Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 6 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
General Election1

"General Election. 1 POLLING DAY INCIDENTS. I The polls in the General Election were (with one exception) taken all over the country n Saturday. The exception was the Kei-ning- ton Division of Lambeth, London, where, the death of one of the candidates since the nomination, by the provisions of tne Ballot Act, invalidates the election all the nomination will have to be begun all over again. The late candidate's widow lias been adopted as candidate in his place. The confinement of the polling to one day is one of the novelties of the Reform Act, and it has the incidental effect of placing a great strain on those responsible for manning the polling booths with officials, as formerly these gentlemen having acted in one constitu- ency could transfer their services to a neigh- bouring division when the poll happened to 1'8 fixed for a different date. Moreover, the vast increase in the number of the electors nas necessitated the wholesale multiplication of polling stations, and so far as Shropshire and Denbighshire are concerned the only two local counties in which contests occurred—the new arrangements made by the County Coun- cils seem to have given general satisfaction. In some quarters it was still necessary for electors in scattered areas to walk a good dis- tance to record their vote, but this is inevit- able in rural districts and could only be ob- viated by allowing home voters as well 3 absent, soldiers to do their polling by post, though, we. hope, it may be possible before next election to reduce the inconvenience in some cases, and we would specially draw rwt- tention to the absurdity of placing two polling stations in one village to serve a wide area, when, it would seem, that one of these might have been placed in another part of the d?s I trict. These are points which, we trust, wíJl be urged on the connty councils before the next election. One of the most surprising elements all over the country was the magnitude of the women's vote. Though they appeared largely indifferent to canvass and public meeting they were evidently anxious to enjoy the novel -?x- citement of going to the poll, and in many con- stituencies they outambered the male electors voting in the earlier hours of the day. The Dew style seems to be for husband and wife to go together to the polling station, though it probably does not follow that they vote for thp same candidate. I "WHO ARE THE BOLSHEVISTS?" Among the most piquant of all the fights j was that of Miss Christabel Pankhurst, under the banner of Mr. Lloyd George and Mr. j Bonar Law, at Smethwick. In an ill-advised moment the ex-militant suffragette was led to describe the Labour Party as a party" cor- rupted by Bolshevists ang led by Bolshevists," to which they pertinently replied that the Labour Party stands and works for social re- form on constitutional lines without break- ing a single window, firing a. single pillar-box, or burning down a single church." An apt application of the old moral that those who live in glass houses (or did once) should be wary about how they fling stones—or even The Prime Minister, who has spoken fre- quently during the election campaign in differ- ent parts of the country, imitated the late Mr. Chamberlain's example and did not, even on polling day, visit his own constituency, where Mr. Austin Harrison's opposition has betn re- garded as entirely negligible. It is probable that the votes will also be counted in the right hon. gentleman's absence. Lack of interest in Carnarvon Boroughs, however, was made up for by the stiff fights in Carnarvon- shire between Mr. Ellis Davies and Major Breese, and in Anglesey, where, we learn, General Owen Thomas has given Sir Ellis Griffth the run of his life and may have beaten him These were the only polls in North Wales, except the two Denbighshire divisions. Another former local candidate,, Mr. Clem Edwards (Coalition Liberal), has probably been unsuccessfull in his effort. to defeat Mr. Arthur Henderson in East Ham, as the Independent Unionist refused to a,ceept Mr. Bonar Law's suggestion that he should stand down to give M: Edwards a clear field. At Buahville Park polling station, Enfield, a d four years old, who was on the voters' Ii" r. registered his vote. At Edmonton it was discovered in the even- • hi<.a that a girl aged nine and a half years was on the register, and on inquiry at her home 't rns foun S that she was in bed. When her parents were told that she could vote, the little girl was hurried out of bed and rushed off to the polling booth. WREXHAM DIVISION. f EXPECTED COALITION VICTORY. I I..F,be resiilt of the fight in :the Wrexiham Division of Denbighshire is on all nds regarded as a forgone conclusion. Very little excitement was caused on polling day. The supporters of the "Labour candidate were not dissatisfied with their campaign, but, none of t;),m were bold enough to predict the return of their nominee. The Labour organisation, however, was directed with intel- ligence and decision, and experienced political workers observed several indications of this fact during the closing days of Uhe conflict. The Coalition workers were not quite so fortunate, I and in less favourable circumstances than those prevailing at this election, these defects would ) have been more disturbing to tfcem than they t seem to be now. ATTEMPTING AN ESTIMATE. I It is now E"86Y to forma relÏiaibleestnnate of j the number of electors who went to the poll. There were 39,207 names an the register :includ- I ing 6,540 men absent with the forces-ab-ou.t which in a military depot town like Wrexham, mora will be heard in the coming montns. Reports received from several of the mining dis- tricts point to the fact that close upon 90 per cent, of the industrial voters went to the, booths. Ln tii, town of Wrexham, however, the poll was regarded as a light one, and many complaints were made as to the inaccessibility of certain polling stations, the ehiV criticism oomingfrom I Sectors residing in Hightown and tlle Garden Village Who had to go what town dwellers re- irarcl as rather long distances in order to record j HiWtir votes. WOMEN VOTERS. L Ths women a,ppe.ar to have turned out to 7° e j in much g.reater force tOian was expected. Most- of t'rx. married women went to the booths