Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
7 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
LAYING ANi INCUBATIONI OF THE SPARROWHAWK

LAYING ANi) INCUBATION I OF THE SPARROW-HAWK (By J. H. OWEN). ? I In' nearly every nest I found in 1916 the hen had finished laying by May 6, the day on which the-school opened, or was too far away for every day visiting. A second nest watch- ed in thei same year gave unreliable results, as these eggs were infertile and I had not numbered the eggs as laid. A seceond nest in 1917 proved useless, as all the eggs were infertile, and the old bird, after eating two on the thirty-eighth day from the first egg, deserted the nest. Another second nest had three infertile eggs out of five, and again the eggs were not numbered. Out of all my mis- fortunes, however, I gathered a few rather interesting details. Incubation in the first nests may begin after any egg or not until the whole set is laid; it will most likely begin after the greater half has been dropped, i.e., three out of five, or four out of six. It is not often that a bird will wait for laying to be finished before beginning to sit. In first lay- ings it is unusual, but not unknown, for a bird to begin to sit after the first egg. In second layings incubation begins much earlier as a rule than in first. I have known several birds begin to incubate with the first egg in second layings, which did not start until they had almost completed a first laying, and I have never known a bird wait for her whole second set to be laid before beginning to sit. This year (1918) I determined to try to satisfy myself, at any rate about the incuba- tion period. At first luck seemed with me. v Not a bird had laid when we came back and nests were plentiful and, fortunately, many of them were in nice easy trees to climb. Of course, those nearest the school had to be abandoned at once, as usual. I selected three nests, and two boys, Knight and Collyer, helped me to take observations. In fact, Knight took charge of one nest hiimself. as it was in just the opposite direction to the other two, which were under the charge of Collyer and myself. At first everything went very well, and the birds had begun regular incubation before anything went wrong. Then a.n egg (No. 8) disappeared from Knight's nest. By a strange coincidence an egg (also No. 3) was missing from mine. Then Knight found a jay busy on No. 1 in his nest and next day that had gone, so he only had three eggs left. My two ) nests had six and five eggs respectively, *and I f give details of the incubation :— I No. 1 NEST. I No. of Egg. 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th Laid May. 3 5 7 10 12 15 Egg chipped June 12 12 (missing) 12 13 infertile Egg hatched Juqe 13 14 — 14 15 — -¡.- Incubation 1 period in ) I days — 35 34 — At this nest we built an observation hut. No 1 egg had a. hole in it when it was chipped on June 12. We (Collyer and I) saw the hen nibbling away bits of the shell round the hole while we were in the hut. I made out that this bird began to sit on May 10. Up to that date the eggs were stone cold when I visited the nest and found the bird off, but from May 10 they were always warm, even if I did not actually flush the bird. No. 6 proving in- fertile was a great blow, as that would-have made the period quite definite for this partic- ular nest. No. 2 NEST. No. of Egg 1 let 2nd 3rd 4th 5th j ¡:- Laid may. 4 6 8 10 12 Chipped June.¡infertile 10 10 12 13 H ,.d June — 12 1 13 M Incubation period in days — 35 35 34 33i This bird, according to my observations, I began to sit whi?e laying No. 3, i.e., May 8. At 8 M. on May 7 all the eggs were stone cold, ??t never again at any visit. Here No. 1 proving infertile rather upset calculations. No. 5 has a short period: at 8-30 p.m. on June 13 the egg was chipped, but the young one not out and the state very little different from what it was nine hours earlier. The nest was next visited at 1 p.m. (summer time) I on Jue 14, and the young one was then out, I but stUI -damp from tho shell. No. 3 (KNIGHT S) NEST. j No. of Egg 1st 2nd 3rd 4tJ 3th Laid May 8 10 12 14 16 Chipped June (missing) 16 {missing) 16 ? Hatched June 17 U8 17 In?ubating perlod1 f n in days 32) — fj 55! æ Eggs No. 1 and No. 8 disappeared during incubation. This nest gives a shorter period. The bird did not begin to sit until she had finished laying, which agreed with her habits of previous years. Knight built an observa- tion hut at the nest, and visited it very regu- larly with one or more friends. One point is very noticeable, And that is how very long an egg takes to hatch aftei* being chipped. Out of the eleven eggs men- tioned above, which hatched out, six took two days after chipping, and in another egg we 8W the hen help the chick by breaking away the shell. In 1915 one egg, in a nest I had under observation, was chipped four days be-" fore the chick came out. These notes are in. teresting, but not conclusive by any means: they point stronglv towards the incubation period being over thirty-two days, at any rate, and generally about thirty-four to thirty-five I Am afraid it would want data of at least a dozen nests, with no inconvenient infertile eggs, to fix the exact period. Other people ware trying to help me by watching nests this year, but the:irmisfortunes were greater thap. mbe, anc-t they got no final results. Another