Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 6 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
16 articles on this page
ABERYSTWYTH

ABERYSTWYTH PETTY ScgSluNS, Wednesday, July 7th.— Before the Mayor (kawlii ALorris, Lmi-), W. J. Watkins, and T W. Powell, Esqrs., Dr Harries was also present for a snort time.. Sunday Trading.—Four tradesmen, who did not appear, were lined 5s. each tor Sunday trading. Charge of Uruelty to a Horse. John Daley, horse dealer, Chalybeate-street (for whom Air, A. J Hughefl appeared) was charged by Inspector fallen, Carmar- then, with having cruelly treated a horse by travelling it while in an unlit state at Aberystwyth on the 7th June. Inspector Balien said about 10-45 on the 7th June he saw defendant with two yearling horses at the Smithlield. One, a roan. was very lame in the off hind limb from laxation of the paterna. known as stifles. He called attention to it and defendant said he bought the two horses at Bwlchygwynedd and asked the farmer to bring them into the fair that day and he had just sold it to Jim Berrows. He told defendant that he was in charge of the horse and driving it in the fair and asked him why he drove it in that state? Defendant replied that he did not notice there was much the mat- ter with the horse; that he bought the two together on the field. Daley asked some men the distance from Bwlchygwenin whence the colt had travelled and was told the distance was twelve miles.—Mr. Hughes said the farm was nine miles from Aberystwyth and inland from Llanon. The Inspector added that the animal was holding the lame limb up from the ground continually and the quarter was wasted which showed that it had been lame for some time. It was evident that the animal •was in pain and unable to travel that long distance by road. It was afterward taken away by rail. He saw Berrows who said he had bought the horse and asked about the horse going by rail to which he replied that it would be much better going by rail than travelling by road. It was loaded in a truck and was alone when he saw it and was being sent to Shrew sbui-y. Cross-ex- amined: Berrows was a large horse and cattle dealer. He understood he was having three more colts put in the truck with the roan and there would then be plenty of room for it to move about. De- fendant said he had bought the horse be- fore the 7th and had asked Mr. Rowlands to bring it into Aberystwyth. Defendant gave the name of the farmer as Jones. Bwlchygwenin, but he made enquiries and found that it was Perthygwenin. Daley and he were both English. He saw the horse being run up and moved about in the Smithfieid and that in his opinion was cruelty. It was being driven up and down and was unfit to be brought into the fair at all. The horse was unfit to travel on the road and to travel about the fair.— P.S. Davies said he was in the Inspector's company and saw defendant driving two colts to the fair. The roan-coloured one was very lame on the off hind leg. The Inspector followed it down to the fair and had- a conversation with Daley, who said the colt had come from the other side of Llanrbystyd.—Cross-examined It was a » yearling and had travelled at least nine miles.—By Dr. Harries: He did not ex- amine the joint to see whether there was swelling or heat. He left that to the In- spector.—Dr. Harries observed that a horse with stifles generally stepped on its toes.— -George Harries, a Shrewsbury R.S.P.C.A. inspector, said he examined a horse at Shrewsbury which Mr iBerrows said was the one.—Mr. Hughes objected to further evidence and, addressing the Bench, sub- mitted that there was no evidence against defendant. The purchase was not complete until delivery and the horse was not in his possession twenty minutes and defendant was not responsible for bringing it into Aberystwyth. If necessary he would call witnesses.—The Bench intimated that it was not necessary and after deliberation in private dimissed the charge without com- ment.—Mr. Hughes said if the prosecution succeeded costs would be allowed and asked for costs for wit-nesses for the de- fence, remarking that it would make the prosecution more careful. —The Bench did not grant the request.

CARDIGANSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS

CARDIGANSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS. Quarter Sessions for Cardiganshire were held at Lampeter on Thursday. July 1st, before J. W. Willis Bund, Esq., chairman; Colonel Davies Evans, Highmead; Sir James Sylumper. Richmond; Morris Davies, Ffosrhydgaled; W. Inglis Jones, Derry Ormond; J. Methuen Leir, Bryn- yreithin; R. J. R. Loxdale. Castle Hill; Charles Llovd, Waunifor; D. C". Aberystwyth J. M. Howell, Aberayron A. R. T. Jones and Walter Davies, Lam- peter; R. S. Rowland. Garth; Peter Jones, Aberystwyth: John Williams, Blaenp-ot-t li, Esqrs., and F. R. Roberts, Esq., clerk of the peace. Qualification. Mr. Peter Jones, Aberystwyth. qualified as a justice of the peace for the county and took his seat on the bench. No Prisoners for Trial. There were no prisoners for tr:al and members of the juries were informed that their attendance was no-t required. The Court was occupied for several hours in hearing an affiliation appeal.

Cardiganshire Recruits

Cardiganshire Recruits. List of recruits secured by Major L. J. Mathias, staff recruiting officer for Car- diganshire :— t J. T. Ll. Jones. Lampeter, A.S.C. Thomas West, Bettws Evan, R.F.A. Evan J. Davies, Oiliau Aeron, Welsh Guards. D. J. Edwards, Yst'iacT Meurig, P.S. Brigade. Evan H. Jones, Ystrad Meurig, ditto. Ben Jones, Myrtle Cottage, Llandyssul, Welsh Guards. J. Hughes. Llandyssul, Welsh Guards. Albert E. Young, Llandyssul, Welsh Guards. I Walter Jones, Llandyssul, Welsh Guards. Bertie Airey, Llandyssul, Welsh Guards. T. H. Hayward, Ciliau Aeron, A.S.C. Enoch Davies, Aberystwyth, R.F.A. James Thomas, Kerry, R.A.M.C. Eric D. Robson. Aberystwyth, R.F.A. William Thomas Williams, Llangeitho, R.F.A. John Thomas Baines, Llanrhystyd, R.F.A. James Thomas, Aberystwyth, R.F.A. E. T. Jenkins, Aberystwyth, R.F.A T. P. Davies, Llangeitho, Pem Yeomanry. W. D. Lewis, Tregaron, Pem Yeomanry. Owen Jones, Lampeter. Pem. Yeomanry. John Davies Llanddewi Brefi, Pembroke- shire Yeomanry. D. V. Davies, Ponterwyd, R.F.A. Charles K. Dawson, Aberystwyth, R.F.A. D. T. Jones. Aberystwyth. R.F.A. Ivor G. Vaughan, Aberystwyth, R.F.A. William Bracher, Lamoetei', 9th Welch. H. Fry, Castle Hill, Llanilar, A.S.C. ( M.T.) C. Adams, Lampeter, A.S.C. OtT.) G. M Davies, Aberystwyth, Welsh Guards.

