Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 7 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
20 articles on this page
Advertising

WE ARE READY. OUR SHOW ROOMS ARE NOW STOCKED WITH THE FASHIONS OF THE DAY. -,Our policy will be to supply goods of undoubted smartness at the lowest possible margin of profit. A visit to our Show Rooms will be esteemed. ■■! ftobt McLean, MILLINERY ESTABLISHMENT, Portmadoc.

PORTMADOC

PORTMADOC. Commission. -Nlr. H. A. Brereton, platoon commander with the Volunteers at Beddgelert, has received a commission as lieutenant in the Territorial Reserve, .and wiLl be engaged on observation post work. o Promotion.—Private Tommy Jones, 18, -G,arth-t-errace, has been promoted to be lance-corporal in the 2/6 th R,.W.F. County Court Bailiff. Mr. Owen Ephraim. Penstep, Llanfrothen, formerly huntsman with the Ynysfor hounds, has 'been appointed to succeed the late Mr. tGwalioa Jones as county court bailiff for Portmadoc district. Obituary.—The death occurred on Friday night after a long illness of Mr. Owen .Jones, 3, Cbrnhill-place, mariner, uncle of jMr. Evan Evans. ship carpenter. He was sixty-eight years of age. Wern Hospital.—Col. Coates, R.A.M.C., .chief medical officer off the Western Com- -mand, inspected Wern Hospital a few days ago and expressed satisfaction with the .arrangements generally. A Deserter. — Private Richard M. Roberts, Glanmorf-a-terrace, Penmorfa, was charged at a special police court on "Wednesday with having deserted from the R.W.F. at Kinmel about a month ago. Defendant was arrested in civilian clothing by P.C.'s 47 and 56 at his parents home in Portmadoc. Mr. J. Owain Hughes, the magistrate, remanded him to wait a military escort who came for him next xlay. i-uneral.— The funeral of Mr. Lewis -Jones, deputy gas collector, which was private, tooK place on Saturday at Port- madoc Cemetery, the itev. VS. T. EKis, B.P., pastor ot Garth, officiating. The -efilet mourners were Jenny Glynn Jones, iiessie Glynn Jones, Llewelyn Thomas Jones Lewis Glynn Jones, and David .Jones (children); Mary ULynn Williams .(sister-in-law); iVlrs. Roberts, I estiniog .(cousin); Messrs. John Williams (uncle); Lewis Williams (uncfe); Tom E. Owen and Robert Owen, Anglesea (brothers-in-law); .John Jones, Angiesea (cousin); Mrs. Hughes. lnystowYIl; Messrs. J. W. Jones, •Casn Stores; Griffith Hughes, coal merchant; G. H. Thomas, draper; and .David Hughes, Shop Newydd. David Hughes, Shop Newydd. The White Cross Fund.-The PwlUieli -children, trained by Lieut. F. E. ioung: .and Mrs. Young, paid a second visit to Portmadoc on fc'riday night to give a per- foraiaiioe in aid of the Portmadoc school children's collection towards the White jQross Fund, the singularly appropriate name given to the fund which Generaa Owen Thomas is promoting to provide protection and assistance to Welsh soldiers and sailors on their return home during .and after the war. The entertainment was organised by Messrs Evan Evans, schoolmaster, David Williams, Ivy House, and William Jones, 9, Snowdon-street and was a remarkable success as regards both attendance and performance. The Town Hall was crowded to overflowing, and the I children excelled themselves as enter- tainers, nearly all the items in Toy Times" and "The Blue Pierrettes" being ,encor-ed. Young Emily, who takes the heading part brought the house down each time she appeared and was thrice encored on the last occasion of her appear- ance. Miss Salty M. Lloyd, daughter of Police Sergeant Lloyd, PwUheli, made her first appearance in "The Blue Pierrettes," she acquitted herself splendidly and was given a rousing reception. The children s performance was preceded by the following programme admirably sustained by all 1 rthose taking part: -Pianoforte solo. Miss i Violet Islip, Criccieth; recitations, Miss Alice Wfiliams, Caecanol; songs, Madame Van Aken of Malines, who is staying at Pwllheli; violin solos, Miss Gunzd., Pwll-j ]1e; and dance, Miss Violet Islip. The chairman was Alderman Jones Morris who .gave an interesting explanation of of the objects of the White Cross Fund, pointing out that the intention was to supplement the Pensions E"und of tlie Government. General Owen fhomas had fought in South Africa and tame to realise how little was done for our brave soldiers and sailors on their return from the war. He felt that the Govern- ment Pension Fund would not be adequate to deal with broken warriors and their ■■ families as they should be dealt with and he was was therefore determined on estab- lishing in Wales a national fund which would so supplement the Government Eund as to provide for the returned warriors during and after this war an assured position in the future for them- selves and their dependants. (Applause). The splendid attendance at the Town Hall -that night was a sure indication that the people of Portmadoc were in warm sym- pathy with the movement and were pre- pared to do all they possibly could to prevent soldiers and sailors who fought in the great war from being more or less stranded as they were after the South African war. Genera'l Owen Thomas 'hoped to raise L25,000 for the Welsh nat- ional fund by means of school children's collections alone. His hope seemed in a fair way,' to be reallised. for within two or three weeks of the inception of the movement the ,sahool children ojf Wales -had already contributed £3.000 and from what Mr. Evan Evans told him (the -Chairman) he felt sure that the school- children of Portmadoc who were bringing their pennies for the weekly fund would make a handsome contribution to the worthy cause. The entertainment was in- tended to aid the children's collection and iie hoped that the little ones of Port- madoc would not be content without a, -total corfection of at least £100. (Ap- plause). The brave men who were ready to lay down their lives in defence of the homes of Britain deserved of the very 'best that could be given them by young Aind old. (Applause). Wales, would, he felt sure, look after the interests of those 'brave men just as a father would look after his favourite son. (Applause). A hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the -Chairman and to Lieut. and Mrs. Young, on the proposition of Mr. David Wil- liams, and the entertainment closed with the Welsh National Anthem and "Gbd Save the King." Mr. and Mrs. Young and the chfdren gave their services free and they were conveyed home bv motor .((lr kindly lent by Mr. and Mrs. R. M. .^reaves of Wern. From Asia Minor. -Corporal Frank Tyler, of the Royal Engineers, late of 121, High-street, Portmadoc, in an interesting 'letter from Asia Minor, addressed to Mr. Richard Newell, said he found Mr Newell's address in the "Cambrian News" which he was reading for the first time for years, having left Portmadoc many years ago for Liverpool. He saw by the "Cambrian News" that all the eligible men had or were being sent away from Portmadoc. "J 'C<'ln assure you we need them all and will need them for some time. I was surprised to see the number of Portmadop boys who were at Suvla Bay; but unfortunately I