thing I have not diwovered is how long the young are kept without food after being hatched it is certainly several hours. Do they get a meal before they are twenty- four hours old? I question it, but iny reasons do not seem conclusive enotgjh to quote. It is, however, notimabl* that for the first week after they are hatched, 11-4 (summer time) is the time in which they get Is iM t faring that week the entrails am rarely given to them—eggs seem to be laid early in the morning as a rule. I have known birds which always dropped their ?gge be- tween 9 and 11 a.m. (oM time) but generally it es ,placeeld'lier th an t zt? My generally O. B. Owen, told me that once he visited a nest soon after four o'clock in the morning, and saw the hen crouching on it. I She ilew away at his approach, and he climbed up to, find five eggs arranged in a pyramid, one on the top of the four; he had disturbed her in the very act of dropping an egg. I have mentioned already that all hen Sparrow-Hawks have their peculiarities. This was very obvious as regards the birds from which I took the above observations. The one I watched from an observation hut was the most silent bird I have ever come across. In the whole time, from May 3 to June 21, I. only heard her note twice. Once she whimp- ered a little when I put her off newly-hotched, young, and once she called to the cock after j she had returned from him to the nest with food. The other bird, not hutted," was, I j believe, the noisiest I have ever come across. At first, May 4r—May 7, I could not get a glimpse of her or get near to her, but after she had begun to sit she used to shriek her alarm note as she left the nest and kept it up incessantly. In addition to this her calls brought the cock up very quickly and they both went noisily all over the wood, but never in company; i.e., the hen flew away and called and the cock called and joined her. Both birds were light sitters and left the nest very easily; to see one on the nest, unless there was rain, it w as always necessary to approach noiselessly through the wood, right up to the! time of hatching. All my observations still, tend to show that the cock bird does not help in incubation. So far 1 have never seen the cock at the nest in such a way as to make me think he had been covering the eggs. On the other hand. I have had very substantial proof that he hunts for the hen more aftd more as incubation advances; I have several times seen him bring food to the neighbour- hood of the nest, and have noticed the hen leave the nest for a meal and return immed- iately, On these occasions she sometimes preens herself and cleans her wing and tail- feathers before returning to the nest, and less often at the nest after her return but in no case does she" take much time over it. If the sun gets on the nest while the hen is sitting, she will nearly always get off and go through the same operations on the edge of the nest. When the young Me hatched &be preens and even stretches while brooding more often than on the edge of the nest. I have before offered an opinion that the cock has some voice in the selection of the nesting-site, and have had, further evidences of this being the case. As this happens with other birds, such as the Pied Wagtail and the Spotted Flycatcher, it is the more easily credited. » From the observation htits alone, I have now seen more than three hundred victims brought to the nests. I have not all my notebooks by me, and so cannot give a detailed list of the various species. Nearly one.,half were "dreNM" beyond recognition, Often while the young are small, the feet are the only part of the victim by which one could recog- nise the bird sometimes even these are miss- ing for example, the first bird I saw brought to the nest in 1918 was completely feathered and beheaded; the lege, entrails, and a good portion of heekin were also missing. Out of all the birds I have, recognised there have been only two game -birds--a red-legged part- ridge very young, complete in every detail, and a pheasant, at theoutside not a week old. I think, however, that this small percentage of game-birds is doe to the large amount of cereal crops rather than to anything e lee, and that the proportion would be much larger in pasture country. So far I We not seen any farmyard chicks of any kind brought to a nest, jjthough numbers are reared all round the woods here. On the other hand, I have seen kestrels and magpies do any amount of dam- age to chickens and partridges. I think one of the mistakes I made in my investigations of the Sparrow-Hawk was that I read the ob- servations of other people first. When one reads the statements of well-known ornitholo- giste, one is bound to be influenced by them, and make assumptions and take things for grntedJ Therefore one is not careful enough to check those points really accurately. These notes are compiled almost entirely from my own observations, but I am quite prepared to find that my conclusions axe inaccurate, and am vfrywJlling te be corrected; I have done my utmoet to check any note brought by a boy before making use of it. In conclton, I would again say with refer- ence to these and previous notes on the Sparrow-Hawk I have published that there has always been some noticeable difference in the beWriour in all hen and %lock Sparrow- Hawks which have come under my close ob- servation.