ABERDOVEY

ABERDOVEY. Patriotic popular Concerts._Mr. Hilton Kershaw presided at a committee meeting on Friday evening, when Mr. G. M. S. Farmer, hon. secretary, gave a detailed! account of the amounts obtained by the! concerts since their organisation in October. The Committee agreed to distri-i bute the money in hand among The Red Cross Society, Serbian medical relief fund, the Welsh soldiers comfort fund and 'the local Belgian refugee fund. The good work done during the past months will be continued and the Committee have arranged another concert -it an early date. — For the second consecutive month Mr. J. q Evans has won the silver spoon. given by the Artisans Golf Club, this time with a net score of eighty-one. This is the third spoon Mr. J. 0. Evans has won. Mj/itary News. Mr. David Owen Foulkes, son of Mr. Foulkes and of the; late Mrs. Foulkes. Celtic House, has; joined the Shropshire Yeomanry. Appointment. — Commander W. S. Atkin, R.N.R., brother of Mr. Justice' Atkin and son of Mrs. Steinart, Dovev; Bank, Aberdovey. has been appointed i transports officer at Southampton. School Attendance Committee.-T-he School Attendance Committee for the i district held a meeting at the Literary) Institute on Tuesday afternoon. There was a good attendance of members. J t

UNIVERSITY OF WALES

UNIVERSITY OF WALES. DEGREE EXAMINATIONS. The following students of 'the Aberyst- wyth and Bangor University Colleges have satisfied the examiners in the subjects named- ABERYSTWYTH. English Law. Faculty of Arts.—Ordinary: Bertie Kay Bonarjee, Dorothy Noel Bonarjee, Francis P. Evans, Thomas LI. Jones. Speaial: Illtyd Davies, Walter E. Davies, Evan E. Robyns-Owen. Faculty of Law. Part III. Principles of Equity: Edward E. Wilson-Jones. Jurisprudence and Comparative Law. Faculty of Arts.—Ordinary Betrie K. Bonarjee. Dorothy N. Bonarjee, Elsie Edwards, Francis P. Evans, Dorothy M. Griffith, Thomas LI. Jones, Gladys M. Wyett. Special: Illtyd Davies, Walter E." Davies, Evan E. Robyns-Owen. Theory of Law and Legislation.— Edward E. Wilson-Jones. Geology. Faculty of Arts. Intermediate: Tom Hopkins, Gwynfryn Jenkins, David A. Mort, Thomas G. Thomas, Gordon Wazen- croft. Faculty of Science.—Intermediate: William T. Davies, Eileen M. L. Hen- driks, Elsie M. Morgan. Faculty of Arts. —:F5fnal: WifLijam WilUams Davies'. Faculty of Se-ence.-Final: Annie E. Blackwell, Eva J. Fry, Charlotte A. Lewis, Edith M. Turner. Chemistry. Faculty of Science. Intermediate: John 0. Beynon, Evan W. Evans, Eva J. Fry, John Ll. Griffiths, Evan Idris Howell, William James, David T. Jones, Hywel Jones, Martin G. Jones, William D. Jones, Anne Owen, George W. Thomas, James B. Whitworth, John Williams. Inorgame.- Final: Thomas E. Aubrey, Cecil W. Davies. Richard 0. Davies, William E. Davies, E. J. Edwards, Evan T. Evans, James B. Jones, S:mon J. Jones. David E. Williams, Fred S. Williams. Organic. —Final: Thomas E. Aubrey, Cecil W. Davies, R. 0. Davies. E. J. Edwards, Evan T. Evans, Simon J. Jones, David E. Williams. William R. Williams. Second-Class Honours. Richard O. Davies. David E. Williams. Third-Class Honours. William Eynon Davies*. German. Faculty of Arts.—Intermediate: Marie C. Austin, Doris G. Bench, Janet B. S. Davies, Stanley Edwards, Dorothy M. Griffith, Frances M. Griffiths, Florence E. Jones, Gwynefth A. Jones, Gwyneth V. V. Jones, Lily Jones, Ida M. Lloyd, Kate Richard, William Richards, Ewart D. Thomas. Further test: Kate Richard. Ordinary: Ronw M. Hughes. Honours.-Class II.: Daisy B. Williams. Class III.: Florence E. Evans. Certificate of oral proficiency; Daisy B. Williams. Physics. Faculty of Science.—Intermediate John O. Beynon, James Davies. William T. Davies. Evan W. Evans, John LI. Griffiths, Arthur E. Hopkins. John T. W. James, William James, Hywel Jones. Martin G. Jones, William D. Jones, George W. Thomas, James B. Whiftworth, John Williams. One-Year Course under Temporary Regulations. David Melville Jones. Final. Cecil W. Davies, John J. A. Jones, Frank G. W. King, Frank G. Wynne. Honours.—Class II. Arget John Saunders Botany. Facultv of Arts.—Intermediate: Gwyn- eth H. Edwards, Dorothy Lloyd Jessie Watkins, -Ila,v P. Watkins Faculty of Science. Intermediate: David Davies, Evan W. Evans, Annie Harris, Evan Idris Howel, John T. W. James. William James. Besil Jenkins, David T. Jones, Hywel Jones. Mar'tin G. Jones. Elsie M. Morgan,, Annie Owen, Dorothy M. Roberts. Faculty of Arts. Final: Endyn E. I Forster. Jennie Jones. Rachel M. Wil- liams. Faculty of Science. Final: Annie E. Blackwell. Eva J. Fry. Elizabeth Morgan I Ada L. Probort, Edith M. Turner. Honours.—First Class: Evan Lewis Jones. Third Class: Ada L. Probert t Liinda T. Rogers. BANGOR. Chemistry. Faculty of Science. — Intermediate- Jennette C. Bevers, Edith J. Edmunds. Annie Evans, Noel G. Evans, Kvan R. Hughes. Violet Gale Jackson. Dil.va, A. Jones. John Owen Jones, William Jones. (Bethesda), William Hugh Jones. Herbert P. Lewis, Robert A. Lloyd, Alfred S. • O'Dwyer, Florence M. E. Parsley. Thomas np Rhys. John Rhys Roberts. Sidney Cheer Roberts, Eric W. C. Thomas, Harold Wilcoxon, Phyllis Wynne. Inorganic. Final: William John Hughes, John R. Morgan. Herbert. B. Watson- Organic, Applied S«rience. — Mary Sutherland. Organic.—Final John Evans, William John Hughes, Elias S. Jones, John R. Morgan, Norman Beattie Thomas. Herbert B. Watson, Idwal G. Ll. Williams. Honours.—Class t. Herbert B. Watson Class II.: John R. Morgan. Class III. • Owen C. Edwards. German. Faculty of Arts.- Intermediate: David Oar field Davies, Gwilym T. Hughes, Kather.ine Hughes, Violet II. M. Hughes, Gladys S. Jones. Ordinary: Gwladys D. Williams. Special: Elsie M. Hall. Honours: Ru;h Allen (first-class), Llewelyn P. Griffiths (second-class). Certi- ficate of Oral Proficiency: Ruth Allen. Llewelyn P. Griffiths Phvsics. Faculty of Science. Intermediate: Edith J. Edmunds, Annie Evans. Noel Glyn Evans, Evan R. Hughes, Dilys Ann Jones, John 0. Jones. Thomas IT

