Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
CONFERRED BY THE KING OF ITALY MILITARY ORDER OF SAVOY COMMANDER

CONFERRED BY THE KING OF ITALY. MILITARY ORDER OF SAVOY COMMANDER. Lt.-Gen. (temp. Gen.) F. R., Earl of Cavan, K.P., K.C.B., M.V.O., brother of the Rev. rhe Hon. E. E. Lamb art, Archdeacon of Salop. He has also been L-varded the Croce di Guerra. CONFERRED BY THE KING OF ITALY. SILVER MEDAL FOR MILITARY VALOUR. Bt.-Maj. (acting Lt.-Col.) Wm. Geo. Holmes, D.S.O., R.W. Fus., son of Mr. Geo. Holmes, Brooke Hall, Norfolk, by his marr- iage with Ella, eldest daughter of Mr. J. Pitcairu Campbell, of Burton Hall, Rossett. Sec. Lt. W. P. Kenyon, R.W. Fus., son of Capt. E. A. Kenyon, Burnell House, Shrews- bury, and nephew of Mr. R. Lloyd Kenyon, Pradoe. He was educated at Sandhurst and was commissioned in May, 1917. MILITARY CROSS. Capt. Walter Jones, R.W.F., son of Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Jones, Elm Grove, Wrexham, for gallantry in the field. He was woundød just before the armistice. MILITARY MEDAL. L.-Cpl. A. Davies, K.S.L.I., son of Mrs. J. Da,vies, 11, Cambrian Place, Oswestry, for bravery on the battle field. Pt. Llewelyn Edwards, Welsh Guards, brother of Mr. E. Edwards, City House, Four Crosses, and formerly a P.C. stationed at Wrexham.

Military Appointments

Military Appointments. Bt, Lt.-Col. J.* R. M. Minshull-Ford, M.C R.W. Fus., who formerly lived at Oteley House, Wrexham, relinquishes the temporary rank of Brig.-Gen. on ceasing to command a brigade, Nov. d. Bt. Lt.-Col. H. H. S. Rogers, D.S.O, Shrops. L.I., from Dep. Prov.-Marshal (CI. X), is gazetted Prov. Marshal (Cl. S.), and to be temporary Brig.-Gen. while so em- ployed, Oct. 27. He was recently awarded the Croi± d'Offieier. Maj. J. C. Pery-Knox-Gore, D.S.O., M.C., R.A., is gazetted Brig. Major, Oct. 1. Maj. Hon. H. G. O. Bridgeman, D.S.O., M.C., R.F.A., youngest son of the fourth Earl of Bradford, is.gazetted acting Lt.-Col. while commanding a Brigade, R.F.A. (T.F.), Nov. S. Temp. Maj. (act. Lt.-Col.) Hugh Lloyd Wil- liams, D.S.Ö., M.C., third son of Mr. John Williams, Claremont, Bangor, relinquishes the acting rank of Lt.-Col. on ceasing to com- mand a battalion, 'July 27. Temp Capt. C. F. K. Mainwaring, of Ote, ley, Ellesmere, from Tank Corps, to ue temp. 1 Capt. with Prisoners of War Camp, Aug. 10 1917. Temp. Sec. Lt. O. Armes, 4th Batt. R.W.F., Volunteer Force, relinquishes his commission Nov. 10.

