Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
BY THE WAYI

BY THE WAY. County Pride. I The other day someone wrote nearly a feolumn in the Manchester Guardian On Being a Lancashire Man." As the Yorkshire iran who read it the next morning remarked, It is just like his d-d impudence." Well, possibly it is not every county which can in- spire the requisite aplomb for such an enter- prise,, and little Simpkins, who was born and bred at Oakhain, confessed to me, with a tone of admiring awe, that it would, of course, be ludicrous to think of anyone writing thus On Being a Rutlandshire Man." Yet, if you asked me, I really could not explain why. For, after all, a county's sense of pride in itself does not necessarily depend upon its size, and, even if it did, Lancashire is not the largest of our shires. Still there certainly is a sense of superiority about Lancashire men which, though hard exactly to define, seems to be their admitted heritage, and I do pot forget in this connection that I am myself the son of a. Lancashire man. Let us admit, then, that in this matter Lancashire stands supreme it does not follow that it entitles Lancashire men to deal in accents of dis- paragement with other counties at least equal- ly and even more proverbially proud. In the article to which I allude the writer describes how his Lancashire associations carried him in triumph from an out of the way South African railway junction, where, being held up awaiting a train that tarried long, as South African trains ,are wont to do, he discovered a. fellow disciple of the Red Rose in the booking-clerk. They were talking of sporting I records, as all Lancashire men do on such an occasional meeting, when the stationmaster appeared. He was, says the writer, a poor sort of fellow, who wanted to talk about poultry-keeping and came from one of the (second cla-ss counties (Shropshire, I believe)." This, let it be said at once, is a cruel thrust, which Proud Salopians have every reason to resent. To them, at any rate, Shropshire is no second class" county; and, if it comes to that, why should it be considered contempt- able to talk about poultry-keeping? It is, at any rate in these days, as profitable an occu- pation as you can discuss, and even those Lancashire men who sometimes condescend to come and fish in our Welsh border rivers at this time of year are seldom above eating scrambled eggs as scrambled eggs can be pre- pared in a hospitable Shropshire inn. There are certain officers in some Lancashire regi- ments in a Shropshire camp who, when they visit the club house of an adj acent golf links, not a hundred miles from Oswestry, have been known to devour as many as—but why tell < » < How Salopians came to be credited with their proverbial pride I confess I do not II' at the moment remember, and a hasty glance at such references as lie on my shelves- (in- cluding Bye-Gones ") has not brought me I any light on the subject. But it is quite clear that a certain sense of (no doubt justifiable) self-satisfaction has long been an ingredient of the Shropshire character, for as far back as 1750, it was announced in Woolfall's famous journal, the General Advertiser," that Those Gentlemen that are Natives of, or have an Interest in, the County of Salop, I are requested to meet their Friends on Thursday next, the 4th Instant, at Seven in I the Evening, at the Pope's Head Tavern, j in Cornhill, it being their monthly Meeting. Every Gentleman is more particularlv de-s slr'd to be present on this Night, as some Regulations are then intended to be made towards carrying on this Amicable and Laudable Society, to the universal Satis- faction of the Members thereof. Record doth not reveal what those Regula- tions were, but I think we may conclude that those present did themselves well," that a due sense of the importance of the occasion pervaded the ceremony, and that the com. pany, having duly toasted themselves and "All friends round the Wrekin," parted with the entirely pleasing impression that there was no county like Shropshire in all the wide world. A Shropshire Society in London still exists, and though its members no longer as- semble in the inspiring atmosphere of a Corn- hill Tavern, but have their headquarters in the more spacious purlieus of Whitehall Court (unless they have been commandeered by the Government), its aim is no less amicable and laudable than of yore, of providing a rally- ing point at which Salopian exiles in the metropolis can foregather to exchange the old expressions of "satisfaction" "On being Shropshire men." < < And I, for one, would not write a single syllable of censure on any wholesome species of county pride. Not, of course, that one wants to see society composed entirely of water- tight compartments, and when, some years ago, we were invited to regard A Shropshire man for Shropshire as a superior electoral cry than any other, some of us, I think, felt that even the most amiable parochialisation of political outlook could, on occasion, be pressed too far. At times it does us good to look and even leap over the barriers, and some deep, significance, in this respect. lies I; in the recent saying of the great Ambassador who, it was last week announced to the uni- I versal regret was obliged to abandon the post he has filled so well, owing to ill-health, that there is no such thing as the American colony fn London, thank God we mingle with our British friends." Yet, the war, which has widened our horizon's in many ways, has also given us welcome opportunities of glory- ing specially in our own lads," As the War Office has from time to time lifted just a. ittle the veil which hangs over the battle line and told us how this county regiment anS that, in- cluding our own gallant R.S.L.I. and R.W.F., have won fresh laurels in the great festival of heroism, we have walked our county road Sf i?M Sik??ts wi& hew mn.a.tion ?h? ;Vitjm??,8. j ed a new beauty in the hills and dales, i-te historic buildings, the farmsteads and the cottages, which these sons of our shires are fighting to defend. Lancashire men, Shrop- shire men, men of practically every county in England and Wales, you have good reason to pen your articles to-day, and heaven, 1 be- lieve, will readily forgive you if you are in- clined to pitch them in the major key. For, from one end of the land to the other there are stories to tell, and as we read them, chapter by chapter, we may well be inclined —no matter to which county we more partic- ularly belong-to inscribe on the final page, a united and comprehensive note of pride On being an Englishman," I A PHILOSOPHER ON THB PROWL. —

