Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
BY THE WAY

BY THE WAY. v A Muddletown Vacancy. I see," writes a correspondent, that the II Border Counties Advertizer' has again been nominating a new alderman for Muddletown. Can it not oblige with a new Town Clerk?" W ell, no doubt, if need be it can, though the choice of.clerks is not so easy as that of alder- men. For, after all, the selection of alder- men is a comparatively simple affair. In Muddletown, as I understand, it falls to the lot of the senior councillor who has "passed the chair," and a reference to municipal records is enough to determine the rest. .That system, at any rate, has its advantages over the one in vogue in some plac-s, where these things go by party favour, and whether Brown or Jones is to order turtle soup for his dinner depends on whether the Blues or the Beds have the preponderating voice in the Council Chamber. To do Muddletown justice, amidst many things that are far from con- firming the opinion of Muddletownians that it, is the hub of the Universe, its Council has never allowed matters cf Imperial politics t-o get mixed up with drains and markets, and seniority of service in the civic chair (pro- Tided the ratepayers do not permanently with- draw their confidence later) counts for more than any accidental opinion on Home Rule for Timbuctoo or Free Trade for the Far-away Islands. Hence, when once an ambitious citizen secures election to the Council Cham-1 ber, he has only to count the number of heads in front of him in the queue stretching up to the mayoral chair, and beyond-that to the edge of the aldermanic bench, and to calculate on an actuarial basis the chances of casualties among councillors, to be able to ascertain to within, say, a year or two, how long he must needs wait before his turn will come to pass out of the troubled waters of electoral campaigns into the harbour of alder- manhood. It is, I imagine, a rather interest- ing source of speculation, which has lately received a stimulus from the tendancy to hustle mayors on after at least two years' occupation of the seat of honour, and present- j day aspirants to municipal office, sitting down j under the spreading oak," listening to the birds of the air building their nests overhead and the water dripping in the "deep well j below, may duly rejoice that the aforesaid j queue is moving perceptibly a little faster I forward. « I do not, of course, for a moment suggest that there is any desire to hasten speed at! the sacrifice of valuable life at the far end of the line in Muddletown, where, a mediaeval poet declared, the people are honest and unanimous," a quality which, let us hope, is none the less applicable to its municipal life to-day. Moreover, it is not always necessary to wait thus hovering on the brink of Fate." Vacancies in official circles some- times occur with dramatic suddenness, and leave us in some doubt as to how they may best be filled, a reflection which brings me back to my correspondent's suggestion about the present need for illumination of the path that leads to the wearing of wig and gown, which, for a cause which everyone regrets, unexpectedly opens up before us. Well, as I have said, while it is a comparatively simple thing to choose an alderman, it is no easy matter to procure the services of anyone wil- ling and able to keep six aldermen, to say nothing of eighteen councillors, in order in the same room! There may be those who are willing enough, but who lack ability. Or there may be a smaller number who are able enough, but are unwilling to make the at- tempt, and I readily forgive them their hesi- I' tation about "going over the top." Perhaps it is with that consideration in mind that Muddletown has decreed that, instead of in- viting only what the man-in-the-stfeet calls the privileged" and the lawyers the qualified to apply, they have thrown com- petition, as in the class for early potatoes in the tillage flower show, "open to the World." It has a catholic ring, but, as a matter of fact, it somehow or another generally happens that the world either does not hear of the offer, or does not deem the prize wdrth com- I peting for, and in thev,, end the race is con- sequently won by those that dwell very near to the parish pump, who, no doubt, find much satisfaction in the honour, to which they are at any rate technically entitled, of regarding themselves as world champions." It is a harmless fiction, the joys of which I would not dream of dispelling, and, if Muddletown, having announced its open competition," finds that very few think it worth while, un- der the conditions, to enter the lists, I shall be ready to offer the "champion of the world" my Congratulations on a bloodless victory. Who he may be I do not know, but ap. parently he must be one who is willing to spend the best hours of the Working day sit- ting at the Guildhall, while the great big world goes turning round outside, and that is not a prospect of much attraction to anyone to whom officialism is not the alpha and omega of existence. Otherwise I might be inclined to solve the problem by, offering my I own services. Of course, I know nothing I about law from the inside of a lawyer's hat, but apparently that is not deemed es- sential now in Muddletown. If any knotty point arose I suppose I could ring up any of the "qualified" willing to give me their advice, so far as my inclusive salary on. abled me to indulge in such luxurious cofi. yersations. Anyhow, if, as the poet says, "By much engine driving at intricate junctions. One learns to drive engines along with the rest, no doubt experience would come in time, and meanwhile Muddletown would, presumably, put up with the result of its own methods of selection. However, lest Muddletown should imagine that I am poking fun at it, let me say as solemnly as I can that I hold it in the. highest honour and regard. Who could do otherwise of a Corporation which, a worthy local historian has grandeloquently declared, are chosen from the respectable and enter- prising classes of the borough, so that all men who, by perseverance and Jess in trade or commerce, in the learned profession of the law, or medical science, or ,,1,0 move in the quieter and more elevated ranks of life,-where the oiium cum dignUaie. is to be seen -in perfection-if to be -seen anywhere -are in the legitimate path to Magisterial authority and Aldermanic greatness. ¡ That may sound a bit snobbish in these demo cratic days; but, after all, tradition st; I counts for something in ancient boroughs, and I, not the greatest leveller" of us all would care to see the reversion of the timé-l noured Wig and Gown descend upon Tom, Dick, or then Harry. A PHILOSOPHER ON THE PROWL. I 1,

