halkyn Tunnel Company having been executed and the deposit of £1300 paid by this company. It is understood that estimates have c' been n obtained and the work is now in hand. The Board repeat their desire that the mines in the district should be kept working, if possible, during the time that the new tunnel was being driven. As capital will have to be raised to carry out the new works and interest charges mot, it is to the mutual advan- tage of both the Mincs and the Drainage Com- pany that a revenue be maintained in order that the whole scheme of deep level drainage can be carried through in the minimum amount of time. The Onager's report says the improved stan- dard of value that set in for lead towards the ?nd of 911 has been fairly maintained, and, from ai! tho information that can be gleaned, there need be no apprehension of any reversion to the for- mer low standard, at least, for a considerable period ahead. The value of spelter, however, con- tinues comparatively low, but inasmuch as the quantity of blende (the ore from which this metal is obtained) produced at tfis mines in this com- pany's area is comparatively Pi iiall, its revenue is Hot much affected thereby.

BANGOR GOLFING NOTES1

BANGOR GOLFING NOTES. 1 I The usual monthly ooanpetdtiioais were played I I during the last weeik with the MhywMig re- sults:— BOGEY OOMPEnnON. Wednesday, February 11th. CLaas A. T. J. Thomas 3 down H. A. S. Wom-tley 4 J. H. Yates 4 „ E. L. Milneir-Barry 6 R. IX. Holmes 6 „ H. WiLLnMum 9 A. E. Vincent 9 Class B. J. R. Jones 6 down W. Lo-v-,itt 0 E. Edwarde 9 Mr T. J. Thomas takes the sili-ex button. STROKE COMPETITION. Saturday, February 14th. H. A. S. WcTtley 94— 8 86 J. H. Yates 104-18 86 P. F. White 98—11 87 T. Thomson 102-14 88 J. Cumming 101— 9 92 As all the competitors exceeded the limit no button is awarded. < The weather conditions remain unfavour- able for competition play. GoiLf through quag- mires and against wind hurricanes beüomes rat heir like hard work. As most of the mem- be,rs get plenty of this without coming to the links, the number cf cards in the varwtlseotii- petitions remains small. < < We do not hint that those who do compete in the winter ccmpetitioAA find the hard work a novelty. Rather that they show a desire for more hard work and are there fox e to be COll- gratulated upon their caieng•"v, Though many cards have been takeu out in the v, e should be glad to see a wider cirelo" of members patron isimig1 this competition. There are a lasrge number of players who never corn-pete because in their opinicn "they would have no chance of win- ning1." Besides being- qui,te a wrong view it is a-iiso hard'lo cme for people playing a.iiv game to take up. Competitions tend to break "cliques," a aid eveai foa: this reasota alone we would urge a.liI members to become competi- tors whenever cccasi-an arises. Fctr a club that contains cliques stands condefmned. On the links we are all golfers: and as such oertair,,v t>liC'uld support mcr"t heartily any efforts -i.e committee make to provide competitions. There aljc-u'd be always alxnit fcurty to sixty carets for every compe.traon, ccmEaderiing cur club memhetrshiip exceeds three hundred. So just split up more, you long aaiid short handi- cap peciple: you profes ional men and you tradesmen-. And all cf you try your luck in the next monthly button competitions. In the meantime just risk sixpence 011 your form in the "Petrpetaial Bogey." And if you want a felilow-cornpe-t.itor ask us: we are ready for anybody aind everybody, so long as they do not get annoyed with the golf bal a?d call it ge.t a,nn-cyed with the go? f "Liall an d c?-i-1 1 it < < w We hear that so far the best card in for the Perpetual Bcgc-y'' for February is 1 down by Mr Campbell Vullax^. And it is a very good card, too. Frotm a description of the round the result might have been even better; alb10 it might have been much worse 1 On the whcie Mr VaUaa^ce can congratulate him.seli on playing thoroughly gocd golf and can thank the gods that they kept in elcooT coan- munieation with hian than aid those little imps whose design is evil. < That card will take a lot of beatinig. It < V[e hope that members playing round the links these days will admire the chobeoi posi- tions for the holes on the various greene. The choice shows ingenuity, but from a golfing frtandpoont absurdity as wellh We recognise the g-reene need sparing at this time of the year, but there is plenty of rccan on several of the greens for the hole to be cut in a place wnich gives -,L chance of a gcod putt going down. On the 6th, 7th, 12th, and 17th, for example, putting is absolutely fluky. Will all members please note there is not a footpath across the 18th green. r • • • • There are complaints concerning the caddies a.nd their game of "hide aaid seek" in the weeds. Certainly on some days caddies do require much seeking, amd we think .the com- mittee might again consider the question cf a sufficient and efficient suppl* y of caddies.. WHY NOT?