LLANDDEWI BREFI

LLANDDEWI BREFI. Shearing.—The Garth shearing took place on Julv 3rd and was well attended. The shearing competition was very atfrac. tive, and the school children who were present in large force, did excellent work. The judges were Messrs. John Davies, L'uest; Mr. John Davies, Pant; and Mr. Benjamin, Esgairgoeh, and gave every satisfaction. The prizes were as follows: -Chmlpion: 1, John ihomas. Garth; 2, Recs Lloyd, Rhysgrog. Local class: 1. David Jones. Penlhvyn: 2, J. J. Morgan, Post Office.

BORTH

BORTH. j Schot'astic Success.-rn the July exam- ination lists of Birmingham University appears the name of Mr. J. Edwards, so't of the late Mr. Edward Edwards, of Ystrad Meurig, and grandson of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Taylor, Libanus Cofctflge. Borth, who graduated with a first class; B.Se. degree :n pure and applied mathematics, physics, bacteriological chemistry, and chemistry (princiiple^. In 1913 Mr. Edwards obtained a first class inter B.Sc in mathematics, physics, and ohemis'rv He has won distinctions and scholarships in science, and his brilliant course at the well-known Provincial University has attracted attention.. For the next few months he has consented to devote his time to important unremunerative experimental work which is to be carried out at tli-p University.

