Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
GLEANINGS

GLEANINGS. MUST MAKE BUSINESS PAY. Regarding the master from a practical pouift of tiew the "Mark Lane Express" says the ob- ject of the farmer, like ■that of every other man Who has .capital stake, is, of course, to make fcis business pay, and he lays his plans wiui I.i c h iiac-?onal ilite,? ,e,sL this object in view. In the national interest; the plans of farmers are being considerably up- set. and more than one man in the country is in doubt as to xheiprofus that ivill accrue from the eliailgo he is called upon to make in his methods. In the growing of corn we know the position, as the prices received this year a.re to hold gLfQci, foe tkc, grain harvested next year, but crops must depend oil the weather ana other circumstances which fanners do not con- trol. It would be just as well if some of the people who are ready to criticise farmers would realise thai the course they are taking to grow more food for the people in this crisis is not without its risks: but then this is a. side of the I question which is not always considered out- 1 side agricultural circles to the extent that it should be. Whatever they may get for them- selves, farmers who are adopting war-tame methods are making a big effort for the country at a period when the first and most essential consideration is the production of the most food for the people. 1 INSPIRING WORDS TO FAR-M, ERS. ;£- The pasture proolem (savs -lie "taiii r NLLU Stcck-bre-der) for the moment is put into the background, and we have immediately ahead of us a gigantic task which can only be achieveu if farmers will wo rtoa^her to attain tne end in view, which can be done by willing effort; lind while the farmer has every reason -t-o criti- cise very sharply the policy which does not permit hiTQ. too do what he believes to berigiit, still he now realises that in this que,st;ion of ploughing up more land there is no choice. There are things which the Food Controller nas done which do not commend themselves to us from a production point of view, but. despite ell these things and while not abating one iota the right to reasonable criticism, we would ask farmers to consider very seriously the remain in portion of the hundred days and to dedicate their services to thi" great work of food pro- di

IThe Indespensable Tractor

I The Indespensable Tractor. THE "WHITING BULL" AT ELLESMERE. The advene of the "Whiting Bull Tractor to Ellesmere has aroused the greatest interest ajBongsit agriculturists, who, having heard of its achievements in their districts, have been led To anticipate great things, and, let it be stated at once, these anticipati_ ons have been more than realissed, as pointed out a few weeks baok, when the Sun Motor Company of lilan- gollen, who hold the sale agency for these famous tractors in the oounties of Salon, Den- bigh, Merioneth and Montgomery, arranged a scrie-5 of demonstrations to provide fanners at Bangor-on-Dee with ocular proof of the tractor's capabilities!. The task before the farmer to- day was not to be' accomplished by clmging to the old methods of the horse plough, and we are glad to find daily evidence of the intention of the agricultural community to take immedi- ate advan-tage of the facilities now existing for the employment of motor traction on the land. Realising these facts progressive and patriotic agriculturists who have seen the "Whiting iiull" at work also realise the splendid oppor- tunity that it brings within their reach, and, after recent further clemonstratiions at Efties- rcere, farmers there may be relied i'poi to fall into line with their confreres of the border coun- ties generally when making 'heir selection o: the best tra.ctor to employ on Tha "Whiting Bull" does the work >f from twelve to sixteen horses; it plough* ticm six tc eight acres a day, and runs on paraffin at the rate of three gallons to the .n're. The great advantage of the "h lutIng rail" tractor seems to be in the fact that it is a general i.,t,il-itv machine which can be employed b) the fanner all the year round. It is not simply a tpactor for the ploughing season. In the spJng it can be used for phU¡:(lLU.g, d!$Cmg. harrow ing, drilling and spreading; in the summer for harvesting, threshing, bailirig nay, loading hay, ana hulling clover; in the autumn for shelling corn, digging po'awes, s^r^aring, fall plough- in and hauling, and in r-he winter dor hauling feed, loading logs, sawinsr ami tiiiri,pug. Is; fact, the farmer who p-osse-,ces a tractor can use it for ail his haulage work and to drive all his Diill-S. The EHesmere damonstrafcioais having been equally convincing with those hJld m other parts of our district, we can only reiterate the hope, previously expressed, that ai a result a filip will be given to the work of increasing the food production of the area to the maximum point, and that many agriculturists will be suf- ficiently enterprising to realise the immense pos- sibilities of the agricultural tractor and lay the foundation for further commercial prosperity by installing one at their farms. It may be stated thaitthe Sun Motor Com- pany are, day by day, receiving letters of high praise regarding the merits of the "Whiting Bull, and, wha.t is even more convincing stdll, in increasing orders fron farmers, sure proofs that this tractor is coming (if it has not already como) to be recognised as an indispensable ad- lunot to the agricultural industry of the triot, and the more widelv its meTite are dem- onsnrated the greater will be the call for *ts services