THE CHURCHES I

THE CHURCHES. Can-on Knox-Ltele died at Worcester, on Sun- day, aged 78, The Bishop of London has appointed the Rev. E. A. Morgan, Willewden Green, to be rural dean of Willesden in the place of the Rev. Pre- bendary Croinie, resigned. The Rev. J. Arthur Jones, pastor of Penuel Baptist Church, Bangor, has received an invitation to take pastoral charge of the English Baptist Church at Coliwyn Bay. Mr. Jones has been at Bangor a litit&e over four years. The Rev. T. E. Nicholas, Weflsh Congrega- tionnl _■ minister, Llangibby, Cairdiganshitre, has been invited by the A,betda.re Independ.ent. Labour party to submit his name to a selection conference for the purpose of nomination as a con f erence f6T the apt ur m h noef xt Pa?t?, i amentary Labour candidate at the next Parliamentary election. The Archbishop of Canterbury, on Saturday, consecrated Dr. Hensftey Hen son as Bishop as Hereford in. Westminster Abbey. There were no public protests, although several bishops were wbsent, owing-, it is -stated, to their objection to the views held by the new prelate concerning certain doctrinal questions. II DENBIGHSHIRE CONGREGATIONAL UNION. I EASTERN DIVISION. The quarterly meeting's were held at Llargolion on Monday and Tuesday week, ait (Va&raion Ohapel. A representative iiumber of delegates attended the conference on Tuesday morning;, when the Rev. J. Talwm Jones presided. lrt his address he alluded to the excellent response iiiade by the churches in the dijfcfioft for in- j creased help to the Ministers' Supplementary Gramt Fund. The majority_ of the ohu-chea htd made special efforts in this direction, butt & i few remainod unmoved. He could not unds> stand the Workmen who had received an increase of 70 per cd. and over in wajges still contri- buting tho pre-war amount towards the main- tenance of tne church and minister. Some de- clared that we hid dter- days befolrei us. with o .r "daily bread," but he ventured to remark thait with prai-tiealy 250 obuanehes without .ro:stors, enplty "colleges, and an impoverishf'd ministry, the outlook of vpirituaI need was very distressing. Ha trusted that the cihurches Would mise themselves. The labour movement was placing high ideale before the world. The church must see to it (that its special duity of being the "salvation of the world" is not usurp ed by wtiheva. Mr. Isaac Smith's recommenda- tion to form a laymen's committee to distribute the fund was adapted. An appeal from Vron- cjeydre Oon-g-reigyitional {.Church, made by the Re\. Milton Thomas, was unanimously support- ed. Resolutions aalnls the decision to disen- I franchise ifflte conscientious ebiwsfcors and state purchase were passed. tie Premier was con- gratulated on his slb'iitetnent of "War aims end conditions of peace Tile Rev. J. D. Jones the secretary of the Union, was congratulated on his return from Y.M.C.A. work in France, togetr.er with the Rev. J. Daniels, Tanvfron. The union also expressed its best wishes and tlnod.èéd" to Mr. Allen Leiitsome, who vras coin# to France as a ianitetn lecturer with tShs Y.M.C.A Expressions of condolence, weirs with the families of the late Rev. R. Roberts, fthos, Mrs. jElias Williams, Llangollen. Mr .John Dfi¡V,le5; Trevor, Mr. John Thomas, Bereft. And othertl. The Rev. Simon Jones. Gwersyllt, delivered an impressive and mspit- mpr sermon OR "The duty of the church in the far, of present-day problems"; the Rev. J. bLIrig "The demeirt of. hope in religion, and the Presutem of the Union, th-i Rov, Talwrp, Jones, preached on Tuesday j iutrht. en "The fascinaitaoh of the name of Jesus." ¡

