Teitl Casgliad: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
BANGOR CITY COUNCIL i

BANGOR CITY COUNCIL. i 3AS AND ELECTRICITY UNDER- TAKINGS. ENGINEER'S REPORT. PRICE OF ELECTRICITY INCREASED. -The monthly meeting of the Bangor City Council was held on Wednesday evening. The Mayor (Mr R. J. Williams) presided and the td-hcr members present were Aldermen Sir Henry Lewis, J. Evan Roberts, W. r. Matthews, Owen Owen, W. Bayne, Councillors Joseph JJavies, W. Thomas, T. Vallance, T. E. Maylor, T. J. Williams, C. Cpoil, John WiHiams, G. R. Grierson, J. L. Y a ugh an. H. J.one8 Roberts, J. E. Thomas, with the town clerk (Mr l'entir Williams), the city treasurer (Mr Smith Owen), the surveyor pir J. Gill.), the lighting engineer (Mr Price White), tho sanitary inspector (Mr W. H. Worrall), and tile'librarian (Mr Griffith Roberts). LATE LIEUTENANT VINCENT. I Hcfore entering upon the business of the Council the MAloit said: "During the last month the war ha.s levied a heavy toll on the kingdom generally and on Wales in par- 'ticular. Pcrnaps we have lost more men during the last month than during any niQnth bince the war commenced. The Angel of Death bas come very near us and hits taken away the only son of one of the iiiort respected members of this Council. I am only expres- sing the feeling of the whole Council when I ask you to pass a vote of sympathy with Vr and Mrs Vincent. Young Lieutenant Vincent was just on the threshold of manhood and ha had been equipped with knowledge and education to tit him for the battle of life. He went out to France to fight for King and country and willingly sacrificed his life, and his name ivill be written in blood on our roll of honour." The Mayer then moved a vote of sympathy with Mr and Nfrs Vincent, and it was carried .n silence. RETURN OF COUNCILLOR COOIL. I The MAYOR referred to the return of Mr Cooil after his indisposition, and said the whole Council was glad to see him back again (hear, hear). BEAUMARIS STEAMBOAT SERVICE. I The MAYOR stated that a joint. commit tee of the Finance and the l'icr and Ferry Com- mittees had just met a deputation from Beau- maris who wished to improve the steamboat service. The committee desired them to m-eet tho Council in defraying the extra cost of an improved service. The deputation would duly xeport to the Beaumaris Council. CEMETERY FEES. I The Cemetery Committee reported having careful ly consitiered the cemetery charges, and recommended the Council to adopt a re- vised "fcate of fees" and forward tnem to the Home Office for confirmation. MR T. J. WILLIAMS, in proposing the adoption of the committee's report, said they felt it was wrong for the town to be financing the cemetery every year. Their sole aim in making the new charges was that the cemetery should not be a prolit-able con. jcrn, but should simply' pay ite way. MR OWEN OWEN said it was clear that; whether one was alive or dead, one had to "cay more" nowadays (laughter). MR W. P. MATTHEWS thought the re. yised fees should be given a trial. Each charge had been thoroughly considered. There was no sense or reason that the cfemetery should continue to be a charge on the rates, and even with the suggested increases the fees would be lower than those charged in other places. The report was adopted. PATRIOTIC PLEDG; BY EMPLOYERS. A letter was received from a Jxrndon news- paper asking the Council to sign a patriotic pledge to the effect that they will after the war give preference when engaging men (all other things being equal.) to those who had served in tne war or in making munitions of war. MR W. P. MATTHEWS pointed out that while tho General Purposes Committee were in favour of the sentiments contained in the letter, they demurred to the form of the pledge in which the words "all other things c-ing equal" were net included, and thought the Council might consider the matter. The form of pledge left too wide a gap. MR T. J. WILLIAMS agreed that there should ba some modification of the pledge which bound the Council to accept any man who had served in the Army or in making munitions in preference to one who had not, though the difference between