Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
12 articles on this page
Advertising

:¡, t: m', by the use of things which experience has proved to be valuable and helpful |» to humanity. All are liable, in a greater or lesser degree, to the same « troubles, and even the strongest person will suffer occasionally from ailments due to an irregular action ot the digestive organs. Whenever ra you are troubled with sick headache—biliousness—constipation—pains in BE EVERYONE BENEFITS, the back, accompanied by want of tone, it is safe to conclude that the stomach is deranged, the bowels out of order and the liver sluggish. You Kj can, however, correct any irregularity of these organs and restore 5| yourself to good health SB BY TAKING | the required doses of Beecham's Pills. Taken as directed this famous medicine will eliminate the excess of bile, regulate the liver and cleanse £ & the kidneys. The feeling of lightness and brightness experienced after the elimination of impurities from the body is a convincing proof of the efficacy of Beecham's Pills. There is no other household remedy jmt jgr as good. The people who remain the healthiest take Sold everywhere in Boxes price lfl\ (56 Pills) and 2/9 (168 Pills). I iiaiginioi i IROOM Hugh Davies's Cough Mixture- No moss Difficulty of Breathing. No mtiiag Diatreitiog Coughs. No moax Sleepless Nights. flugh Davies's Cough Mixture. THS Safe Remedy. TaB Southing Mixture Tiis Pleasant Medicine. For ordinary Congha, Cqldl. and Difficulty of Breathing, DAVIES'S COUGH MIXTURE never (ails to give immediate relief, and in the most -obstinate cases has proved to be a certain and speedy onre. loW by Chemists everywhere, 1/H & 2/9. HUGH DA VIES, Chemist, MACHYNLLETH. For Children's Cough, Whooping Cough, etc., It will be found invaluable. x471 FAIRBOURNE, S.O. THE NEW SEASIDE RESORT. Merionethshire, N. Wales. Y nysfaig Hall Hotel. OPPOSOT BARMOUTH. Ltbraotiou-Sto Bathing, Boating, Golf, Tennis and Croquet, Eaay Ascent to CADZB IDRIS. thttt links elose to the Hotel. Trout Fiehinc (Lakes and %»■») Good Sea Ftehinjj—BUM, Plaice, Mackerel, etc. Gtood Rough Shooting and Wild Fowling free. BOARDING TERMS from 42s. PZR WEEK. Accommodation for Motorinta. Terms—Saturday to Monday, 188 inclusive. telejrrami—Hornby, Fairbourne. jtU HARRY H. HORNBY, Proprietor. EST ABEISBED t882. DAVID WILLIAMS, Builder and Undertaker, 12, Prospect Street, Aberystwyth. BXPBBISOOSB Wbmm EVPLOZTO. Kskimates given for every description of werk

Friday Mar 5th 1915

Friday, Mar. 5th. 1915. CARDIGAN, Saturday Turkeys wofe bought in for Hid per lb, geese and ducks 111ft per 1b and fowls 9d. Butter In lumps, Is Oid per lb, In llb rolls In 3d. Poultry (retail)- ducks and geese In per lb, fowls lOd and lid per lb, Eggs 2d each. 0ARMARTHEN BUTTER. Saturday-The demand for cask butter continues good. Prices remained firm Is 2i to la 3i per lb, frpah pats Is 3d to Is 4d per lh. Eggs easier at from 17s 6d to 20s per 120. Market closed fl&t LLANDILO PROVISIONS, Saturday.- Batter in lbs. Is 2i1 to Is 4d; do in tubs, Is 21 feels 2Jd per lb. ggga, 5 and 6 for'ia. Welsh u I'll flheese, 6d to Od per lb; Oaerphillv ditto, 91 per lb Cheddar, 3d per lb. Fowls, IOd per lb. NEWCASTLE EMLYN, Friday. There was a large attendance, and bosioecs wa& IIrla. Butter-amal) supply, selling well at fallowing prioes, vfz-in uasalted lumps for (aotory blendi-og Is Oid. ditto in casks salted far retail purpoaea Is and Is Od per lb, ditto in pound roils Is 2d per lb eggs, 7 for 1* Welsh obeese, 6d tc 5$d per lb rabbits, fid to 14 each. OSWESTRY CORN MARKET. Wednes f dkay.—Whi^e wheat, 88 Od to So 31 Rer 75 The red, 78 6 t to 7a 8d i old eats, 198 Od te 20s dd per 200 The new o*t>s, 17* Od to 18e Od per 200 The malting barley. 218 to 'J22i0d per 280 lbs; grinding barley, 19s 0d,to 20s ?f.er 280 lbs. 08WE8TRY OENKKAL MARKET, Wed- iboOsy-Fowle, 4a M to 5n 6d per oonple jacka, 4s Id to S. 6d per couple rabbits, 31 to la 84 per ooople; batter, is 4d to is ái yer lb fI4lP. IR 61 per dozen pot&coee, „3i te Is 3d tter 20lbs tdmatoei, 4d per lb rrhatarb, 2d per bundle cabbages. Id to 2d Oaob apples, 2d to 5d per lb carrots, I d -,Pao 2d per bunch. BIRMINGHAM, C VTTLE, Tuesday. .VKHupply of pigs was smaller than recaDt'y, pricts .f smaller sizes being easier, bat sows dv-ert-r. •Cattle and sheep were unchanged. B«c"n pigs sold at 12s, small piqs, 12s, sows, 10e Sd j per eoore. Bepf made 7to 9J per Ib, and mutton 8d to loid per lb. LONDON PROVISIONS.:Mouday. Maiiare Samuel Page & Sea c-i,,oart Buttor ■— j Danish continnes weak, other descriptions in fair request Danish, quoted lSSs so 140 Siberian, 130s to 140s trriuob, 1308 to 140R Dutch, 120a bo 140s Irish, 120s to 144s Australian, 130.. to 140s, unaalted 108* New Zealand. 102s to 108», unsaited 116s Argen- tine, 102a to 106a and unsalted 108s. Bacon 1 steady-iriph quoted 968 to 100s Oaoish and Swedish, 94a to 100s: Dutch, 9.t8 to 98s Russian, 92a be 96s Canadian, 94s to 9fh. II.. Inactive- American long cut quoted 708 to SOa short out;, 64s to 671. Lard in j only limited demDd-Amerlcat) pails quoted 1538 to 03s Oil, and do boxes, riii to 52a 6d. Obeese slow-Canadian 64" to 68s New Zaa- land, 608 to 63s 6d Australian, 58s to 62s 6a j Datoh, 76s to 88'. Efc-gs—best in £ 00(1 demmd } and prices higher secondary deecriptions dull, LONDON DEAD MEAT, Men luy.— Good #applies and tra.6 qniet, though prices are rather firmer KngHah beef. 3s 8d to Is Od Scottjh ft!d- 4" Od to 48 2d; shorts, Is 6d to 4n J0d: exsrcme, 5s Od Dcptford and Liverpc.oj killed. 3a 6d to 3s Sd refrigerate-! •InrfipiMtftr—C^t, 3s 2d to 3s 0d no seconds, Aa'ld te 3. 4d do forreitisrters, 2>3 'Ul to 2e 4d Argeptlne — niudquar^rB, 2s 10a to Jo id > foi j j-rters, 28 3d to ?3 5d. Mutton — 8