wit 11 iihen- husbands; the soldiers' wives took their frjp:1dsand neighbours; they went to the in force, and as a body are jj to show the Government t-hat tiiey j *aiu« site vote and all exercise it j t!ga-ll''1'n Oe.rJJ women have cast theor votes against Labour, 1 and that they have done so largely because of j their belief in Mr. Lloyd George. On the whole it is probable that between 25,000 and 30,000 votes have been recorded, including absent voters, unless the soldiers return their papers in exceptionally large numbers. This is not ex-I peoted. Quite a number of absent voters on leave or discharged endeavoured to vote in per- son, but, of course, they will have to follow the procedure laid down for recording the soldiers' vote. LAST FEW HOURS. The fine weather produced a heavy poll in das- tricts where the electors had a short distance to travel, but elsewhere the absence of the usual crowd of cats and carriages kept many at home, particularly amongst, the newly enfranchised electors. r The Labour candidate's friends cla,imed to have greatly improved their position during the last few hours of the contest and Mr. Hughes cer- tainly sec-Lired tho active co-operation of all the trades union organisations in the district. The railwayman are said to have voted solidly for Labour, The miners' vote has been split. Both candidates toured the division during rhe dav and were received with enthusiasm by their supporters at the thirty-nine polling stations set up in the constituency. Sir Robert Thomas had a remarkable reception in many of the mining villages, particularly at Rhos, where the real balance of power in the division still lies. DENBIGH DIVISION. 04? DENBIGH DIVISION. A FOREGONE CONCLUSION. The generally expressed opinion, at the close cf the polls on Saturday night, in most parts of the constituency—where the electors now number over 30,000—is that the poll nad not been a heavy one and the lightness of the returns are largely attributed to the iact that the result is a foregone conclusion. It must, oi course, be borne in mind- that the electorate now numbers nearly three times that winch returned bir Herbert Roberts with large majorities. There is a large field of virgin electoral soil from which the improb- able may have to be reckoned with. Both candidates are stated to have expressed them- selves confidentf-8ir D. S. Davies as to she result of the election and Mr. E. T. John "n the justice ?nd ultimate triumph of the cau30 to which he is now allied. Something like a fifth of the voters reside in the Colwyn Bay area; in Llanrwst and the surrounding dis- trict Liberalism always has been, and is still, very strong and the same remark applies 0 Denbigh and the Vale of Clwyd where as the Gee tradition is still cherished, Sir D. Davies, as a connection of that notable Welsh family, derives a certain amount of personal prestige. LADIES OF LLANGOLLEN. The Llangollen area is, under ordinary con- ditions politically, -very much of an unknown quantity; but it is fair to assume, at the present election, the champion of Labour vi i'l find himself in a decided minority—a fact: that has been abundantly demonstrated at the public meetings he has attempted to address. An outstanding feature of tiie polling a,t Llangollen where business is said to have been brisk all day at the two booths situated at the Council Seliool&wa-i the alertness of lady electors to exercise their newly-acquired right. ^Votes for Women! is a cry that has been assiduously raised for man y years in the locality; where a partic- ularly well-informed and active campaign was J waged, in support of the political emancioa- tion of the sex, and there were abundant in- dications that the Ladies of Llangollen, ou I Saturday, polled their full strength. DECENTLY AND IN ORDER. There was nothing, however, akin to excite- ment, and not a single instance of boisterous- ness to record; and the word respectable -greatly overworked to describe polling everywhere throughout the country-must do furrer service here. Sir D. S. Davies visited the town during the day, and had a hearty Lreception; but Mr. E. T. John, though doubt- less present in the spirit, was not otherwise I conspicuous. Whilst" brisk business" de- scribes the voting in the town little doing was the phrase in most constant use at the booths in the outlying districts. At Glfn- oeiriog, Llanarmon, Llansilin, Vroll, Garth, Trevor, and Llantysilio, there was no more excitement displayed than usually attach- es to a well-ordered rummage sale. The ballot boxes from the entire area have been collected and conveyed lo Denbigh where the result will be announced on Saturday evening, the 28th inst. PSWESTRY DIVISION. I The rival candidates both finished up the short but strenuous campaign with meetings at Oswestry, the titular headquarters of the new constituency, which now includes the Whitchurch, Market Drayton and Wem areas of the old Newport Division, but loses its former section south of the Severn," which has been transferred to the new Shrewsbury county division. Both had good receptions at their final rallies, Mr. Bridgeman in the Drill Hall and Mr. Morris at the Victoria Rocms, and there were enthusiasts on either side, more especially those who place large reliance on the indications afforded by public meetings, -often very untrustworthy—who were pre- pared to wager victory for their respective champions. What the result may be we mut wftifc and see" till Saturday week, when ihe votes will be counted at Oswestry. General opinion seems inclined to assume Mr. Bridge- man's return, but there are those who, reckon- ing 011 the solid." block vote that has prob- ably been given for Labour by men engaged in organised industries and their wives, knowingly predict that Tom Morris will run him close. Much, no doubt, depends on the women's vote, and how this may have gone it is hard to say. All we can say is that it was cast in surprisingly large measure. The Liberal vote, too, which, a canvass, taken at the outset of the contest, seemed to indicate would go pretty solidly for the Coali- tion, has become a much more uncertain fie menL as the campaign progressed, and weight of numbers probably, on Saturday, went to Mr. Morris's account. There were, however, we believe, a not inconsiderable number of Liberal abstentions. At the last moment, the most was made by the Labour Party of the Premier's equivocal oronouscements on conscription and the walls were placarded on polling day with posters bearing the telling legend, No conscription and a Free England." Apart from this we saw no eleventh-hour development of the con- tent the Coalition election managers remain- „i^g gonj^nt srttbjfclie laa-ge Jftk L.f. .;>=J.L..t;W.I. Hoyd George as the Man who brought vic- tory," as a means of persuading electors to Vote for Bridgeman. i BRINGING IN THE BALLOT BOXES. 