Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Denbighshire Pensions Committee

Denbighshire Pensions Committee. THE EMPLOYMENT OF THE DISABLED. Mr. J. M. Porter, of Colwyn Bay, presided at a meeting of the Denbighshire War Pen- sions Committee at Chester, on Thursday. The Committee dealt with numerous applica- tions by widows and disabled men for alter-- native pensions, and. heard several appeals by men who claimed that their disablement was 

I I Wrexham Childs Death I

Wrexham Child's Death. Mr. Coroner Kenrick eat without a jury at Wrexham, on Tuesday, to inquire into the cir- curmqtanms attending the death of Kathleen Powell, aged 8, the daughter of Elizabeth Powell of 1, Georsre-street-, Rhosddu. The mother, who has four children. and whose hus- band is with the Forces in India, said that on Sunday she was washing the children by the kitohen fire when the deceased reached over for aome boots and stockings and pulled over a kettle of boiling water. She sent for Dr. Mae.Gilwrav, and he said ho had no "staff" to attend to the child at his house, and said the child must be taken to the surgery. Witness wrapped the child in a blanket and took it to the Infirmary where- she died next day. The Coroner said that death wu due to an aocident, and that no blame was attached to any- one. He said that he did not desire to oast any aspersion upon the doctor, but if he (the Coroner) had known the facts, he should have given in- structions for the doctor to be called as a wit- ness to explain why he did not go to see the child. The doctor might have considered it the best thins: to send the child to the surgery. He dial not east, any aspersion on the doctor.

WREXHAM BOROUGH POLICE COURT

WREXHAM BOROUGH POLICE COURT. Monday, before his Worship the Mayor (Mr. L. B. Rowland) in the chMr. Dr. Dnnkwarer, MaMia. J. F. Edi?bary. T. B. Taylor and W. J. i Williams. I A SERIOUS OFFENCE. Elizabeth Parry, wife of David William Parry, 4. Mount-street, was charged with having un- lawfully made use of a birth certificate knowing it to be forged, counterfeit or false. Mr. Lawson Taylor, town clerk, who prosecut- ed. stated that Mr. Owen, attendance officer, called upon defendant to inquire as to the cause of absence from school of her daughter, Wini- fred, whose age, according to the school register, was 13. Defendant 1Wd the child WM 14, and was entMed to st?y ait home. Mr. Owen &gked for a birth certificate, an-d on a subsequent visit one was produced, which showed that the child was born on October 13th, 1904. and was there- fore 14. Mr. Owen examined the certificate and noticed that the 4" in 1904 was over an erasure. Inquiries at the Superintendent Regis- trar's Office showed that the date of birth on the register was October 13th, 1905. Evidence was given by Mr. Owen, Mr. Bag- nall Bury. superintendent registrar, and Mr. Geoffrey Fisher, deputy-superintendent registrar. The latter' stated be issued the certificate, and that the alteration had not been made by him. Defendants who denied hatving intedred with the certificate, said her husband was in the army, and ,Mi. had fife children, A fine of 3gis. was imposed.

I IOswestry a Dispersal Station

I IOswestry a Dispersal Station. I The Army Council has set up six dispersal stations to deal with miners, pivotal men and demobilizers who are coming home in advance of general demobilization, and one of them is at Oswestry, for the Western Command and Ireland. The work is being done at high pressure, and it is officially stated that the staff at each station is about 200, who work in three shifts throughout each 24 hours with cessation.

Cambrian Railway Officials II Impending Resignation I I I

Cambrian Railway Official's Impending Resignation. I We understand Oat, having reached the retir- ing age, Mr. Herbert E. Jones, Carregllwyd, Os- wesfcry, will relinquia his position as Locomotive, Carriage and .Va.gon Superintendent of the j Cambrian Railways Company on December 31. Mr. Jones, who came to the Cambrian, twenty years ago from the Stockport district, where he was oh the staff of the iMid land Railway Com- pany, has rendered active and devoted service at Oswestry, and under his supervision some notable advances have been made in locomotive and car- riage construction in connection with the Cambrian. We believe that the directors have as yet made no appointment of a successor to Mr. Herbert Jones, but it is likely that during the interim Mr Q. C. McDonald, the company's chief engineer, will aestune the ipoot of Acting Locomotive Superintendent.^ and will couple with hie present duties the overnight of the works afid the Locomotive Carriage Department generally.