Advertising

I .t A it &. OES It J -Logai I Arnfleld's MUSIC WAREHOUSE, DOZiO-CIXiX.B'Sr TDNIKQ AND RRPAIRS. SINGLE TTOINO OR BY YEARLY CONTRACT. DEPOT FOR GRAMOPHONB8, WEL813 AND ENGLISH SONGS, ETC.; Agent for Collard & Coliard and all Leading Makes of Pianos, llarn/oniums and Organs. I

LLANYBYTHER

LLANYBYTHER. Annual Medical Report.—The following report was presented to Llanbyther RuraJ Couucii by Dr. K. Cambria. Thomas, dis- trict. medical offitx^r. ajed its consideration was adjourned:—The population was estimated at 3,585, a decrease of fourteen. The number oi tincorreeted births was sixty-eight, four less than in 1913. Total deaths registered fifty-four or fifteen per 1,000 of population, eleven less tlan last year. Nett deaths belonging t. the dis- trict under one year of age six, or eighty- eight per 1.000 births—a great improve- ment on 1913. which was 140 per 1.000 Nett. deaths at oil ages was fifty-three or fourteen per 1,000. which compares favour ably with the years 1912 and 1913. Number of inhabited houses in the district at ceit.sus 1911 was 964, and average number per house four. The number of cases of infectious diseases notified at all ages from all causes was twenty-one against twenty- two in 1913. Twenty-two per cent. of deaths occurred from tuberculosis; nine per cent, from cancer; twenty-five per cent, from heart disease; nine per cent. from Bright's disease; eleven per cent. from pneumonia and bronchitis. The death- rate from tuberculosis is extremely high but as several cases really belonged to other districts, the percentage in this district itself was below that given. The number of fresh cases notified during the year was only seven, being half the number notified during 1913-so that though the number of deaths from this disease during the year was abnormally high, it is satisfactory to find that the number of fresh cases are diminishing. The presence of a sanator- ium in the district., apart from the bene- ficial effect on its inmates, has a moral effect on the inhabitants of the district so that even though the habitations are in roost cases very insanitary, the windows are kept open and greater efforts are made to carry out the open-air treatment during recent years. The number of erysipelas cases notified was high and cannot be clearly explained. Though infectious he had hardly ever seen two cases in the same house at the same time. Four out of the five occurred in farm-houses g(i thnt he was inclined to believe that the carelessness with regard to cleanliness after visiting pig-styes, cow-houses, and stables have something to do with its preA-alence. Diphtheria would always be until great improvement in the housing condition and a strict supervision of dairies and cow-slieds arc adopted. Though the infant mortality compares favourablv with that of the past four years, yet much can be done to lower the number of deaths amongst infants. Considering that well over thirty per cent, of the children are brought up on artificial food, such as cows' milk. condensed milk and proprietary preparations. tt 's surprising that tho mortality is not higher. Now that our country is drained of the physically strong, every effort should be made to develop the physique of the rising generation, and that can be most effectually done by encouraging the natural method or infant feeding—and periodically inspect- ing school children followed up by propel treatment of those found defective. the villages of l'encar'eg and Parkyrhos linvi.- no proper supply of water for domestic purposes. Nothing has been done with regard to drainage and sewerage and it would be impracticable until theiv- was water supply. The general character of sanitary defects found were mud floors. JU, oenerete foundation, no damn course, soil abutting walls, defective lighting, defecrn#- roof and chimneys, want of eave troughs, windows not made to open. insufficient and polluted water supply, cowsheds and nm- styes too near d'veU-ing houses, insufficient accommodation. The Council are now adopting model bve-l.-iws and drafts liavv been submitted to the Local Government Board for approval. The sanitary cond> tions of schools generally are satisfactory, but Llanybyther, Abergorlech, Gweinogle and Llanycrw.vs Schnofe are still in the same state as last. year. No houses hm" been erc-cted by the Council as it is really not an easy thing to know where to buil. The tendency now is, for people to move in more accessible places for convenience safco. It appeared to him that the best system f" adopt would be for the Council to issue loans to impecunious owners whose pro- perty lie m places which are likely to afford a fii" remuneration for expenses incurred. Opportunities would thus be given N- acquire an eventual freehold and so encour. people to stay in the district. Now that the model bye-laws are adopted the erection of proper bouses will be ensured