I CORRESPONDENCE I

I CORRESPONDENCE. ftrf 110 NOT "CeiREARIIII Inp Ill! 1KB OPINIONS vxragssrb at WIUTARS ;N TIUS I THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST PRESIDENT AND TEMPERANCE. giit,-In your report of the Primitive Method- j ist Conference, held in Oswestry last, week, the President referred to the national control of Mil- ways and certain industries, which had been found necessary during the war, and ventured to suygesfc that still further control would be exercised in future. Referring to public houses, he is reported to have sa.id: More drastic treat- ment might yet be to come." Certainly, as things are at present, anythinJit may happen things ar4l at precent, an, under the powers of the D.O.R.A., but eventu- ally the will of tihe people will prevail. The present restrictions in the beer output It not in the interests of true temperance. Owing to the scarcity of beer men are being driven to stronger liquors to which they are nn. accustomed in place of the harmless beer, which is ae necessary to a large majority as is the imi- versal cup of tea. To quote Dr. Charles Mercier. M.D.. F.R.C.P.. from an address delivered be- fore the Midland Medical Society on October 31, 1912: A l&r?e proportion of our people of all erases not onlir never Take too much, but also find The moderate amount they fake keeps them in better health. enables them to digest food better, to sleep better, and to do more work than if they went without." Unless he has some idiosyrtcracy, a man who is engaged in strenuous and laborious muscular I exertion is refreshed and invigorated when j fatigue begins by a glass of beer. and is better j able to continue his labour. and generally the eupreme value of a dose of alcohol in enabling a man in an emergency to get the last ounce of energy out of himself is too well established. By all means let us be t-Pmperate in all things ¡ and denT to no man that whidh is benencial to j his beinsr.—I am, etc., A MBMMm or THB TRUE TEMPS*AKOE j AeóCIATIÖl' CHEESE. I SIR.—Working men want cheese and cannot do without it. It is the staple lunch for the man in the field. Yet local farmetis. cheesemakers, are com- pelled to send 'their cli-e-ese 50 rnil" away to a stipulated facts*?, and to cease dealing with the factor who has bought it for years. If such farmers want- cheese for their men the carriage has to be paid back. This it not economy or ,hai; t-o bp, paid ?,aok. Thi,4 it not. economy or I am told some hundreds of cheese made on I the niiiek-ripening system are lying a;t a, little town near Shrewsbury rotting because somebodv lt&a leoftrmandeered them who does not under- stand the difference between quick and slow ripening cheese. The cheese business is very badly managed.— I am, etc., J ORN: PTOTTGHMAX.

No title

The Local Government Board have issued j a memorandum notifying the postponement of 1 the election of municipal aldermen and coun- cillors for another year.

Advertising

Working in the Wet Caused Chill on the Kidneys and Bladder. Then Dropsy Set in. In 1901, Mr. W, Dean, of 36. Beechfield Road, Doncaater, lay helplees for two months through kidney complications, and was told he could not work again." "Working in the wet began the he explained. It caused a chill and led to bladder disorder and backache. Then inflammation of the kidneys set in followed by an almost suffocating attack of renal dropsy. From heåld to foot I was swollen be- yond recognition. I was only kept. goirw by sips of milk, and there seemed to be no hope for me. Yet I made a wonderful recovery, for when at my lowest ebb, 1 was advised to try Doan's Backache Kidney Pills. "Thiil medicine overcame all obstructions the T),tins left my back, the ur inary flow in- I creased, and the dropsy gradually subsided. Be- I fore six weeks had passed I was absolutely well ajrain. Thanks to Doan's Pills I am back at work and never felt beltter in my life. (Signed) W. Dean." More than 16 Years Well. Chi January 7th, 1916, Mr. Dean hid :_U Am doing my bit' at war-work now, and busy all hours or the day. I maintain the splendid health Doan'* Pills restored to me, over sitteen years ago. ? enM/rt ?A? ?? j?? 