No title

——————-——!  Though certain railway services may be aug- mented for the Christmas holidays, there wdl I be o qyri9,-

Sir David

[ "Sir" David! AMUSING MISTAKE IN "AN ACCURATE LIST." The recent speech of Major David Davies, M.P., in which he objected to the unsolicited letter of credit from the Premier and Mr. Bonar Law, has had a wonderful effect upon the clerical staff at No. 12, Downing-street. In a circular we have received from an unknown quarter, but apparently posted by an official hand., containing the names of "Official Coalition candidates pledged to support the Peace and Reconstruction policy of Mr. Lloyd George and the Coalition Government," there appears, under the head- ing "Montgomeryshire" the name of "Sir David Davies, M.P. When the knighthood was conferred on the recalcitrant Major, who refused to be labelled like a piece of lug- gage," we are at a loss to but appar- ently it was felt that as the official telegram I did not "fetch" the degree of "reliability" required, perhaps a handle would! But. as our read-ers know, Major Davies is the last man in the world to covet such an honour," especially in exchange for his liberty of voice I and action. Yet the delicious part of it is that at the head of the circular is printed tie: line This list is accurate, and can be used in full or in part any day this week." n

j 1 Llandysilio Breach of Promise

1 Llandysilio Breach of Promise.! ¡ £500 DAMAGES. I. Mr. H. E. Harrison, under-sheriff, and a, jury at the Sheriff's Court, Welshpool, on j Tuesday, sat to assess damages in an action I heard in the King's Bench division, in which the plaintiff, Jane Ann Roberts, daughter of I Mr. John Roberts, farmer, Church Home Farm, Llandysilio, had obtain.ed judgment, I the, defendant being Thomas Pickstock, far-! mer's son, living at Rhos, Llandrinio, a j I neighbouring farm. He was not present in; court. Mr. Roberts Jones, Oswestry, was for the plaintiff, and there was no defence. PLAINTIFF'S CASE. I Mr. Jones said there were no letters to be read, as the two parties lived within a mSle and a half of one another and met con- stantly. Plaintiff was thirty years of age, and the defendant about the same age. They had been acquainted since they were child- ren, and acquaintanceship developed into courtship in the early part of last year, and' i they used to go for walks together until the I I end of the summer, and it was understood between them that ultimately they would get married.. Sometime towards the end of the summer an intimacy took place, with the re- smt that in August of this year a child was I born and in October it was fathered on de- fendant. Plaintiff was naturally in a very distressed condition, but the defendant said that everything would be all right and that she could trust him. They continued to meet, and in February he specifically mentioned. marriage. He gave her Y,30 to pay the ex- penses of the stay in London, where he sug- gested that she should go for her child to be born, promising marriage on her return. The money was discovered in a drawer by the plaintiff's mother, and her parents then dis- covered. the condition she was in. Defendant expressed his regret at the state of affairs, and asked Mr. Roberts if he had any objec- tion to his marrying her, and Mr. Roberts I replied that he had not, and that that was the I best thing they could do. I CHANGED HIS MIND. Four days later, however, defendant came Jaack to Church House Farm and said he had changed his mind. He told plaintiff he had got another girl into trouble, and went as far as to ask her whether she could not find money with which to pay her off. He asked whether she thought ?200 would be enough, and if ? could she nnd. the money for him! I PLAINTIFF'S EVIDENCE. I I Plaintiff gave evidence bearing out her soli- I tor's statement.—How long did you continue ¡ to walk out with him 1-1 ill he told me he j was married. That was in May.—You be- lieved he was married?—Yes. I said, "I ¡ don't believe you are telling the truth," and he said I am telling the truth." The Under Sheriff—This girl met him ohe Clay, and three or four days later she met him again, and he told her he was married?—Yes. When did he promise márrittgef-About I February. He asrecl if I would be his wife. I I said "Yes," and he said, "There is going to be trouble, but that will be soina consol- ation at any rate." My parents found out I my condition, and forbad me to go awajfc I THE OTHER GIRL. Keterring to tne otner gin ne askea me cuu I think 2200 would satisfy her, and I replied that I did not know. He asked me to lend him money to settle with her, and I said! "After we .are married and riot before." After he saw my father he said we would get j married &t once. His father was going to re- tire, and we would go to Rhos to live. John Roberts, plaintiff's father, said de- fendant asked if he could marry his daughter, and he said" Yes; that will be the best thing under the circumstances. I hope you i love her, and think she will make you & suit- able wife." He replied, I do." A few days later defendant came back and said he had changed his mind about getting married. He suggested that they should put it off for two years. Witness refused, and next morning defendant came again and said he hoped be had. changed his mind. Witness told him he I had not. A fortnight ago defendant came to his house and wanted the k30 he had given I plaintiff. Witness told him he was going to keep it until other matters were settled. I II After a deliberation lasting ten minutes the jury awarded plaintiff L500 damages.