the two men might be as great as the difference between chalk and c h eese. It was decided to ask the newspaper whether there was any objection to including the words "all other things being equal" in the pledge. -h- SALE OF IsEWSPAPERS ON SLND.WS. NUISANCE CAUSED BY bTKLET CRIES. The To Ail Clerk submitted letters reeeive-ct from thb Secretary of thj Bangor Brotherhood and the Free Church Council with regard to the sale of on Sunday, and s'ated that he had n-riltcn to all the iiewgvendem in the town celling tti-ir serious attention to tha great i uts- anet; caused by newspaper boyis s houting in the ttrceM. recommen d The General Purposes Committee recommend ed pro&'?ut'ons unless there wa? a &eneral im provernetit. THE TOWN CLERK explai_ ned that th, e C.ounci.l. cculd prosecute under their bye-laws, while the police could prosecute under an Act of King tJharlcs. • MR J. WILLIAMS said it was clear that the i-itisanc? had become very marked of late. MR W. P. MATTHEWS said that boys could not be prosecuted for »elhn<» newspapers, but lor crc.Utng a r.uij:ln by shouting. aut h rr- SIR II. LEWIS pointed out that the author- ise of the (Jliferent chapels and churches in the city could prosecute these boys for disturb- ing tti, services. They could also be summoned for disturbing the peace of the citizens. He unved that the. committee prosecute in eyer., case oeeuring in defiance of the bye-laws. This was carried. f the f,;iiw?e d Mr. Taylor complained the nuisance caused in Trefian on Sunday mornings by boyt; calling out newspapers. There .vere five OWl" e. t Sunday. Another source of annoyance was the r lt' 'e of boys riding tvreleee bieyciea diOG.J Sa 4cvilled practically of strong ivef. SIR HENRY LEWIS, in seconding, said that one was liable to be misunderstood in supporting eiich a motion. It might be thought one was in favour of restraining one of the most valuable liberties we had in Mus country—the liberty of the Press. Ho did not wiali the Daily Mail to be excluded from the Library because of its opin- ions upon this particular matter. Other news- papers haa been of tho same mind, amd there was no public man who had the right to enjoy his office, if he was not willing to submit to public ^riticusm, but :no newspaper or man bad the right to exercise that liberty in a.n indecent way. No one had the r;,g.ht to exercie-e that legitimate liberty in the insulting, contemptuous and blatant niinne-i- in which tho Daily Mail had been doing on that and other occasions. It was not the criticism of Lord Kikhener that had i oaijeed the member a of the Stock Exchange in di/lerent towns to burn v^e paper and show tliei-r indignation in the mo§V contempuoua way they could. He hoped the Council would join with other towns in showing their regard for decency in public print. AIR JOSEPH DAVJES thought there was something to be said on the other slue. He wai amazed that the mover of the resolution did not a I;go -p,,i t into the dock the leading x.e in the world, the Times, who, with tne Daily Mail, had been endcavourmg to make the country realise the seriousness of the present position, lIe was sure that if the criticism of Lord Kitchener and the efforts to make the country realise the icriouaneie of the position were placed in the balance, it would be found that those news- pap-era had done a most valuable service to the country. lie failed to see how the Times and the Daily Mail had been disloyal. The facti presented by them wore facts known to every German they were facts which Ministers of the Crown in February and March last brought be- fore the workers of the country. The good done by these newspapers waf) that a Minister of Munitions of War had been appointed. The truth was that three-fourtha oi the people in this country had not realised the gravity of the danger that existed at that very hour. Everybody who read these newspapers would admit that they had only brought that fact out and endeavoured to make the country realise what had occurred, and by so doing they had done- invaluable tier vice. Mr Lloyd George in Bangor called attention to the grave danger the country was in and