NEWCASTLE EMLYN

NEWCASTLE EMLYN. Obituary.The death took place on Friday evening at the age of seventy-one years of the Hev. Thomas Thomas, Tiverton House, Llechryd. He had been vicar of the parish for thirty-four years and l'e. signed his living last jrcar owing to •ill- health. He was held in the highest esteem in the loc-ility iind leaves a widow, two sons, and one daughter. Belgians Charged. --Loti is Loclerq and Maillett Lever, two Belgian refuges at Newcastle Kmlyn, were summoned at Pen- rhiwpnl for fishing in the Teify during close season. Water-bailiff Griffiths stated that he saw them pick up night lines. Mr. Roy Kvans, ii-ii- delended. contended that there was no evidence that defendants set the lines, and remarked that they should never have been proceeded against.—T!v» cases were dismissed. Drinking Facilities.The renewal of four It Newcastle Emlyn was objected to by Superintendent Jones. Camarthen, fit the ndjouvned licensing sessions on the ground of redundancy. In the case of the Swan Inn. Bridge-street. Mr. John Phillips, headmaster of the Grammar School who spoke for the temperance party, said there was a public-house for every fifty-five of the population. It was a sad state of things and derogatory to the enterprise of the town in other directions. We are he sport and talk of the people II of the coiintrv." he added. The Bench decided to refer the licences to be con- sidered in the following ordei-Rose and I Crown. Station-road Half Moon Inn, Swan Inn and King's Head. ,3X Hare, or Rabbit. -Student% of Kmlyn Grammar School attended in strong force at Penrhiwpal Petty Sessions, last week to listen to a case in which three of their colleagues were con- cerned. Summonses had been issued against Tom Havard Oavies (13), Castle House: George Thomas, Adpar; Evan Jones, Lamb Inn; David Humphreys, T. J. Tucker, and Thomas Nicholas, the last three named being students of the Grammar School. Mr. Roy Evans was for the prowcutiozl- Watkin Jones Evans. gamekeeper in the employ of Mr. Fitzwilliams, said he saw doiendants in search of conies on Blaenant field. They had two ferrets, a greyhound, and six nets.—Mr. James Jones (for the defence) submitted in the case of Tom Havard Dnvies, that he was under age, and it rested on the prosecution to prove'that he knew legally what he was doing. Tho B"nch upheld the objection and dismissed tbe. summons. — Giving evidence for the defence. Tucker said they were simply looking on. They went at the invitation of Davies. who had had permission from the tenant. After a ferret had been put ;nto the hole an animal came out and witness remarked" There's a hii-c- Tt proved to he a fox.—The summonses weiv> dismissed on payment of costs

MAflHYNIX TH

MAflHYNIX^ TH Mawdtfach Railway. In the absence owing to military duties of Colonel David Davies. M.P.. ir. Edward Powell. Plas- bryn. presided at the annual meeting of the Mawddwv Railway Company at New- town on Saturday. Mr. W. J. Evans, the secretary. submitted the report of the nrrectcjrs and balailce-Bheet, which were adopted. These showed that the c mpany were able to pay interest of four per cent. en the debenture stock and to carry over £57 6s. Id. to the debenture redemption account. Colonel Biavid Davies, the ictiring director, was re-elected. INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL GOVERNORS Fridav, February 26th.—Present: Mrs. J. 0'. Jenkins in the chair: Dr. A. O. Davies, the Rev. D. Cunllo Davies. Messrs. W. M. Jones, T. Parsons, H. Meredith Roberts (clerk), and H. H. Meyler (head- master). Appreciation.—The local Belgian Com- mittee wrote thanking the Governors for their kindness in admitting the refugee children in Machvnlleth to the school with- out payment and also expressing appreci- ation of their action.—Mr. T. R. Morgan" in regretting his absence through illness, wrote, thanking the Governors for the ,votp of sjjmpathy passed with him and appreciating the feelings expressed Cli,D-i-P ldtieation.tn the course of a discussion. Dr. Davies said he considered that people who could afford should show their appreciation of the privilege by being ready to pay for the education given in the school. Education was cheap enotilli. Mrs. Jenkins: It is ridiculously cil vai). The privileges we have would be appreciated In England. We are dealing w.ith public money and it is necessary to be very scrupulous. Improvements.—The Board of Education wrote asking to be furnished with the plans of proposed improvements and asking if it was out of the question that the necessary 'improvements to the cookery room should be included in the proposals.—The Clerk explained that the plans were with the County Surveyor for modification to meet the wishes of the Governors.—Dr. Davies- Are they likely to come to hand before next ver ?--Tho Clerk said ho understood the County Surveyor intended going to London to discuss the plan- with the Board. Instructions had been given to the Sur- veyor not to exceed the estimate of £500. That was the object of modifying the plans. —Dr. Davies: Has anything at all been done?—-Tlie Clerk: Yes. the path in front of the school. Dr. Davies: Any of the other improvements?—Mrs. Jenkins com- plained seriously that no action had been taken with regard to the ofhees and the delay in dealing with other defects, including^ the tower. She said she felt sorry for the children and staff.—It was ap-ped that the Clerk should write strongly complaining of the delay in proceeding with the plans. Coal.—It wrts agreed to allow fnp con- tractor an increase of 2s. in the price of coal supplied to the school. Desks. On the Headmaster's request, it was agreed on the proposition of Dr. Davies. seconded by Mr. W. M. Jones, to improve the equipment of the cookery room and laboratory by having twentv-four new des' s. 1+ was explained that there was a credrr balance of over £ 200.