ISEA ENCROACHMENT AT 1 TREARDDUR BAY

I SEA ENCROACHMENT AT 1 TREARDDUR BAY. I STONE COFFINS UNCOVERED. I I RELICS OF THE ANCIENT CHURCH OF I t ST. FFRAID. At the precipe rous sea .si do .re&oa-t of Tie- ardd/ur Bay, about two miles from Holyhead, the sea has during recent times been making rapid iniroads upon the sandy coast, and with- in the past half century something like 100 yairds of the land has been completely washed away. The last storm carried away another three vardl; or more, and the encroachment has now penetrated into the burial ground, which it is believed was used in connection with the ancient St. Ffraid's Chmch. The Church, which was founded in the fifth century, has now completely disappeared. Some of the eM oaken riifters that used to form the roof of the old Church hoare lieen utilised in the building of many- of the oldest farm houses in the district. After the storm that prevailed over the week-end, some workmen en gaged in build- ing a sea wall near the spot discovered that a iiutiibcr of stoaie coffins had been exposed,. Tho heads ton CH had beem washed away, re- vealing the skeletons inside. One skeleton wa.s in a romarkaibly good state of pre: erva- tiJOn, and might have been the remains of a man buried within the last century instead or, as is most probably the case, being that of a person interred nearly fifteen centuries ago. It was the body of a very tall ma.n. The burial ground is in the shape off a large mound of sandy f-oil, and this is due to the fact that in the old days the custom was not to dig graves but to place the body in a stoaie coffin and pile the earth on top. The burial ground is on the properly of Lord Sheffield.

I GWYRFAI RURAL COUNCIL i

I GWYRFAI RURAL COUNCIL. Tlie Gwyrfai Rural District Council, on Satur- day, advanced another step Ln connection with the proposed housing scheme for the villages of Ebenezcr aaid Clwtybont. It was reported that Mr Hardvng, as agent to the Vaymol Estate, had visited the loc.ality with the Council's surveyor and inspected various sites which Sir Cliarles A^slieton Smith, Bart., had expressed h's willing- ness to sell at an extremely low price to the Council. A special committee accordingly re- commended that the sites in qii'oetion be acquired, em bracing an are, of two acres, ai-id afforiiing room for about 36 houses. A resolutiool was moved approving the recom- mendation of the special committee, whereupon some of the members of the Council criticised their action in abandoning an alternative project, previously considered, for acquiring oondemined property on the adjoining Coedhelen Estate and building the new houses on that site. The re- port wa.s, however, adopted. When the d ^cussron as closed, Dr. Lloyd Owen (medical oiffcer of health) stroaigly urged the Council to acquire tlwee acres, which would ell- able them to build 12 houses per acre without increasing the rental more than a hiif-pe,nny a WCtPk. On this point, however, the Council took no action. Notices were received under section 63 of tho National Iriisuranoe Act with reference to two houses described as being dangerous to health, and it was resolved to serve the necessary notices upon the owners.