1 When, at eight o'clock, on Saturday night, the doors of the fifty-nine polling booths in the Oswestry Division were closed, there was in no single ascertainable case, any business waiting to be done. The advice to "Poll Early appears to have been generally acted upon, and, during no period of the day was there any rush or undue pressure. As one official described it to a representative The election has been most respectably con- ducted." A number of causes are advanced in explanation of the absence of the exuberant excitement that has characterised some Lye- gone contests, which probably may have been to some extent accountable. The scattered area over which polling activities were con- ducted the absence of young men in France and the element of indifference engendered by methods adopted by party leaders, all made their influence felt. As a municipal organ- iser stated he has seen ten times the excite- ment generated regarding a Council election adding, as an after-thought,—" but that was before Lord D'Abernon's influence was felt. CANVASSING TABOOED. I Personal canvassing, of the house-to-house order, seems to have been almost tabooed by both candidates, who relied upon platform appeals and mural literature for the stat. ment of their claims; and, vehicular methods of assisting hesitating voters to the poll, familiar J in other days, were scarcely en evidence at all, j motor cars and conveyances, sporting party colours, being few and far between. There is j little use, therefore, for the once familiar phrase, both candidates paid a series 111 j visits to the polling stations during the df,v," in describing Saturday's events and the fact that Mr. Walter Morris, who visited Whit- church as deputy returning officer to see that the returning officer's instructions were being j carried out was greeted as tiie .LaDOUr candi- 1 elate" at the polling station, points to a moral. BOXES IN SAFE KEEPING. j Immediately after the polls had been closed, with the utmost prdinptitude the necessary | sealing operations were carried out and the I complete arrangements made by Mr. Walter Morris, for collecting the ballot boxes in the immediate vicinity of Oswestry were cprried out. These were brought to the Guildhall by motor and other means of transit; and. IJY nine o'clock, the larger -proportion had been safely stacked in the strong room the number being being further added to after the arrival of the 10-35 train, by which the boxes from till the stations in the Whitchurch and Ellesmere area were conveyed the tale being completed on Sunday morning by the arrival of the Market Drayton contingent. I THE COUNCIL'S STRONG ROOM. To many burgesses the information may come by way of a surprise that the Guildhall contains a strong room capable of housing three-score ballot boxes. It is not a large apartment; situated contiguous to the Cqun- [ cil chamber with which it shares an atmos- phere of mystery admirably appropriate to its present purpose. There is an appearance of masculine strength, about its well-braced doors indicative of ability to keep a secret, and the large percentage of feminine confidences-for fair voters polled well on Saturday—that re- pose in the strong room are in quite safe- I keeping. The ballot boxes crowd into one corner the regalia that made- gorgeously pic- turesque Mayor's day at Oswestry, and othor borough treasures; from which it will be gathered that their Christmas and Boxing Day associations will not be devoid of dignity. Arrangements have been made for checking over and depositing the votes of absentees as they arrive—by the way the first soldier to" record his vote did so on Friday week—siifiie when the returns have been arriving by every post in bulky batches. Monday's post at the Guildhall was a big one, Tuesday's a bigger, and it has grown daily. A special box is set apart for the reception of these voting pupc., s. The strong room at the Guildhall will be cleared a week on Saturday, and, the, necessary preliminaries having been gone through, it is anticipated that the result of the election will be announced at the Guildhall before five o'clock. HOW I GAVE MY FIRST VOTE. I [BY A WOMAN VOTER]. I On Saturday, December 14, I gave my first I Parliamentary vote. It was, in fact, my first vote of any kind, because I have not hitherto been a local government elector. On the whole I found it rather a disappointingly hum- drum experience. We have so long heard of the blessing and" power" which the franchise was to bring to women, that we have been worked up into the expectation that the exercise of the privilege would be quite an exciting sensation. Yet, it seemed such a novelty, that it often left us feeling that, after all, voting was out of accord with our routine domestic life, and even the receipt of the candidates' election addresses failed to create that sense of new importance which I ¡ had always imagined it would. It was, in I fact, only on the day before the poll that I finally decided to vote at all, and then not because of any appeal I had read or heard. But I found that some of my. women friends I were going and so I thought I might as well, too. I noticed that in most cases wives accom- panied their husbands to the polling station, 1 but, as I had no "husband to go with, I had to go alone. It was rather disconcerting to hear the presiding officer, whp had a particularly 1 loud voice, bellowing my name out when I pave him my number, but otherwise I found it an entirely unmoving affair. I simply took ny paper, made my cross, and put the paper in the big tin box, and, after an exchange of a few trivial remarks with a friendly official in- side the booth concerning the pleasant weather and such non-committal topics, Lcame aw ay. That was all, and as I walked home I could not help thinking thal, after all, it was not worth having stoned statesmen's win- dows and starved "t&eself in Holloway gaol about.