TREGARON

TREGARON Latter from Africa. P. W. Rees, C.M., has received a letter from Private J. T. Hughes. 3rd Infantrv Brigade, Kim- beriey Regiment, thanking the children of Tregaron for a parcel they had sent out to him. Private Hughes is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Hughes. GJangro. He was very popular in his native place and was medically advised twelve months ago to visit Africa. For several years he was assistant at Mr. Ree* Jones's. Emporium, and was engaged in business.at Rofryfon-j tein prior to the war. The letter reads— "Dear Schoolmaster, mistress, teachers, and school children.—I have been in this country twelve months and it seems like twelve years. While I was at Roffyfontein I had a very happy time and made myself quite at home with English and Dutch. This country is very beautiful—nothing like Dear Old Wales—sun shining every day of the year; very- little rain falling, but when it twines down it comes down in tori ents, hut we don't mind that because it brings with it a good time for the tanners and plenty of fruit. Grapes, peaches, plums, oranges, and apricots grow in the open like apples at home. ] only wish I could send some to you all but now I can't get at them myself because I am far away and living in a land in which nothing grows. Hut it won't be for ever. I left Roffyfontein about four months ago to jon the army and to do my little share for the empire a.nd King. And I went to Kimbevlcy thinking at fir*t to join General Brandts Commando but owing to my friend joining the Infantry Brigade I did idso. and 1 must say that I feel in very good health and very tit. We do all sorts cf work and T have been nearly all over South Africa. We live sometimes in tents, but ottener in the open. it is very warm in the dav, but at night it is bitterly cold, and this is where the lovely" warm mittens you sent me will come in handy. U-nr uniform is short trousers like football knickers, but khaki, and shirt sleeves rolled up; puttees on the legs, and great coats for night duty. That means every night now. I was pleased to hear that so many of the ojd bevs of the National Scnool have gone to help to keep the old ttng flying. hen I received the lovelv parcel you sent me I could not make out what it was and from Tregaron, too. T was lying on the sand basking in tl)e sun when I opened it, and 1 am not ashamed to tell voil that I cried like a child. To think that the little children of my old school remembered me far out on the African Veldt! I only wish I could thank every one of you in person, but f tell von from the bottom of my heart that my best and warmest thanks are sent von. Yes S tobacco is very cheap, but cigarettes and real English ones from the old country came as oil to my old rifle. The pipe is simply great. I had lost my own and had to use a IKaftlr pine, and that at best is a cheap one. O our master knows what I mean by a. cheap one). I only wisli I could teli you all about our troops out here, but owing to the strict censorship we have to be careful. I hope aft<'r the war is over shall be able to tell you all about it. One thing is certain—that all of us are longing to have a go at them. WeU. I must stoo now. I am going to the "Bathing Parade" in the beautiful sea. Just come back feeling very clean and fit. I must prepare for night duty. Well. I wish yon all good-bye and good luck. If you only knew what part you child-en take in this great crisis von would be surprised. By sending say one packet of iegs vou work wonders. Once more 1 thank voit all. Good-bye and God bless vou. From one who is trying to do III, best for the emnire. Your old pupil and friend. Jack Hughes.—P.S.Please ask the children to remember the old boy or Tregaron in their prayers for a safe, happy, and a speedy return from the front. Goodbye. Jack.

LLANILAR

LLANILAR PETTY SESSIONS, Friday, February 26th. -Before Dr. Edward Roberts. G. W Parry. Evan Richards, and J. G. Morris Davies. Esquires. Education. Three parents were sum- Mioned by Aiban Lewis, attendance officer, for neglecting to send their children to school." John Hughes. Lletyrgrugiar. L'anrh vstvd. and Michael Bray, Tanv- llothr. Devil's Bridge, were fined 2s. and costs in respect of ea< h child. An order to attend was made m the case ol Mary E. Jenkins. GUingors. Llangwyryfon. Wanton Damage.-—Samnel Simmons, farmer's son. Tanygeulan William Richard ~Edwards school boy, Aberdeleunant. were charged by the Chief Constable with havmg obstructed the highway by placing gates across it. Evidence was given h" P.O. F. SFhvnod. Pont Hurries Price, Tynfron and Robert Guthrie. Doigtt ybethn. — The boys were bound over.