ELLESMESEI

ELLESMESE. I PETTY SESSIONS.-Monday. before M!1'1 w. H. Ho??R, Browt?o? Tow?r, C. R. Mostyn Owen, and Isaac Cooke.—Thomas Mill- le,rd, .osMar. 'KHaBnuere. MsM N èlHa (Strange, iard, '0«ef l M? Margaret Skitt, Le, ?are each nnod 5s. for ndm? biey?es withou't Hg'ht:s.— Ellis Davies, soldier. ft native of Oswestrv. wis charged by Mr. John Wynn, farmer, Weston Lidlingfield, by whom he had been employed, with doinsr wilful damapre to a fence on Decem- ber 31. The defendant, who did not appear, was fined P,2 and ordered to pay £ l da-mage.- At a Children's Court, two Ellesmere school- boys were charged by Inspeabor Dwvad Evan*, Cambrian Railways, with itihrwin* atones at a railway engine on December SI.-The dd. ants wetre bound over. OBITUARY.—Thr&e od?Mianan? pM?cd away here la.? week. Mf. Edward Ftamcis (82). of Scotland-street, who for many "yeaJ rs waa weH known ad a. W.ona(.?. mslMer M?i a' respected member of the local Foresters. Mrs. Eliz. i Plica (81), widow of the tate Mr. James Price, formerly of Brook Mill, Penlev, who has been hvin? with her niece, Mrs. Pickering" Tues- t'oriia-.strp?. The funeral took place on Tues- day week, when the remains were interred in Penley Churchyard =id-t every token of es- teem and regret. The Vicar of Ellesmere (the Rev. F. G. Ellerton) officiated, and the chief mourne-is were Mrs. Pickering And Mrs. Tevni-s (nieces), Mr. and Mr*. F. Madeley (nephew and niece, and Mr. E. and Miss Hayward, Penley. Th6 bearers were foir former neighbours, Messsfs. J. Rodenhnrst-, ? Moulton, J. BoAghey and John Smith.—The last of the trio was Mrs, Frances McCutchan (84) of TrimpJey. Mrs, McOutchan, who his been a respected resident in EHesmere for many yeaw, was a. native of Forden, Mont., being the only surviving daughter of the kite Mr. Evan Bowem, Nant- I cribba. Ford en. Sh-j married Mr. William McCutchan of Woodfleld, ftethurst, Sowtoi North wood, who pr?ceea?ad her many years &(). ThA Vioarf, the Re?. F. G. EBefbon, and M). H. R. G11ø aoeompanied the b&&T. which WM t?en on Monday to London for interment 1 in Numhead Cemeitery, w1;' her butband 19 biixied. )