pointed out the very need which these newspapers emphasised later on. Hew could it be said that these papers were disloyal, thotigh one of them did go a little beyond what was reasonable in making a personal attack. It was degrading public liie and individuals when personal attacks were made. As air amendment he moved "That in the" opinion of this Council the charge of disloyalty brought against the Daily Mail has not been sustained and therefore declines to boycott the journal from the Fireg Library inasmuch* as isUcfi-^trdn would be contrary to tfié phn. ciplo of jufitice and freedom long cherished by the Welsh nation." MR VAUGHAN expressed surprise at conn, cillors wishing to pass a resolution of that kind. It wao not. the duty of the Council to dictate what newspapers should be allowed in tho Public Library, and, because they dis- agreed with one particular item in the paper, wish to exclude it. Personally he did not think the action of h\i. paper was disloyal. Some* members of' The Council might be charged with disloyalty. On Sunday week the Council was asked to show its loyalty by attending the Empire Day service at the Cathedral, and how of them did so? MR TAYLOR thefljght a resolution con demning Lord Northcliffe would meet the case. He was not in sympathy with barring any paper from the Library, though the Council had created a precedent when two years ago 300 residents applied that a certain paper should be taken at the Library and the request was refused. MR T. J. WILLIAMS suggested an amend- ment—"That in consequence of the virulent attack of the Daily J1 ail upon Lord Kitchener that paper 4)e no longer taken in the Bang&r Free Library." He did not think the word di?oval was the right one to use. [ MR BAYNE thought the matter should be referred to the Library Committee. DR J. E. THOMAS did not think the Council had a right to interfere with the liberty of the press. He failed to see how the article was disloyal. By a majority of one the resolution was referred to the Libr.Lry Committee. I —

ANGLESEY ASSIZES t

ANGLESEY ASSIZES. t A RIGHT OF WAY DISPUTE. J (From Our Ret>ortet>) I The Anglesey Assize were opened at Beau- maris, yesterday (Thursday), beiore Mr Justice Scrntton. There being no criminal business the Judge was presented with a pair of white gloves by Dr. H. d. Lowe, Rhosneigr (the High Sheriff). The Judge said he congratulated the county upon the absence of crime, which entitled him to that very useful addition to his wardrobe (laughter). The only case in the list was an action brought by the Attorney General at the relation- of the Aethwy Rural District Council against Sir Geo. Meyrick, Bart., Bodor.gan, and Mr John Jones, Ty Mawr, I.iangadwaladr, farmer, for an injunc- tion restraining the defendants, and each of them from erecting or maintaining in, upon, and across a common ioad or highway known as Ty Mawr- road (otherwise called Lou Castell), certain gates or ol-rtructions, and to; remove such obstructions. or obstructions, Griffith K.C., M.P., with whom was Mr Trevor Lloyd (instructed by Mr W. Thornton Jones), apf^rcd for the plaintiff, and Mr Ralph Banks, KJC. with whom was Mr Edwards Jones (instructed by Messrs Crawley end Co., Londdn), represented the defendants. The action was trie4 before the Judge and a special jury. I Mr Ellis Griffith stated that Sr George Mey- rick, in 1910, acquired two, farms known as Ty Mawr and Castell Coron. The contract, for sale was dated the 8th January, of that year, and the road in dispute was nb?'therein mentioned, but it was included in the conveyance, bearing date the 16th April, 1910, as being part of the parcels of Ty Mawr. The point at issue was as to vbfci?'_fci' part of road from Ty'nycoed to Caban 'rag or ,-r.;Mi not a highway. Several witnesses wwe called to show that the road had been uaed by the public for many years, all stating that the reputation which the road had was that it rias a public highway. In the afternoon, by arrangement, the court rose early in order to allow the members of the jury visiting the locus in quo. The hearing of the action will be resumed at 10.30 this morning (Friday).

