Teitl Casgliad: North Wales Chronicle and Advertiser for the Principality

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
18 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

"THE DAILY MAIL" Battle Postcards Official Photographs taken on the battle- field showing all phases of the Great War* H™* To Mr II o£t "ttmg Hand this To Mr. ? Rotting f. ?r your post- OT Stationer your post- ???enf ?PO? or Stationer Please reserve for me the following cards you P"?? ? "Dai!y Mail" Official War ynu? ort?f LO-DAY. Postcar at 6d. per packet I TO.DA Y: Packet 1. Coloured. Packet 2. Coloured. Strike out those Packet 3. Coloured. you don't want Packet 4. Photogravure. Packet 5. Photogravure. Every Packet contains Packet 6. Photogravure. 8 different cards and —— costs Packet 7. Photo Facsimile. 6d Packet 8. Photo Facsimile. OCI* Packet 9. Photo Facsimile. D k 10 Ph F  8 Y ea aame pnce. Packet 10. Photo Facsimile. AH styles same price, Name i. Address 'H' The Packetl Nos. 4, 5, 6, 7, Be 9 and 10 will be ready about Sept. 1. Ltookets 1, 2 and 3 will be ready about Sept. 11. ORDER YOURS TO-DAY4  Y«|i   m&M f ?Tmtih?MM?L JJ??????S? ? For ? trifling sm of 12 60 monthly yoa can have 

PWLLHELI POLICE COURT I

PWLLHELI POLICE COURT. I A IHIENDLY SOCIETY FINED. I On Wednesday, before Messrs J. G. Jones (in ho dhair), Maunce Jones, Win. Thomas, W. W. Griffith, J. H. Parry, G. C. Roberta, and Dr. Gwenogfryn Evans Mr W. G. Day, solicitor, Westminster, repre- lenting the Registrar of Friendly Societies, sum- moned Owen Parry, secretary of Llanaelhaiarn Sick Benefit Society, for failing to supply an- nually for three years the financial returns oi such society. Mr O. Robyns Owen, who defended, asked for an adjournment in order to have time to pre- pare the returns. The previous secretary (Major Wheeler) had been killed in action, the preuent secretary was engaged on munition work, and two of the three trustees had died. Mr Day objected to an adjournment, but the Bench decided to hear the evidence. Mr Day then produced the correspondence that had passed between the parties during the last three years Though the returns were promised they had not been applied. Major Wheeler joined the Army in the summer of 1914, and in March following Parry became secretary. In 1915 Parry wrote saying that the money were to be given- to the village. But the Registrar replied that that could not be done without consulting the members, and that the society ctpuld not be dissolved. Several letters were sent to Parry up to last month, but notihiag had been done. There was a sum of over £100 somewhere, and Mr Day wanted to know where the amount mIiI, Mr Robyns Owen said that the society had be- come inoperative since 1914. A uiun of £ 3i>3, to- gether with interest for three years, was deposi- ted at the Savings Bank, and he produced the deposit book. The officials of the society thought that since the letter had become inoperative in 1914 no returns were required. One of the offi- cials (Davies) had been at the Dardanelles, and .waa now in Egypt. The circumstances were ex- ceptional, and though there might have been a technical offence committed he (Mr Owen) hoped that the Benah would not penalise Parry. They regretted that the offence had been committed. A fine of 2s 6d for each offence (7s 6d in all) Was imposed, with 31s 6d. costs. CONTRAVENTION OF COUNTY BYE- I LAWS. Supt Thovqaa Owen summoned H. G. Jones, Cefnamwlch, Tydweiliog, for not having put up ligthrts on a sewer that was being constructed in Tydweiiiog. The offence was admitted. Mr R. H. Evans, Matlryn College, said that he was driving in a motor oar from Aberdaron to Madryn, 14to at night, and after rounding a difficult corner on entering the village the wheels of his car dipped several times, and further on went over soil that bad been excavated from a man-hole. He stopped and walked back, and saw that a sewer trench had been made in the road, and that there were no lights anywheie to warn motorists of the dangerous state of the toad. He felt it was his public duty to inform ihe poiioa about the matter. Defendant was fined 10s and costs. LIGHTING REGULATIONS. I P.O. Jonea (19) summoned Gladys Mitchell, Hant, Aberaoch for not screening two head- I ights on her motor car at night. The informant (aid that the defendant waa driving through Pwllheli when he beckoned her to stop, but she proceeded towards Lianbedrog. The lights were very brilliant. Defendant was fined 10s. 3fiss G. E. Bush ell, Llysarborth, Nevin, who Vfcd not a.ppear, was fined 22 2s for not screening the light in her rooms at night. P.C. Pugh said that tho tenant of the house pulled down all the window blinds, but that the defendant raised them up again. The rooms had the windows open, and the lights full on up to midnight. Abraham Prichard, Bryncoch, Abererch, was fined 53 for riding -at night a bicycle without a light.