1 THE CHURCHES 1

1, THE CHURCHES. 1 II CHURCH SELF GOVERN- I I MENT, II PROBLEMS DISCUSSED AT OSWESTRY MEETING. I The Rev. M. B. Lutener, vicar of Oswestry, presided over a representative gathering of Churchpeople at the Church -House, Oswestry, on Wednesday of last week, to discuss problems of Church self-government and the Life and Liberty Movement. In opening the proceedings the Vicar said that, if the meeting I was to be of any real value, there should be I some way of giving permanency to its con- clusion's, and they required some simple fonn of j association in the parish willing to give active help; and he thought the most useful association was the Life and Liberty Movement. At the ? same time he pointed out that three societies specially aimed at furthering their ends—the j Church Self Government Association, which I exists for the simple purpose of pressing for an I enabling bill on the lines recommended by the j Archbishops' Committee; the Church Reform I League, concerned with the remedy of abuses, j and ihF§ Life and Liberty movement, I wider and more general in its obj ect, which wa.s j j to secure full expression end freedom for the new life Stirring in the church at the present time, land it also urged action, ae soon as possible, on • the lines of the Archbishops' report. Let people 1 enrol themselves in one or other of these 1 .societies, and they desired to avoid discussion as to the comparative merito of either. I I CHANGE BOUND TO COME. The Rev. E. G. Selwyn, C.F. (late headmastcr I | of Radley), then spoke on the steps which The Life and Liberry movement is trying to further. There was, he aaid. a feeling tiha/t- change was [bound to come. and all the three association to which the Vicar had alluded were signs of the ittimes, and if they were aeked, "What lies be- hind them the answer would be two things, of which the first was the growing self-conscious- ineee -of the church during past fifty years and the increasing difficulty of adequately ex- !pressing- their needs because the work of Par- liament had become increasingly congested, and they found it more and more difficult to get laws through Parliament, and a solution was suggest- ed of some sort of federal system for the British Me*. Inevitably, a Church question when it came up in the House of Commons did not st.,and much chance, and he quoted statistics to show how small was the percentage of Church Bills that were passed. So they were faced with the •growing self-consciousness of the Church and the increasing difficulty of getting any Church Bill j tfchrough Parliament. Wherein lay the remedy? Let him say at once he regarded both from a national and a Church point of view with the greatest reluctance disestablishment as a way out of the difficulty. He a.sked them to con- sider in detail the proposals made in the Arch- bishops' reports, in which a scheme was pro- pounded that promised to provide a satisfactory I solution. Whilst providing for thoroughly re- presentative church assemblies, on a democratic j basis, it also suggested a means of expediting the adoption of Church Nieaeurst by Parliament, and he proceeded to allude to directions in which the efforts of Churchmen might turn in the direc- ttion of sec urine reforms when once they were assured that efiect would be more readily given to their decision. THE UNCHANGEABLE COMMA. At present they could not effect 'he I slightest- re'form--t.hey could not even rnange, a comma in the Prayer Book—without an Act of Parliament that, in existing conditions, it was ¡ impossible to obtain. Amongst other things he thought the division of a diocese that was too l&rsre should be within the Tyower of the Church. There waa a. bishop near there who annually published the number of letters he xvrote and the miles lie travelled, and they were immense, and the, figures proved not only his own energy and capacity but. that his diocese was too large, and,that it should be divided. Again, he thought it wite only fair -that parishioners should have something to say to the appointment of the parish priest; after all they had to live with him I .f had to live -mit7q Iiim as well as hA with them; and having alluded to Other directions in which reforms await an op- portunity of treatment, the speaker said that 'the present was the time to grapple with the j auestion. and he did not think the Church would be found wanting. THE VICAR'S VIEWS. I At the close or a discussion in. wmch several I' •uggestions were thrown out—ftfoe most notable that a further meeting be called on the object eo tha.?, in the interval, parishioners might study and inform themselves r&?&r

OBITUARY

OBITUARY. ) THE LATE REV. J. PRYCE DAVIES, 1 CHESTER. The death was announced, on Friday, of the Rev. J. Pryce Davies, M.A., of Belmont, Cambrian View, Chester, former pastor of the Calvinistic Methodist Church, St. John St., Chester. He wag born at Llanechill, Carnar- vonshire, and was educated at the British School thewe, then at Garth School, and after- wards at the Normal College, Bangor, where he qualified for the teaching profession. For a. time he had charge of a school at Llandder- fel. Subsequently he entered Bala College. He graduated M.A. at Edinburgh, and joined the ministry of the Calvinistic Methodist Church. His first pastorate was in Carnar- i vonshire. He came to St. John Street Church at Chester as pastor in 1876, and remained there until his retirement in 1909. Some years before his retirement he visited the Uriite(f States to attend, on behalf of his de- nomination the Pan-Presbyterian Council. He is survived by two sons and two daughters. His elder son is in America, and the younger son, Dr. James Pryce Davies, is on active ser- vice.- The elder daughter was married to Mr. W. R. Roberts, who some years ago was High Sheriff of Denbighshire, and the younger daughter is the wife of Major -M Cullagh, r King's (Liverpool Regiment]. I