Advertising

19ublic eti!tSJ. ,41"" THE LONDON CITY •& MIDLAND BANK LIMITED. 'ESTABLISHED 1836. Subscribed Capital. £ 24,906.432 0 0 ) Paid-up Capital Reserve Fund £ 4,342,826 0 0 BIRECTORS. SIR EDWARD H. HOLDEN, BART., Chairman and Managing Director.. WILLIAM GRAHAM BRADSHAW, ESQ.. London, Dqputy- Chairman. TTT' Tm? LORD AIREDALE, LeedS. ARTHUR T. KEEN, ESQ., BtrBM?ehaat. ??"tr?TTT ?i?BATEg B?RT, Li?roool. THE RIGHT HON. REGINALD McKENNA, 31.P, M rroVFR BEA?,?igy ESQ., Liverl)o 1. London. EirmineUr3. ?? ??? ???t?'??Ai..?0?? ?????? FR??k WILLIAM NASH.?..Birmin?? ??? RIGHT HON. LORD PIRRIK. K.P.. LcS?oA. ?TtA1?? ??????? *c;o MP Llandin^m. |* S-IR THOMAS ROYDEN, BART., L?wrpMi.     .I.  ESQ.. Liverpool. 'flLSON^K.^B^k.<^G.faC.I.I!^«2M?,> H ^IMPWNoIE WYLEY.'ESQ., CeveuttF- JOHN GLASBROOK, ESQ., "-Ma- HEAD OFFICE: 5, THREADNEEÐlE STREET, LONDON, E.C.2 « foint GeneraL Managers: J. M. MADDERS, S. B. MURRAY, F. HYDE, E. W. WOQLLEY. lDr. LIABILITIES AND ASSETS, 31st December, 1917. gifr A s. d. To Capital Paid up, vis.:— £ 2 10s. 6d. per Share on 2,075,536 Shares of £ 12 eadi 5,188,840 0 0 ii Reserve Fund 4,842,826 6 a „ Dividend paysble on 1st February, 1111. 350,246 14 0 „ Balance of Profit and Loss Aoccirtit, as below 733,785 5 < 18,815,6S7 16 „ Current, Deposit and. other Accounts 220,651.768 9 5 ii Aeoeptasioes on account tf CUltlmer.I2.,t" 17 6 P.280,944,332 0 7 aaBMeHManBAnsnaaaBS I$s. d. By Cash In hand (lftoluding- Geld Coin £ 7,030,300) and Cash at Bank of England «4,«6^83 tf 1|• „ Money at 'Calf and at Short Nottoe 31,$MMO ¡ Investmente:- War Loans, at cost (of whioh 9408,41 las. Is lodged for PublIC and other Accounts) and other n British Government Securities mmtU4,13 Stocks Guaranteed by the British Government, India Stooks and ifMiian RaSwey Debenturee UI,760 11 9 British Railway Debenture and Pre- ference Stooks, British Corpora. tion Stocks 1,71M73 4 < Colonial and Foreign Government Stocks oW Bends 6M,3M ?)? a Stufdry Investments 5":21 a u BMta of Exchange n, 17 f(J 146,421,719 12 4 n Advances on Current and other Accounts 88,510,868 1 I Advances on War Loans. 19,046,639 8 8 „ Liabgftfts of Customers for Accept- 4 anoea 8,888,808 17 a "Bank Premises, at Head Of?e and  BranohM 2,937$M I t "Beft asl Bank Shares:— t 49,688 £ 12 10 0 Old Shares, I M 19 e paid I 148,294 912 10 0 New Shares, 42 10 0 paid Coat 91,225#"g 0 < S Less part Premium on Shares issued 473,269 II Dr. PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT for ihe year esdlag 31 it December, 1917, df. i 9. d. To Interim Dividend at 18 per oent. per ann. to Sffth June, 1"1, ti-,Ss income Tax 322,793 9 11 „ DivldeiM payable en 1st February, t11S, at 18 per oent. per aim., I less Income Tax 350,246 14 0 i, Reserve Fund tor Con- Ilngenetes see,Meoa „ SatafS?a aM tafte to I Staff sonrtng with M.M. Forces and Bonus to other Members of the Staff 304,518 10 3 Balance carried forward j to next Aocount 733,786 S 8 a2,21,,64 8 10 « a; d. By Balance from last Account 243,838 5 to n Not profits for the year ending 31st December, 1917, after pro- viding for all Bad and Doubtful Debts 8 10 •aHWBESBSfcWtll Til EDWARD H. HOLDEN, CIUMMAN AND M;?tGH!& DmOR. ???