DEGREE DAY AT ST DAVIDS COLLEGE

DEGREE DAY AT ST. DAVID'S COLLEGE. On Thursday of last week degree day at St. David's College, Lampeter, was held when, oiring to the war, no invitations were sent out for the usual luncheon, though luncheon was provided for parents and near relatives of graduates taking degrees or licences. The Principal (Dr. Bebb) accom- panied by Professors Scott, Wrade, Walker, Tyrrell Green, Richards, Thomas; and Guest as well as by the graduates and members of St. David's College School, of which the Rev. Mr. Footman is head- master, assembled at the College and went in procession to the Memorial Hall where the degrees were conferred and licences given by the Principal. Professor Thomas presented the candidates and Professor Tyrrell Green invested. I The degrees and licences were conferred and given according to the following results of the June examination by the I Oxford and Cambridge examiners, the Rev. J. C. Morris, M.A., Norlth Wales Univer- sity College, examining in Welsh:- I Honours List. B.A. Degree.—Theology: Class II., E. D. Johnson, Southsea. Classics: Class II., A. P. Cook, Haverfordwest. Mathe- matics: Class I., Daniel Thomas, Llany- byther; Class II., W. Megicks, Lampeter, History: Class I., B. W. Benskin, Pwll- heli; B. E. Hughes, Gorseinon. I Moderations. Theology: Class in.. Daniel Jones, Ltanilar. Classics: Class I., Jacob Evans, Ciribyn; Class II.. L. M. Whitworth, Lampeter. History: Class II.. Herbert, Roberts, Wrexham. Responsions.—Mathematics Class I., E. J. Harries, Letterston. Science: Class II., W. B. Williams, Kidwelly. History: Class 1., J. B. Thomas, Morriston. Wrelsh Class n., T. G. Jenkyns, Letterston; B. Roberts, Dolgelley. Pass List. B.A. Degree. Class I., V. G. Aston, Stourbridge. Class II.: H. S. Jones, Goodmayes, Essex. Class III. J. E. M. Christopher, Newtown; William Davies, Brynmawr; T. C. Edwards, Abergele; A. E. Evans, Llanrwst; J. B. 0. George, Neyland; A. Ll. Jones, Llanon (Cards.); Oliver Jones, Brvnamman; Owen Jones, New Quay (Cards.); R. H. Pritchard, Bethesda. Supplemental certificate for licentiates in divinity:—Class I. J. H. G. Clunn, Teignmouth. Class II.: W. G. H. Thomas, Birmingham. Licence in Divinity.—Class n. N. C. R. Campbell, Lampeter; D. Richards, Pen- nant, Aberai^th H. S. Richards, Newport (Mon.); J. Williams, Burry Port. Class III.: A. Bodyccmoo, Larnrpeter W. C. L. Davies, Llansawel; T. Jeffreys, Keynsham D. T. Jones, Newcastle Emlyn; Morgan Jones, Llandyssul F. R. May, Aberdare; C. J. Parsons, Tonyrefail; R. O. Rowlands, Rhuddlan (Flints.); H. Whitehead, Brad- ford D. S. Williams. Ystalyfera W. H. C. Williams. Churston Ferrers.. Theological certificat.e (third year specialists): Class II.: W. Megicks, Lampeter. Class III. B. W. Benskin, Pwllheli. Moderations.—Class II. W. R. Davies, Llanfair Clydogau; B. P. Jones, Aber- ayron. Class III. D. Davies, Lampeter; E. D. Evan, Bodvean, near Pwllheli; W. T. James. PorAtypridd; D. M. Jones. Tanybwlch, Merioneth; 1. C. Jones, Lam- peter; J. T. Jones, Pontrhydfendigaid; J. W. Jones. Lampeter; D. L. Lloyd, Car- marthen D. T. R. Perrott, Llanelly; D. Williams, Maesteg. Theological certificate (sscond year specialists):—Class III. Jacob Evans, Cribyn; Herbert Roberts, Wrexham. Responsions..—Class I.: X. M. Edwards, Abergele. Class II. D. M. Davies, New- castle Emlyn; David Evans. Llanddewi Brefi; E. T. Jones, Abersoch; J. R. Ll. Jones, Llanarthney; H. Llewellyn. Bar- goedl. Class III. L. J. Edwards. Llanfi- li,ingel-,ir-aiN-h; W. P. Jones, Barry; T. A. LI. Phillips. Llanelly. First Year Biennials.—Class I.: W. B. Chapman, Birmingham. Class II. W. T. Thornber, Blackburn; T. H. Williams, Ciliau Aeron. Class III.: W. Brazell. Pembrey; A. F. Cox, Abersychan (Men.); H. R. Davies. Abcrgwili; W. Ellis, Hyde, near Manchester; S. R. Jones, Pontlottyn; Thomas Rees, P'enygraig. Luncheon Ni-a,,3 served in the Refectory at the College after which the only toast submitted by the Principal was that of the King, which, the Principal observed, needed no words. He asked the company to emphasise the toast of his Majesty as the representative of our country and embodying their patriotism. On that unique occasion the Principal asked the company to sing the National Anthem. The request having been loyally responded to. the Principal addressed a few words to those who that day were leaving the College, giving them all good wishes in their future work. The Visitor of the College (the Bishop of St. David's) who at the last moment found he was unable to be present, had sent a message to 'them cf congratulation and of good wishes. Last vear he (the Principal) was the unfortunate cause of the cold way the degree and licence men cf that year were sent oil: to their parishes. He was glad to meet the men of this year and to thank all for their sympathy with him in his illness which then prevented him from being present to confer the degrees and giving the outgoing students a parting word. He recognised the importance of degree day in the lives of thci?e who were taking their degrees and in the lives cf parents and relat ves and of those who were going to be relatives. (Laughter.) Though the College on the present occasion was naturally and rightly overshadowed by the war, he felt that they mutf; not forget the importance of the occa- sion in the lives of the degree and licence men and must for the time being try not to let the national cloud rest unduly on them in going out from the College. They missed from among them that day a large number of students who had gone or were going to the war but while they regretted their" absence they could not regret the cause that had called them away—the ser- vice of their King and country. (Cheers.) Though degree day this year was a quiet time, the report which the examiners had made and the results as decided by the examinations were unusually satisfactory. (Applause.) One of 'the examiners wrote before the report came out to say how pleased he was with the change and improvement of the work since last year. There were, he added, very few howlers of an idiotic type. (Laughter.) That was. at any rate, something—(laughter)—"and very few incoherent answers. He spoke also of having examined at Cambridge I (where the effects of the war were being felt as well as at Lampeter) and was sur- prised to find, thac the students of St. David's College had done so well. (Hear, hear.) The whole report of the examiners was to the same effect. He (the Principal) congratulated those who had done so well in the examinations and thought it: particularly satisfactory to find that the honours work of the College had attained a high standard. The College had II one graduate in the final year in mathe- matics in the first class and three historians on which they must congratulate the students themselves as well as Professor Scott and Mr. Fletcher. (Applause.) But it was not merely by examination that the College measured its position, but by tho growth, improvement, and progress of the men the College sent out to do the diffie-uk work they had to undertake. (Hear, hear.) Everyone thought that the times in which he lives are the most important times in the world's hiatory. The present, time no doubt was a difficult and anxious time and would be more difficult and time no doubt was a difficult and anxious time and would be more difficult and anxious after the war was over. It should. however, be borne in mind that times or difficulty were also times of grealt oppor- tunities and that they should be met with prudence, courage, and enthusiasm. (Hear, Hear.) The future welfare and rputation of the College depended upon the individual students whom it sent out into the world. He was glad to be able to say that the reputation of the College was growing and improving not only in Wales, for which that College was founded, but in England, where many Lampeter men were doing excellent work, and far across the waters and wherever Lampeter men are found. One had come over in the Canadian contingent and otip in the Australian contingent. (Cheers.) Let the students now going out remember that the good name of the College depended upon the good work they did. Of course, tho .success of the College itself depended upon the quality of the men sent into it and upon its having a sufficient number of men (to train and after looking back and seeing what the College had done in the past they should look forward and do what lay in their power to send to it the best men that could be oUtained to enhance its welfare and success. His ambition for the College was that the number of students should, grow to 200. It had recently gone above 150, but the number had since gone back ^somewhat; and when they 'took into account the way in which the College had dealt with the present difficulty and the way in which its supporters had stood by it they had cause tor deep thankfulness. (Hear, hear.) The men who that day were going out he congratulated and wished every success to, hoping that the lessons they had received at the- College would be found useful in their .after life and that: they would keep on learning. To them he would say in conclusion good bye" which meant "God be with you." (Cheers., The company then separated.