THE TVAR

THE TVAR BLOCKADE OF GERMANY. On Monday in the House or Commons Mr. Asquith read a notice formally de- daring the blockade of Germany, remark- ing that the notice declares in Kulbeic-ntlv plain and unmistakable terms the view the Government takes not only of British rights but also of British duty. Germany has declared, lie added, the English Channel, the north and west coasts of France, and the waters round the British Isles as a war area and has officially noti- fied that all enemy ships found in that area will he destroyed and that neutral vesse1 will be exposed to danger. This is. in effect, a claim to torpedo- at sight without regard for the safety of the crew or passengers any merchant vessels undfn* iiriy flag. As it is not in the power oi: the German Admiralty to maintain any suriace craft in these waters, the attsel- can only be delivered by submarine agency. I The laws and custom of nations in re- gatd to attacks on commerce have always pi esumed that the first duty of the cjiptcr. of a merchant vessel is to brine it fxd'bro a prize court. wher0 it may he tried, where the regularity cf the capture may be challenged, and' where neutral may recover their cargoes. The sinking of prizes is in itself a ques- tionable Let. to be resorted to oily in extraordinary cir- urn stances and after provision has been made for the .vifetv of the crew or passengers if there are passengers on board. The responsibility* tor discriminating between neutrals and enemy vessels and enemy cargoes obviousb- rests with the attacking ship, whose dutv t iN to verify the status and character of the vessels and cargo and preserve all papers before sinking or even capturing the ship. So also is the humane duty^of providing for the safety of the ere* "and passengers of merchant vessels whethei neutral or enemy, an obligation on everv belligerent. It is upon this basis that all previous discussions of the law for regulating war- fare at sea has proceeded. i The German submarine fulfils none of tnese obligations. She enjoys no local command of the waters in which she operates. She does not take her capture within the jurisdiction of a prize court She carries no prize crew that she can put on board the prizes she seizes. She uses no effective means for discriminating between neutrals and enemy vessels. She does not receive on board fol. safetv tho crew of any vessel she sinks. Her methods of warfare are. therefore, outside tho scope of any of the international instru- ments regulating operations against commerce in time of war. The German declaration substitutes Ic- discriminate destruction for regulated capture. Germany is adopting tl">s-« methods against peaceful traders and non- combatant crews, with the avowed object eif preventing commodities of all kind, reaching or leaving the British Isles or Northern France. Her opponents are therefore driven to retaliatory measures in order in their turn to prevent commodities of any kind ftOm reaching or leaving Germany. The^c measures- will. however. be enforced without risks to neutral ships or to neutral or non-combatant lives, and in strict observance of the dictates of humanity. Tlie British and ftrench Government* will, therefore, hold themselves free to detain and take to port ships carrying goods of presumed enemy destination, ownership, or origin. It is not intended to confiscate such vessels or cargoes unless they would be otherwise liable to confiscation. \essels with cargoes which have sailed before this date will not be affected. SOLDIER'S HUMOROFS LETTER. In a letter to a friend in Aberystwyth, Private W. S. Jones, who is serving with the King's Royal Rifles, attached to the Expeditkruaiy Force, ays- "e have been in these trenches for a month and have been temporarily cut awav from the out- side world. Our little crush belong to the Seeond Division (rightly called by Sir j John French '"the Iron Division") and we have been holding the line at a very well- I known spot which will no doubt become historic. The Germans tiave made count- t less attacks, but each time I am -afraid j our reception of them has been otherwise than cordial. Last lJigbt we had an attack and my rifle got too hot to hold. While waiting for it to cool I was just I thinking to myself what a funny world we are living in. for me to be doing a bit of "rapid"' out in France that moment. We. expect to have a rest in a few days, as we have been here at it for about three months. I am now in a deserted house, a couple of hundred yards behind our trenches, just goilig to have a birthday, a jolly good sleep on a stone floor with a roof of a sort above. Of course, there is always a chance of a "Jack Johnson" dig- ging me in the ribs and waking me, or handing over a knock-out, but they won't trouble me much. By the way, they came over in hundreds yesterday. I am feeling in the pink of condition, but the present moment a wash, hair cut. and shave would prove a complete disguise. You would laugh to see me now, covered all over from head to foot with some of the choicest por_ tions of France. I knøw as much French as Welsh. When any of the boys us-k for anything they always ask for it in French. I am just waiting details of Kaiser Bill's blockade. He is getting a bit desperate. I confidently believe that by June I shall hp a civilian once more. Private Jones is well known in Aberyst- wyth, his parents residing on the Buarth. COMMANDED BY A WELSHMAN. Captain George Hove, grandson of the late Captain Jordan, or Pigeons lord, Llan- granog, Cardiganshire, and a brother ot Mr. ( Hope, of Pigeonsford, is in com- mand of the Queen Elizabeth, one of the latest battleships which is prominent in tlie bombardment of the Dardanelles. She has four sisters, which are all practically ready -The Warspite., Valiant. Barham and Malaya. These warships arc the most formidable vessels afloat. In guni they ore unequalled. They throw a projectile weighing a toil a distance of twen'y-eight miles, thtis outranging anything in the illli of ordnance hitherto made. In speed though