League of Nations

League of Nations. TRIPLE ALLIANCE OF PEACE, A well-attended, public meeting was held in the Assembly Rooms, Arthur-street, Oswes- try, on Friday, under the presidency of the Mayor (Councillor Wm. Morris), who was supported by the Rev. M. B. L'utener, Eben. Evans, E. Williams, T. Little, H. E. Grif- fith, J. J. Poynter, Evan Roberts, and Mr. W. H. C. Jemmett. The Mayor, in addressing the meeting, men- tioned how fortunate he had been since he came into office of having a broad and united platform, and said how appropriate it was that a meeting which had for its discussion the great and important question of "The League of Nations" should have a Coali- tion" platform. He pointed out that the neeting was in no sense political. Mr. T. Stanley Roberts, M.A., Professor' if History, University College of Wales, Aber- ystwyth, after alluding to the lessons taught in the rough school of war, asked what of the campaign that would follow when peace was proclaimed? Until business is mad-e honest, and commercial life moralized, war will go on. Trying to do somebody in life is, Professor Roberts's summary of the life of a large number of the population. If we intend to be true advocates of a League of Nations we must begin with ourselves. A League of Nations will have to have behind it a force to make the disobedent obey and ready for any emergency which may arise. An agreement already exists between Great Britain and the United States that they will never wage war on one another, and now perhaps France could be persuaded to join the other two. Every question of (lifficulty or dispute to be referred to arbitration and the decision abided by. That would be the beginning of a League, of Nations, If any country threatened war then Britain, United States and France would boycott that nation and, leave it helpless. The British Empire as it exists to-day is in itself » League of Nations, inasmuch as it keeps 400,000,000 people at peace, Before Britain tan enter into a League of Nations, an authority must be created which can speak for the Tvhole of the British Empire, other- wise our League of Nations will have the in- herent weakness 'that parta of the British Empire may separate from the mother country. It is there we must begin our League üf Nations, seconded by maintaining our alli- ance with the United States of America, thirdly by trying to persuade France to own our alliance on the same terms and follow on in that course, and trust that-we have done what is best for removing the horrors of war. The Rev. Even. Evans moved, That this meeting is in full sympathy with the move- ment towards a League of Nations." This was seconded by the Rev. Evan Roberts, sup- ported by the Rev. M. B. Lutener, and car- ried unanimously. Some discussion followed, and the meeting closed with the' usual votes of thanks to the speaker and. Chairman.

No title

About fifty employees of the Cambrian Railways Company have been killed during the war. Mr. J. H. Thomas, at Cardiff, referred to Mr. Lloyd George's Newcastle speech, and said he .protested against the dragging in of .he King s name. He believed the King, who knew no politics, would be as fair to the Labour Parrv as of the ftther parties.