Advertising

I Sight Testing specie. If we cannot help, we say so. If we can, we do thoroughly, THEREIN LIES OUR SUCCESS. E B. BCKA'EP THOir/S, D.F.O.A. Qusl'fi'f- for Sitfci Tetting, by Extm. LCDOOD, Honours Certificate. R.Bonn trlhcmas & Sons 4, Bank Place, Portmadoc.

No title

did not come across any of my schoolmates. I was on the Gallipoli Peninsula, for seven months and was at the evacuation on December 20th. The Suvla Bay business was a terrible affair, though. I do believe we would have got on better if we had the men when wanted. We landed at Suvla on the night of July 6th. and by July 9th we had lost about 11,000 men, so you can picture the gaps that wanted filling up. Thank God, I got through with only a shrapnel splinter in the arm but I left many a dear chum there. There are five of us left out of the original section who left England. We are now web away over the desert, keeping our eye on Johnny Turk in Asia Minor. So you see the Cambrian News" travels a long way in the world. I have just seen a little civil- ization for a few days for about nine months, so will be glad td come across some white people once more We had terrible experiences in the Peninsula --no wash, no water, no clean clothes, etc. We are now in luxury compared with the Gallipoli days. It will be good, however, to see a good solid stone house once more. Give my kind regards to Inspector Parry and to Mr. Rhys Evans. my schoolmaster, and I wish all' good luck to the Portmadoc boys, for I have a sneaky regard for the boys I was brought up with. We are all doing what we can to squash the common enemy." Gallantry in f ranee.— Lance-corporal Willie Williams, R.W.F., of Carnarvon, who has been recommended for the IXC.M for gallantry in France (in company of Lieutenant Venmore, who has been recom- mended for the military cross) is the son of the late Mr. John Williams, mariiver, 22, Chapel-street, and nephew of Mr. Samuel Williams, workhouse master. On the night of January 30th last, Lieutenant Venmore. who is the son of Mr. James Venmore, of Liverpool and Anglesey, was on duty as patrol officer in front of the British trenches in France when a sentry in the firing trench reported that three men in an advanced listening post had bo-en wounded. Two of these men were just able to crawl back to the British lines over the j barbed wire, but the third man was ioo seriously wounded to follow, being shot through both legs. Lieut. Venmore volun- teered to go to his assistance and took with him a non-commissioned officer (Corporal W. Williams, a Carnarvon man). They went out under heavy fire over the parapet and, after great difficulty, successfully brought in the man over the wire and two ditches. This brave action was succeeded by a further gallant act on the following morning, when a message was received that a man had had his prm blown off at another listening post, practically un- approachable by daylight. Lieutenant Venmore again undertook to go to his aid, once more taking with him Corpora] Wil- liams. T hey crawled across the open ground in the face of heavy machine gun fire. The sufferer was reached his wounds att-ended to, and he was subsequently brought to safety. Both the officer and his companion were most highly congratulated by the brigade and divisional officers. Obituary.—Mrs. Morris, in business for many years as grocer and draper at Sea View-terrace. Borthygest, passed away on Friday, at the age of eighty-one years. She was noted for her charitable deeds and will be greatly missed at Borth-y-gest and particularly by the Weslev.in Church, where she was a zealous member and liboer31 contributor. Deep sympathy is felt with her three grand-daughters who were brought up by the deceased after their father was drowned at se:1. Deecased's husband, Capt. John Morris, had pre- deceased her many years. Intermediate School.A meeting of the Governors ,was held on Friday night present, Mr. J. R. Owen, chairman, Alderman J. Jones Morris, Mr. Jonathan Davies, the ReV. W. T. Ellis, B.D. the Rev J. E. Williams. M.A., Messrs J. Rhys Evans, M.A., headmaster; W. Morris Jones, elerk; and J. J. Edwards, assistant derk--1fr. Jonathan Davies for the Finance Committee reported that there was a balance in hand at the end of the financial year of £ 145 which was £102 better than a year ago. For the second year running there were no arrears in school fees and for school books.—A letter was received from the Central Welsh Board with regard to the suggested altera- tion in the date of holding the annual examination. It. was suggested that it should be held in future either at Easter or at the beginning of the summer term instead of at the end. The Governors decided to object to both suggestions and to recommend that the examination should be held as usual at the end of the summer term but that the terms should be re- adjusted so that the summer term might end early in July. An old pupil of the School who has recently secured a good appointment in the Civil Service, wrote thanking the Governors for their kindness to him whilst in school. They had not only awarded him a scholarship yearly for five years, but also granted 1!11 1 bursary four years in succession. He also desired to thank the Schol staff for their kindness and hoped the School would have unlimited success in the future.

PWLLHELI

PWLLHELI. Re-elected.Ill.. Cornelius Roberts, the mayor, has been re-elected the treasurer of the North Wales Meat Traders' Associa- tion. Licence Extinguished. At Quarter Ses- sions, on Thursday at Carnarvon. Mr. Trevor Lloyd (instructed by Mr. John Humphreys, Portmadoc) appeared in sup- port of the appeal of Mr. Evan Jones^ the licensee, against the refusal of Pwllheli magistrates to renew the licence of the Star Inn, Pwllheli. Mr. William George appeared for the respondents. Nine wit- nesses were called on behalf of appellant and two by the respondents. After a hear- ing of two hours and a half. the Bench con- firmed the decision of Plii-Illiell justices and disallowed the appeal. The licence will accordingly be extinguished without compensation. (Sham Fight.—The Pwllheli Company of Volunteers engaged in a sham fight in Nanhoron Park on Thursday. Captain and Adjutant John Evans, of Broom Hall, acting as umpire. Q«h»r ninety members took part. At the close of the engagement Mr Claude Lloyd Edwards, J.P., the volun- teer battalion commandant, 'entertained the Company to tea at Nanhoron. A Kind Offer.—Mr. D. Charles Owen, stationmaster at Afonwen, has offered the donkey he won in a Red Cross sale at Criccieth last week to. Pwllheli Red Cross Committee for a like competition. The Criccieth competition for "Neddy" realized 414 2s. Personal --Lieiit. F. E. Young left Pwll- heli on Saturday to take uo army duties in the Midlands.