Advertising

FOURTEEN YEARS OF INDIGESTION. PAIN, WIND, HEADACHE, FAINTNESS. REMARKABLE CURE BY DR. CASSELL'S TABLETS. Fourteen ycare of I of it. Fourteen yearns of daily torment. That had been the experience of MM Howe, of 2, Glouoester- st-reet, Newport, Mon., until she got Dr. CaeseU's Mrs Roue, N'tuport. Tablets and was cured as thousands of others have been cured. She eays :—"1 had suffered for 14 yoaivs from indigestion, and I would not coe a dog go throigh what I did in that tiittp. I had wind and split- t;ng headaches almost daily, and tood caused euch pain that I was afraid to oat at all. But if I went amy tin 10 without feed I got to weak and iow that I felt like to faint, Nothing relieved me until I got Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Then I improved daily, and now I am in excel- lent health." Cltro after cure, evan in the most revere caseb, have proved Dr. Caesell's Tablets to be the suiest reriieoy ever devised for Nervous Breakdown, Arisemia; Debility, Sleeplessness, Nerve Pains, Palpitation, Kidney and Stomach Disorders. Children's Woakneea, Spinal and Nerve Paraly- sis, General Bodily Exhaustion, Brain Fag, and all run-down conditions. Send 2d to-day to Dr. Cassell's Co., Ltd. (Box 53), Chester Read, Man- chester, for a free eample. All Chemists sell Dr. Gctf&eil's Tablets at lO^c!, 18 làd. and 2^ gd-the 2a 9d size being the most economical.