A BANGOR BREACH OF PROMISE ACTION

A BANGOR BREACH OF ] PROMISE ACTION. SEQUEL TO A NEW BRIGHTON I MEETING. PLAINTIFF AWARDED X50 DAMAGES. I An action for breach of promise was heard by Mr Justice Scrutton and a jury at the Carnarvonshire Assizes on Monday. Ihe plaintiff was Miss Annie Hope Aitken, living at Orme-terrace, Bangor, who claimed dama,ges from Archie Campbell, described as an assistant murine engineer, of Durban- road, Liscard. Mr Artennis Jones (instructed by Messrs S. R. Dew and Co., Bangor) appeared for the plainliff, and the defendant conductcd his own case. Mr Artcmus Jones, in opening, said the case was in one respect a very pathetic one, for the defendant, when the plaintiff was in service in Liverpool, seduced her under a pro- mise of marriage, and she gave birth to a premature child. It was not one of those actions in which sentimental and absurd letters with a lot of crosses were read. It was a case where a young woman standing on the threshold of life had her career blighted by a serious wrong done by the defendant, and it was a case where she should be awarded substantial damages. The plain- tiff, who was 24 years of a.ge, was at New Brighton when she became acquainted with the defendant, and they walked out together. Letters were exchanged between them. That ended the first chapter of this sad story, for the correspondence eeased and the plaintiff destroyed a photograph the defendant had given her. The second chapter opened in March, 1914, when the defendant, who had apparently jiint returned from a sea voyage, wrote to her at Bangor and said he was com- ing down, and asked whether she could re- commend any lodgings. At that time she was arranging to go into service at Liverpool, and ho met her at Lime-street station. They met from time to time and walked out to- gether. In April under a promise of mar- riage she allowed intimate relations to take place. She demurred at first, saving she was a respectable girl, but he said he would marry her. She was not in very rohust health and returned home, where she gave birth to a child, In November she wrote to the defendant:— "Dear Archie,—I have been expecting to hear from you for some weeks past, but all in vain. I cannot think why you have not written. You may be surprised to hear that I have given birth to a child yesterday, and I ask you. to think about the matter and write and let me know what you intend t< da by return. I do hope that you will keep to your promise as I had no idea the state I was in and the child was stillborn." The defendant replied:—"Your most startling letter to hand to-day. My mother called round to-day and handed it to me. Would you on your honour tell me I am to blame for your misfortune? I only saw you aoout two months ago and am sure there was nothing the matter with you. 1 can honestly say that 1 do not know the meaning of stillborn. Let me know right away and I shall consider what would be the beet thing to do in the matter. My mother is taking a home in Durban-road this Saturday, and of course she will have to buy another house of furniture. As soon as you receive this let me Know everything that is wrong, and what you want me to do, and all about the child, and I shall do my best to comfort you if I can in any way. It seems no end of trouble with" me lat-elv. I cannot express my thoughts for what you have told, me. Let me know the_:wliolo matter which you seem to accuse* me I of." Thereupon plaintiff'wrotelo liim as follows:— I can honestly say that you are the only person I have to thank for my misfortune, and there is every proof here that 1 have never been out un- less my mother or sister have been with me, as I am not a lover of going out at any time. It is my mother's wish, and also my own, that you should try to come down on Saturday, and then I shall be able to explain all to you, as I am too weak to write any more." On December 4th, the defendant wrote regret- f ting he could not come down to Bangor. As the defendant was trying to shuffle out of his pro- mise, Mrs Aitken went over to Liverpool to see