No title

A branch of the Farmers' Union has been formed at Conway, of which F. W. Rob- erts, Bodafwy, Llandudno, has be n elected President, and Mr. R. Kidd, Llandudno, secretary. The Colwvn Bay Local Committee formed to assist the Denbighshire War Agriculture Ex- j ecutive Committee have appointed Mr. J. Jones, of Teyrdan Hall, their chairman; Mr. Lea, of Bryn Euryn, their vice-chairman, and Mr. Oakley, of Bryn-y-Maeii, their hon sec. At the annual meeting of the Conservators of the River Dee Fishery Board, held at Chester, on Saturday, Dr. Fitzgerald (Chester) was re-elected chairman of the Board and Air. Lloyd Price deputy-chairman. The total ex- penditure was R717, and a balance was left in hand of £ 73 10s. 8d. The accounts were adopted. It was agreed that the committee should consider extending the fishing season from March 15 to the end of September in order to meet the ueed for increased food ouplplies.

IOFFICIAL RETURNS OF MARKETI PICES

I OFFICIAL RETURNS OF MARKET P&ICES. The official returns u market prices for the wees ending Jan. 80 compiled from the reports received how tiie auurt! of AKr.eu.mns's mantel reporters give; tne following iuforuiatioo: Fat Cattle.ouppiies of fat cattle show a further slight improvement, the. total number offered this week at ali tue ■■ markets include in the return being 4,2/0 against 3,996 last week. The chief increases were at London and Carlisle, wnere respectively, 142 and 2437 cattle were marketed "ITllig I, \I;), against 54 end 1C9 the previous week, while larger supplies are also reported from several other markets, notably Bristol, Partington, Huli, Ipswich, Xewcastle-on Tyue, Liver- pool, Shrewsbury and Truro. Against this, however, there was a decline in numbers of 100 at Salford, 70 at Leicester, 50 at both Wellington (Salop; ana 40 at Northampton and 30 at Preston. Sheeg have generally been shown ;u larger numbers; at Norwich there were 785, against 300 last week, at EKeter 53-1 against 310, at Liverpool 1,888 against 926, at Carlisle 2,Ola against 1,545, at Huli 352 against 185, at Here- ford 410 agitinst 271, and at Penrith 1,100 against 887. The total supply at all marked is fcs.ese, 12,048 last week. Supplies of pigs, on the other hand, show a slight reduction as compared with the previous 11 week. The numbers of fat cattle, sheep and piga now entering the markets included in this Return are in each ease only about one-third of the average in the corresponding week of the last three years, but I it may be noted that in order to obtain better dis- tribution many cattle and sheep are being sent to small local sales, which no doubt causes supplies at the larger markets to be smaller than would otherwise be the case. Trade for all classes of stock has been conducted in accordance with regulations, cattle making from 53s. to 75s. per live cwt. according to grade, sheep Is. 2d. per Ib, dressed carcase weight plus the value of the skins, which this week average just over 2d. per lb., and pigs ISs. per score live weight, Oswestry (January 80th).—Fat cattle in small sup- ply and quality very medium. Sheep also shown in small numbers, and quality again poor. Pigs were all medium-fed porkers, except a few sows. Shrewsbury (January 29th).—Supplies of fat cattle showed a slight increase, the entry including a number of well-finished beasts, several of which realised the extra Is. per live cwt. Sheep were shown in similar numbers to last week; the skins were valued at about Ijd. to 2d. per lb, of the carcase weight. Nearly 100 fat pigs were offered, and sold at the controlled price of 18s. per score live weight. I Wellington (Salop) (January %tb),-Only a small supply of beef; all classes were represented, but there were not so many good cattle as last week. Sheep I were shown in larger numbers but still not nearly sufficient for the demand; all were sold at controlled rates. Only two fat pigs in the market. ¡ Store Stock.—Trade for store cattle has again been rather slow, but, except at Norwich, where all classes were about 2Qs per head cheaper, prices show little iD clination to fall, in fact, at the Shrewsbury special saie, trade was rather dearer, best quality beasts making from 77s to 85s. per live cwt., against 76a. to S2s. 6d the previous week. Dairy cows are cheap- er than last week, prices declining as much as £ ? to ?4 per head at Preston, ,ud ?