nominally twenty-five knots they are capable cf making circles found the ¡ best of Germany's battleships or batile I' cruisers. In fighting power they have no equals. í BRAVE STAND BY THE WELSH I I REGIMENT. I Th? "Daily Mail" of March 2nd gave 1 the following graphic account of how the Welsh Regiment and the Scot's Guards j' blocked the German road to Calais though outnumbered by twenty to one: Only now, alter the lapse of many weeksv is it possible to tell the story oi how o00 British soldiers barred the I Kaiser's road to Calais; how fewer than K.) English linesmen charged right into the mouth of a veritable inferno, drove back a twenty times stronger force of Germans, and for ever freed England from the menace of the Finn on Calais sands. The story is tolel by an officer who is but now recovering from a wound received on that day at the end of October when 2,40 men of the "contemptible" British army led the village of Giieliii-elt, on the road to Ypres. against 24.000 cjf the War LOrlh. hordes. The British troops consisted or the sorely thinned battalions of the Scots Guards, the South Wales Borderers, and the Welsh and Queen's Regiments, whicli held hastily constructed trenches across the front of Gheluvelt village. There hnd been no time to perfect these poor defences against the artillery and rifle fire of the enemy, but every British soldier knew that the position had to be held at all costs, for once the line was broken there was nothing to stop the Huns' march on Calais. Reinforcements had been promised; the Worcesters were on their way. but even then the odds would be nine to one. COMMANDERS IX DI-G-OUTS. From lor.g before dawn the battle raged. The German artillery searched the British trench from end to end and shelled the Chateau of Gheluvelt, where the battalion commanders were quartered, causing their hasty removal to a dug-out in the chateau grounds. Men fell not by ones and twos but by dozens and half-dozens, but those who survived, were tig steady as if on parade. There was no random flrina. The officers, careless as usual of their own safety, ceaselessly patrolled the position from end to end. cheering and encouraging their men. Many fell, and those who could scrambled to their feet f again, making light of their injuries but many had fallen for all time At last the shelling ceased and there v.-as a stir in the German ranks. Thev were about to charge. Now the British knew that the. time of their inactivity had passed. Now they could take toll of the enemy avenge their comrades who lay 11 stark and stiff around them. The machine-gunners Jooked to their weapons: there must be no hitch, no jam when the. moment came. And so the Germans charged. On they came without fuss and without flurry, only to be mown down in thousands by rifle and gun. One moment there was a solid advancing mass of Germans, and the next there was still a mass of Germans, but they were fiirther away, while between them and the British was a carpet of grey heaps. Again the Germans came on. climbing and stumbling over those grey heaps—those heaps which but a few moments before were the leaders of the advancing host. The carpet became thicker, but no living enemy reached that lead-spurting trench, and at last, the .Jv&iser's soldiers fell hack to cover. "COLD STEEL." The British held their line, hut at tern fig cost. Scores lay dead, and there wa- scarcely all unwounded man in the wbojo long line of trcncii. The Welsh Regiment in the centre had suffered heavily. Rem tenements from t.I" scant reserve behind t,he chateau wer^ hurried into the trench. and then the German shelling commenced all over again. The day wore on. men fell left and right, and as yet there w;) no sign of the orce-step Regiment. Towards dusk the Germans could bo seen massing lor another attack, and the British tio ;ps prepared for a final stand There wore no mo;e reserves and if the Germans but persisted in their attaclf nothing could have stopped them. Tlie shelling redoubled in fury, and then came the second attack. The full fury was directed at the centre of the line bold bv the Welsh Regiment. Horde unon horde of Germans pressed forward. IjliintJrcds fell as they advanced, but -where one fell two filled his place. Right 111> to the trench they came; right up and in. Then it was cold steel. The Welsh- fought stubbornly, dying rather than give ground, but weight of numbers told, and as night fell the enemy commanded the trench from the centre. No quarter was given to the British. Savagely the Prussians stabbed about them. Bayonets were thrust into dtall .J*d livntf. and manv an English soldier. T)»t wen tided by a Prussian bullet, was murdered, bv a Prussian bayonet. On the left the Scots Guards still held theij- line. and on the right the Queen's waro at bay. and before the enemy could advance they had first to deal with these. tallant remnants of gallant regiments. >)yt new the Worcesters had arrived. An officer of the South Wales Borderers, the old 24th. which gained. undying fame iit Rorke's Drift, had at great risk to 11101- self found arid guided the Worcestejs t (> the hard-fouglit field. F.X}JrY'S LOST CHANCE. The Englishmen were only three compan- its strong, but these scarce 500 men charged right through the shot-sweut streets of Gheluvelt, right up to the lost trenches, almost into the heart of the German host; and the Germans turned and fled fieri clen the odds at this moment were more tnan twenty to one in their favour and weing lost for ever their chance of break jug- through to Calais. Had they with- stood that desperate charge, had they in turn borne .down upon the Englishmen sheer weight of numbers would have! carried them through to the Calais road But they fell hack- back behind their original position, and were never again able to break the British line. Of the 500 Worcesters who went to tho charge but 200 unwounded men answered to the roll when the field was won and of the 2.400 British soldiers hale and ,dIOJl when morning broke but 800 lived to teU of.that great fight. :=