No title

The Durham Minen' 'Council on Monday, voted practically unanimously against the suggestion of the Coal Controller and of the owners that female labour should be intrr. duced to relieve men for underground work in the mines. They also rejected the sugges- tions of the Executive Committee that miners should work on pay-day (Saturday). The South Wales Miners' Federation held a special coitfere-nee at Cardiff on Monday, regarding the proposals of the Ifiners' Fed- eration of Great Britain to establish a head office in London, with a full-time president and secretary at a salary of £800 per annum each. It was stated that the secretary, Mr. ThomM Ashton, and the treasurer, Mr. W. Abraham (Mabon), M.P., are resigning, and will not seek re-election. The conference de- cided to add the words, or paid Government official" to "KLe condition that election as a member of Parliament shall necessitate the resignation of the president or the secretary. The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced tm Thursday that up to that afternoon the subscriptions for National War Bonds had reached the stupendous figure of one. thousand million pounds. No previous loan in any country nag ever placed so large a aura of Actual new money wt the disposal of the State. The world's previous reeord has been held by too War Loan of 1917, which yielded £ 948,460,000 in actual cash received, ajid the present recoad is all the more remarkable and gratifying as coming on the top of the earlier effort. The Chancellor intimates that some- thing in the neighbourhood of £ 25,000,000 is wanted every week and he looks to the result already achieved to give a stimulus to con- tinued qflfart ia the twhum,