& to ?7 at Penrith Shrewsbury..—(January 25th).-At this special sale 1,082 store cattle were on offer, the supply including some very nice quality beasts; trade was l again good, prices ruling rather higher than the previous week. A bunch of 12 Angus cross bullocks of 51 cwts. made the top quotation of 87a., while an- other bunch realised 84s. 6d., and some small heifers 76s, per live cwt. Irish Polled Shorthorn bullocks made up to 85s., while some Irish Shorthorn bullocks realised 80s 6d. and 82s. 6d., and other bunches of Shorthorns 73s. to 75s., per live cwt Not so many I Shorthorn heifers were on offer as usual, but some nice lots of two-year-olds realised from 78s. to 80s. per live owt. Three good bunches of Hereford bullocks made between 83s. and 84s., and a few other lots over 80s. per live cwt.On the average best quality made from 77s. to 858, second 70s. to 75s., and in- ferior down to 64s., per live cwt. About 75 per cent of the cattle got sold. Grain and -Meal .-Londoii.-Wheat.-There has been a good supply for the time of year, which has ¡ realised the official L aximum price. This is raised by 18. as from 1st February, but the deliveries on old terms in the last six trading days of Jan- uary were above and not below the average. Import- ed wheat has been a slow trade, except for fine Can- adian, which at 82s. per 496 lbs. (79s. 3d. per 480 lbs.) has a very steady sale. The top price is 84s. 8d. per 496 lbs. (81s. 6d. per 480 lbs.) paid for Australian. t There is little imported wheat on sale at less than I 79s. per 496 lbs. (76s. Od. per 480 lbs.). Barley. There is no rise in British barley on the 1st February, and the low price for home- grown malting quality causes an appreciable pro- portion to be absorbed for feeding purposes. For fine Californian 92s. per 448 lbs. (82s. Sd. per 400 lbs.) is freely paid, and buyers include millers as well as malsters. Canadian feeding barley at 80s. per 400 lbs. is regarded as dear, and has little sale. Oats.- The American white type at 61s. 6d. per 320 lbs. (603. per 312 lbs.) has been in increased offer, but is not much appreciated. The maximum price of home- grown oats is advanced Is. as from 1st February. Chilian oats at 74s. per 320 lbs. (72s. 3d. per 312 lbs.) are quickly sold. Maize.—-There is no spot supply, but by-products are not exhausted. Pulse.—An ani- mated market exists; sales include, fine old maple peas at 40s. per cwt., golden maples at 35s. per ewt., good type 1917 maples at 150s. per 532 lbs., ordinary 1917 maples at 135s. per 504 lbs., Calcutta split pea at 195s. per W4 lbs., split beans at 117s. per 4g0 lbs, and English 7917 beans at 140s. per 532 lbs. Some Chinese beans at 29s. per cwt. are on offer, but the price represents so large an advance that there are few buyers. Milling offals and meal.—The official prices for wheat offals are 260s. per ton for bran, 270 for medium offals, and 280s. for broad bran and fine offals. Sale* of oatmeal are made at 28s. to 29s. per cwt. for American and Sis. to 82s. for Aber- deen. Higher prices are asked for special qualities, I and on permits being obtained business is effeoted, j The scarcity of barley meal continues and no price '■ can be quoted. Maize meal makes 480s to 640s per ton. according to nneness, gluten feed 4608., and com* moa feed 440s. Oilcake.—Very little Is procurable, 380s. per ton for English linseed cake being the leading price. Rapeseed cake at is eagerly sought after. Brewery and distillery products.—The prices ruling i are nos. per ton for dried distillery grains, 380s. for dried ale grains. and 628, f?r wet ale grains. Malt culms are held for 300s. with buyers at 295s., per ton. Milk.—.London (Euston, and Paddington).—The general shortage continues and there has been no milk on offer at the platforms Birmingham (New Street),—There is a good demand, and only just sufficient supply to meet requirements, none being available for sale on the platform. —