No title

Recent notes on wasted opportunity from Chanticleer's pen in country districts have re- sulted in numerous interesting oommunicationa being received!, frcm which it i6 evident that method and system have been conspicuously ab- sent on many estates; w'hilet many foa-iners in agri- cultural districts btili discredit the important facts that well managed poultry of a tcie-etcd record layanig sia am and of a breed suited to the dictrict ill result in a handsome profit being obtained at litte cost and very little extra labour to the farm handa already employed; whieit when the land is not overcrowded, other live stock, such a& cattle and tiheep will suffer in no way, and the poultry allowed oil the pastuire l will be kept al- most rent free. It must be dietimte.y stated that past experience has demonstrated tlic fact that the Briiifih lien (except untler most favourable circumstances and in the hands of skilful methodi- cal breeders of long standing) will eeldom be a source of profit when debited with rent or labour. Numerous correspondents have been so warned by Chanitiolcer to avoid ultimate failure reward- in or tiheir efforts, and practical advice has boen given which, if followed, should do much to Im- prove the poultry industry of this country, whioh hasj too long been associated with lethargy. A few of the poinits dealt with by me during the past few weeks may prove helpful to those in- terested in the welfare of the hen as a laying machine* Poultry ehouid aiwaye be kept in pro- perly erected houses on hygienic principles, and must bo cleared out once a week, instead of once a month (or even twelve months, which the writer discovered on an extensive farm only recently); tha,t no breed of fowls pay for feeding and at- tention after its second year or third season, and the moot productive period is the first laying eeasoiv whilnt the following twelve mo-nthe is the wisest fo- fertility in breeding for stock; that surplus cockerels ehouid not bo kept after the twelfth Meek, entailing extra cost of food and damaging tho remaining flock, that all chickens selected for the next year's breeding should be rung and numbered if possible, a record being kept of their strain and pedigree, as is done with the other farm stock, euch as horeee, oows, sheep and P, gr that in no case should pullets full of eggs be eenit to the market for table purposes, and eold at unremunerative prices; that orces- bted fowls on the farm are generally the most profitable when a judiciouu mating has been ef- fected and tho parentage definitely known, as the crossing of well-bred utility poultry if of known and apjwoved breeds is a progressive mca&ure; that under no circumstances must the male birdis frornj orofls-bred Hooks be used in the breeding pens, but killed for market, being fat- tened up when "ripe." In Chanticleer's opinion thirty to forty bene- per aoro of pasture or arable land bet the limit fct. progressive poultry culture 00 as not to diamage or taint the land or inter- fere with other farm stock kept; all grain must be well scattered oovc-r the land, and never fed to flocks congregating round the licmestead and farm buildings. Such method induces exercise and benefits the land; all massive breeds or these which lay brown shelled eggs, and are useful for are beet hatched in the spring, April and May for preference, never later except wlipn the chickens arc being specially hatched for Ohiristmae or spring chickena; that one handful PeT bird of eoft food OT hard grain i sufficient to III-,I al,,d,willlst good p!ump oats and sound wheat or tailings may be profitably given, milize or Indian corn should only be fed sparingly except in severo cold or wet weather; to fipecialiso with a few "two or three" good breeds cf known properties, n.nd suited to the land and climatic conditions of the district, will invariably recompense tho owner by adding pro- fits to his efforts. Chanticlecr's readers will doubtless agree (especially those in the suburban districts of great cities) tnat there ncveir was an age when business men—especially young men— have more need for pome interest or taste out- sidtc their daily occupation, and whilst they may not have the advantages of verdant pastures and farm lands, tlhey will find that poultry culture kT utility or the show pen wiiil prove a pleasant and fascinating divertio.11 from the routine of a busi- ness l'ife. Change of work is generally consid- ered to be as gcod aa play, and the cultivation of poultry on up-to-date progressive method.3, Chanticleer emphatically declares will assuredly giva new life a.nd energy to those who devote time to it requirements. Pcultry keeping, even as a hobby, differs from many other hobbites— be- ing an unselfish one—for members of the house- hold, male or female, young or o'd, can wonder- fully assist in making the poultry a thoroughly profitable success, and whether exhibition, egge, or the table bo the goal sought for, pleasure and prcfit will assuredly prevail. ECONOMICAL FEEDING. Advieo on economical feeding is' solicited of Gliauticleci-, and a coi re^poii dent) is adviei\i that it. ia neociisary to have a definite idea as to what the feeding is for, whetiier egg production, show pen or the table. The prime object of food is to promote good health and general • productive- nees no matter what the goal may be. In the earliest at-agc, for tihe euccespful rearing of chickens to maturity it is of great in)portanco that wcM developed frames tihall be obtained, and it is fake economy to feed with inferior quality food during chicken hood. Much, depends upon the first three incidw treatment, Mid no effort should be spared to aæist development. Tho most easily digested foodis are biscuit meals or cooked cereals which growing poultry eat eager- ly, and thrive well on, but all fiuch foods ehouid be increased in bu!k and nutriment by the econ- omical addition of phosphate foods, &uch as sharps, middlings and soaldcd bran, and such wheat offal will benefit all breeds of poultry. Ma.ny poultry keepers, Chanticleer finds, give cheap gram and meals with a high percentage of flash formers, whicH is a mistake, as what is actu- ally required in growing profitable is big frames. Tho mineral matter and salts as found in bran combined with well balanced quantities of heat and cwrgy producers should have an addition of at least ten per cernt. of animal matter. The oxcceeive rains and cold weather experienced in most parts has doubtless caused anxiety in many poultry yards, and many readers have asked for advice en heat producing fooclo to enable young birds to resist the climatic conditions experienced the last few weeks. • Eveii in such case there ;s no need to friceuragc needless ex pence. Gar- lic feeding, or addin.g chopped green onion tops to all soft food is a wise procedure whtich in- creafs.ca the bleed temporaturc and prevents many ailments, whilst wasfcp butcher's ecraps well boiled and added to-the mojsn.mg feed, is bot.h economical and nutritious. Tea meal i3 a good pulse food, and energy producer for many young and old fowl, whilst it is of great benefit to pullets whioh are reddening up for la.ying. A wi(i investment daily recommended by Chanticlcer just now is clover chaff, whuh when eoaked overnight, in. creases* in bulk, and consequently makes an ex- cellent base for mixing with various cereals. Sprouted oats is an' ideal mid day meal and will be enjoyed by chicke-M, layers, or birde in moult. On the score of economy sprouted oats is recom- mended. Those who havo regularly given this food are loud in their praise of its beneficial ef- fect and wonderful-, feeding proper) iew. Where eggs are required or pullets to be pu&hed off for laying, poultry keepers will do well to inotease tho soft food and decrease the grain supplies, whilst the converse saecoeda whero proper de- velopment is dcfeiircl and maturity to be held back. An excellent rule to follow is to u-c evprv effort to prevent non sitters as puilets laying be- fore the fifth moa'h and the massive breeds or sitters the eighth month. This ensures vigor- our fowls, large sized cgg«, and profitable chick- ens. Undersized, poorly developed poultry arc not associated with economy. Exerci.sc is al- ways economical and encourages muscle building at small coet. All gritin scatter- cd in loose litter 'ecsens the corn bill, and .n- er cases the winter egg market. Sound wheat and plump oats, with an occasional feed of barlev (fprouted if pofi iible) will prove a more econom- ical grain fe-efl than mai/e, which soon causes an overplus of f.at and thus prevents ovarian action. Table fowls require .continual feeding with soft food, a.nd only sufficient grain to promote scratch- ing exorc.se. Bulky foods enr-ure the proper se- cretion of juices for assimilation and flesh pro- duction. Chan tic:<