No title

n Fifty women, employed by the Birmingham I Corporation as road workers, are mainly engaged 10 preparing the roads for tar-spraying1.

LLEYN TRIBUNALI

LLEYN TRIBUNAL. "PUBLIC HOUSES OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE. A meeting of the Lleyn Tribunal was held to-diay week at Pwilheli, Mr Maurice Jonea in the chair. A licencee applied for total exemption, con- tending that public houses were of national im- portance or the Government would have closed them. He said that in the summer, when visi- tors came, his receipts averaged JB40 a week.— Conditional exemption was granted. Mr Robyns Owen appeared for two men em- pioyhed as drivers of passenger motor "busea. They drove two buses, of which they were aiso' pro- prietors. One ot them had been exempted up to September 30th.—The oases were further adjourned when both of them would be con. sidered together. A married appellant pleaded that for family reMons he should be exempted, and in reply to questions ho said that he had nine cluldren.- Conditional exemption granted. At the request of the court, the Clerk said that ail farm labourers who had been exennpited up to November 14th must send in their notices of appeal before then .f they intended bo appeal at all. The Clerk ako appealed to farmers and their servants who had received temporary exemption to join the Volunteer Corps in their respective localities. Mr Roberts, Bodwrdda Farm, Aberdaron, pleaded that since the coming of tho Insurance Act farm servants did less work und stopped working on the slightest ailment. Ho thought the Government ougiht to allow farmers more ser. vante under these new conditions and not leas. Mr Richard Roberts, contractor, Chwilog, ap- plied for exemption for his p.art-ne,r. Prior to the war he employed seven men. but now he had only one. His four eons were either in tho Aimy or N&Vy.-ExemprtioD Was granted. ,D n was granted.

DONT DRUG YOUR STOMACH

DON'T DRUG YOUR STOMACH. MAGNESIA WILL NEUTRALISE THE HARMFUL ACID. Drugs axe a curse instead of a blessing to lie man or woman who employs them indiscrimin- ately. They numb the nerves, and although the trouble may be subdued for a time by ilie ueo of ever-increasing doses it io not cured, and sooner or later it will manifest itseif in a serious if not incurable form. Especially is this true in the treatment of indigestion and dyspepsia. To subdue or quell the symptoms of these all too common ailments, drugs and artificial digeetants axe extensively used, aictt 'j, has often been demonstrated that such things are usually useless as well as dangerous. Digestive trouble, in nine cases out of ten, is due to an excessively acid condition of the stomach, and tho simplest and best way to neutralise this acid is to tako half a teaspoonful of pure bisurated magnesia in a little water after meals. This is neither a drug nor a medicine, but a simple antacid, which achieves one object thoroughly, that is, it neutralises the acid, and by so doing it prevents the food fermenting, and removes the chief cause of pain and unpleasantness after eating. Bisur. ated magnesia will enable you to discard your drugs and artificial digestartfs, and make it pos- sible for you to enjoy good meals without fear of resultant pain. Obtain a little to-diay and prove it, but bo sure you get the pure bisurated magnesia, wihich is absolute^ diatmct from the acetates, citrates and oxides, or the equally uri- suitable mixtures of bismuth and magnesia. You will find that it is stocked by most high-class oh-emi-sto everywhere.