ICorrespondenceI II

I Correspondence. I COUNTY GENTRY AND THE WAR. SlR,—A letter appeared recently in one of the Welsh papers which contained an attack upon the leading families of Wales, accusing them of holding back in this hour of danger in the history of our country. Though the majority of the people of Wales are aware that the charge is utterly I without foundation and, though it is in- credible that any educated person could bGolieve so mean and untruthful a charge, it is, perhaps, only right that the public generally should be enlightened as to the part played by our squirearchy in the present state of national peril. The county of Cardigan was especially aimed at bv this unscrupulous critic. Therefore a brief survey of what the Cardiganshire gentry have done in the past eleven months of the war may be welcome and useful; and what can be said of this county can also be applied to the same class in everv other Welsh county. Our only peer, the Earl of Lisburne, holds a commission in the W elsh Guards. Of our two leading families of Gogerddan and Bronwydd, Sir Edward Parry Pryse is at present commanding one of the bat- talions of the Welsh Regiment, whilst his younger brother, Mr. George Pryse, is a major in the Welsh Horse Reserve, and his onlv son is a second-lieutenant in the South Wales Borderers. Of the Bronwydd family, Lieutenant Kemes Lloyd, of the Grenadier Guards, only son of Sir Marteine Lloyd, has been wounded at the front. Other members of this ancient family who are serving their country in arms are Colonel Herbert Lloyd and Colonel John Lloyd, whose only son, Capt. Audlev Lloyd, of the South Wales Borderers, has been severely wounded in action. Probably the family with the largest number in army and navy is that of Brynog, six of the late Captain Vaughan's sons having been on active service, one of whom (the late Major Charges Vaughain, D.S.O.) having been killed at the Dardanelles. Very dose be- hind comes Cilgwyn five of Mr. Fitz- willinm's sous holding commissions. Our Lord Lieutenant f:Colone-1 H Davies Evans) has his eldest son in the Royal Artillery; his second son being major in the Pem- brokeshire Yeomanry, while his youngest son, Mr. Alan Davies Evans, a civil engineer, has been taking part in the fighting in East Africa. All three sons of the martial family of Lewes of Llanlear have been serving their country; the eldest as a colonel in the Royal Artillery, the third as commanding officer of a bat- talion of the Essex Regiment, whilst the second son. the late Capt. Price Lewes, R.N., of H.M.S. "Superb," died in a naval hosnital last winter. Three grand- sons of this family also hold commissions —Second-licutenajntsj Martyn L('wes, Lewes Mott. and John Xewland. Jhe only son of Tyglyn Aeron, Major PrIce Lewes, is in command of a battery at the front.' Major Longcroft, of Llanina, is one of our most celebrated airmen, HIs younger brother died of illness contracted bv military training last winter. Three sons of Uõvd, Waunifor the two sons ot the Hon Mrs. Stewart, of Alltyrodm and their uncle (Captain William Stewart) are on active service. Major R. B. Jordan, D.S.O., late of Pigeonsford, is in com- mand of a battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment at the Dardanelles. Ot his cousins, the Hopes of Pigeonsford, Llan- granog, Wales is especially proud of Capt. Hope, commander of H.M.S. "Queen Elizabeth, whilst other brothers are also serving including Capt. Herbert Hope, R.N., Major Pieton Evans, of Glan- helig. is second in command of the 12th Battalion Welch Regiment, and hie younger brother, Lieut. Lawrence Evans, has obtained a commission in the 7th Royal Fusiliers. Mr. Harford of lalconr dale is with his Yeomanry and his son, who is now fighting in the Dardanelles, holds a commisson in the South W ales Borderers. Captain Edward Powell, of Nanteos, head of one of our oldest county families, rejoined his regiment at the out- break of the war. Paymaster S. H. Jones Parry, R.N., of Tyllwyd, is on board of H.M. "Roxburgh, in the North Sea. Captain E H. Vaughan, of the well- known and highly-respected faiuilv of Llangoedmore. is with the Welsh Horse. Two of the Davies family of Tyglyn are serving and one has been wounded. Capt J. J. Evans, of Lovesarove, and Major Pugh. of Abermaide, hold commissions in th" Welsh Horse. This is an incomplete nd hnrriedly- drawr-up list from memory; but there must be many more members of our fad- ing families who have volunteered for ser- vice whose names are not included. Yet even in this curtailed state it constitutes a roll of honour of which Cardiganshire must feel nrond, and naturally so. I only hope it will to some extent help to check indecent attempts which are being made. even at a time like the present when we- should all endeavour tn do what we can to eliminate all class distinction, to keen alije that class hatred which has been the stock-in-trade of the more, un- scrupulous political agitator for many years and which has worked incalculable 1Il:hiI"f in the country. While feeling prourl of the splendid sacrifices made by the other classes in the country, the fact cannot be denied that no single' nlasii of the community as a class can show so noble a record as the country gentry.—Yours etc.. Y GWIR YN Erbyn Y BYD."