No title

Lieut. C. C Banks, R.F.C., who was one of the officers who brought down the German Gotha in Essex during last weak's, air raid, is a son of Mr. C. P. Banks, Llanddulas, near Abergele. At a well-attended meeting at Holyhead on Saturday it was decided to form a branch of the Welsh Farmers' Union, with Mr. J. N. Thomas as chairman. It was urged that the farmers of the county should discontinue their membership of the National Union of Farmers and became members of the Wolsh Union. •

ELLESMERE FARMER ANDI THE BABIES MILK

ELLESMERE FARMER AND I THE BABIES' MILK. I ADMITTED THEATENING I ? SOLDIER'S WIFE. | I MAGISTRATES' SEVERE CENSURE. I A case which arousad considerable interest ?n the BUesmere district was heard a.t Overton Petty Sess ions, before Mr. Warburton Lee and etner magistrates, on Saturday, when Frank Weaver, farmer, Licde Green, Bronington, was charged with using threads towards ?ora Grif- hths. a soldier's wife, who resides at Tybrough- ?toii. Mr. W. Gou?h Thomas appeared for the complainant, and the defendant, when charged. said "I used threats under great provocation." Mr. Thoma.s raid that Mrs. Griffiths was the wife of a soldier who had been serving in France for 18 months. She had also two brothers serving in France, and another who had given his life in his country's efvice. Last S&p?'m- ber she had great dimculty in getting milk for he* two babies, aged S? and 1 £ years respcc- 'n?ely, a.nd adopted fhe course of reporting the case to the local food OMitTo l commi,bwe. Ir ?curisequence he (Mr. Thomas), as ,recary )f th? committee, wrote a very courteous letter to -the defendant's moitlier asking her to supply complainant with milk. but. apparently resent- lTleDlt was felt at Mrs. Griffiths reporting the matter to the food committee, and since then they had put every obstacle in the way. MrS. Griffiths supplemented her husband's separation allowance by daily teaching at a school and had a little girl to look after her children while she was absent. Consequently, she could only send the milk before 9 a.m. or after she returned in the afternoon, but, notwithstanding this, they refused t-o serve her when it was possible for her to go to the farm. and in the early morning or after she returned from her school work. The offence with which defendant was charged took place on December 18. Complainant said she had not the slightest ill- feeling towards d-efondan/t or his mother, and she was not responsible for the food committee directing the defendant's mother to supply her with milk. She wus m-erely concerned in get- ting milk for her little children. The defendant lived nearer to her house than any other farmer. Prior to applying to the food committee:, wit- ness had cycled aill over the district and called a* 10 farms, but was refused milk. She was a | stranger to the district until a short time before that. When she had offered a coin of greater value than the milk required she had been re fused change or the milk. On December 18 she (complainant) was speaking -to Mrs. Weaver -it the farm when The defendant's son came up and cold her "to chuck thait ——— rot and clear off his premises, and if she was not off quick he would kick her ofT; the road was the place for a dirty scoundrel like her." Since then she wa.s too frightened to go to the far-m. On two occasions she had sent for milk after six o'clock at night and wa,s told thav had gone to bed. Complainant alleged that milk supplied Wa.3 m'xed with old and curdled in a very short !time, The Chai=?an be a vety s&r"cms The Chairman: That will be a very ser i ous nr'a?ter. M". Thomas. This ?s only a preliminary charge and probably there will be another charge later on. He added that he had received a letter from complain mi'1? husband in France who felt very strongly in that, matter. If some- body would not protect, tho wive.- of soldiers fighting for tlie country it would be a very sorry thing for England. The- defendant said he admitted swearing at complainant, but it waz became she was "b e ek- Rua-rding" his mother, and he could hear her 200 yards away. There was milk about now and another farm close to his wher" complainant could get. milk. It would put an end to tha.t unpleasantness if she got her milk elsewhere. Mr. Thofna-s: He suggests she should go to a farm whioh is two miles away. The Chairman said that defendant would be bound over to keep the peace for 12 months and pay the costs, &s., and advocate's fee of one etinea. Mr. Lee added: "Here is a soldier's wife and young children. Now we all kWH, voting babies co'ne first and that any difficulty should be placed in her way in getting milk for them is very regrettable and disgraceful. But apa-rt from that, the language you used to her by your own admission is absolutely disgraceful, and you oug-ht to be ashamed to stand there and look us in the face afte- using such language You are not fighting, and you must behave ycur,sdf while you are staying in the country."