Advertising

GENUINE IIIURATED MAGNESIA can now be obtained locally from J. BOWEN, 157, High-street; MESHACH ROBERTS and Co., 301, High-st.; R. A. EVANS, The Pharmacy, Portdinorwio; antl other high-class chemists everywhere. Powder Farm costs 119 A 2/9 per bottfo. Tablet Form costs 1/1 & Zj 1 per bottle.

IN WALES COUNTY FAMILIESI AND THE WAR

I N. WALES COUNTY FAMILIES I AND THE WAR. Writing in last week's issue of Country Life, i' M.J, U Bays:— uotween plain and sea, full of hilil fasttiessee, has the traditions of an ancient figiit- uW raw, and to-oay, as a leAr in the Vate of Glamorgan wiote, Welshmen have a reputation as fighters, and although I do not want to draw any comparisons between one race and another, you can believe me when I ea

BANGOR SOLDIER KILLED f

BANGOR SOLDIER KILLED. f Lanoo- Corporal R. D. Jones, who resided at 11, Britannia square. ?ipper Bangor, was k;.Il in action on July 25th. He was working as a miner In S. Wales when he joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and went cut to the front in Decem- ber last, attached to a oompa.ny oi the RoyeJ Engineers. He leaves a wife and four children.

A WELSH FUSILIER S IMPRESSIONS

A WELSH FUSILIER S IMPRESSIONS LIFE IN THE TRENCHES. '1 Private J. E. Hughes, Royal Weleh Fusiliers, whose at Llanfair P.G., Anglesey, writes:- A bright sunny day and the sun is sliining in a per- fect blue sky. Not one of those sultry, oppressive days, for there is just the faintest of breezes blowing and out here, a few raiies behind that iiiybteriouf3 un- known world of caruage and horror, it is good to live in spite of longing "ior England, homo aiia beauty," which steals over evea the hardest of old soldiers. Resting here to-day in one of those quaint mud-built little French. villages. How many have we seen now! Kesting here now, even though we si'eep on the floor of a French farmhouse, though there are no amuse- ments, is absolute luxury eonipared with our experi- encea of last month. The weather is fine, and the men's little bivouacs in the garden have one advan- tage—they are clean. 'Tis true we found no rats In the German dugouts, but even the cleanest was troubled with vermin. By day we have what was once a pretty river to bathe. It is not like the open sea we are so fond of; but, muddy and dirty; it is a pleasure of an afternoon to strip and take a plunge in. What line types of human beauty ^d health thcs" British soldiers are, and to think to- morrow they may be lying—a prey to German mili- tarism, out in the wootis-dCdd. No punishment can be too severe for the ICaiscr and his minions when the reckoning comes. This thought, fortunately, has no place in the soldier's mind, for he has only one fixed resolution, to "carry on" until victory is assured to the Right. The Uriiibh Tommy is gocu epirits personi- fied, and his good honour and fortitude have cheered many a war wdi-a little French village. Everywhere is lie welcome. He has a kind joke for the old men, he lends a helping hand to muuaige. Everywhere is he popular. A clean bed—the green grass, and a good wash basin-the river, and we are contented. Of course. -there are little auxiliaries which assist in making our lot a happy one. There is the B.E.F. canteen, where wo can get, a supply of smokes and eatables. It ts luxury to obtain tinned fruit and bread after so much bully and biscuits, though the Army supply system, even in the trenches, is excellent. The-n we have a divisional band, which gives excellent selections. Thrre is the pierrot troupe—keeps us in touch with home; but, best of all, her,- is the English mail—how eager- ly we look forward to it! No person is more popular than the post corporal. How his eyes beam when he greets me, "A letter for you, sir!" and how he apolo- gises when he says, "No English mail to-day, sir!" Given a home-made cake and some smokes from home -we are as happy as larks in the summer sky. That is our little world at present, primitive it is true, but what a Inxury from that sordid, uncanny world we have just left behiird.. It may be better te forget the horror of it all. The ruined villages—not a stone is left; the ruined woods—how thin they have become; the fields once fair and prosperous, for it is a. fertile countryside, the fields are waste and desolate. An earthquake could do no mre damage; the ground seems churned up. The little cemæries with their little wooden crosses and their bottles, which stand over the buried gallant heroes who fed—not even at peace there, for often have I watched the German shells dropping ill their laidst. And the unburied dead, amongst whom the living live, for the Germans leave their dead and ivounded, and not only will they not bury them them- selves, but give us no quarter to do so* for it is a ruthless, savage warfare they are carrying on. Bat nothing can upset the fortitude of this army of clerks and shopkeepers, and on they go as far as higher authority allows. them. Perhaps it would be a good thing to givo the details of the horrors of this 'warfare, lest we forget. For someone must pay when the eiid comes. It is nof In the British natnro to conceive a hymn of hate, but we may and must conceivc and stick to a firm, fixed resolution to punish one who has broHglit so much misery to all European homes, who has set tho clock of civilisation so many years back. Lest wo forget, lest we forget. The news from here is cheerful. I enw German prisoners early in 1915, proud, haughty, and confident; I have also seen prisoners coming down from their lost trenches during the push of July—brow- beaten, sullen, "with their tails between their legs," but withal glad to be out of the hell Oicy have asked for. I can assure you they have no heart to attack, although they fight like tigers behind their machine guns, concealed and protected. They know now and avow they will be beaten, but they are out to do as much damage :u possible before giving in. That is tho civilising element in their kultur. Ont hero the r. n are splendid, neither defying nor dreading what is in store. So cheer up at home, you anxious ones- Write often, for nothing cheers so much as news from the gootl home country.

