Teitl Casgliad: Llangollen advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal (1860-1893)

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
National Farmers Union1

National Farmers' Union. 1 WORK IN FLINT AND DENBIGH, Ia the first. annual report of the Flint and Denbigh branch of the National Farmers' Union » resume is given of the work accomplished during the eight months which have elapsed since it was formed. One of the first duties of the branch was to consider the amount of the minimum wage payable under the Corn Produc- tion Act. to agricultural workers. Three of its members were also members of the Wages Com- mittee for Flint and Denbigh, and one member a member of the Wages Board which meets in London. Tihe twice of wool was a matter in which the branch took an acti ve interest. Re- presentations were sent to the proper authorities, and may yet bear fruit. Aotion was taken as to the cause of flooding of certain lands in thf, Abergele and, Rhuddlan March, and changes in this direction are imminent. Resolutions were passed and deputations were arranged in order to induce the War Offioe not to call up any more men from the land, and these efforts of the branch were crowned with success. The grading of cattle and cheap in the Vale of Clwycl aiiaxk-ets gave rise to regrettable scenes which the branch investigated, and for which satisfaction was received. The ( branch took the leading part in the formation of an Advisory Committee of all the branches of the union in Wales, so tlhait agri- cultural matters specially affecting Wales should be dealt with bv those who know best, the condi- tion of agriculture in the Principality. This committee, when in full working order will, un- doubtedly, be of great assistance. Strenuous and energetic efforts were made by the branch to have removed the restrictions on the fat cattle and sheep markets, and as a result of these efforts I the restrictions were modified, and the stock is now disposed of in fair numbers.

MONTHLY AGRICULTURAL REPORT 1

MONTHLY AGRICULTURAL REPORT. 1 The crop reporters of the Board, m reporting en agricultural conditions in England and Wales on the 1st 'December, state, that the, weather during Novem- ber has been fairly favourable for autumn work, though less so upon the eastern side of the country. In many districts part of the arrears have thus been, made good, but the general position is atili rather backward for the time of year. About two-thirds of the area intended for wheat is now reckoned to be sown, atld, as compared with the 1st December last year, the area &owD is from 5 to 10 per c&nt less, but the situation was then more forward. Other autumn-sown crops are similarly rather behind last year. Where up, the young corn appears quite satis- I factory. Owing to the general damp condition of the I Jand, broadcasting of wheat has been adopted rather more frequently than usual. The potato harvest has been practically completed I 'In most parts of the country; rather more dit;ea.se has come to light, and there are some reports that the I¡ tubers are not in all cases keeping weil. Roots are of quite satisfactory quality generally, but their con- dition is often dirty The yield of potatoes, 6.6 tons I per acre, is equal to that of last year, and one-third of a ton above the average. The total production ) amounts to 4,203,000 tons, by far the largest ever I raised, and 868,000 tons, or more than 25 per cent. ¡ above last year's record. Turnips and swedes show a yield just over average, 13.2 tons per acre, and? more than half-a-ton above last year; the total pro- II duction, however, owing to the reduced acreage, j amounts to 12,018,000 tons, and is a little below last year's total. Mangolds, with 20.6 tons per acre, are about 1 ton above average, but 1J tons below last I year; the total production amounts, to 8,231,000 tons, j which, although a quarter of a million tons less than I in 1917, is, apart from last year, the highest since I 1912. Live stock has done only moderately well during the month, partly owing to the shortage of artificial feed- ing stuffs. Prospects for winter keep are on the short aide in many parts of the country. Labour 'is stiii short, but the situation is, if any- thing, very slightly easier than a month ago, though influenza has been responsible in many places for de- lay, both in pulling roots and sowing corn. The following local summaries give further details regarding agriculturaj, conditions m'he different dis- tricts of England and Wales. FLINT, DENBIGH AND MERIONETH. Autumn Cltiva.tion.-The weather during Novem- I ber, was generally favourable for autumn work, and a gool deal of cultivation was done, but, owing to the i lato start, this work is less forward than usual. Barely two-fifths of the land intended for wheat had bee? sown &t the end of the mouth, and the area- seeded is about 10 I per cent. lSB than at the same date l?t ye?r. The little wheat showing above j ground looks strong and healthy. Potatoes and Hoots.—Potato lifting is now nearly; completed, but the crop varies greatly in quality and j condition; on wet land much of the crop is diseased. A good part of the mangold crop has been lifted, and ) the roots are usually good, both in quaMy and en- dition.. Turnips and swedes are generally of a satis- f actory quality, but pulling is not so forward as inI the case of mangolds. ir Live Stock.—The condition of live stock is variable; In some districts stock have done"well, but in others they are less satisfactory. There is a faitt supply of winter keep. Labour.—The supply is usually sufficient, though short in a few districts. I 0. SHROPSHIRE. Autumn cultivation.—ine weather during the month has been more favourable and a good deal of plough- I ing has been done, but the autumn work is still some- what backward. Rather mora than two-thirds of the land intended for wheat has already been sown, and the area sown is about'the at this date last year. Very little "Wheat has been broadcast. The early sown wheat now showing looks well. Potatoes and Roots.-Liftlug of potatoes is practi- cally finished, and the quality and condition of the crop are generally good. Mangolds are nearly all raised and mostly carried, and the quality is good. Not so much progress has been made with turnips and swede3, but their quality is also generally good. Live Stock have not done well in some districts, partly owing to the lack of artificial foods, but in others they have maintained their condition. The I supply of winter keep is variable, but with plenty of straw and good root crops, should prove sufficient. Labour.—Tire supply of labour is still short, but there I seems to be some improvement.