I j Soldiers Death

j Soldier's Death. t BETTISFIELD SPORTS FATALITY, At Prees Heath Military Hospital on (I.a.v week, Mr. Coroner 6arside held inquests concerning the death of three soldiers, two from Shaw bury, and the other a soldier from Bettisfield. There was no jury. He first in- quired into the circumstances attending the death of Robert Albert Smallman-Smith, aged 19, a driver in the R.F.A., Bettisfield, whose home is at Greenwich. Evidence of identification was given bv the deceased's father, Pte. John Smith, wlio is stationed at Wein. He said that his son took part in sports held at Bettlsfield. on August 5, and met with an accident. He died in the hospital on Sunday. Deceased toM him that he slipped, off the gun limber, and that it was quite an accident. Driver Henrv Godfrey iReeve, R.F.A., Bettisfield, stated that on August 5th they had camp sports. Deceased had entered for the gas alarm race. Two men were on the limber, and. the deceased was one of the detachment in this race. Smith was riding on the, limber. The team had harnessed up and were going into action in a canter, and when going over some rough ground the off-wheel dropped into a hole tmd Smith was thrown off the limber, and the gun-wheel passed over his bodr, He waa immediateV picked up, badly hurt, and. was taken to hospital, and subsequently to Pree« Heath, It was a pure accident.—Major Dr- Grav Newton, R.A.M.C., stated that de- ceased did. on the 26ta as a result of shock following fracturc of the pelvis bone and rupture of the urethra.-The Coroner ex- pressed. his sympathy at what, he concluded was an accident.—Major Bertram J. F'. Ford, who was in command of Smith's battery, wrote tendering to the parents and relatives the deep sympathy and condolence of every officer, N.C.O. and men in C Battery., The accident happened through the splendid keen- ness of this man to win the gas alarm race for his battery, and had it not happened un- doubtedly the race would have been won,—t Verd-ict, "Accidental death."

ELLESMERE

ELLESMERE. PRESENTATION.Mr. John Bellingham, Kenwick's Park, who has been connected with the Primitive Methodist cause at Lee Bridges for a long time was, in view of his forthcoming marriage to Miss Ellen Williams, Lee Bridges, presented on Wednesday evening, of last week with a tea service, and his daughter, Mrs. Fanny Jones who, previous to her recent marriage, for some time had acted as accompanist in the Lee Bridges chapel, was presented with a similar gift in acknowledgment of her services. Mr. and Mrs. T. Lea, The Springs, also generously presented both Miss Williams and Mrs. Jones with Bibles. The Rev. J. E. OgcLsn, the 'newly-appointed superintendent minister, made the presentation.

No title

Nottingham is suffering from a plague of mosquitoes. William Share, a Birmingham butcher, re ports to the police the loss of £ 2,000 in nk notes. The notes were rolled up together in his pocket. He spent some time in a hostelry with companions, and on returning home found the notes missing.

Advertising

Failure ofthe Nerves. NERVE PARALYSIS, OF FIVE YEARS STANDING, QUITE CURED BY DR. CASSELL'S TABLETS. It is the wonderful nerve nourishing power of Dr. Cassell's Tableta that enables them t, cure cases such as the following:—:— Mr. Robert W. Siokley, 20, Milton-street I Womb well, near Barnsley, ,%ays: For ovei five years I suffered with Nerve Paralysis. M\ right side from the arm to the foot was c-om pletely paralysed; I had to go with a stick. trailing my leg ao, though it were dead. Medical treatment proved useless in my case, and there seemed no hope of any cure. In fact, I waa given up as unfit ever to Work again, a.nd after five Yeg-r6 of helplessness I was of the same opinion myself. But one day I was advised to try Dr. Cassell's Tablets, and very soon I began to feel the bene- fit. Feeling and power gradually returned *,•> my leg, and I found I could walk a little with- out tihe stick. Then I managed to cross the street, a.nd so it. went on till now I am strong and well and bade in my old employment." Dr. Oassell's Tablets are the proved Remedy for Nervous Breakdown Nerve Paralysis Spinal Weakness Infantile Paralysis Neurasthenia Sleeplessness Ansemia Kidney Trouble Indigestion Wasting Diseases Palpitation Vital Exhaustion Specially valuable for Nursing Mothers aad during the Critical Periods of Life. Sold by Chemists and Stores in all parts of the world, including Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Afrioa, a.nd India. Prices: Is., Is. 34.. and 3a. (the 3a. size being 'the most eomoui"