IFLINT AND DENBIGH HOUNDS

FLINT AND DENBIGH HOUNDS I wiill meet Tuesday, Feibruary 24th Rhydymwyn. Thursday, February 26th Pen-yr-efail. Saturday, February 28th Whitfield. At 11.0.

No title

A Wbite P-aper issued) on Monday shows that the total capital uf the National Debt, whioh on tho 31st March, 19r2, amounted to £ 668,344,4S1, was on March 3ist, 1913, £ 656,473,765, there having been & d?ci'&Ht? during the ye?t "f havitig beer- a &creaw, dur An.- ttij uf

IANGLESEY FARMERSI UNION

I ANGLESEY FARMERS' UNION. I THE BURDEN OF THE RATES. Having for ifca object the formation of a. branch of the National Farmers' Union, a latrgely- attunded meeting of the farmers! of North-West Anglesey was held at Holyhead, on Saturday ftft^iriiooai, at the cJ.o of which it \vas tuianimouti- iy decided that a bcaaich be formed. Mr Win. Owen, C.C. (who presided) gave some Interesting statistics of tho -incixauMd expenditure which tao latepayers of iimglesuy iiave to bear. cost of the upkeep of the main road. leaduig from Holyhead to -Vlenai Bridge (winch was niiQstly uccd by motorists pa^suig through on t £ i«k' way to uud from Ireland) had increased from £ li98 131 1911. to CI988 -i-ii 1914. The cos-t of JiJaiiitaiitiin# inmates in Dellbigln Asylum in 1911 was L192, in 1914 it had increased to £ 4C0, whilst too eo-st of eduoatioin liad increased to the extejiit of a 2d rate in the same- period. Then the cost of ent'oircing the weekly half holiday i.n tho county w:.s £ 40 a year. Alw Owen Williams, Tynybuarth, said that the iiates Jiad imcxeased cons;derably during the last twenty ^ears, and they were sfall increasing, WftAd there appeared no immediate prospect of a re- duction. He criticised the proposed laind Biil, ihio object of wbich, he ea-id, WM to bring the people back to the land. Farmers, instead of employ ing men, would turn the land into grazing land .0 as to avoid paying wages, so tha-t instead .of more work being provided there would bo less. Tho land ti-antsfer system would be too expen- sive. Why should not lawyers, doctors, bankers, money-lenders, etc., bo compelled to con tribute to the State upon the basis of what they received? (hear, hear). Mr Hughes, Tregyhelydd, reiiiarked that farm- ers must believe more in self-help than -in Govern- ments. Their future prosperity depended upon oo-operation (hear, hear). Alderman It. O. Pierce, whilst agreeing that tho burden of the ratepayers had increased very greatly of iit-eent years, attributed >thiis to a large eixtent to the demands made by the education acid otdier departments. Far instance, the Hous- ing and Towaii Planning Act would add v.ery con- siderably to the county's expenditure, and a largo part of the cost would fall upon the farmers, inasmuch as Anglesey was an agricultural county. Dr. Parry Edwards, J.P. (a member of the County Council), remarked that the eomdtitioins of liviing had so improved in the country of lato years that fever and other infectious diseases had increased. Tliere was still room for improve- ment, particuLarly in regard to the sleeping ac- commodation for farm labourers, eome of whom, to hie knowledge, slept in places which wea-o nothing short of disgraceful. Dealicng with the Insurance Act, ihe ea-id it was being played and trifled with. A large number of men called in the doctors without tho least need. It paid the mien .in some oases to be "on the clu b," for they then received more money than would be the case when at work. Mr Harper, Trefengan, Holyhead, said that the farmers were -the most important people in the kingdom, because everyone depended upon the land. Farming was the most important of all industries. irrtpo-litaiit of all Mr Robert Jones, Cerniaes, asked whether the member for Anglesey would be asked to support tlie farmers ¡:n the event of a, branch of the Union being formed. The Chairman: If the branch is a strong one lie will ha TO to listen to us, but if it is weak he will not. Mr Thomas Hughes, Rhoseolyn: Wo should send to Parliament a man who has our interests at heart. Mr Owen Williams: If one of the candidates at en leuechion supports us in 0110 thing and holds views contrary to oura in ten others then thero should be 110 hesitation as to which to support. Mr R. J. Gardiner, Valley, said that if they aa farmers were to unite together they would bo able to do more for each other thtali they had done in the past.