No title

The Directors of the Chester Race Company I have decided to hold the Annual Race Met- I ing on the Roodee, in May next year, provid,-d itI facilities could be given for so doing. The Military Authorities who have been in occupa- tion of the Stands during the war, could poss- ibly arrange to give the Company at least temporary repossession. The Chester Race Meeting has not been held since 1915. Among the 2,000 repatriated prisoners brought into Leith on Saturday was Captain j Leif Robinson, V.C., who brought down the first Zeppelin in England at Cuffley in April, 1917. The captain, who was subsequently brought down and captured in a fight over i Douai, had been in eight different camps in Germany. He did not give his experiences, |j out said he had been very badly treated. j

Montgomeryshire Farmers andI Major Davies MP

Montgomeryshire Farmers and I Major Davies M. P. V- At a meeting of Montgomeryshire Far- mers' Union at Newtown, last week, Mr. T. Williama presiding, the Secretary (Mr. Tom Howard) said he wrote to Major Davids en- closing the parliamentary programme of the National Farmers' Union. That programme urged that the price of farm produce should. be maintained at such a level as would enable the farmer to pay adequate wages and equit- able rent, and leave for him fair interest on his capital and reasonable remuneration for his own labour and skill; that there should, be reasonable security of tenure for the farmer who farmed properly so that he would not be liable to be turned out of his holding without full compensation; that agricultural labourers should have fair wages to maintain a reasonably comfortable standard of life; and that an adequate supply of sanitary and comfortable cottages should, be provided. Other clauses in the programme aimed at making rural life more attractive, the revi- sion of local taxation, the farmer to pay in proportion to his income on an equality with other classes; the encouragement of agricul- tural education and research, and the revi- sion of railway rates, preferential treatment I to be given to the transport of home-grown produce. He asked Major Davies if he ap- proved and undertook to support that pro- gramme. Would he support British agricul- ture by voting for measures in accord, with that policy independently of party organisa- tion, and would he pledge himself to raise, if necessary, the question of pursuing a vigorous agricultural policy? He had received, added. Mr. Howard, rio reply from Major Davies. The Chairman said they were all bound to agree with the programme of the Farmers' Union, which contained nothing extravagant or unreasonable, and they felt a little disap- pointed. that the county member who was sup- posed to be so closely interested in agricul- ture, had failed to reply. If there had been a contest he dared say they would have had a reply. What steps they would take he did not know, but he thought it should be brought home to Major Davies in some way that' he should consider their views on that matter. Major Davies had scarcely anything to say in his election address as far as agriculture was concerned, and agriculture being so im- portant now it was up to them as farmers to put it to Major Davies in a very firm manner. The Prime Minister and heads of the Govern- ment proposed to deal with and take great in- j terest in agriculture in the near future, but they told the farmers nothing very definite, and left them with a feeling of doubt. If j they could not get their own member's sym- pathy and his declaration of what he thought of their programme there was something lack- ing. There was a possibility, addled Mr. Williams, that the coming Parliament would not remain in power for long, so failing satis- faction from Major Davies it was worth their while to consider whether they should take steps to consult the Labourers' Union to see whether something could be done by bringing out a candid.ate who would promise to devote some of his energy to the good of agriculture. After discussion, it was agreed to ask the hon. member for a reply.