CORRESPONDENCE Jo

CORRESPONDENCE. J"o. COUNTY SCHOOLS AND AGRICULTURE. Sm,—I do not apologise for quoting the opening portion or your excellent article in last week's issue on (bunty Schools and Agriculture, wherein it is said: "It is to Wle credit of the people of Wales that Iwb-n the Welsh Secondary Schools Act made it possible they were prepared to make great sacrifices to establish schools from one end to the other of the Principality. Parents also made sacrifices to fill tne with pupils. H hether the educa- tional results which have since been secured have been commensurate with those sacrifices is, after many years of trial and experience, unfortunately still open to grave question. I'erhaos that is mainly due to the fact that Welsh couiuy schools and their headmasters, as well inspectors, have been unabie to entireh* emancipate themselves from the encrusted methods of the English public schools and have therefore devoted too much attention to the teaching of dead anel dying lan- guages to all pupils alike and have not adapted their curricula and instruction to the future careers of the pupils and to useful and practical purposes generally." Every observer of the trend of things in education I think, will admit sorrowfully that the high anticipations with which the establishment of the system of secondary edueation was hailed have not been justi- fied by the results; and I believe that you have with instinct placed your finger on the exact source of the failure—the in- ability of the teachers and those above them to "emancipate themselves from the encrusted methods of the English publ c schools." lour deduction of what is true of agriculture is equally true of other departments of knowledge. Children are kept at uncongenial and to them useless studies to gratify the whims of the Pan- jandrums of the Central Welsh Board or some other equally-fossilized organisations, who ignore the essential differences of tem- perament, attainment, tastes, and abilities of scholars and therefore treat them as if all were of the same sort to be put through the machine to appear to identical shapes and quality. Experience teaches that human beings are not built that way. Each individual differs materially from the other m- elividual; but that is a fact that is lost, sight of by those responsible for framing the curriculum of the schools. A boy who might Ivecome a capable* writer if led along the patls of history, literature. English composition, etc., is into instruetton in algebra Ktaelid, chemistiy, and gymnastic feats in trying to solve riddles in figures, while the teaching. of essential, arithmetic is practically ignored. The result is that when the lull-fledged essential, arithmetic is practically ignored. The result is that when the lull-fledged scholar is turned out into the world to seek a career and to sell his services he finds that he lack-; the equipment necessary for his success in the struggle for existence. He finds that he has been stuffed with a mass of facts and figures he has never assimilated and therefore worse than use- less as it tends to produce mental dyspepsia that deters him from future study. Mr. J. L. Paton. headmaster of Man- chester Grammar School, at the annual prize-giving of Hawarden County School, emphasised that point. He said he was glad to hear from the Headmaster's report. that the curriculum was extending metre and more into what might be called prac- tical subjects. Some people spoke con- temptuously of this as "bread and butter'' education. But he believed in it. He re- membered when serving 011 a technical education committee in Warwickshire being attacked for advocating "bread and butter knowledge." His replv then, as now, was that and butter know- ledge" is better than "bread and butter ignorance." He instanced the girl who. being asked if she would cook a potato, said, "No, but I can make nitric acid." He had found in Manchester a boy who, at the bottom of form after form, showed real genius for metal work. Humr-n lieings hungered, and it was right that brains should be set to work to satisfy that hunger. This applied to all classes of the community. He Ixdievcd entirely in an education which should be at the ser- vice of rich and poor alike, and in which all social barriers should be broken down, I, Sir. oleael for a more human conccp- tion of the responsibilities of the teacher towards his pupils and less regard for the shibboleths of the faddists in Wales or Loudon. As Mr. Lloyd George has re- minded the* country, a -ew years hence Britain will inevitably for the continuance of its commercial supremacy "gainst a reconstructed GVr- manv; against competitors armed \v«tb highlv-organizcd scientific and commercial knowledge, apnlied with all The thorough- ness and practical insight with which Teuton is characterised. Is it therefore < not time for us to take stock of our- metnocls of instruction and to overhaul our educational machinery in order to see in time whether our methods are likely to stand the strain of thi.; competition or whether they are, as many íjolievn, self- condemned in their practical results ? As Mr. ia-Loa observes, it is easy to sneer at bre.id and butter education," but what is to become of the person whose head is full of the classics, if his stomach lacks bread and butter ? The-e is too much tendency to produce clerks iii the schools, and not the best type of clerk at that. while better-paid and more valuable careers from the national point of view are practically ignored. "This is an engineer's war," says the Chancellor of the Exchequer; but what is the contribution of the county schools of Wales to the production of engineers? Possibly the Board in London which rules ifcheiV dtestiny and allocates grants fjor subjects taught with in their precincts is not yet aware of the fact that such an opening as engineering exists. They may discover that fact of their own accord in another generation or two; but in the meantime what of the boys and girls who are being led up blind alleys and to ex- pensive callings they have no qualifica- lifi tion tor? They now waste time and their parents resources—often entailing heavy sacrifices to otlie,, members of the "family— in being crammed with a lot of knowledge suitable enough for some scholars, pos- sibly. but for many others absolutely fatuous and useless.—Yours etc., NEMO.

ARTHOG

ARTHOG. Literary and Debating Society.—An ex cellent repast was given as well as a mis- cellaneous meeting on Friday terminated the winter session of the Society. Over sixty members sat down to an excellent tea and all enjoyed the good things. The following ladies presided at the tables:— Mrs. Williams, Lost Office; the Misses M. M. Ellis, M. Pugh, J. H. Jones, C. Rowlands, Catherine Jones, and lJilys W ynne, assisted by other lady members of the Society. A miscellaneous programme was subsequently gone through. The meeting opened with a pianoforte solo ex- cellently performed by Mr. Goronwy Davies, the Bee Hive; a recitation was given by Mr. Thomas H. Jones. Com- petition. "Darllen Darn or Benod a'r Tycoch," allan o Cartrefi Cymru:" 1, out of many competitors Miss Ceridwen Ellis; adjudicator, Mr. Morgan Williams. Song by the Women's Party, under the leader- ship of Miss S. Davies; solo, "Y Gloch," Miss nilys Wynne. Competition, egluro y ddiareb Y Gaireg a Dreigla^ ni Fwsogla 1, out of many competitors, Mr Goronwy Davies. Recitation, Mr. Morris C. Jones; solo. Miss Sarah Davies; comp- petition (unrhyw dou o "Lyfrau Cymanfa 1915), 1 Mynorydd Wynne. An amusing drama was performed, the title being Y Gwas Gwerthfawr." The farmer was personated by ir. Williams, Post Office; "Tlie Farmer's Wife," Miss G. Rowlands; "Tlie Servant," MV R. Pughe; The Children," by Misses Mair Williams. Jennie Jones, Masters R. J. Williams and D. Glyn Jones; and the "Invited Friends" bv ]\tessrs Goronwy Davies, Mynorydd W ynne. and W. Morgan Williams. It was most interesting and all thoroughly enjoyed, the piece. Cvstadleuaeth "Dyehmygion Cymreig:" 1 (equal), Messrs Goronwy, Davies and G. Lewis Wynne; adjudicators Messrs William Williams. Pc-t Office, and C. Roberts. Address by the Chairman Rev. J. Williams Davies), which was greatly appreciated. Addresses were also given hy Messrs. Morgan Williams and C. Roberts. Competition, pianoforte solo, "Fairv Blossoms:" First prize awarded to M iss Ceridwen Ellis adjudicator Miss M. I Roberts. Solo by Miss Sarah Davies. Competition "Ysiori Fer:" This proved a humorous and interesting competition, over thirteen competing, 1, Mr. Elis J. Evans; adjudicators, Messrs Morgan Williams and C. Roberts. Duett competition. "Y Lily a'r Rhosyn:" 1, Miss Sarah liavies and Mr R. P. Roberts. Song by mixed choir guilder the leadership of Robert Pugh. A collection was made for the "Milwyr Cym- leig" during the meeting. It was an ex- cellent meeting throughout and many com- peted in the various competitions. There was a large attendance from far and near, though the weather was rather unfavour- able. Praise i» due «to tlie ladies and gentlemen for the preparation of so excel- lent a programme. The music adjudicators were Messrs Morgan Williams and D. John Owen. Fairbourne: and the accompanist, Miss M. Roberts. A hearty vote of thanks was accorded to all who helped with the tea. A vote of synmathv was passed with the Rev. E. Jones Edwards in his illness, which prevented him from attending.