BLAENAU FESTINIOG

BLAENAU FESTINIOG. Funeral.-Thv- funeral took nlace on Friday at Bethesda C-onietei-v of Mrs Thomas, wife of the late William Thomas Gwaenydd-terrace, RJÙw. She was sixty-two years of age. Two of her sons are fighting in Francs and daughters of the deceased are in America. Tabernacle's Effort. -Tabernacle C.M. Church is now making a special effort to raise the remaining £ 200 required to come up with the termR of the offer of the Llan- dmam family. The Rev. R. R. Morris, the pastor, collected £ 201 outside the Church last year.

CRICCIETH

CRICCIETH. The King's Pledge.-The canvass of the adult population of Criccieth, that is, of persons over fifteen years of age, recently undertaken by the Local War Temperance Committee, for the purpose of getitng them to take the King's temperance pledge has now been completed. The result was announced on Friday night by Mr. Wm. George, the chairman. Out of 873 persons canvassed as many as 762 took the pledge. The remaining 111 refused. Thus over eighty-seven per cent. of the adult popula- tion had taken the King's pledge. It is understood that other districts in the county are initiating a like movement. S

ONLY TEN SAVED

ONLY TEN SAVED Torpedoed at Night Without Warning. PORTMADOO MAN'S ESOAPE. About twenty minutes past ten on Wed- nesday night in last week., the Liverpool steamship Zent," owned by Mesrs Elders and Fyffes, was torpedoed without warning by a German submarine. The sJ earner was struck twice and was torn from bow to stern. She sank in about three minutes after the first torpedo. Ten only out of a crew of sixty were saved. Two stow- aways were also drowned. The su' vivors included Captain Martin the master, and Captain Edward Edwards Hughes, 20, Mersey-street, Borth-y-gest. the second officer. The first officer was drowned. Captain Hughes, in an interview with our correspondent, said they were unable to get any boats away, the steamer sank so quickly. It was pitch da.rk and they had no idea, that a submarine was about until the steamer was struck by the first torpedoed. Captain Hughes was in bed asleep at the time. He got up and, as he puts it, simply walked out from his bed I into the sea. The next thing he remem- bers is clinging to an upturned boat with the nine other survivors. The Germans simply left them to their fate, making no attempt at rescue. The ten survivors clung to the upturned boat for nearly three hours when they were rescued by a British ship about ten past one in the morning and taken to port. Capt. Hughes contracted a severe cold and com- pletely lost his voice for some days. His voice has now come back and he appears none the worse for his terrible experiences. He arrived home at Borthygest on Saturday night The Zent" was a steamer of 3,890 tons and was well known as a. banana trader between, the West Indies and Manchester. Pathetic scenes were witnessed on Friday at the offices of Messrs Elders and Fyffes at Garston, Liverpool, when anxious relatives made inquiries for information of the crew of the" Zent." The steamer only left port on Monday.