No title

Sir Edward Poynter has resigned the presi- dency of the Royal Academy, which he has held for 22 years. He is 82. The oldest woman elector is said to be an Edmonton lady, who is 105 and has never heard of Lloyd George! But she said, if sti-ei were 4ble to vote she would give it to those I who did most for the poor people and would 1 ¡a.ve. t4 tll .i:ttIi..L-

SHREWSBURY DIVISION

SHREWSBURY DIVISION, POLLING QUIET AND UNEVENTFUL Polling throughout the Shrewsbury Division was marked by the same general apathy that prevailed throughout the country, and on all hands the eon.teat was regarded as unreal and flat. Taking the division as a whole probably little more than. half the electors went to the poll. In some diBtricts where there were con- centrated an extra body of enthusiasts the num- ber voting was higher. This was particularly so in some of the working class areas of Shrews- bury, twos and threes of the more zealous of the partisans working hard in these places to bring up all their friends; but even at these centres the fight, was but a faint eoho of former elec- tioneerin.g doings in the borough; while taking the town as a whole the contest was so quiet and uneventful that it was difficult to realise that any- thing unusual was going oa. Both candidates— Mr. Butler Lloyd (Coalition) and Alderman A. Taylor (Labour) were early about, and during the day looked in and out at various polling centres; but there was no whirlwind of motor cars; no excitement, no crush of voters anV where, very little in the way of colours to be seen, nothing but striking indifference and drab dreariness and mud all round. WOMEN VOTERS PROMINENT. Still, quite fifty per cent. of the electors went to record their votes, and in those were included a large body of women, particularly the wives of the organised workers;. Ditherington polled about 50 per cent., and the-appearances pointed to the women coming' up in larger numbers than the men. These women electors came up in batches of six, eight and as many as ten at a. time, as though they were neighbours and had come to see each other safely through what they regarded as a novel experience. Many husbands brought down their wives to vote, and the cynio in more than one district remarked that it was the first time that many husbands and wives had been seen together. A CALCULATION. The calculation is that outside the soldier vote 12,000 of the electors went to the poll. In the Abbey Foregate Ward there were four polling booths, but so slow were the voters in corning up that twenty minutes would go by without a single elector presenting himself, and for the last five minute.s before the closfHig of the poll there was not a voter presented himself. It was theswme at Ditherington. At Meole the last voter to record his vote was a man of 90, who marked his .paper just as the clock struck eight. It is impossible to hazard the result, but the gen- eral feeling is that the Coalition candidate will be returned.