FOOD CONTROLI

FOOD CONTROL. I RATIONS NEXT MONTH. I Lord Rhondda, the Food Controller-, staibed in the House of Loirdls on Thursday, thatt early in March he Ihoped to have the country covered by local i-fotioning, schemes deauing with fats, and iri many eti e also with meat, with power to extend to crftheir articles. It was contemplated that at an early date, these schemes would be bombined info one national scheme. ITEMS. Maximum prices have now been fixed for marmalade. A Carriiart-lier, lady and the butcher who sup- plied her have been heavily fined for buying; and selling 102-lbs. of meat in 10 days. It was. for a Sc. Bernard dog which had a weak heart 1 The Public Meals Order came into force on | Monday. No meat is now served for break- fast in hotels and restaurants and visitors must bung their own sugar. Meat at luncheon and dinner must only be 3os. A National Kitchen Division has now been forme,d at the Ministry of Food under Mr. C. F. Spencer, of Halifax. Lord j.-aondda has repeat- ■ edly invited further activities on thie part of local authorities, and in this coraie--tion the issue of official orders may be shortly expected. In the meantime the local authorities are. urged to press forward any schemes' they may have in hand. j Lord Rjhondda and Mr. Prothero addressed a large gathering of farmers in 'the Caxton Hall, Westminster, on Prdaiv, and pointed out lhat I there was no fear of starvation, and at the very worst Government would be able to give a. ration of meat, bread and fats, something like 50 per cent, above what Genna-ny evan pretends to give. Nevrrtheiess in the next eight monhs we shall be going tlirough the most critical per- iod in the history of the nation, and it was ess- I entfial we should puli together. Mr. Prothero appealed to farmers to accommodate themsetl ves to the neoessary rag-iorling of live stock feeding.

No title

Messrs. Knight, Frank and Rutley, of 20,1 Hanover Square, London, announce the forth- j coming sale of part, of the Eaton estate, bor- ) dering on Denbighshire. Mr, W. J. MacGeogh MacCaw, Unionist i meraber for West Down division of Ulster, has been fined £ 400 with 35gs. costs, for: hoarding food. Mr. MacCaw said he knew nothing about the goods found at his house; but he took the responsibility.