True and False Kinds of Nationalism

True and False Kinds of Nationalism. A CALL TO WALES. BRIGADIER GENERAL OWEN THOMAS' SCHEME. Brigadier General Owen Thomas pre- sided at the closing puKic meeting in con- nection with the annual assembly of the North Wales English Congi-e-,atiort-al Union at Rhos-on-Sea last week and in the course of an address said he had always been a supporter of missionaries who were the pioneers of civilisation in the dark parts of the earth, -and to whom the British Empire owed a great deal. He had seen the work of missionaries him- self in many parts of Africa, and had come into close touch with the savage tribes there. Many of the practices of the tribes were cruel; but when one inquired into those customs it was found that the natives who practised them had some good reason for what they did. He would rather leave those people alone, in spite of their cruelties, which they carried on for what appeared to them to be good reasons. than he would condone the cruelties of the savage people whom we were fighting in Europe and who laid claim to be re- garded as Christians like ourselves. We had to look nearer home for the heathens and barbarians than in the wids of Africa. It was really necessary to consider whether a mission should not be started to see what could be done to reform the moral nature of the frightful people who came over here to kiK little children. He held two convictions very strongly. Oni was in regard to Christianity, and the other in regard to nationality and the small nations. In regard to Christianity he felt that even if lie could persuade him- s.r that there were no world hereafter he should still sav that it would not be possible to adopt and practice better principles and better teaching than the principles and teaching of Christianity As to nationalism, there were two things called by that name—one was true and the other was false nationalism. False nationalism consisted in flag-wagging and political claims to nationality. That was the kind which people made use of to get into Parliament and into other places. True nationalism, in his opinion, meant love of one's country, of one's people, of the institutions of one's country and a determination to leave one's country better than one found it. The true nat- ionalism will welcome people of other nat- ionalities into Wales, while the other cans out "Wales for the Welsh" and that kind of rubbish. True nationalism is also loyrfi to our King and to the Empire, for the Empire is made up of various nations all united like the roots of a great tree. W ai.es, Scotland, England, Ireland, Australia, Canada, and the rest all may be likened to the roots of the great tree which forms the Empire. Without the roots that tree cannot live. People who want to do away with the little nations and merge them into one cosmopolitan kind of nation would make a great mistake if they should succeed. The people in the Principality, for instance, know the peculiarities of the root which they repre- sent, and what is the best support for it, and if the roots are left alone to develop in their own natural way the tree will con- tinue to grow and to flourish and to be the finest tree in the world. He was a Congregationalist, and hoped he (always would be; but, on coming back to Wales after his travels, he felt there was too much sectarianism in his native country. He believed in healthy rivalry of all kinds, but it was a mistake to be too narrow. Narrowness in Wales seemed to he an obstacle to everything ene tried to do. "I am most anxious," he proceeded, "that the men who are fighting for us now should be well cared for when they come back to this country. I have gone 0 through a war before this, and taken a different part in it, and I know what it is to come home 'again and to feel practically stranded. I left everything and gave up everything, and after three and a half years in serving my country there was nothing that I could come back to, and I remember landing in London and seeing nowhere to turn. I went to the Govern- ment and explained what I bad done. I have never forgotten that; but I was not as badly off as thousands of these young men who wll cg;ne back to us after the war. I had friends and relations to whom I could go; but what about the thousands and thousands of men who have given up practically everything? Ordinary work- men who earn 3s. or 4s. a day will not suffer like men who have given up posts at £ 300 or £ 400 a year. which they wiki find filled up when they get back. What are we going to do for their wives 'and their children? Do not trust too much to the Government. The Government will do something no doubt; but with the Gov- ernment the help must be a kind of flat rate. They must treat al! the privates alike. We want to do something more as a Welsh nation-that is, the people who live in the Principality of Wales, you who come here and breathe the atmosphere of Wales. We want to see that these men when they come back are "looked after just as you would look after your own son. I want the nation to give them a real wel- come home, and to have something ready with which to assist the special cases where the help given by the Government will not suffice. For that purpose I am trying my utmost to get TVVes to take up this matter as a whole united people, and to raise a fund which will be worthy of the Principality. We cannot do too much for our soldiers. These men at this moment are holding the Germans away from our country. I hope that in this part of Wales, as in the other parts, you win do all you can for the Welsh Soldiers' Fund. (Loud applause).

No title

In order to conserve paper supplies, I readers are requested to give a definite order for the "Cambrian News" to their local agent. This will enable the agent to order the exact number required and so avoid returns.