Mr Ward Green and the Oswestry Division

Mr. Ward Green and the Oswestry Division. I Miss Jeibb, Lee, Ellesmere, sends us the fol- lowing corre.,3pondence for publication;— Lee, Ellesmere, December 14th. Dear Mr. Ward Green,- I have, unfortunately, not kept the letter you sent me when at a meeting in Oswstry you de. cided to give up your candidature for the Oswes- try Division. You wrote, among other things, to the effect that you distrusted the Coalition and would vote for Labour. As chairman of a Labour meeting here, I said that, thanks to your patriotic action," we were spared a disas- trous three-cornered fight such as had been thrust upon many constituencies to divide votes thrust upon many const, and dish those Liberals who decided not to sell their souls. Last night, at a meeting here for Mr. Bridgeman, it wa,s asserted that you had re- tired in favour of the Coalition, and a letter was read to that effect from you to the Rev. Huer-h Parry. I do not doubt there is some misunderstand- ing which you alone can explain. Whatever it is I shall ask the Oswestry Adverttzer to pub- lish my letter and your reply. Neither I, nor several others who have made a similar state. meat to mine, will sit down under an imputation of dishonesty.-Yours sincerely, Jjouisa Jebb. The Wood, Maesbrook. December 16. Dear Miss JeWb,— At a meeting of the Oswestry Divisional Liberal Executive, held a month ago, the follow- ing resolution was passed :—" That., having con- ferred together, we decide not to contest the division at the forthcoming election." You will ,at once see that it is misleading for either Labour or Coalition to claim that I retired in their favour. I did not retire a,t all. The Ex- ecutive decided to stand aside at this sinister election. I have never expressed myself incon- sistently wit,h the above. Having decided to take no public part in the local election, I have, at the request of the Whip's office, been workin,g for a Liberal candidate in a Lancashire constitu- ency. I am exceedingly pained that a misunder- standing has arisen among old comrades. With best rega-rd,kours sincerely, Thomas Ward Green.

I M ORD A

M ORD A. PRESENTA'TION.-An interesting presenta- tion took place at Morda School, the recipient being Mrs. Wardle, who until her recent wed- ding was Miss K. Galloway and for eight years acted as mistress in charge of the infant#' depart- ment. The Vicar (the Rev. Maurice Lutener) presided, and was accompanied by Miss Lutener, his daughter. The proceedings opened with a patriotic song, Joan of Arc," and the head- master "(Mr. Lewis Edwarde) then alluded in terms of high praise to the way in which Mrs. W,airdle had performed her school duties.-The Vica.r, on behalf of the managers, said how deeply they appreciated Mrs. Wardle's service4 and regretted her departure. He trusted she would be very happy in her new sphere of life, —Lilian Harrison and John W. Jones, who had been unanimously selected by the children for 11:,Ihe purpose, on b?h?lf of the school mana.ga. tea.oheœ and scholajs. asked Mrs. Wardle to w- cept a case of fish knives and a set of cookery Boales. In doing so they each wished Mr8- Wardle long life and ha-ppin?ss.—Mrs. Wardle responded in a nea.t little apeooh, and the cere- monv concluded with the singing of God Save the Kiag." WHITTINGTON. -1 OMISSION.—lne names ot tne Misses Cartwright, Rose Hill, were inadvertently omitted from our report of the entertainment on Thursday week. B.P.G.-On, Sunday, at the parieh church, the offertories were given to this the oldest mission- ary socd stv of the church. The Vicar of Holy Trinity, Oswestry, preached in the morning and the Rector at niht.

No title

The Allied fleet have had to bombard Smyrna, where -certain Turkish elements, armed by the Young Turk Committee, have fortified themselves Tihe King has approved the appointment of the Rev. Ernest William Barnes. M.A., Master of the' Temple, to the oaorronry of Westminster, va-oant owing to the decea,-t, of the Righit Rev. .,a.K.9;Y. ■■ I