Welshpool Mans Experiences

Welshpool Man's Experiences. STORIES OF GERMAN BRUTALITY j The second Welshpool prisoner of war to return reached home on Monday evening in the person of Pte. William Bray, South Staf- fordshire Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bray, 8, Cumberland Place. He joined the army in November, 1916, and went to France in the following October. He saw consider- able fighting in the La Bassee region, and was moved. to the Somme during the German offensive in March. He came through the very severe- fighting unscathed, and his batta- lion was then sent to Messines, which was then quiet, for a rest. The rest proved an illusion. Pte. Bray and eight others were detailed to hold an advanced post. They went in on April 9th, and returned from a night working party about two o'clock. Soon after the Germans commenced a hot bom- bardment and our front line retired. This j movement was observed, bv the men in the j post but orders to retire failed to reach them, and after a hard fight they were, surrounded i and captured. I REVOLTING CRUELTY. I Pte. Bray related his experiences after cap- ture to an "Advertizer" repregeiitativeff and,' his story confirms the view that brutality is. a feature of the Germans as a body. He said I they were taken to Hallwin, just behind the lines, and were kept there for three months. Their work consisted of making ration dumps and unloading barges. They had to walk I fourteen kilometers to and, from work, and this necessitated getting up at three o'clock in the morning. Their food consisted of a third of a loaf, watery soup and coffee. There was no solid food, and their sleeping quarters were a disused factory with straw bedding and one blanket each. The work was very hard to men weakened by want of food, but no con- sideration was shown to them. It, was all "drive." One prisoner was so weak that he could not wheel what was considered a sum- ciently big load, in his barrow. One of the German sentries loaded it for him, and be- cause he was too weak to move it he kicked him in the body. He was laid out for hours and suffered great agony. It is only fair to say that a corporal, more decent than the general run of Germans, took the sentry away. I A STRIKING COMPARISON. I The butt-ends of the rifles were kept in very active use by the Germans, and the prisoners suffered a severe trouncing for such an offence as attempting to pick up a cigar- ette eiid-eb coveted article to a man who had been without a smoke for many weeks. In this connection it should be noted the prison- ers in this country are to be seen every day comfortably lolling in their seats in a. railway carriage or sitting on a wagon puffing away at pipes and cigarettes. An attempt to get a mangold would also let the unfortunate prisoners in for blows from a rifle. So great was the craving for food, that our men collected all the nettles and dande- lions they could find. [ MADNESS AND DEATH. I Many men went mad and many more died. There was n<> provision for medical treat- ment, and for a long time there was no oppor- tunity for a bath, so that the hapless prisoners suffered tortures from their verminous condi- tion and troubles brought on by lack of a proper and varied diet. Later, Pte. Bray moved to Wambruches, furtl r back from the fighting line, and. was employed on munition dump making. After a pa? here prisoners with a knowledge of horse; were called for, and he was one oi 200 men who moved to a place near Antwerp, to 'a camp for sick horses. I CHANGE FOR THE BETTER. Their lot now changed for the better, as they were amongst Belgian civilians,- who gave then toup and other food and did their washing for them. There was always a bit of bread to be had, and altogether, through the kindness of the Belgians, their oosition was greatly improved. On the Wednesday following the armistice the Germans marched them for three days towards the Dutch fron- tier, but ilrcing that they could not cross the Germeiis left them. They tramped to Moll, "tilchtbe) found in a state of hila.io-s jaymakin. Bands were playing uid the populace merrily' dancing in the i-ircets They slayd here one night, and then took tram to Ar.twerp. Everything possible was done to ui;ike them comfortable, and ¡tHr a short stav they wgnt to Ghent and tt,,e,i to ,!3rLiges. they took train 1.) ("sums. They vere g:\en a fine. reception, and had a very good time. Finally, they crossed to Dc- i er. GERMAN fc; WITH FRENCH MEDALS. I Th" treatment generally was very bad, added Pt. Bray, though they did. better to- wards the end, because they were amongst the civilians. The Saxons treated them far bet- ter than the other Germans, and they were particularly fortunate at one time in having as foremen soldiers from Alsace-Lorraine. One of these menaid that although he wore German uniform at heart he was a French- man, and he took great pride in French medals won in years gone by by members of the family. He and his fellows did all they could to ease the sufferings of the British. One of the German guards was a Notting- ham lace-maker. He said he had many friends in Nottingham, and looked, forward to return- ing after the war. The Germans who could speak English were better than the others. Pte; Bray commented sarcastically on the j treatment of German prisoners in this coun- try, and said he would like to be put over them for a little. Another suggestion was that those who slobber over the Germans I should be sent to Germany for a spell.

No title

Mr. Asquith, speaking at Huddersfield/'cn Thursday, again protested against the holding of the election at. the present time, and de- scribed it as a great blunder. He went on, io deprecate very strongly the mode of selection of candidates by the Coalition, the leaders of which had barred men who had supported the progress of the war most earnestly, some of whom, indeed, had been in the fight and had risked their lives. There was a new elector- ate, many of the men most entitled to vote would either not have a chance to vote or would have to do so in the dark. It would mean a House of Commons without authority, criticism would be gagged, and the freedom for which we bad been fighting abroaa- would he imperilled nt hop"-