IThe Pood OrdersI

I The Pood Orders. I I INFRINGEMENTS AT WREXHAM. At Wrexham County Police Court,on. Tuesday, several traders from the district were fined for charging prices in excess of the maximum fixed bv the Food Controller and for other infringe- ments of the ordar-all of which were described by the magistrates as seiioua offences. David J ones, 19, Smithy-road, Codpoeth. who aold butter at 2s. 6d. instead of 2s. 4d. per lb., and who admitted the facts when interviewed by the Food Inspector, wae fined two guineas on each of two informations plus an advocate's fee. Thomas Jones, Church-street, Rhos, who sold butter to unregistered customers on October 29, was fined 2gs. in one oate and 3gs. in a second catse plus an advocate's fee. Enocli Goodwin, 12, IligSi-s'-reet, Rhostyllen, was summoned for selling chocolate at 4d. per oz., the maximum price, being 3d. per oz.—Mrs. Goodwin said a mistake was made in the eh&rgef, j and called two witnesses who deposed that they were regularly supplied with chocolate at 3d. per oz.—Fined IDs. plus an advocate's fee. I

i j OFFICIAL RETURNS OF MARKET PRICES

i; j OFFICIAL RETURNS OF MARKET PRICES. Oswestry (Dec. 11).—About 50 fat cattle on offer, the majority being placed in the 1st grade, while 10 beasts were super-graded, but eight were rejected as i unfit for slaughter. Large entry of sheep, including a few pens of nice quality a.nim?, but the majority lacked finish; skins made3s. 9d. to 7s. emb. The pig I supply included some nice quality bacons Store cattle were 1:0 better demand at slightly highes prices, except only in the case of inferior young stock. Dairy cows in milk were generally cheaper than last week, while calvers were of poor quality, but prices remained un- changed. Store pigs sold sharply at higher quotations. Shrewsbury (Dec. 10). -^flPvery small supply of fat cattle, only 69 being in the market, but the quality showed a great improvement, the entry including six very good Hereford cows from one farm, which aver- aged about 13 cwts. each, while other good lots of Hereford cross cattle were also shown. Sheep num- bered about 570, and included a lot of 100 from one farm, which were of very nice quality. Pigs were a fair show, but heavy-weight bacons were scarce, (Dec. 6).-There was a good entry of 1,413 store eattle1 at this sale, and, with a larger attendance of buyers j the demand was good for strong beasts at higher prices than a fortnight ago, but small young cattle were not in much request. The top quotation was I 7!: 6d. per live cwt. realised for a small bunch of Devon heifers, but probably the best bunch of stores I in the market, consisting of 16 cross-bred Hereford I, bullocks of 9? cwts. made 75s. per live cwt.; another j very good lot of the same breed weighing 9 cwts., realised nearly 76s., and others of 8 to Si cwts. 68s. I to 74s. 6d. per live cwt. Some bunches of young growing Hereford steers of 7 to 7i cwts. sold at 65s. I to 71s. per live cwt. A lot of Shorthorn bullocks of 81 cwts. realised 76s., another bunch weighing nearly 9 cwts. 74a., and other lots 64s. to 71s. 9d., while some I useful Shorthorn heifers of 8 cwts. made 72s Gd. per live cwt. On the average, best quality cattle made from 70s. to 76s., secondary sorts 04s. to 68s., and a < few other lots 55s. to 6Gs. per live cwt. Just over half i the entry got sold. (Dec. 10).—Dairy cows rather I easier to buy, the top quotation being £ 75. A I useful bunch of 20 store Iambs (Shropshire c.ross) made ¡ 59s., another lot of wether lambs 57a., some ewe iamh« | He. 6d., and some 3rd qua-ty ?s. Od. pa head.