IWEAK LUNGS AND WEAKI DIGESTION

I WEAK LUNGS AND WEAK I DIGESTION. I AN EXPERIENCE OF FIFTEEN YEARS. I 8, Prince's Road, Richmond, Surrey. Dear Sirs,—I wish to send you a few words of praise and gratitude for benefit derived from the uso of Angiwr's EmuISlimL It is now quite 15 years ago asince I first began taking it, on the advice cf Iny dUCtOT. I suffer from weak 1mnigs, coupled with eihsromic gawtritis, and, owing to the delicate state of my ytomiaeh, A is the only Emulsivyh I can retain, although I have tried all other makes. I cannot digest proper meals, frequentlv takin,g nothing but milk for weeks, a.nd I don't know what I should do without the Emulsion. I find it especially useful for relieving the rackitig, exhausting cough from which I fre- quently suffer. Y Gill arc at liberty to make use of thi., and I shaH be pleased to answer any inquiries. (Signed) (Miss) A. RANDALL. For over twenty-one years Amgier's Emul- sion hrjf: been prescribed by tho medical pro- fession and usd in tbs hospitals, aud is now universally recogaiised as a standard approved remedy for lung affections, digestive disorders and wasting d-iseases,. For sale by all chemists and cLrug stores at Is lid, 2s 9d, and 4s 6d. A sample bottle sent free on receipt of 3d for postage. Mention this paper. The Axgier Chemdeatl Co., Ltd., 86, ClerikenwelS Had. London, E.C.

Advertising

Tel. S5 & S6 Llandudno. Wires: Garage, Llandudno. I TO MOTORISTS. NOW IS THE TIME TO ORDER TO GET GOOD DELIVERY NOTE OUR SOLE AGENCIES & THE VALUE OFFERED Easy Terms Arranged. WOLSELEYS 16-20 h.p., 5-seater E475 witlA dynamo. j FORDS The cheapest Taxi sold for hilly districts. 4-seater I 1135. Landaulette £ 180 VU LCA NS English throughout; reliable, economical, 15-9 h.p. I TORPEDO 4-seater, f-295 WOLSELEY-STELLITE Light or, fi57 10s. A Wolseey in Miniature-VICKERS, LTD. OVERLAID Strong and powerful for hire v/ork. LAN- I DAULETTE, in Stock £ 375 TOURING CARS, 5-Seater. £ 245 APPLY- °n any THE RED GARAGE, SXTppoi;Ze„t LLANDUDNO. F. A. WILKES (9years Wolseley Co) I LLANDUDNO. F.A. WILKES (gyears H'o/?/0' Cc? OIK T > Of LUXURIOUS & UNIQUE $ MOTOR CARRIAGES Embodying the Latest Improvements and Patents in Construction, f V, C WILL BE HELD AT THE K SHOWROOMS of LOOKERS, Ltd. l 134, Foregate St., CHESTER, > C Cpmmencing MONDAY, MARCH 2nd, for ONE V < WEEK, from 10 a.m., until 8 p.m., each day, V P ADMITTANCE BY INVITATION ONLY. J £ For Full Particulars Apply to the Manager— T =LOOKERS, Ltd. = Tel. 948, Chester. 134, Foregate St., CHESTER. | M Sg