I REV EVAN EDWARDS CF j I

I REV. EVAN EDWARDS, C.F. j [ The death occurred on Nov. 27, from pneu- monia, at Tidworth Camp, Hants., of the Rev. Evan Edwards, C.F. Born in Liverpool iu 1885, he was trained at Bala-Bangor College, and ordained in Christ Church, Oswestry, as assistant minister for the village branch churches of Carneddau and Maesbury in Nov., 1912, continuing in that position, periodically taking services in town and fulfilling his share 5 of the duties connected with the Free Churcn minist-ers* Fraternal," the Oswestry -e Church Council and the Shropshire Congrega- tional Union with great fidelity and zeal, in- til on receiving a unanimous call to the pastor- ate of the Congregational Church at 're- brook, near Mansfield, he settled there in 'August, 1915, and did excellent work. fooa I after the outbreak of war, he was s. ciepte d by the Y.M.C.A. for service in France, served his period, and had quite recently been ap' pointed chaplain under the Navy and Army Board, proceeding to Tidworth Camp, here, after a few days' illness, he passed away gently in sleep. In August, 1915, he nArrlo4 Miss Gladys James, only daughter of the esteemed postmaster of Oswestry, and wide sympathy will be felt with her and her retle daughter in their bereavement. At the monthly church meeting at Christ Church I,n Thursday, a resolution of deep sympathy was submitted by the minister, seconded by Mro P. H. Minshall, senior deacon, and carried in silence, followed by special prayer. The funeral took place on Saturday, at Aintree. On the route from the barracks to the station at Tidworth, the coffin had been borne on a gun carriage, and accompanied by the garri- son band an d six Australian officers who act- ed as pall bearers, and the Rev. W. P. Read, C.F. Amongst others present in addition to members of both families, including -Mr. and Mrs. James, were, from Oswestry, Rev. J. J. Poynter, who took the service in the l ouse, Rev. Evan Roberts, J. Wesley Whitn ore, E. J. Evans, who had baptized Mr. Edwards, R-ev. J. H- Ferguson, who took the committal service at the grave and gave a short eulo- gistic address, Rev. A. Diamond, and Messrs. Rawlings and Old, special representatives from the church who, with numerous relatives and friends, military officers of Tidworth, brought or sent beautiful floral tributes. MR. JOHN H. EDWARDS, SOUTHSEA. I Mr. John H. Edwards, Tycelyn Farm, Southsea, died, on November 24. Mr. Edwards had been ill for a fortnight, and succumbed to an attack of pneumonia. He was, the son of the late Mr. Joseph Edwards, well known in the Wrexbam district as one of the founders of the Farpers' Association, after whose death the farm was carried on by the deceased and his only sister, Miss Gwladys Edwards, with whom much sympathy is felt throughout the district. The funeral took place at Wrexham cemetery on Wednesday.

Oswestry Prisoners ReturnI

Oswestry Prisoners Return. I THEIR EXPERIENCES IN GERMANY. Amongst the prisoners oi war released irom Ger- I many are two Oswestry Wys who reached their homes on Monday week. One is Pte. Arnold H. Howe, Kmg'6 Liverpool R?gt., only son of Mr. H. H. Howe, Boft Street, manager of the American Oil Company, and the late inirs. Howe, and the other is Pte. W. Manser, Scots Guards, eldest son of Mr. Manors," Victoria Street. Pte. Mansers was captured in Nov. '914, and left Germany on April this year, when he was takep to Holland, from where he Was repatriated and arrived in England on Nov. 17. His constitution has suffered considerably by the trying conditions of his life for the past four years. Pte. Howe arrived in HuU on the Archangel on Saturday week, in company with a large number of repatriated soldiers and was conveyed thence to Ripon. He joined up on Feb. 17, 1917, received his training at Prees Heath -Camp and the East Coast and was later drafted to France. He was wounded and taken prisoiier4 on Nov. 30, 1917, afc EJpehy. and was taken with his fellow prisoners to Le Quesnoy, and later to Dulmen,, in Germany. The journey into Germany Pte. Howe de- scribed as awful, abcui forty men being crowded into one cattle truck. Ile was detained in hospital several weeks during which time he hard little or no treat- ment. On recovering Pte. Howe was taken to Tournai with other! and worked there and at other towns in France and Belgium until released. Their employ- ment was varied, joiners, labourers, assisting at tel- ephone works,- etc., and latterly at a horse hospital in Valenciennes. Asked as to the food Pte. Howe stated that he and his fellow prisoners had a daily ration of i lb. of black bread and a little soup, and occasionally sausage, which was as hard as stone* and quite unfit to eat. He also said that he had to thank the parcels received from home for keeping him alive. These he received fairly regularly, be'ng under the supervision of the Red Cross Society, but the Germans used to keep some t £ sf them for their cv u use. He was allowed to write two letters and v-o post- cards home each month. In the earlier stages of their imprisonment their treatment was very bad, their guards hustling them at their Work, but latterly it had improved. Pte. Howe Ipoke very highly of I the kindness of the inhabitants of a French town '¡' who often gave them food. The news of the armistice he "aid was hailed with del'ght by the German sol- diers. He'is now in fairly good health and is home on two months' leave.