I ELLESMEREI

ELLESMERE. I ALLEGED BIGAMY.—At the Police Court, on Monday afternoon, before Mr. Cooke, Dora i Elizabeth Dodd. whoso home is at Oefn, was changed with bigamously marrying Pte. Bert i Pitman, a soldier, at, Ellesmere last August. It was stated that the accused's husband ie a soldier serving in Fmnce.-On the apfplioation of P.S. Barber, Mrs. Dodd was remanded for a weelk.

No title

No London papers will be published either on Christmas Day or Boxing Day. The first air journey to India has been accomplished by Major-Generq, Salmond, D.S.O., who flew from Cairo to Delhi, 3,208 piles, on a Handley-Page machine.

I Much Married Man

I Much Married Man. I SOLDIER'S FOUR WIVES, I I ARRESTED AFTER FOURTH BEDDING. At Wem Police Court on Thursday, John Henry Ounsworth, L..Cqrpl., R.A.M.C., sta- tioned at Prees Heath military camp, was charged before Capt. Maddocks and Mr. J. Adams, with bigamy. Dorothy Ounsworth, of 20, Sea View. Mar- ton, Northumberland, stated she had known accused since he was 14 years old. He then resided at Murton. She was married to iiim at Easington Registry Office on Nov. 6, 1907. She lived with him for several months and then went to live with her parents. After Le went away she saw him in 1910 at Murton, and had not seen him since until that day. There was one child of the marriage. She received no separation allowance from Hm. Ivy Lillian May Cooper said^she was mar- ried to accused at Benmell Parish Church, Northumberland, on March 2, 1912, he stating he was a bachelor. There were three children and she was receiving separation allowance ) from the Army. I Louisa EdB" Tyers stated she went through a form of marriage with accused at Rearsley Parish Church, Leicestershire, on May .4, 1917, and had one child. She lived with her parents and defendant sent her money. I Maggie Roberts (age 20), of Coton, near Wem, stated she was employed at Prees Heath i Camp and made the acquaintance of accused at a party last Christmas, and afterwards kept company with him. They were married at Edstaston Church, after banns, on Nov. 23 last. He stated he had had. a wife but had obtained a divorce. Sergt. A. C. Edwards prodifced certified copies of the above marriage, also a statement by the accused admitting the offences. P.C. Diggory, Whitchurch, said he received information of the case and made enquiries at Prees Heath Camp on Nov. 23 last. He proceeded to Maggie Roberts' home at Cotoa Wood and when the wedding party arrived ar- rested accused, who replied that he had ob- tained a divorce from his wife. Prisoner was committed for trial at the Assizes.

I I Llanfyllin Rural Council j

I I -L-la-nfyllin Rural Council. j Mr. John" Jones, Vareh oel. presided over a I meeting of the Llanfyllin Rural District Council, I; on Thursday. HQUSELE OOPORÂ!O. i I T xut> Liverpool corporation wrotte that they f had., house at Lake Vyrnwy for the accom- modation of the council's roadmen.—Mr. Storer (surveyor) said the Corporation wal-i aiming at reducing: the population of the water-shed in order to guard against pollution. The corpor- ation was the first body to complain about the roads and the roads could not be looked after if there was no house available. The corporation bad two houses which could be made habitable at little expense.—It was agrreed to ask ths cor- poration to r&m.ir nnp n; th"" I THE VANISHING SMALL HOLDING. i I ilne Woar Agricultural Committee wrote ask- j| ing for particulars of any land in the &r

PENYCAE

PENYCAE. SOCIAL & DANCE.On Wednim-tiw, a social J and dance was held in the Church School, f arranged by the associates &itd members oi the ¡ G.F.S. A capital programme had been arranged I and a very pleasant evening was the result. i a Tau lt. 11

No title

I General Botha has arrived in London fyt t the Peace discussions. J