Advertising

MILLIONS OF PSCPLB. I FLORILlNE FOR THE TEETH. b:\V4 ussd this economical Dentifrice j with full Batlstactton. A few drops pro- tlu,co t refreahtiil lather and cloansor, rendering the teath white, and arresting decay. Also put up In Powder Form Why not Try iir

MR LLOYD GEORGE ON THE WAR

MR LLOYD GEORGE ON THE WAR. VICTORY THAT WILL END WAR FOR EVER. After his visit to the Eisteddfod, at Aberys- twyth, Mr Lloyd George, who was accompanied by Mrs Lloyd George, arrived at his home, at CriccLeth, on Friday night. He spent some por- tion of Saturday with Mr G. P. Williams, The Eifion, Criccieth, a lifelong friend, whose two sons, both oaptains in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, have recently fallen in France. In the evellling the right hon. gentleman presided at a concert at Llanystumdwy Institute, whidh institution was given by the War Minister to his boyhood village. Mr Lloyd George was given an enthusiastic re- ception as he entered the building, accompanied by Mrs Lloyd George, Miss Olwen Lloyd George, Miss Megan Lloyd George, and Lieut.-Colonel David Davies, his Parliamentary secretary. In a presidential address, Mr Lloyd George, speaking of his schooldays in Llanystumdwy vil- lage, said he well remembered the Franco- Prussian war. The village school was divided into Frenchmen and Germans, and he was glad to see tiiat Napoleon III. of Llanystumdwy in his schoolboy days was present at the concert that night. He was guarding the door of the concert-room (laughter). "At that time," lie proceeded, "we were play- ing at war, but there was not one of us who thought that forty-four years after not only would there be another war between France and Ger- many, but that lads from Llanystumdwy would also be in that war. Some of them are fighting gaflant-ly at the front, some are making cannons, but edbh of ÍOOm is tring to do 'his best for his country (cheers). Britain was in this struggle tlirough 1110 fault of her own, but because her honour was deeply involved, and because she would be disgraced if she had not taken her stand (cheers). THE NIPPERS GRIPPING. "I am not going to say anything about the struggle, except that I am satisfied with the way things are going (loud and prolonged cheers). I feel that for the first time for two yoon the mppe-re are gripping, and we s?aW not be very long before we begin to hear a crack (loud cheers) [ When we shall be in a position to extract the kernel—well, that is another matter. If all de- pends upon policy, and I say at once that, hav- ing eirtered upon this quarrel, we shall see that there will not be another war in our days (loud cheers). The people of this country have made greater sacrifices than anyone ever contemplated as possible. Three years ago no 0000 ever dreamt that Britain would pour millions of her young manhood into the battlefield. Our sacrifices have been greater than had ever been thought of, and according to the measure of our sacrifice must be the vigour of our demand (cheers). We must not be satisfied until wo are sure that not only in our day, but in the days of our children and of our children's children there will be no repetition of this crime against humanity (loud and continued cheers). That is why we must not merely have a victory. We must) have such a victory as will be a warning to any ruler that now sits or will ever sit on a throne, and to any kings or counsellors of kings, thait they will be called sternly to account by the conscience of civilised nations for every outrage they perpe- trate against interna-tional right and fair dealing (cjheens). That is why we must not merely have victory, but unmistakable victory, unchalfeng- able victory, complete victory, a