Advertising

THE FTEAL WELSti CURE ImEnl .nMtM 1 CURES S?HffJ COUdS&CdlDSl Invalu?blo inthe Nur..r7 HH Bottles 1/3 and 5 » Hi OF ALL CHBMISTS AND STORES, FLNL

THE ROLL F HONOURI

THE ROLL §F HONOUR, I OFFICERS I JU¡,uD.. Woolley, Sec.-Lieut., W. L., 8.W.B. Previously reported wounded and missing on Sept. 22, has been killed L. action in the Balkans. He was the second son of Mr 'and Mrs. E. T. Woolley, of the Halod, Ruabort, and before joining the army was albeclkal student at Liverpool University and had passed his first M.]3. examination, 1k ws* only 19 years of age. I DIED. Maule, Capt. Geoffrey Lamb, R.A.M.C, Only son of the late Dr. William Maule and Mrlt. I Maule, of Birkdale, and only grandson of Mr. Jaa. Lamb, of Manchester. He was educated at Sfcxenw- Oury and Christ's College, Cambridge. I DIED OF WOUNDS. Evans, Sec.-Lieut. Noel Everarll, R.F.A. Younger son of the Rev. and Mrs. E. James Evans, of Trillo Vicarage, Colwyn Bay, and formerly of Chirk, and grandson of Major T. Everard Huttoa (one of the Six Hundred"), died of wounds at Rouen on Armistice Day. He was only 19 years of age, and was educated at Rhos-on-Sea Preparatory School and Llandovery College. He obtained his "commission in the RoyaJ Field Artillery in June, 1915, and proceeded to France in September, where he was posted to the 5th Division (27th Briga.de) in which his brother, Major Morgan P. Evans, M.G., has served since 1914. Lieut. Evans was a fine ath- lete and excelled as a threesquarter Rugger, playing for his school and also for the Cadets while in train- ing at Exeter. At Llandovery he established a record in athletics, carrying off practically all the prizes in the annual sports in 1916 and 1917. He was a free scorer in the Rugby XV. Playing against Brecon to 1916 he scored seven tries. r Percival, See.-Lieut. Only son of Mrs. Percival, of Hafod House, Euabon, -who f|ll while leading his men into action. Lieut. Percival enlisted in Sept. 1914, in the E.S.L.I. but was transferred to the K.O.Y.L.I., and had gone to France for the third pea-iod on Oct, 1st, and fell on the :4,,>. N C.Q'S, AND MEN KILLED. Allen, Pte. Fred, K.S.L.I. Youngest son of Mrs. Mary Allen, Charlotte Row, Ellesmere, was 26 years of age. He was killed in action only a. few days before the signing of tha armistice. He joined up Sept. 1, 1914, in the first battalion of volunteers in the K.S.L.I., had been on the western front since the Spring of 1916, and had been wounded three times. A Wesleyan C.F. in a sympathetic letter to his wife, to whom he had only been married since Sept., said that be (the chaplain) was only & few yards from him when he was killed. He dame out of the line before the battalion, and just as he arrived at Headquarters in the village of Bry, a shell burst and wounded eight and killed an officer and two men. He (the chaplain) buried him the next day, about a hun- dred of his comrades gathered round and they had a simple service. Before leaving the village they erected a wooden cross, and made the grave as nie. as tbey possibly could. I J. Pte. John Richard, K.S.L.I. Eldest son of Mr. and MSrs. J. T, Jones, 16, Signal Terrace, Oswestry, waa killed in action on Nov. 3, altar fcur years and three months service in Hong Kong, India amd France. Before enlistment he was employed by Mr. W. H, Corbett, Salop Road, for three years. Th's is the second son they have lost in the war. their second son, Pte, Geo. Henry Jones, fell on August 8 last. Kirk, Pte. George, 1/8 Lancashire Fusiliers. Son of