Oswestrys Threshing 1 Difficulty 1

Oswestry's Threshing 1 Difficulty. 1 SMALL HOLDERS' PROBLEM. j Mr. A. E. Payne presided at Oswestry War ( Agricultural Committee on Wednesday, whc?J? Mr. E. Goff drew attention to complaints be j had received that small holders at Welsh Frankton could not get their grain threshed. —The Secretary said that at the previous meeting he was directed to write to a machine owner requesting him to thresh at TVankton. j He had written twice but received no reply.— j Mr. Frith said that several farmers in the Weston Rhyn district were unable to get their •threshing done.—The Chairman said now their t request had not been acted on they should { compel machine owners to do the necessary work. (Hear, hear). COMPLAINTS OF THE COMMITTEE. 8 Mr. Geo. Williams said farmers were com- J plaining that the Committee were, not doing s their work properly and seeing all threshing- was done.—Mr. Wiltliew said the fault lay J not with the Committee but owing to the í shortage of labour and threshing machines. I They should not forget that farmers made many similar complaints before the war an 11 there was not much to La surprised at now, seeing that thousands of additional acres had r been sown with grain. (Hear, hear).—Mr. Hobbs said that at sonÜ farms threshing :'ad taken place twice and at other adjoining farms there had been no threshing at all. Mr. J. Evison said in his own district some J farms had had threshing three times and others not at all. Æ TO HAVE GRAIN THRESHED. I It was decided to take steps to have grain I threshed at Prankton apd Weston Rhyn, to' accept an offer by Mr. R. C. Pryce, Brough- ton, to send a machine to the district for three weeks in the new year, and to request all the threshing machine owners to meet the Advis- j ory Committee and talk matters over.The •! Committee proceeded to select men serving in j the forces abroad to return to farm work.- The Chairman said that the total number of j men allowed to return to Shropshire was 200, j and Oswestry's qucta worked out at 14. I i

i j Montgomeryshire War j Agnculture j

i ? Montgomeryshire War j Agnculture, j I Mr. W. Forrester Addie presided over a meeting of [ the Montgomeryshire War Agricultural Executive Committee at Welshpool on Friday. PIVOTAL MElSL Intimation was received that the quota of "pivotal" mM to be released had been increased 60 per cent. so that the- Montgomeryshire quota was now 90, Ap- plications for the release of men from the navy could be made in addition. COAL DISTRIBUTION. j During & discussion on coal it was stated that far- mers in din?uity should apply to the agricultural During difu IC dward Jones: The distribution i. very uneven. In some districts there is plenty. :t is serious for farmers who cannot get coal for ttiresbiug.-Tlio secretary; The Caeorsws and Tregynon machine is held up. Mr. Jones, Varchcel: The only coal merchant in Llantair hadn't a ton yesterday.—Mr. Williams: Did he apply to you?.—The secretary: No. It has been ad- vertised, and farmerg know that if they cannot get supplies they should apply to thic committee. It was reported that there are now 48DtiJoldier- ^workers in the county. BOARD OF AGRICULTURE SUPER VISION. The Glamorgan committee forwarded a resolution j strongly urging that all the duties Allocated to them or to tneir successors in the future should be under j the direct control and supervision of the Board of J Agriculture, and that the position of the. Welsh Agri- « cultural Council should be only that of an advisory and consultative body, and that it should have no administrative functions. They felt strongly i that it was undesirable in the interests of agricul- ture that, there should be any form of organisation | tending to dual control or a conflict of policy in the diffedent parts of the eauntry. t Mr. Will'ams remarked that the ordinary man knew nothing about the Welsh -Agricultural Council, and II did not know whether they did right or wrong, Capt. Naylor said it seemed to him that if they had a seperat-e Board for Wales they would lose the benefit of the experience of the present Board in London.-A,fr, Roberts:, It will alsoroean dual con- trol.—Mr. WUHams s?id he doubted whether the Board for Wales would work to advantage. The resolution was supported. ) SURPLUS ARMY HORSES. I The sale of surplus army horses was raised by Mr. 'I H. Meyr'ck Jones who said that no horses should be brought into Montgomeryshire for sale. The Food Pro- ducMon horses in the county could be sold there but to bring in other horses would glut the market. They did not want all the ria raS horses brought in. To have WO or 400 horS8 brought in would knock t-hp ) horse trade badly, Mr. Roberts: And they are not the proper class of horses for this county.—Mr. Williams: Some countits which are short might like to have them but we have plenty. resolution was passed urging that no sur. j plus horses should be sent to the county for sale. S BETTER SLAG DEMANDED. I Mr. WHEams again raised the question of slag. Now  that the railway transport difficulty was not so ser- ious could something be done to secure better kag.- I 1. _J ivxr. atcoerrs: p=ùwn is qune aa dim cult a? it WM six months ago.—Capt. Naybi: We must kMp the matter in view or we -may tlu