Advertising

THE QUESTION OF HEALTH. There is an old saying "A stitch in time saves nine," and if upon the first symptoms of anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple but proper means of correcting the mischief nine- tenths of the suffering that invades our homes would be avoided. The body is a machine full of intricate and delicate mechanicism and when one part is im- peded it gradually throws the whole out of gear unless it is quickly put right. A cold, a chill, a touch of indigestion or liver com- plaint, a pain in the loins or the little in- discretions to which in the hurry and tur- moil of life we are all prone (such as eat- ing too quickly, not taking sufficient rest, worrying too much over our troubles, etc. etc.), all tend to bring about a deadlock in some part of the human mechanicism or a weakening or slowing down of the whole. A good bracing tonic, one that will re- vitalise and will wind up all the machin- ery, will at such times work greater won- ders than a long course of nauseous medi- cines. A dose of Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters taken when you feel the least bit out of sorts is just that "stitch in time." The question of health is a matter which is sure to concern us at one time or an- other, specially when Influenza is so pre- valent as it is just now so it is well to kpow what to take to ward off an attack of this most weakening disease, this epi- demic catarrh or cold of an aggravated kind, to combat it whilst under its baleful influence, and particularly after an attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of complaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters is acknow- ledged by all who have given it fair trial to be the best specific remedy for dealing with Influenza in all its various stages, being a preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ail- ments requiring tonic strengthening and I nerve increasing properties. It is invalu- able for those suffering with colds pneu- monia. or any serious illness, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness and lassitude. Don't delay, but try it now. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testimonials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s. 9d. and 4s. 6d.) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which none are genu- ine. Sole Proprietors:—Quinine Bitters Manu- facturing Company, Ltd. Llanelly, South Wales.

LIBRARY

LIBRARY. THE WELSH OUTLOOK. -Cardiff: The Wetkh Outlook Press; 3d. The July number of the Welsh Outlook, a monthly journal of national social progress, is a bright number, full of utformative and interesting matter. The noites of the month deal with a variety of subjects pertinent to the life and activities of the nation and special articles are contributed by Professor Sir Henry Jones on the religious outlook, by Prin- cipal Roberts on "Changing Standards," by Rosa Newmarch on Russian Music and Painting (continued); and by Professor Phillips on "Education and Individuality." The life and opinions of Robert Roberts, a wandering scholar, is continued; and the numbed- is graced with items of poetry and illustrated by photographs, including a group made up of the Right Hon. D. Lloyd George, Professor Henry Jones, and the Rev. John Williams, Brynsiencyn. It is altogether a creditable number in contents and get up. SOCIAL LIFE IN WALES by JO:,dl Finnemore.—London. A. and C. Black; Is. 6d. This publication, which forms a section of Black's historical series, is an attempt to give the young reader a glimpse of the social life of the Welsh people from the days when Wales began to occupy its present borders. The subject is a wide one and is dealt with on the broadest and simplest lines. Regard has been paid to points where Welsh life has shown itself distinctive from the general life of the British people. The book forms a com- panion to the two volumes of "Social Life in England" which has met with so much appreciation in British Schools. The book is usefully bound and it has fifty-seven illustrations, four of them in colour, selected by Mr. Robert J.' Finch. The text shows research and gives an intimate description of the people, their modes of life and government before the coming of ithe Saxons and the changes which were brought about by the coming of the Saxons and of their conquerors, the Normans. The book is written in simple picturesque language and should be of great use in schools not only in Wales but throughout the kingdom. A FRIENDLY TALK WITH SOCIALISTS AND OTHERS, by Joseph Bibby.- Liverpool: The P.P. Press; 6d. Whatever readers may think of the writer's theory of reincarnation, which is scarcely pertinent to the discussion, they cannot fail to be interested in his Letters on Socialism." "Some Lessons from the War," and "The New Socialism." In a survey in Letter vi., the writer says:— WTe have now carefully examined the claims of Democratic Socialism, regarded as a panacea for the ills which affect our social life. We drew attention to the fact that in China, a country surpassingly rich in natural resources, but which contains no capitalists in the Western sense, the level of material comfort is much lower than in America where capitalism abounds; we also found that the theory of Socialism which affirms that the misery of the poor is caused by the riches of the rich is in opposition to observed facts. We noted in Letter 1. that dame nature has not placed every person at the same Iage in evolution, but to each has given an environment calculated to call out the latent powers requiring to. be developed. In Letter II. we stated that capital was not the product of Labour alone, and also that if the capitalist was abolished it would be necessary to provide national reservoirs of capital for the floating of new ventures. The proceeds of industry would not, therefore, go 'to laTxmr alone, but to the replenishment of the State reservoir of capital Further, we expressed the opinion that the fittest persons to control material wealth were those who plan and initiate or take the risks in the organisation which produce (it. In Lstter III. it was shown to be vitally necessary to social progress that now capital should be continually produced; and that for the welfare of all it was a primary condition of social wellbeing that talent and business capacity should be developed; and, further, thit capitalism, wjth all its faults, was more conducive to those ends than Democratic Socialism. In Letter IV". it was stated tha): the true, way to displace the capitalist Ni-as to do h:s work better, and that as capital was available in the open market for all to hire, a socialist regime, if such were desirable, could be more fittingly and more honestly brought about by the Socialists set ting out to replace the capitalist by doing his work better. In Letter V. the question was examined from its moral side, when it was found that the advocacy of orthodox Socialism begins by violating moral principles, and that it fails to enjoin upon its members the fact that welldcing and wcllbeing are related as cause and effect, and dan not be put asunder by artificial arrangements. In thus frankly and freely stating the case as it appears to me, 1 hope I have not closed my mind agaiinst any honest attempts which may be made towards social impi ovemtAit^. I ar-n no more satisfied with our present (attainments than the orthodox Socialist himself; but in making efforts towards social advancement, we shall have to understand a little more of the true mean- ing of life, and of the laws which govern the world into which we have come. We may then discover the means whereby, in an orderly world, attainment and advance- ment can be rightly won. In the first place, nature has so arranged things that harmony and well- being cannot be produced from 'the selfish strivings cither of individuals or of classes. All classes and all talents are needed in society, just as all kinds of instruments are needed to produce a concerted piece of music, and all individual efforts should, therefore, be consistent with the good of the whole community. 1 We do not get rid of disharmony by declaiming against others; but we make an appreciable contribution to the common weal when we see to it that our own