I Smithfield for Llanfyliin

I Smithfield for Llanfyliin. I PROGRESS OF THE MOVEMENT. I An adjourned meeting of farmers convened by Mr. Hubea rWatkins, auctioneer, vvas held at the lowii Hall, Llanfyliin, on Jan. 31st, to consider further the question of establishing a smitihfieid in the town. There was a la.rg attendance, over which Mr. Kugiiee, Llwydiarth Hail, presided. I Mr. Watkins 'reported that he had already re- ceived promises fhom farmers to take up shares in the proposed Smitlitield to the extent of £340. I Mr. Stanley Davies, who is opposed .to the proposal thought that many farmers had promised to subscribe because they thought- they must bri_ ng ali their cattle into the grading centre. That was not so. Dealers could still buy at the II farms, and take it To the grading committees thBmsdvels, risking the price the committee wouLd fix. The chairman: I think the f?ingM in I fa.vour of the smitihiieCd and I think it will also be a good tteing for ibe town. If Mr. Davies says ihailf the promises toO take shares were made under a misapprehension, we can get the pro- mises confirmed or withdrawn. Mr. Davies: I did riot say half, I said a num- ber. Mir. W-atkins: And it should be remembered alls" that even ii a smithfield is built, there will I be lioithmg to prevent, dealers going round the Cûuntr-, to bttv as before, but according to the regulatione 1141 cattle should be brought to Llanfyliin to be graded. Mr. Davies: The cattle are to be sent to the i big towns where the need is urgent. Mr. Watkins: Yes, but ,the- authorised auc- tioneer knows belSt where to send the surplus as lie gets official instructions. I Mr. Lewis, Cefngaer: Why can't a smith- ) field her, pay as wet! as at Oswestry. Mr. Watkins: One local genA-lemail is &o con- vinced that it would pay that he has agreed to put £ 100 in it. -Air. Jones, Ty vaen, said that some of the far- mers who had promised to subscribe were walk- itig about the streets that day instead of at- tending the meeting, Mr. Watkins replied that it was difficult to got, farmers together, but as far as he could see there was a great and general dtewiiie fotr a smithfiefld. On the motion of Mr. Watkins, seconded by Mr. Lewis, Tanvgraig, it was agreed, without dissent-, to form a company for the purpose of establishing a smi#thfio'd, and the following committee was appointed to inquire as to a suitable site and report to a further general meeting: The Chairman, Messrs. Hubert Wat- kins, Lewis, Rhos, Jones, Bryngogledd, Jones, Tvfaen, Jones. Commin-mawr, Jone-s, Penybryn, Jones, Plas-onn, Gitt-ins, Talwrn, Edwards, i Stone House, Wallv Jones. Roberts, Oefngaer, Joseph E. Jones, butcher, ^.obe-r: Hughee, Bodvddon, Roberts, Davies, R. A. Jones, J, Griffiths, Bronirafh, Parry, Ty- issa, Lewis. Tanvgraig. and Roberts, Efei- I v-ewm. Mr. David Lloyd, borough surveyor, was appointed secretary, j