No title

Mrs. J. H. Thomas, wife of the railwaymen's I leader, has received a letter from her son James, who is serving with the army in France, saying A lot of the boys here am putting on their ballot-papers Demobilisation first, election afterwards,' and not voting at fall." JL ftV «--8d

iv8 t r a y St ory

iv8 t r a y St ory. HEIFERS PROTEST AGAINST DRINKING IDENTIFIED BY HORNS. At Oswestry County Court, on Friday, be- fore Judge Bowen, there was only one defen- ded case down for hearing. Robert Jones, blacksmith, Wigmarsh, West Felton, sued Richard Morgan, farmer, The Bank, Llany- blodwel, for £ 11 12s. for damages sustained through defendant taking possession cfa heifer belonging to plaintiff. Mr. Roberts Jones was for the plaintiff and Mr. Wynn Edwards for defendant. A DUMB PROTEST. Mr. Roberte Jones said it would appear that plaintiff and defendant each bought a heller at Oswestry Smithfield on June 5th. On the way home defendant went into a public house with a Mr. Thomas, of Pentreceax, to make a deal over his (defendant's) heifer, and while there the animal strayed away.—The Judge: Evidently did not approve of drink- ing (Laughter.)—Mr. Roberts Jones dud it would also appear that plaintiff's heifer strayed from West Felton during the same night, and was eventually penned 111 Mr.John- son's yard in Salop-road, Oswestry, where it was claimed and taken away by the defendant. The defendant's heifer was subsequently found to have strayed to the farm of Mr. Whitfield, the Bwlch. Plaintiff's claim included £ 5 for loss pf trade during the wed, the cow was out of his possession and for a week's ex- penses. DEFENDANT'S TALE. Defendant stated. that Thomas, to whom he sold his heifer, paid him for the animal when they went Ímo the public house. Witness admitted taking the heifer from Johnson's yard, and said he could see no difference be- tween it ard, the one he purchased.—Cross- examined: The one heifer had straight horns and the others were slightly curved.—After hearing a large number of witnesses, the Judge gave a verdict for plaintiff for £ 4 4s.

The Pivotal Scheme

The Pivotal Scheme. SHREWSBURY'S PRELIMINARY LISTS. PRISONERS' PAY. A meeting of the Labour Sub-Committee was held at Shrewsbury, on Tuesday week. Prelimin- ary lists were received i rum district committees for the release of men under the Pivotal Scheme, and it was decided to submit to the Food Pro- duation Department names of 82 meri for relBase from the army before general demobilisation. A circular was received from the Food Produc- tion Department forwardu^ a revised scheme for the employment of pii-:nws of war on agricul- tural work. Under the new scheme the amount# charged for, rtili services of the prisoners muat be at the current local ra!e for similar wcrk. The Women's Committee reported that 10 women.'had been p.!aeed' during the week, 2 were in training and 6 available.