LIBRARY

instrument is giving forth sounds which make for concord. In the light of the knowledge that society is an organism, it will also be seen how foolish it is to do anything which weakens the social body. Physiologists all agree that in an effort to improve some functional activity, it is better to build up the general health and so help the, ailing organ (to recover its normal condition. The great majority of militant Social- ists act on the theory that they can tem- porarily damage the general health of the organism and yet succeed in permanently I' strengthening a particular part. Tirs is the exact opposite of the physiological method, and I think it will be discovered by painful experience before long, that the physiologist is right and the Socialist 91 wrong; for society is so constituted that when one class is made to suffer, all the others suffer with it. From our survey of the question, it is clear that what is needed is not so much a new social arrangement as a new spirit of service; the spirit which seeks not its own, bult the common good. A theory of life is also needed which will harmonise the interests of all classes. An effective movement in this direction will set in when we begin to realise, as we ought to have realised already, that selfish- ness of all kinds is a form of ignorance, and lthatJ better results follow from the spirit of service than from that of strife. Although there is little of equality amongst the various members of any com- munity, any more than •'there is equality between the members of an ordinary family, there is a subtle tie which is as binding in the one case as in the other. When that fact is fully realised it will be seen lzhat in doing the best we can for all the others we are in reality doing the best for ourselves. Every workshop in the country, for instance, represents a group of this kind, and the employer stands in loco parentis to his workpeople. In those industrial communities which are governed by shareholders, the managing director and the staff of managers and foremen will occupy that rote, livery person in these groups should regard himself temporarily as a member of thfflt particular industrial family; each should seek to contribute of his best to the common good, and the management should lead the way in the exemplification of the spirit of unselfish service. Bojth the employer and the workmen will be happ!ier, more capable, and better off in every way as the, result of the growth of the spirit of fellowship; and improved efoouiomic conditions would the secured without the cost be¡'ng charged against the pubbic, as is the case at present We have already seen that (character and ability are two of the factors—indeed, klie most important factoi-s--in individual as in social progress. In the effort to better the social condi- tions, the heads of our industrial organisa- tions. who are the natural leaders in the industrial group, should take a more active part, by seeking to encourage and i-eni-ard ability wherever fit manifests itself and by seeing that every one in the group receives such supervision as will encourage the development of any useful talent ho may possess. Under an arrangement of this kind, hours of labour would be shortened wherever they were found to be too long for the wellbeing of the workmen; tor where the true welfare of each individual craftsman is being sought after labou-- conditions will be made healthier, and one great source of human misery will thus be appreciably reduced. The worker would also, under these con- ditions, enjoy greater security of employ- ment, and working from the higher motive of goodwill to all, he would not only become more capable and efficient, but would attain to a higher level of manhood. And last, but not least, he would not see the spectacle of the workhouse staring him in the face; at thei end of his life's labours, for in every successful business conducted on this basis it would be found des'rable and necessary for the management to establish a pension fund, either from the nrofits of the business or by joint contri- butions.

Advertising

I ■ ■ ■■ m h II yon hate a BAD LEG. LJ M I M W Eczema, Old Sores, n Wounds.Ringworm.Cuts, ■ Burns, Scurf, or any skin affection send to Maurice Smith,Ph.C., F.S.M.C-, Kid- derminster. lor a Iree sample ol HEALO Ointment. lt costs yon nothing, and you will not regret it. Try it, you need not send for a large box. A Shifnal Lady says it is worth 95 a box. Healo allays all irrita* tit>n, reduces inflammation, prevents festering, soothes and heals all bad lees.* Don't say your case is hope- less without trying HEALO. Boxes 1/lVa & 2/9. LOCAL AGENTS- M E Morris, Chemist, High Streec Portmadoc