him and his mother. The defendant told MIs Aitken that he ¡ WOULD BE AS GOOD AS HIS WORD. I On December 12th, he came to Bangor, when he suggested that he was a poor man, and not in a position to marry. The plaintiff knew the nature of his employment, and there was some conversation about his wages. He asked her if he allowed her £ 2 10s a week whether she would be able to save money out of it? She told him that it was not so much his circumstances that concerned her, but that she had formed a strong attachment to him, and was very much in lovo with him. Then he had a conversation with the mother, and they discussed the question of. the publication of banns, the plaintiff having an objection to be married in a Registry Office. It was arranged that they should get married in Church. The plaintiff wrote to the defendant on December 17th, and receiving no reply, wrote again on December 19th. On December 26th, she sent him a wire, I have received no letter vet. Am expecting you." Two days later she wrote j to him in these terms:—Yours to hand this morning. I cannot think what, has happened to you, as I did not think I was doing wrong in writing to your mother, as who else could J. write to? I had written three letters and a wire, and received no answer to any. I think you are trying to break my heart. I have worried so much about you that 1 have not been able to walk about, and this is what I have to put up with. I thought you were hurt or ill, and it seems such a funny way of doing business after all I have suffered. 1 want you to let me know, as soon as possible, what you intend to do, as I cannot stand much more worry. I have no one to look to only you, and you know from the first you promised me what you would do, and then you think of treating me like this. Dear Archie, try and think what it means, as you have sisters of your own, and I wonder how you would like them upset like I am;" There was no answer to that. On January 5th, there was one final appeal from Mrs Aitkcn, asking him to keep his promise. In this letter, Mrs Aitken said she could net understand why he was treating her daughter so coolly, as when she saw liiui at Bangor everything seemed to be quite aJ right, "Even ae- I wae walking along the road to the station you asked me to make haste, ae you could come and take her," proceeded the letter. "I did all in my power to do so, and the girl came on wonderfully well the first week, but has done nothing but worry aoout you this lafct fortnight, wonctenng -what has happened to you. In fact, she waa so ill Let week t'llat I Dogged of h-cr to have a doctor, but- she begged of me not to, as she said she put all her faith in you. Why are you treating her like this after all .me has suiiertd for you and never once gave you away? Do write, it only a hne, for she has no one to look to but you, and e-he is beginning to feel it very much as each post eomeiR and not a Mne. She cannot go on much longer like this, I l hztva to 6:-) dore and I feel something will have to be done flI3 there will be no Annie left, and I myeelt am beginning to feel 1 am gO;lJ.g again. Eventualy a writ was i&>¡d, and counsel drew out a defencex on defendant's behalf that ho never made the premise. Since then, however, the defendant had written to the effect uhat ho would appear himself. The p.aintiff corroborated couneel's statement-, and added that she sent the defendant a pipe, which he returned. The Defendant (to plaintiff): When did I' tell you I earned L2 10s a week?—When you camo down in L'œmber. and my mother &?:d she h?d to save on 356 a week. Mrs Aitken, the plaintiff's mother, Raid she fiaw the defendant's mother in Liverpool, and also the defendant, who asked what she w-slied him to do. She told him it was his duty to marry her daughter. He replied that he did not think he was worthy of her. She said, "After what has happened you are." He tnen stated that he wouldi marry her, and' added that hia word wae his bond. On December 12th he came to epend a week-Mid at witness's house, and she heaid him asking her daughter whether could save out of £ 2 10s. Witness remarked to him that she had to save out of 35s a week. DEFENDANT'S STORY. [ The defendant elected to give evidence, and the Judge asked h/m whether- he "promised to marry the plaintiff. The Defendant: I never promised to marry the The Defen d ant: I never promise d to marr y t?