victory that can- not be explained away by German professors to a oredulous people. If it is not such a victory, the sacrifice will be in vain and war will have to be renewed oil a blacker and bloodier scale. Let us have done with war now and for ever (loud cheers). I THE TASK A GREAT ONE. 1 am gilad, in the middle ctf a great war like this, to be able to come to Wales, for a few days' holiday. If you can call making three speeches in three dfrys and a fourth to-morrow morning a holiday, then it is the first holiday I have had for three years (laughter). But to come to my countrymen ion Wales is always a holiday to me. Theru is a change of atmosphere, a sense of re- pose and relaxation, when I come to Wales (dheers). When I feel tired, as I do sometimes up in London, I have a sense oi holiday stealing over me when 1 take up all old Welsh book. It carries my thoughts, my spirit, away to the hills and valleys of my native land, and as I read I can almost feel the breezes of Cambria refreshing me aa-.I giving me a feeling of restfulnecs and of iiew life (oheers). That spirit is in my blood. It is so much in my blood that when I break out sometimes my English friends do not understand me. I am delighted to oome to Wales. Although I have only had a few days here I feel nested. The task in front of us is a great one, a grave one. We are still oalling upon the coun- try to prolong the sacrifice. The cause for which we are fighting will open up a new world to us all, and a better one. But we must help to make it better (oheera). One of the singers to- night sang of unity. We saw that spirit of unity in the Cymaaifa, at the Welsh Eisteddfod at Aber- ystwytih, when men of all denominations came to- gether to sing 'the old hymns of Wales. Let that unity be something which will last, not only for the period of the war, but during tlie period when the damage done by the wax "is being repaired, even beyond that, when Britain will be made sudh a new land that even its own sons and daugh- ters will not know it—a land of peace, a land of prosperity, a land of hope, a land to love and die for, a land of which the poorest that dwell in it will be able to say, 'This is a glorious land to live in and to work for' (loud and prolonged oheers).

MILITARY WEDDING AT BANGOR

MILITARY WEDDING AT BANGOR. ARNOLD-DYSON. I At Bangor Cathedral, on Wednesday, the maxriage of C?ptaMi William Arnold, Machine Gun Section, eldest son of Mr aaid Mrs Arnold, The Causeway, Llandudno, and Mis Mary Gwen- dolen Dyson, elder daughter of Mr E. A. Dyson, Collector of Customs and Excise, Sunderland, formerly of Bangor, and of Mrs Dyson, took filaoe Both bride and bridegroom were former- y otudents at the University College of North Wales. Archdeacon Morgan, Trefdraetih, an old friend of the bridegroom's family, officiated, assisted by the Rev. J. D. Jones, vioar. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a dress of nirron and Georgette with a hai of Georgette, trimmed with white cornflower. She carried a bouquet of white roses. The bridesmaidis, Miss Dorothy Dyson, the bride's sister, and Miss NeU Arnold, the bridegroom's sister, were dressed in brown crepe de chene trimmed with green velvet, and wore hats of brown tulle, Lieutenant Arnold, tho bride- groom's brother, was best man, and he was assisted by his brother, Cadet Frank Arnold, and Sergeant George King, Machine Gun. Section. During the service appropriate musio was played by Mr Ivor Thomaa, tihe Cathedral sub-organist. After the ceremony a reception waa held at Glyndyl, Upper Bangor, where Mr and Mrs Dyeon are spending their holidays. Subsequent- ly Captain and Mrs Arnold left for their h ney- moon, which will be spent ixr North Wales.