Advertising

¡;,<> ,p. YENO'S UGHTNINC COUCH CURE The Ideal family remedy. Contains no opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at all ages. COUGHS.COLDS it INFLUENZA Veno's is the surest and speediest cure for these winter ills, the best pro- tection against more serious dangers. CHILDREN'S COUGHS Soon yield to Veno's—even Whooping cough. And there is no trouble in giving it, children simply love veno s. Other sizes 1/1\ ""d t/9, I ar0P I from chemists and, stores -j. • q • wm CI everywhere. Jiefuse sub- iriai m stitutes, they are not Bottle W mm "jiKt as good as Fenos. I The 01de«t bliipoating Ks'-abliah m en to tin Town and District John Lloyd & Sons Town driers, j fown driers, Billposters and Distributors, £ Having the largest number of most I prominent Posting Stations In al) parts I of Aberystwyth and District, they are | able to take large contracts ef every g denoriptioii | OVKR IOØ STATIONS IN TOWN DISTRICT H Official jBlil-puater* to the Towu and 8 L'UvuCj Councils,G. W.B»Co., Cambrian B Kali way Co., the A.I.C., all the Ana- I tioneers ef the Town sad Dfatriat, and I other pabMo bodies. I A'I Irene—TB-INITY RD, ABBBYSTWTTH. Mr. JAMES KEES, Dental Surgery, 30. ALEXANDRA RD., ABERYSTWYTH. (Same Street as Railway Station) ATTENDS PERSONALLY. TRKGAPON, 1st and last Tuesdays in each month. LAMPK'I'ER, 2nd and 4th Fridays in each month. LLANKHYSTYD, 1st and 3rd Wednesdays in each month. LLANON. 1st and 3rd Wednesdays in each month. ABERAYRON, 1st end 3rd Wednesdays in each month, hours 1-30 to 3-30. LT,ANARTFF, 1st and 3rd Fridays in each month, NF.W QUAY, lBt. and 3rd Fridays in each month. MACHYNLLETH, 1st 2nd and 4th Wednesdays in each rhonth, at Mis Tn-vor Jones, Gruthyn House (close to the Hospital). a B mi a ■ ^If yon have a CAD IBG, U E" Mk 1 Eczema, Old Sores. ■ W. U Wounds.Elngworm.Cuts, B flg ^mmr Burns> sour!, or any skin affection send to Maurice Smith,Pil.C.- F.B.M.C., Kid- derminster, for a free sample of HKALO Ointment. It costs you nothing, and you w]l not regret it. Try it, you need not seud lor a liirso box. A Shilnal Laay s/iys it is worth £ 5 a box. Ilealo allays all irrita- tiou, reduces inflammation, prevents festering, soothes and heals all bad lees* Don't say your case »s hope- less without trying HKALO..Boxes 1/1 «• 2/9- LOCAL AGENTS- M E Morris, Chemist, High Street Portmadoc CAMBRiAN illl RAILWAYS ANNOUNCEMENTS. The 12-50 p-m. Train from Machynlleth to Aberystwyth and the 2-30 p-m. Train from Aberystwyth to Machynlleth are now can- celled. AMENDED NOTICE. <)_ < In addition to the Suspension of Day and Half-day Tickets to Stations on other Company's Lines All Day and Half-Day < Excursion Tickets ■ 1 Between Cambrian Stations "1 mom, olon- I S on ARE NOW SUSPENDED -———————— 1 The following Cheap Facilities will be continued for the present:— Tourist Tickets, Week-end (Short and Long Date) Tickets, Saturday to Monday Tickets, ¡. Period Excursions (with certain exceptions), Market Tickets, Workmen's Tickets, Commercial Travellers' (Week-end) Tickets. EVERY SATURDAY I for 8 or 15 days On Mondays, March 8, 22. 'j For 2, 5 or 8 Days, EXCURSION TICKETS WILL BE ISSUED TO LOISriDOIN" :A- Every Friday during March, for 8 or 15 days EXCURSION TICKETS WILL BE ISSUED TO SOUTH WALES, And to the Principal Towns in Lancashire, Yorkshire and The Midlands. To Scotland, Fridays, for 17 days. 14 DAY TICKETS TO MID-WALES STATIONS Every WEEK DAY. For further information respecting the arrangements shews abovio application should be made at auy of the Company's Offices or to* Mr Herbert Williams, Superintendent of Line. 8. WILLIAMSON, Oowasftrv. Mar. 1915 General Managrr for King and Country ROLLSHONOUR Beautifully Designed in Colours. 1/- each. These Certificates are intended for use of Sun- day Schools, Political and Working Men's Clubs, Factories nnd Workshops, Friendly Societies and Kindred Organisations in recog- nition of Members who k I have responded to the I call to serve their King and Country in the War, ON SALE AT THE Oambrian News STORES. TERRACE ROAD, I ABERYSTWYTH.