_e girl individually—that i, to hcreelf. The Judge:-Well, did you .promise to marry foetr (collecWiveiy •—(laughter). WLha-t do you mean ? Defendant: During the time I went out with her I treated her as a inend. During the six years I Lave known her I have only seen her six time- The first time I met her she wa. sup- posed to bo in a convalescent home, and not in service. Tasked whether hc would care to go out, and 6he wa always willing. The Judge: She eays that on Eac-ter Monday, 1914, you had intercourse with. her, and that you said that if anything happened you would marry* her?—No. Did you have intercourse with liei-f did. She states that you again said in Septembei that if anything happened you would marry her. Is that true?—No, cir. The mother says that when she saw- you in Liverpool you then d)i-,oniised to marry the plain- tiff?—No. What I said was that 1 was not in a position to marry hex. Did you say anything about earning S2 10s a week?—I never remember. Wae anything eaid about being married by banns?—Not that 1 remember. V.?hat is your income''— £ 2 & for a fuH wee k Nl, ',iiat 18 vuur lr?coni, of 48 hour?. What is the largest sum yon have earned a week during the last three months?— £ 2 7s. 6d. Questioned by Mr Artemus Jones, the defendant said he was a fitter, not a marin.: engineer, llo was certain he told the plaintiff's mother h. could not marry the plaintiff under the circum- stanecfl as he never had a steady position. Did you tell your own mother ttiat you were I lici,er invii- going to marry the never men- tioned marriage to her. What did your mother say?—She told me it was none of her business—that 1 was to please mys'jli. Why did you come down to Bangor on De- cember 12th?—I was asked to go there because the girl was sick and that if 1 went there she might get well again. You knew the girl had a great dfeal of affec- tion for you?—She might have had a. certain amount, but she never showed it to me. Did you say when you were down at Bangor, "Get Annie well as I will tako her away ?—I said Try and get Annie well &6 I will coino again at Christmas." What do you think you were expected to go to Bangor for; did you think that the mere sight ot you would act as a tonic on this giri o health?—That was what I was given to und'T- stand (laughter). Ij The defendant told the Jury that. through h's solicitors, he offered the plaintiff S25 to be paid at the rate of £1 a month, but she refused the offer. The Judge, addressing the Jury, said that if they arrived at the stage of considering damages they should not give aa elaborate sum which mo defendant, could not pay. lie would imply !!O to bankruptcy and tlrtj plaintiff would get. hath. mg The jury awarded the pajnt¡ff JEM damages. The Judge told the defendant that if he could satisfy the court that owing; to the war he could not pay the. money he would grant i stay of execution, but no doubt h? ww earning more on account of the war and leave would be given to lftvy execution.

Advertising

NEWS RECEIVED AFTER GrOING TO PRESS. :Jr .s; l; HOSPITAL SATURDAY AT BANGOR. To morrow (Saturday) public and house. to house collections will bo made at Ban- gor in aid of the Carnarvonshire and Anglesey lntirmary, v v' .v j K-i -y-y; »- ■ j ■ | | i J 1 "I have proved ???/ that my cure M?? ? s permanent" SaysthisBA Man. ????? Says this BANGOR Man. of ». f -TJu'C'lI'r'h lifti}]g a heavy weight I my badr, and at the time I hoiiie. j\f.t.erwa.r

PWLLHELI POLICE COURT r