AGRICULTURAL ORGANISA I TION SOCIETY

AGRICULTURAL ORGANISA- I TION SOCIETY. RESIGNATION OF MR EDWARD BROWN. I On November 12i,h, 1913, the foilowniig iinstruc- tion waa isaueu to members of the staff of the A.O.S. — Ciroumstanoes have arisen whech have drawn the pit tuition of the chairman (Lord Shaftes- bury), to the iruadv inability of asiy mem- ber of the A.O.S. et-aff leaving the office for the purpose ot interviews relating to A.O.S. work with officials at Government departments, amd Lord Shaft?bury wishes me to is&ue tho tmd lord ?cihaft,("bury -%vl, h k,-s iiie to Wlflue tdio "That no member oB t'!i? bta?i is to leave the ofiioe for the purpose of interviews without fust obtaining my permission. (Signed) J. N. II a.rr.i s. To t-hat Mr Brown eta-oilgly objected on tho ground thai as head, of one of the eooety a de- pailmentis he slhou'd be trusted in questions of this kind, that for many years he had been ac- customcd to cone'u?t Government omcia?t; om mat- ters relatinig to his work and been consulted by them, and tlhat asi the greater part of the funds of the A.O.S. are derived from Troaeurv {promts. Government diepartniemte should; havo th freest a«?s to ofHe?aLa of the A.O.S. l The committee of the Agricultural Organifa- tion Society ILPp.:ove..l this instruction. Owing to

AGRICULTURAL ORGANISA I TION SOCIETY

this and othor co?ndmoMS w?ich made hia poei- tio1 an ,jmŒih:e Ql1. Mr Drow n placed 8 tioii an -oiio, inl,r Bi-ox%?i d We te?, which w&a.?'c?ptcd, ,1nd has now tak?n drect.: Mr Brown was for !?.(?r?y fourteen years see-! ret?.ry of th,? Na.t.?n?L Pouttry Organisatioi S"

Advertising

CLARKE'S B 41 PILLS can be relied upon to cure. in either sex, all acquired or constitutional Disctarges from the Urinary Organs, Gravel and Pains in the back, tree from Mercury" Established upwards of 50 years. In boxes 4s 6d each, of all Chemists and Patent Vendors throughout the World, or sent for sixty stamps by the makers. The Lincoln and Midland Couuties Drug Company. Lincoln.

FREE INSURANCE

FREE INSURANCE. Every purchaser of the North Wales Chronicle (if a fare-paying passenger) is itt- sured for J3100 against fatal injury on the Rait- way, for seven days from the day of publication, if they Bign the coupon on Page 3. It is we* necessary for coupon holders to carry tho insur- ance ticket on hia or IHT person.

Advertising

I If you are going to expend only I I ON A CYCLE TYRE I COVER, BUY ONE OF DUNLOP ?? J!L?J 0 ?<-? PJL manufacture. All roadster patterns are ALL roa d ster patterns are- FULLY GUARANTEED I AS UNDER;- I I I COVER FROM | CAMBRIDGE 12 MONTHS 8s. I WARWICK 13 MONTHS 9s. DUNLOP 15 MONTHS lis 6d. Why buy inferior imitations of Dunlops which carry no guarantee whatever ? I Dunlops Lead in Quality and Service. The Dunlop Rubber Co., Ltd., Founders of the Pneumatic Tyre Industry, 33, Leece Street, LIVERPOOL.