BY THE WAY1

BY THE WAY, 1 A Back-Yard Luncheon Party. I On Friday I experienced one of those "mystic transportations, or which the poet speaks, that now and lien to unexpectedly waft us out of the humdrum surroundings of everyday life into the presence of some momentous, historic scene. Needless to say, it happened in that most mystic of all cities of the world, our own dear old dirty London; though there are parts even of London where one little dreams of stumbling upon history in [the making, at any rate to the outward eye. l Certainly I was little thinking of any such prospect as I walked down Queen Victoria- street, just as the fingers of the clock of the creeper-cov,ered church of St. Andrew-by-the- [ Wardrobe pointed to half-past one. My f mind, indeed, was set on the wholly un- romantic subject of food,, as, wishing to avoid I the rush and crush of the luncheon hour traffic surging about Blackfriars Bridge corner (increased nowadays by the long queue nait- [ing outside the inviting portals of the National Restaurant" in New Bridge- ? street), I turned up one of those narrow wind- ing ways, hardly worthy ot the name of street, by which, passing under the shadow of the "Times" office, you may-if you do not get hopelessly entangled in\ the many erratic twists and turns—eventually land on Ludgate Hill. There is, perhaps, in alil central Lon- don no spot which is less suggestive of cere- monial. These tortuous lanes, shut in by great warehouses and more or less blocked by huge lorries and straining teams slipping nervously on the smooth-worn setts, which seem to be built only as short cuts for errand boys, are the drabest sights in the whole metro- polis. True, the locality is not without its flavour of romance, but it is of an age that is past. Near here once stood tke monasty of the Black Friars, "where Kings and Em, perors were entertained and Parliaments were held," the little theatre where Shakespeare's company performed and the King's Printing House, where John Bill printed what was for long England's only newspaper, and Baskett printed his Vinegar' Bible." Not far away is Doctor's Commons," where marriage licences used to be issued, the "cosey, dosey, old-fashioned, time-forgotten, sieepy-headed family party of courts which so excited the ire of Dickens, while close by Chaucer was born. But one thinks little of these things, especi- ally at lunch time, in these scurrying days, when sites that once were sacred to the Muses are swailowed up in the great maws of Utili- tarianism, and smothered under the grime of the modern workaday world. Imagine my astonishment, therefore, on turning a sharp corner, to see a flower-decked marquee, ap- proached by a carpetted pathway guarded by a few police, from whence there floated the strains of a military band playing the National Anthem." So remote from the general stream of traffic was it that, amidst the roar of the main streets a Hundred yards away, the music had attracted little attention and only a handful of messenger boys and a few beshawled women from some adj acent court had gathered to catch the crumbs of harmony and eloquence which fell from the well-filled tables. But such crumbs were worth catching in all conscience; for, here, in this little back yard, and partially exposed through the open awning to the vulgar eye of every passer-by, there sat the men who, in one way or another, possess the power of moulding the opinion of our far-flung colonies and of our great Ally across the Atlantic! It was The Times entertaining to luncheon the Premiers and the Press of the Dominions, ,and the Press of the United States. Some half-dozen Colonial Prime Ministers were j there, including "our Mr. Hughes" as they delight to call him in Montgomeryshire, and Sir Robert Borden. So WM Lord Reading, just returned from the States, and Lord Burnham of the Daily Telegraph," and the wieMers of editorial pens in a core or two of the great newspaper offices 5n Australia and Canada and New Zealand and Newfound- land. and the States. And presiduig over them all, urbane in manner, but almort viciously complaining of hampering of the British Press by the Censorship regulations, the great Lord Northcliffe himself, while the music was thatof the Scots Guards, not least famous of all our crack military performers. < < Even in poipi of time the occasion was a notable one, for, as the "Times" remarked, on the following morning, this was the first occasion on which the little square in Blackfriars has been the scene, at least for 130 years, of anything like fes- tivity. 1 In point of importance the gathering was even more unique, because never before in the whole history of the world, has the Press of the English-speaking races foregathered in such, influential numbers to sit down at meat (or rather I should say at fish," since even such powerfut guests had need to bow to the Food Controller, and the menn consequently included no coupon-able course) in a dingy back street of London town. Under these circumstances it was, perhaps, excusable that there should have been a little blowing of trumpets by others present besides the in- 'For once in a way strumentalists in uniform. For once in a way the editorial "we" partook of a more directly personal note, though, even so, I do not doubt that those present who were not news- paper men, some of them often the victims of newspaper criticism, were ready enough to admit that, after all, the Press has played no small part in the work of waging war, of keeping up tie apinte of the people at home, so fox- as it is permitted by the Qao>o«s of keeping them and others informed on mftfr tera they are entitled to know, and work thflj better for knowing. Others, of course, hav4 realised this and have paid their tribute ac- cordingly. Even Government departments have begun in a tentative sort of way to re- cognise it and to make spasmodic efforts to insure the protection of the work of news- paper production all over the Kingdom. Per- adventure, then, just for once in a way, the Press may be forgiven to saying it themselves, in no boastful spirit but simply as a state- ment of unchallengeable fact. Anyhow, such occasions as this rarely occur; and, as I lingered a moment in the vicinity of that gaily decked marquee, amidst those drab and dreary surroundings, I seemed to discern m that unwonted scene, of which I was an acci- dental spectator, a very significant picture of the secret of the mystic power of the PiVii-r. this concourse of men, unostentatiously tucked away behind grimy buildings, out of the sight of the thronging multitudes m -hose service they toil, making and moulding history and public opinion in the recesses of printing House Square. It was as if one had suddenly caught a glimpse of the hidden machinery which drives the world. A A PHILOSOPHER ON TBB PaOWL.