PWLLHELI POLICE COURT r FARMERS WITHOUT nOl LICENCES. I The Pwllheli Police Court was held on Wcd- nesday, before Messis Maurice Jones (in the chairf,W. W. Griffith, C. II. Lloyd lift wards, J. Hughes Parry. Wm. Thomas, G. II. Roberts and Dr. O. Wynne Griffith, the latter taking UI.J oath as a magistrate on his election to the chair of the County Council FARM CHS WITHOUT DOG LICENCES. As many as 117 farmers were summoned for keeping aogw without licences. Most of the defendants pleaded guilty. Two or three offered a defence on the .strength of the dogs'- age. Others ^aid that they had sent in applications for exemptions or were under the impression that they or their re- latives had done so. The magistrates retired to consider all the cases, and were absent a considerable time. On returning to Court, the Chairman said the Bench had takcD some time to consider all the 117 cases. -They regretted very much that they were troubled with such cases. The defendants knew-—or they ought to kllO\V-- that applications for exemptions were to be made in January. Ihe B4enell regretted that farmers had neglected to ask for exemptions. But the charge3 preferred against the defen- dants wa.s not. that of neglect, but that of having failed to take out licences. Exper- ience "ought to have taught them that for many years now exemptions were necessary before farmers could keep dogs without pay- ing for licences to keep them. The Bench would adjourn the case of Robert Roberts, Bdcyrn, but would dismiss the charges against 0, J. Penny, R. Jonee, Nant: W. Pricbard, Pistyll: Mary Griffiths Nevin; and Owen Jones, Mount Pleasant. All the others would bo fined 7s 6d each-

Advertising

ALLIANCE ASSURANCE COMPANY, LTD. t ESTABLISHED 1824. J ACCUMULATED FUNDS EXCeS" '£:33,500,000. THE Right HON. LORD ROTHSCHILD. G.O. V.O., Chairman. ROBERT LEWIS, General Manager. Chief Office k BARTHOLOMEW LANE. LONDON, E-C- The operations of tho fJompany extend totim following amoi;ig otiaer brandies of Iiifc'u.;>noe • FIRE. LIFE AND ANNUITIES. Y MARINE. YV C on I following Firc- "C Workmen's Compensation, Personal Accident and IV.se.aso. Third Party and Drivers' Risks* Plato Glasa aiid Hadl Storm. Burglary and The ft. fidelity Guarantee. y The Company aho grants CAPITAL REDEMPTION POLICIES- BRANCHES ot. among—other places— LIVERPOOL: 69. Exchange-street Easj#y?r J. MASON GTJTTEIDGE, Secretary. o' WREXHAM: 28, High-street; 3 A. STANLEY DAVIES, Secretary* Prospectuses, etc., may be obtained from V'S; of the Company's Branches or Agents. • |Jjr ATLAS ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED. HEAD OFFICE: CHEAPSIDE, LONDON. 1 FIRE LIFE ACCIDENT BURGLARY"! UP-TO-DATE POLICIES. 1 LOW RATES. ,1, PROMPT SBTTLE-V1 <• „■ AGENTS at—Amlwch Mr E. W. Da?'? A N.P. Bank. Bangor: Mr W. G. Grttt?' ? Upper Bangor: Mr W. Pughc, Bryn. ^jT Bcaum?ris: Mr F. D. Thomas, N.P..63)1'" r?thesda: Mr *?? R. Lloyd, do. Carnarven: \Y. 0 .en, do. Conway: Mf Owen Rewind,  | Hol„-ioad: Mr W. Hughe? do. Llangefni:)Ii? ? '1 Jones, do.. Llandudno: Mr J. A. J! do Menai Hndg&: Mr J. T. Roberts, do. *? bi?h- Mr W. Met?hts Jones, do. Pwilheh:??. D°T. Lioyd, do. Rhyl: Mr C. S. Sabin Lu0 Ccmac6: Mr 0. LL Hughes, Tyddyn Syo, JJa<, PwLheh: Mr D. A. Hardcastle, Madryn ??.t Office. Wrexham: Mr D. Williams, N.P. Mf J. P. James. Resident Inspector, lni;le 12, Orme-road, Bangor. Liverpool Brar?: 4, CHAPEL-STREE? T-t J. W. MARSDEN J. Branch Man.j ) Royal Exchange Assurance i Incorporated A.D., 1729. Chief Offices: g- ø. ROYAL EXCHANGE, LONDON. Branch Offtcea: ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, -.nit ROYAL EXCHANGE eHAMB1^ EXCHANGE STREET WEST. LIVERPOOL. Funds in Hand £ 6,000,0^ Claims Paid. £ .48,000 Every Description of FIRE, LIFE, & CASUALTY, Insurance Transacted xg SPECIAL TERMS granted to Annuitll when Health is impaired. Fuil Prospectus on application to:— Mr S. H. Smith, Lloyds, Bink, AmCVVctt- J. Horatio Jones, Solicitor, Bango'- J Mr O. H. Humphreys, Lloyds 8. Carnarvon. Mr W. Morris Jones, Solicitor, POrt I jf* 'h BUC FLr?A!5 ',I (. MOï-¡.-¡!i BEETLE ?  ——————————————— ——— 'iW 4 A private Hnut?d h?bJitv company, Y?  tub of WiHtan. Thomas and Sons ('llrubt{ poiters), Lim?d, h? just been gj £ a<-cp:?! of JEMO.OOO in £ 1 share ?.g cent cum. prcf.), to takj over the ?'?n-3 timber importers and mcT?h?nts   Wi-??x.?am, Swansea and Cardiff, ai L! T?-cmas and Son. }