TALYBONT

TALYBONT Petty Sessions.—At the monthly sessions Oil Tuesday, before A. Cecil Wright and Kdward Jones, Esqrs., Margaret Williams, Gwastod, Borth, was charged, on the evidence of P.C. Griffiths, with having allowed two cows to stray, and the case was dismissed on payment of 5s. costs. Shearing.—The annual shearing took place at Alltgochymynydd on Saturday. The pair of shears, given by Mr. E. E. Jenkins, was won by Mr. M. B. Jones, Cyneinog; Mr. T Blaenant Jones. Taly- bont, coming second; and Mr. J. Evans, Dolgarnwent. third. The judge was Mr. Joseph Evans Dolgelynen, who won the shears last year. B.D Degree.—LJongyfarchir yr ysgolor Samuel James Leek ar ei Iwvdd ant yn ennill y radd uchel o B.D. Dechreuodd ar ei yrfa yn NhalybonC o dan ei hen athraw, Mr. Daniel Jones, C.M. Aeth oddiyma i'r Ysgol Ragbaratoawl ('Ine;r- fyrddin. Tra yno pasiodd ei "matrdc" vn y dosbarth blaenaf. Wedi bod yno am duwy flynedd trodd ei wyneb i Goleg Oaerdydd. Bu yn efrydydd diwyd a chaled tra yn y coleg, ac nid ymprphwys- odd nes cyrhaedd y nod uchel oedd ganddo 1. o'i flaen. Bu ei yrfa. yn un hynod o Iwyddiannus, oherwydd mae"r ffaith ei fod wedi enruill y radd anrhydeddus hon cyu cyrhaedd ei saitli ar liugaiiv oed, yn glod nid bychan iddo, ac yn ddigonol hrawf ei fod yn feddianol ar alluoedd meddyliol cryf. Melus ydyw ei glywed yn traddodi'r genadwri. *gan ei fod yn .Miaradwr llithrig ac effeithiol. Heb amheuaeth daw yn enwog yn v pulpud, a dylasai enwad y Bedyddwyr fod yn faleh f<>d ganddynt fachgen mor Hawn o rKhrvlith.

ABERAYRON

ABERAYRON. Schoolteacher's Tragic Death. Mr. IS John Evans, assistant-master atthe Coun- cil Schools, Owmavon, was killed on the Mumbles Railway at Swansea on Saturday night. He visited Swansea during the day and was crossing the railway lines between the slipway and 'the arch when he was knocked down by an engine, being terribly crushed. The body was conveyed to the mortuary, where it was identified on Sunday by Mr. Rhys Nicholas (head- ma,'(rer of the Cii-mavozi, Council Schools) and Mr. D. M. Evans (with whom deceased staved at Cwmavon.) Deceased was thirty-nine years of age. a native of Aber- ayron. where his aged mother resides. He was educated at Aberystwyth University College, and at one time held the head- mastership of Caerphilly Schools.

Advertising

For King and Country. I ROLLSw HONOUR Beautifully Designed in Colours. tD 11- each. These Certificates are I intended for use of Sun- day Schools, Political and Working Men's Clubs, Factories and Workshops, Friendly Societies and Kindred Organisations in recog- nition of Members who have responded to the call to serve their King and Country in the War ON SALE AT THE Gambrian News STOKES, TERRACE ROAD, ABERYSTWYTH. it It sits t Just Perfectly DAINTY LINEN and ROBIN STARCH seem || to belong to each other. There is a freshness and il charm about linen starched with ROBIN, which must be experienced to be believed. This is because EE38 you can exercise your individual taste when you » starch your linen at home with |i | STARCH [ j making the linen just as you g|g|j like it-neither too stiff nor too limp and you can always have your things just when you want them. LAdd nothing but water FfflA ^1 to ROBIN-the Powder Starch—and satisfaction HB is sure. he New Starch I 1 ELLIS'S I PHARMACY a DISPENSING of English and Foreign Prescriptions. Medical and Surgical Requisites. Robert Ellis, Pharmaceutical Chemist, 53, Terrace Road, ABERYSTWYTH. Tel. 71. GARDEN SEEDS J. VEAREY Has now in Stock a large variety of New Garden Seeds I OF THE BEST QUALITY. FRESH VEGETABLES Daily from our own Gardens. Sweet rcas a Speciality. Note Address 17, NORTHGATE STREET, ABERYSTWYTH. Mr. JAMES REES, Dental Surgery. 30. ALEXANDRA RD., ABERYSTWYTH. (Same Street as Railway Station) ATTENDS PERSONALLY. TREGARON, let and last Tuesdays in each month. Fridays in each m^nth. LLANRHYSTYD, 1st and 3rd Wednesdays in each month. LLANON, 1st and 3rd Wednesdays in each month. ABERAYRON, 1st and 3rd Wednesdays in each month, hours 1-30 to 3-30. LLANARTH, lEt and 3rd Fridays in each month, NEW QUAY, 1st and 3rd Fridays in each month. MAGHYN'LLETH.lst. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays in each month, at Mrs Travor Jones, Grathyn House (close to theHospital), Scientific Bight-Testing and Frame Fitting Qualified Sight-Testing Optician. W. MIALL JONES, M.P.S. Pharmaceutical Chemist Fellow of the Worshipful Company Spectacle Makers, and of the Institute of Ophthalmic Opticians. 33, TERRACE RD., ABERYSTWYTH STEAM SAW MlUiS, ABERYSTWYTH. R. ROBERTS and SONS, TIMBER AND SLATE MERCHANTS. EVERY DESCRIPTION OF JOINERY DONE QUICKLY AND CHEAPLY. OARS' and BOATS' SAILS made on the Premises also all kinds of SACKS, COAL BAGS, &c, ESTIMATES GIVEN. JOBBING DONE: FELLOES, FOR OART WHEELS, TRAPS, AND OTHER VEHICLES. I PETER JONES' Briton Slate Worhi k j 14- vpmm ABERYSTWYTH. Elain andjErmmelle.d Slate Chimney Pieces, and every description of rnonumencal worfoin Slate, Marble,and Granule. Best.Coal at lowest Prices. Coke also supplied w =- -J MEMBER OF rc 4L rp WATKINS, PLUMBER AND DECORATOR, 7, Custom House Street. Workshop-Sea. View Place, STORES for MANTLES, GLOBES, SHADES, Etc., of all kinds and at all prices. Also ELECTRIC LAMPS. 8a, TERRACE ROAD. MUSIC ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED, ARNFIELD'5 Music Warehouse, Dolgelley- Large Selection of Welsh and English Music always in stock. .r-J' Agents for Collard and Collard, and all leading makers of Instruments. Write for Catalogues. 1