CHUROH OF ENGLAND ZENANAI MISSIONARY SOCIETY

CHUROH OF ENGLAND ZENANA I MISSIONARY SOCIETY. On Wednesday week a very successful drawing room meeting was held at Grlyngarth Palace, by the kind invitation of Mrs Williams, on behalf of the Church of England Zenana Missionary Society, when the Rev. H. P. Napier-Clavering, the clerical secretary, and Mrs Napder-Clavering, gave a very interesting account of tho Society's work amongst the women of India and China. Special mention was made of he faot that each Indian killed in tWo terrible war meant a child- widow in India, whose lot is an extremely sad one. There was also a very brisk sale of Indian a.nd Chinese embroideries, etc. The Lord Bishop of the Diocese presided.

SOLDIERS LETTERSI

SOLDIERS' LETTERS. I The Editor will welcome the receipt of letters from eoldiera at the front, which will be pubUehed in our columns after having: been duty pateood by the Consor.

No title

Mr John Bythell, dhairman of the Manchester I Ship Canal Company, died on Friday At Man- I eheater, in his 77th year. i

Advertising

I ? ? < L?? Every Burberry Garment ¡',it'Vr; 1rt.Îf9 .1 ¡ Bean tlt" Burberry Label PROTECTION and COMFORT Whenever weather conditions in Town or Country, travelling by road, rail or sea, on Active Service or any other occasion, call for the most efficient and economical security, it is always wise to be provided with THE BURBERRY -which, owing to special weaving and proofing, supplies a dry and com- fortable safeguard against rain and all damp. —whilst dependable in weather-resist- ance, it is perfectly self-ventilating. i-keeps out cold or wind better than a leather coat. —is luxuriously warming in the chilliest weather, yet being -light and air-free, is cool and hygienic on mild days. _voluminous and scientific in design, "allows perfect freedom for exercise. I I Practical Evidence .of the Efficiency of j THE BURBERRYj The Burberry kees ou t the heaviest rain, is very light, yet wonderfully warm on cold days, and cool on hot ones." L -F. Gardner. The Burberry 1 had from you is everything I could wish for. I have been in heavy rain-storms and have kept dry. -E. Moore. "Although so very light and cool for summer wear, I soon found it degrees warmer than an ordinary cloth overcoat for winter wear." -F. Prout. t So beautifully cool to walk in, I not like a wretched mac. that /a  MM M< ??. fatigues one So. I -T. S. Franks. W ^"» 1\ f >. BURBERR YS .-Ájl\Vll; AGENTS t— BANGOR. Vallance Bros., 295 High Street. COLWYN BAY. T. H. Jones, Conway Road. LLANDUDNO. H, A. Shilton, Lloyd Street. W. S. Williams & Son, The Loyal Warehouse. RHYL. H. K. Osborne (A). Sidney G, Talbot, 48/50 High Street (L). WREXHAM. W. & J. Prichard, 14 Hope Street (L). Jenkins & Hughes, 2 Town Hill (A). N.B.—Agentt mørkeà I, L" are for Women's Burberry garments only; "G" for Men's only i "A for both Metis and' Women's; "M" for Burberry Military goods in addition to Civilian. Those unmarked include all three Departments.