Advertising

When I say soap I mean-Fairy soap. The best and goes furthest l UOJLU HBDLKT 00. LTD., mnrOiJTLfrOV rm

Lleyn Local Tribunal

Lleyn Local Tribunal. POSITION OF AGRICULTURISTS. Lleyn Military Tribunal met on Satur- day to deal with 105 applications for ex- emption from military service. There were present Alderman Maurice Jones, J.P., chairman, Principal Evans, the Rev. T. E. Owen, Messrs. J. Hughes Parry, J.P., W. E. Williams, J. R. Jones, John Pierce, with Mr. J. G. Jones, mili- tary representative; and Messrs. Hugh Pritchard, clerk; and Simeon R. Jones, assistant clerk. New Regulations for Farm Hands. The Chairman said new regulations had been received which were of great import- ance to agriculturists. Accordingly, it would be well for the Clerk to explain them in detail. In future no unmarried agriculturist under twenty-live years of age would be treated as in a certified occupation. The Clerk said the new regulations as regards men engaged in agriculture would not come into force until May 1st. In future single men under twenty-five years of age employed on farms as carters, horse- men, ploughmen, teamsters, etc., were not to be treated as in a certified occupation; nor were single men under tliirtv years of age employed on farms as bailiffs or fore- men. Accordingly, the certificates of ex- emption granted to the agriculturists named would cease automatically on Mny 1st, and on that date the holders would become as a matter of course soldiers of the King unless the holders were able to secure exemption on grounds other than that of certified oecupation. ^ney were entitled to apply on such grounds up to May 1st, and probably for a short time after; but on that point the regulations were silent. The new regulations, moreover, provided that no single man employed in agriculture, even if his age exceeded twenty-five years, could be treated as in a certified occupa- tion unless he was so employed before August 15th, 191. Many men had entered certified occupations after August 15th last, but in future exemption could not be claimed by such men unless they were in those occupations before August 15th. Any farmer who employed a single man under twenty-five years of age after May 1st would for all practical purposes be em- ploying a soldier. The same remark applied in the case of a farm bailiff or foreman under thirty years. The Chairman—The explanation is quite clear, even if it does not give satisfaction. Mr. David Jones, a schoolmaster at Rhoshirwen asked from the body of the Tribunal Chamber if the new regulations applied to farmers' sons as well as to farm I servants. The Clerk—Yes; the regulations make no distinction between sons and servants. Exemption has been granted to them in the past not because they are sons but be- cause they are employed as horsemen, ploughmen, carters etc. The Tribunal then decided to adjourn until May 2nd all applications by young agriculturists under twenty-five years and farm bailiffs, etc., under thirty years 1 The Chairman emphasised the fact that the young agriculturists named could not after May 2nd apply for exemption, except' on ground of domestic or financial hard- ship, etc. Mr. Arthen Owen applied for exemption for a widow's son employed on a farm of fifty acres. There was a married son also employed on the farm and they tilled eight acres. Five other brothers were on sea. The Military Representative opposed the application. Exemption was granted for two months. A man applied for exemption for his son employed on a farm of twelve acres., Replying to the Clerk, he said he had about two horses, about two cows, and tilled about two acres of land. He had three other sons. two of whom were married. The Clerk—Why don't you give definite figures instead of "about" this and "about" that ? (Laughter). The application was refused. A small farmer farming three acres and holding twelve acres of accommodation land applied for exemption. He had three cows and twenty sheep. He was emploved in South Wales up to June last. The application was refused. In the case of a young farmer holding "ixtv acres of land and with two ser- vants, the Military Representative said he was agreeable to absolute exemption being granted. as applicant was medically unfit for the army The Tribunal granted conditional ex- emption. Mr. Arthen Owen appeared in support of an application for exemption by a young man on medical grounds. His widowed mother also depended on him. Mr Owen said two local doctors certified him as not medically fit for the army, but at the behest of the Tribunal lie proceeded to Wrexham to be examined by the Army Medical Board. To his great surprise, the Army Medical Board certified him as fit for military service. The decision of the Medical Board greatly upset him and since then his health had quite broken down and he had been in bed ever since. The Clterk—The gofod news of the Medical Board was too much for him. (Laughter). Mr. Owen—Some of these cases are laughable, but this is really an exceptional case and may easily have very serious con- sequences if the man is not exempted. The Clerk-The Tribunal can do nothing if the Army Medical Board have passed him as medically fit. The Tribunal cannot supersede the Medical Board's decision. The Military Representative—I object to exemption in this case. Mr. Arthen Owen (laughingly)—No doubt. The Military Representative is here like a stone wall. Like Pharaoh, he hardens his heart as he proceeds. (Laugh- ter). It is not like that with you and I, sir (addressing the Chairman). Our hearts do soften sometimes. (Much laughter). The Chairman said as Mr. Owen must know the Tribunal could not grant exemp- tion on medical grounds if the Medical Board had passed the man as fit. Mr. OweÎI-Yes. I appreciate that. but I think you should know the facts. I pro- duce a medical certificate. A brother of the applicant said he was ready to go into the army himself, but had been rejected as medically unfit. The application was refused