I PROPERTY AND OTHER j SALES r

| PROPERTY AND OTHER j SALES. r MID WALES HORSE SALE. HIGH PRICES. j The monthly sale of horses was held at the Reposi- tory. Newtown on Tuesday week, when upwards of 120 Horses of all classes were included. The heavy draught horses met with a complete clearance at ex- ceptionally high prices far exceeding the reserves amongst the higest prices, was the following:-Alr. J. Hamer. Abermule 133 guineas Mr. T. Alderson, j Perthybee, 8am, 122 and 112. Mr. E. Phillips, Garreg- lwvd, Aberhafesp 120 Mr. Reynolds, New Castle Hall 117, Mr. Williams, Cyll, Trefeghvys 116, Mr. T. Jbnes, Tyneivvdd, Cefn Coch, Welshpool 114, Mr. Chapman, Morforion 112, JVlr. W. Rogers, Balcheldre, ) Churchstoke 105, Mr. J. Humphreys, Gate Farm, Llan- dyssil 1C2, .Mr. J. S. Jones, Cwndoekin, Abermule 93, Mr. W. Gittins, New Mills, 79, Mr. Davies, Cancoed, Llanidloes, 79, Mr. Pugh, Lanbrynmair 78, Mr. D. Owen, Cemmaes Road 72, and Mr. Gittins, Glyn Berriew (W. Unbroken cart colts and fillies were in great de mand, amongst others sold we noted Mrs. Lewis, Moat, Manafon 73, Mr. D; Owen, Gwastad coed 72, Mr. Francis, Tynwrtra 70, Mr. f!. Ðvans, Tybrith 67, Mr. D. Owen, The Bank, Aberhafesp 65, Mr. R. Davies, Cemmaes Road 58, Mr. Evans, Llanidloes 57, Mr B Morgan, Aberhafesp 51, Mr. Jones, Pwllcoch 51. Amongst the top prices for harness horses and cobs were Mr. Lewis, Llansnno, Penybont, 59, Mr. T Evans, Cefnllydan 55, Mr. Pugh, Upper House 49, Mr. E. Jones, Aberystwyth 49 Mr. P. E. Williams, Woodlands 40, Mr. E. Owen, Black Hall, Llandyssil B?, .,Ir Ptgh, Newtown 87, Mr. E. Jones, Clul) 31. The next monthly sale is advertised t-r t;.k.. piace on Tuesday, February 26th 1918. — LORD CREWE'S CHESHIRE ESTATE. HOLDINGS SOLD FOR £ 100 PER ACRE. Mr Frank Lloyd oSe ed for sale by auction at the Royal Hotel, Crewe, on Monday week, 2 farms whicll had hecbecome vacant through the death of tenant46 situate at Bpurstow, about 3 miles from Beestoil Castle Station. The auctioneer described them as 2 most desirable holdings A large company attended. Bidding for the Grei D Butto Farm of 109 acres I principally in pasture, offered without reserve started at zC4,500 and by £lOO's reached io.100 at which figure Mr. J. Brown was the bryer on behalf of Mr. R. Dodd, Euton, Tarporiey, Bidding for Sunnyside a 20 arm holding on the opposite side of tllt; road started 4?1,400 and quickly rose to being sold to Yr. Fitton, of Poole. These sales form a record top Cheshire during recent years. Messrs. Tylee and Co., of 14, Ussex Street Strand, London, were his Lord- ship's solicitors. J j PROPERTY SALE AT DOLYWERN. Messrs. Jones and Son, auctioneers, Wrexham and Llangollen, conducted a very successful sale of farm lands and cottages at the Queen's Hotel, Dolywern, oa Thursday. There was a very large company present, and bidding was very brisk. Mr. R. H. Dodd, who con- ducted the sale described in detain the various lots, offered them as !iollows:-Ttl y-zir,h Cottages, (4 freehold) Glyn Traian, and occupied by Mr. William John Cobb and others, vaa sold to Mrs. Brookes, Tanygarth for £ 280. Tal-y-garth Issa Farm, Glyn Traian. containing 34 acres, in the occupation of Mr. John Evans at £ 60 per annum, was also sold to Mr. Brookes for £ 3,620. Grobwll Fach (freehold land) in the Parish of Glyn Traian, containing one acre in the occupation of Mr. Richard Morris at £3 10s. was sold to Mr Edward Hughes, Llwynmawr for £ 180. Oefn Brynian (freehold land) in the parish of Glyn Traian, seven acres occupied by Mr. Lewis Thomas- at £ 2, was sold to Mr Roberts Plas i Issa, Glyndyfrdwy for £ 110 Cae Tyhelig, Glyn Traian, containing Si acres, occupied by Mr. Richard Jones at £ 8 10s was also sold to Mr. Roberts for £ 355. Cefn Bedlwyn. containing 81 acres, Glyn Traian, occupied by Mr. Edward Jones at a rent of ze5, sold to Mr. Edwards, Bryniau. for £210. [ Messrs. Charles Richards and Sons, Llangollen, were the solicitors. THE ABERGAVENNY ESTATE. At ttie auction sale neia recently at Abergavenny by direction of the committee of the 2nd. Marquis of Abergavenny. Messrs. Knight, Frank and Rutley, dis- posed of nearly all the lota, camprising the outlying portion of Nevill HaH estate including the historic- al Suga Loaf and Derifach Mountains. The totei realwd 223, OCO.