j ICARNARVON COUNTY POLICE COURT l

CARNARVON COUNTY POLICE COURT l LODGING-HOUSE KEEPERS AND VISI- I TORS' REGISTRATION FORMS. This Court was held on Saturday, before Messrs Iasard Davies (chairman), A. W. S. Williams, Wynn Williams, Trevor Hughes, J. R. Hughes, Richard Jones, G. J. Roberts, and J. C. Lloyd Williams. Margaret Griffith, Eisteddfa, Nazareth, was fined 10s for keeping a carriage without a li- cence. Wm. Jones, Plas Beuno, Clynnog, was charged unclear the Aliens' Restriction Order with failing to ask hie lodgers to sign the necessary forms. Superintendent Williams stated that 16 ladies w l *ti the d,& f en, and two gentlemen were staying with the defen- dantt, and not one of them had filled a form. Mr J. RqiHughes: Are the notices in Welsh? Superinitendont Williams: No, but the vi?tot'a 71i.h. Mr Richard Roberts, who defended, complained that a good deal of difficulty was experienced in sooucirug these forms. The Chairman: I think there should be an official centre where these forms can be ob- tained. Mr R. Roberts said his client had tried to ob- tain the forms at) Clynnog, but there were none to be got. If the Government insisted upon these forms being filled they should be provided by the Government. Mr J. R. Hughes did not think it right to ask Clynnog lodging-house keepers to come to Car- narvon for the forms. Richard Hughes, Shop, Clynnog; Thomas Ro- berts, Cilooed Isa Farm, do.; and Evan Pritchard, 'Co.mfa.'r Bwt.h, do., were charged with similag offences. The Chairman said the Bench had decided toj impose a fine of 4s in each case. They thought there should be in each viliage a centre where these forms could be obtained. On the back 01 the forms it was stated they could be obtained at booksellers, but it had been shown that efforts made to obtain them in Carnarvon had failedo The polico might inform lodging-house keeper8 where the forms could be obtained. Superintendent Williams remarked that thej, could hardly expect the police to go from do to door to tell lodging-house keepers where they, could obtain the forms. Mr J R. Hughee: The police have plenty ot. time in these small villages to give the neop sary information to lodging-house keepers. A CHARGE OF THEFT. Griffith Lloyd Roberta, Hyfrydle-road, Tal, earn, was charged witli stealing chaff, valued at 2s, belonging to Mrs Elizabeth Thomas, Talysarn., A lad named D. John Jones, employed by Mrs Thomas, said that the defendant went into Mm Thomas' stable and witness locked ham in. Later: he saw the defendant coming out of a hole ia tho wall of the stable with the chaff on hit back. Sergeant J. H. Jones gave evidence that when first charged the defendant replied, of the kind." Subsequently the defendant 13 at the Polioo Station and said that D. J Jonsa gave him permission to take the chaff, and h- was willing to pay for it. The Defendant, on oath, said that D. J. Jones said ho could borrow a little chaff, and lit: tookj a bucketful away quite openly. The Bench fined the defendant 15s. CYCLING WITHOUT A LIGHT. Evan Thomas Williams,. Hyfrydle-road, Taljy sarn, was fined 69 6d for riding an unlighted bit cycle at night.

Advertising

"u.  f A BOON TO WOMEN WORKERS. } X | ? tb????M? T?HERE is no reason why a woman's hands and com- tt t T plexion should be ruined by war-work in munition T. t j j 1 factory or on the land. The regular use of Ven-Yusa, n it 1t the novel oxygen face-cream, is all that is required to M M I ?EE =  isk. preserve the natural, delicate beauty$f the skin. 'A 1 ijP Ven-Yusa gives the skin what is aptly described as an ??. T oxygen bath," which restores the velvety softness of  vl ????? ?t?tfT? youth, and guards the complexion from the harmful j!jjxL  ?J?''  ?T?&M effects of mental and bodily fatigue. j^| I 5 f [ 11. far jar, of Chemists, *< or C. B. Fulford, Ltd., Leeds. 9\\i.1"r9r ¡