Best Kept Cambrian Stations c 1918

Best Kept Cambrian Stations &c. 1918- The General Manager of the Cambrian Railway. Company has announced that the prizes for the best kept stations have been awarded as follows:-IF.% liovey Junction., Mr. E. Lloyd; 2nd, Barmouth Junc- tion, Mr. T. W Godsall; 3rd, Afou Wen, Mr. D. C. V Olwen: di tt,o Bllilth Roar] Mr T H Pprirnsp- 4th I Giandyfl, Mr. J. W..Eagles; ditto, Pantydwr, Mr. A. j R. Morgan; ditto; Erwood, Mr. E. Spoonley. The first prize for the best kept horse, harness, etc., has been awarded to Carter John Jones, Newtown; the second to Carter T. J Probert, Newtown; the third to Carter E. E. Rowlands, Machynlleth; and the fourth prize divided bet-ween Parcels Vanman D. Ii Evans, Builth Wells, and Temporary Carter 0. Owen, Barmouth. r The same high standard of cleanliness and neatness has been maintained at the Signal Cabins which ia. t year were granted prizes, and the Directors have. agreed to similar prizes being awarded this year to the following cabins:—Afon Wen, Bui "tli Road (North), I Builth Wells (South), Dovey Junction, Ellesmere Station, EUesmere Junction, Llanymyaech (JSoithj, Moat Lane (Wst), Newtown, Portnjadoc (Eaat), J?ortmadoc (West), Pwllheli (East,), Pmrlll?-???ii Taiyilyn (No. 1J, and Towyn. The first prize for the best kept warehouse waa secured by Machynlleth, and the second by NewtowB I (grain warehouse).

I 4 LLANYBLODWELI

I -4>- LLANYBLODWEL. MILITARY FUNERAL.The funeral ot Sapper Williari-i Frank Michael, R.E., only son i oi Mr. and Mrs. 1. ivliaiiaei. Hill View, Port-hy- waQii, who was fatally injured in a cycling a.CC1- dent on Friday week, took place with military honours, at The Churchyard, on Wednesday, and f was attended by a largo number of friends sympathisers. The service at the house wag taken by the Rev. G. T. D. Pidsley, and at the churah by the Vicar, the Rev. J. Allen Jones. The mour-n&re were:—The parents, Mrs. W. A. Thomas and the es Emily, Sarah and Daisy I' Michael (sisters), Miss Eva Jones, Porthyw&en, Mr. J. Davies, Liverpool (uncle), Mr. and G. Davies, Seaoombe (urd- c and aunt), Miss M. i Morris, Liverpool (cou&in), Mrs. E. Lloyd, Pon}¡-  ywaen (aunt), Mr. J.' W. Lloyd and Miss M. J. !iI.Oyd, Porthywaen (cousine), and Miss ,Jouea, < i Tr&na.ch. The bearers were Messrs. M. Jone», I J. Bromley and J. H. Abbotts, Porthywaen, and J | R. H. Scott, Oswestry. A large number of r | beautizul wreaths .were seat, including two from j his fellow- workmen on, the Cambrian RailVays, j where he wasem;ployed before joining the army. & !r 51. MARTINS. [ WAR SAVINtGS.ROI,IDAY. -Upon tqe t-otal l deposited in the War Savings Association hav- < ¡ ing- reached £ 4,320 by permission of *?bs man- lagers and approval of the Local Education Auth ority, the child attendi, ¡the Church of England School w?s Kraut holiday. „ IN KTarl*?, holiday. I

No title

The Fc?od Production Department ajmounc?  j | that they do not propose to handle the dis- v i ? tribution of seed potatoes for next 'ear's I [ planting. f Mr. Lloyd George, speaking at Bristol last | week, said that once the emergency which led J to the Military- Service Act had passed, the Act would lapse, and there was no intention to renew it. He insisted, however, that the question whether we shouldl have any form .tj of conscription in the 'future depended entire- ly on the peace terms. If an end were ijot 4* put to the system of conscript armies the 'i Peace Conference would be a farce and a sham. The Government's policy was disarma- ment all round, but the Navy muse be kept as a definite weapon. .M v -v aw Ait, vljlv A>»