Mr. and MTS, Kirk, Brook Villa. Wstün Oswestry, wa? killed in action on October 28, at the age of 19, Before joinlug up he was employed by Ilitssip. Birch and Jones, Bailey Street, Oswestry- Mayes, Pte. Percy J., Manchester Regt. Husband of Mrs. G. G. Mayes, second daughter of Mr, and Mrs, Bebington, Chapel House, Chapel Street, Oswestry, was kil'ed in action ia France on Oct. 9, whilst assistjng a comrade. Roberts, Pte. David, R. W.F. Son of Mrs. E. Roberts and the late Mr. Roberts, of 15, Fairfield Street, Wrexham, was killed in action on October 31, in France. He was nearly 21 years of age, and prior to enlistment worked at Gresford colliery. Eighteen months ago he enlisted and had served in Ireland, Egypt, Palestine and France. • Williams, Pte. R. H. Son of Mr. and Mrs. T. H, Williams, Delfryn House, Fennant Road, Rhos. Davies, Pte. P..1., r.. Son of Mr. and Mrs. 1!4 Davies, 39, Orchard St., Oswestry, died on Nov. 7, at his home While on leave Irgm France. Tho particulars of his death are very sad, as he caly came from; France a few days prior to his death, and at the time of his death was awaiting his discharge from the army. He joined the army in ISept, 1915, and was wounded on the Somme. He was buried in the Oswestrr Cemetery on Nov. 11, wish full military honours, the firing party and bug"era being provided from the Inniskilling Fusiliers, Park Hall Camp. The chief mourners were the father, sister and brothers. He was formerly employed at Brynkinalt Collieries, Chirk. > Edwards, Gunner Arthur Wynn Official news has been-received of the death from pneumonia of Gunner Arthur Wynn Edwards, Royal Garrison Artillery, eldest son of the late Mr. J. R. Edwards, Star Inn, Llangollen, and Mrs. Ed- wards, 62, Pool Road, Oswestry He had taken part in some of the most severe fighting both on tha Salonica and Egyptian front the last 2J years, coming out unhurt. He was a Very keen athlete, and only recently took two prizes in hi* battery sports in Palestine. Edwards, Pte. Alfred Son of Mrs. Alfred Edwards, of 14, Bark Hill, Whitchurch, died Nov. 21, in Curragh Oamp Hos- pital at the age of 31. Deceased, who leaves a widow a.nd five children, was formerly employed at" Terdick Hall and at the Rectory, and just befora he joined the army in November, 1914, he was iii- ployed in the Gas Works. On Tuesday week ha mortal remains of the soldier were laid to re; a Whitchurch Cemetery with full military hoi) The funeral service in the Parish Church w", Ji:t.. ducted by the Rector, the Rev. S. Dugdale. or C T. Dugdale, an officer in the deceased's ii uti attended the funeral, at which there were friends present, as well as the members ot tha deceased's family. The coffin was covered withi beautiful wreath Southern, Pte. Joseph, M.G.C. Sou of Mr. and Mrs. Southern, 7, Oakhurst Road, Oswestry, died in the. Military Hospital, Grantham, on Nov. 19, of pneumona. after only a few days illness. He was 26 years of age and leaves a widow and one child. He had seen much service abroad. The funeral took place at Barrowby on Nov. 21st, with full military honours. OIBD OF WOUNDS, Roberts, Pte. Jonathan Son of Mr. Joseph Roberts, Hill Street, Ponkey. WOUNDED. Martin, Pte. Harry, Canadians Nephew of the late Mr. W. Martin, of Queen's Park, Oswestry, wa6 wounded on Oct. 1, and is now in the 6th Northern General Hospital, Leteester, He has served in the-Canadian army for 3 years. He left Oswestry about 10 years ago, but before retmming to Toronto, Canada, ha hopes to Par his nift OAWpstrv frftrid,