CORRESPONDENCE

CORRESPONDENCE. Wr wo sot »gn;ss KXfKeSSMt j BS-waifSiia *a»s DENBIGHSHIRE MAIN ROADS. Sir,—In your report of the Denbighshire County Council meeting in the last issue of the Llangollen Advertiser appear*, the following: "The County Accountant (Mr. R. Humphreys Roberts) presented the estinu ate as to main roads for the year ending March 31, 1919. The total amount was pub- lished by you as £ 17,728. I desire to point out that these figures are not correct. The estimate presented was as follows:— Western, or Denbigh, district £ 10,619 0 0 Eastern, or Wrexham, district 25,878 0 0 Total £86,497 0 0 Thanking you for allowing this correction to appear in the next issue of the Llan- gollen Advertiser," I am, etc., County Surveyor, ELLIS W. JONES. Wrexham, Aug. 19th, 1918.

THE CHURCHES

THE CHURCHES. At. the Baptist Ohapel, Carrog, the Rev. W. S. Rowe. formerly of Ruitihm, has been formally in- ducted as pastor of Carrot and Glyndyfrdwy Baptist Oharches. » Mr. William Griffiths, Glyn- dyfrdwy, presided, and the new minister wat weloomed to the district by the Rev. Edward Edwards, Carrog, and Lewis Davifis, Oorwen, oil behalf of the local Free Churches. The charge to the minister was delivered by the veteran minister, the Rev. Dr. H. C. Williams, Corwen, and to the ohurohos by the Rev. J. H. Hughes, Bala. The Rev. J. Jones, Fogiiliog, subse- quently preached to a latgo oongregaitian. The Rev. W. S. Rowe hails from South Wales.

No title

A threatened strike of harvest workers ia Northamptonshire has been. averted by their acceptance of 25 per cent. increase on the harvest wages of last year, and to work the same hours as in 1917. A team of Association international foot- ballers, including Meredith and Vizard, are to tour the ohief towns on the North Wales coast for the purpose of playing exhibition games in aid of the North Wales Heroes' Fund. On Tuesday morning, a terrific bomb ex- plosion occurred at Dungarvan, county Water- ford, when a strong quay of masonry was shattered), windows broken, ceilings injured, and the door of a residence, the occupants of which were asleep, pierced by an iren pro- jectile. No arrests, however, have yet taken place, "and the matter is so far a mystery. A charge of having failed to comply with _P cultivation order brought against the pro- prietor of the Oakwood Park Hotel, Conway, with respect fo the hotel golf links, was dis- < missed by the Conway bench last week. Mr. J. N. Joyce, Whitchurch, gave evidence for the defence, shewing that the proprietor had really done more cultivation than he need, and the ploughing up of the golf links was im- practicable on account of the expense.

Advertising

Neurasthenia and Broken Health. INVALIDED SOLDIER MADE WELL AND ENABLED TOWORK BY TAKING DR' CASSBLL'S TABLETS. Mr, GeotIge L. Joseph, 14, Whaat&lale-roaii, Ki,ng',s Cron, London, fays:—" I was in the army when my trouble Came on, and bad seen nearly two years of active service. I found myself getting very run down and nervy, and though I tried to keep going it was no uAw. My sleep was very disturbed and my general health low. Appotite failed me. I suffered with violent headMhes. and finally became so weak that I had to go in hospital. 1 was discharged Buffering with severe neurastihenia. or nervoua breakdown. I was terribly nervous and do., pressed wh?n I ?came home, oould nœ &x !n ldremed wa-hneyn ttlh:2' ? 1 çd the teelin? of glmm I acduT?d wM re?Iy tiM?Me. Then I tried Dr. Omoffe Tahleta, aad thei resdts have been. They br4cQ me T? u Br. 3, Nervous Breakdown Anaemia Nerve Paralysis Kidney Trouble Spinal Weakness Indigestion In?nttle Paralysis Wasting Dises"s Neur"thenia Palpitation Sleeplessness Vit. ExhaNS?on Specially valuable for Nurainsr Mothers and during1 the Critical Periods of Ltfe. gdd by Checniats in aS parts of the world, inducling Aufttralie, New Zealand, Canada, Africa, and India. Pzioaa: la., U. Sd., oorf 3s. {&e Jfc iw bflsnffi tib* mMfk eoonwoktllt