CORRESPONDENCE 1

CORRESPONDENCE. 1 PROBLEMS AFFECTING AGRICULTURE. Slit,—I think it would be only fair to those on liiom Mr. Mansell's strictures, and your ] supjrot of those strictures in your last issue, have fallen, to ask the public to look at the other side of the picture Mr. Mansell has di awn. The present time, when our own land is suddenly required to provide for the needs of the nation, calls attention not only to the shortcomings of the tillers of the soil, the owners, and their agents, but also to the position which agriculture as a National In- d,ustry has held for the last 50 years in these Isles. All my life I have been intimately connected with the management of estates in various parts of the country. Very vividly do I re- I member the lean years of the seventies and eighties when agriculture was brought by adverse seasons into an almost hopeless con- dition. How did the nation and those res- ponsible for it's well-being regard the terrible plight of the farmers? Was it not with calm indifference which I may illustrate by the! expression of opinion given by the then Prime Minister, that they had better turn their attention to growing fruit for jam-making." On the other hand, how did the landowners meet the situation? Are memories so sbort that the permanent reductions of rent, and allowances of 50 per cent. and even more, given to their tenants, are forgotten? Thstaks to these timely aids, and the dogged -ieter- minatioll of the farmers, th6 storm was weathered, but no thanks to the nation, or it's dulers, that it was so. While on this part I of the subject may I ask for comparisons to be drawn between the treatment measured to British farmers and that given by their Governments to th*- French, German. Dutch, and Danish farmers? I am afraid the re- sults would not be favourable to British Governments. Oh! but someone will say, look at all the Acts of Parliament which have been passed for the benefit of agriculture. Granted several have been passed, anal inexpensive form in any case for rendering help by the State, but a pennyworth of practical help is worth more than a pound of Parliament orders, especially when those orders expressly ignored the inter- ests of landowners by drpriving them of any voice in the cultivation of their land, and disposal of it's produce, except in the lul year of the tenancy, penalizing landlords dis- satisfied with their tenants, and generally divorcing the interests of landlords and ten- ants. If landlords are becoming only rent col- lectors, which I decline to believe, at whose door does the fault lie? Not with the land- lords who have in a great many cases ex- pended more than the fee-simple value of the land in its equipment. For many years agri- culture in these Isles has been treated as an insignificant appanage of the State, by no means a necessity, and this Mr. Prothero clearly demonstrated when he said a short time ago that the land must now endeavour to provide the cereals for 35 millions, and meat for 18 millions which have hitherto come from over-seas. Instead of blaming owners, oecupiert, agents, as Mr. MaDsell and you, Sir, have done, holding them up to the scorn of the people, who are short enough now of food, and will, thanks to the mis-management of our resources, be much shorter soon I fear, would it not be better to encourage the fine efforts of tenants and landlords to meet, under most adverse conditions, the additional requirements of the nationam, etc., BROWN LOW R. C. TOWER. Ellesmere, Salop) .Feb,. 5, 1918.

Land of My Fathers

Land of My Fathers." WELSH SINGERS IN JERUSALEM. General Sir Philip Ohetwoede, in a letter to a relative, writes:- I attended a concert of the famous Welsh singers in Jerusalem. They sang quite beautifully. For the first time 'Land of my Fathers' (the Welsh National Anthem) re- echoed through the streets of Jerusalem in Welsh.

No title

The British Government has threatened Germany,8 through the Dutch Government, that reprisals will be made unless two British aviators, who have been sentenced to ten years' imprisonment for dropping pamphlets on the German lines, are immediately re- leased and given proper treatment as prison- ers of war.