PENRHYNDEUDRAETH

PENRHYNDEUDRAETH. Medical. Mr. Hesketh Richards, son of Mr Evan Richards, Bryn, has passed the second professional examination of the Royal College of Surgeons and Physicians of London. Funeral.-Tlie funeral took place on Thursday of Mrs. Smith, wife of Mr. John Smith, Osmond-terrace. Minfford. The Revs. S. Pierce and M. E. Morris offici- ated. Deceased was fortv-four years of age.

The Library

The Library. THE FINANCES OF GREAT BRITAIN AND GERMANY, by E. F. Davies.—T. Fisher Unwin, London; 2d. In this pamphlet of over sixty pages Mr Davies critically reviews the financial posi- tion of Great Britain and 0f Germany and comes to the conclusion that while Great Britain has gold to more than cover its paper currency Germany's paper issue, when it comes to be cashed, willi reveal a position of bankruptcy. The financial position of Germany is put in a nutshell in a note attached to the picture of a puzzled- looking German who is soliloquising, "I got a receipt for 100 marks. I gave that receipt for a second 100 marks and received a second receipt. For the third loan I gave the second receipt. Have I invested 300 marks and have the Government got 300 marks; or have both of us got nothing ?" CHAPEL, by Miles Lewis.—London: William Heinemann; 6s. C'hapel, the name of the chief character in this novetl and of his son, has the Cardiff district for its setting. Mr Lewis, the author, belongs to a family fairly well known in the Rhondda at Llantrisant and through the valley of Glamorgan. He was born in the parish of Llantwit near Cardiff and has lived in the district nearly all his life. The author has an excellent command of English and has succeeded in building up his characters so as to give them a distinct living personality. The narrative, however, is continuously inter- rupted by tedious detailed descriptions, and the story itself is a picture of money grabbing, jerry building, commercial trickery, municipal vindictiveness, and selfishness in the attainment of ends which cannot be said to be "true to nature" of the people of rural Wales and one would be loth to believe to be true to any gen- eral extent of people in the Metropolis of k Wales. §

Machynlleth Tribunal

Machynlleth Tribunal. The Machynlleth Tribunal met on MoUji day, Mr Richard Rees, chairman presiding There |Were also present Messrs. JohnP Lumley, John Pugh, T. R. Morgan, J; Blayney, Edmund Gillart, clerk; and Colonel Norton, military representative. His employer applier for exemption for a butcher and slaughterman. Five of his men had already gone and he had to close his Aberdovey shop. The father of the lad applied for was on active service. I Absolute exemption was granted. A plumber was granted conditional ex- emption on the ground that his joining the army would involve great inconvenience to the district. Three months exemption was given an assurance company superintendent, who applied on the ground of hardship, as his aged mother and sister were dependent on him. In an adjourned case, a timber measur- ing cloerk produced a birth certificate showing he was over forty-three years of age. He was granted total exemption. The case of a traction engine driver was adjourned for the attendance of his employer. The military authorities raised the ques- tion that a previously-exempted man described as a baker and bread deliverer should be unstarred on the ground that he was not a baker. Applicant's father and employer said the man assisted in the baking as the otherefplo-vee was in delicate health. The case was referred back to the military authorities with a fill] statement of the evidence taken by the tribunal. Mr. John Lumley complained that the Chairman had informed one applicant whose claim was refused, that if he (the Chairman) had his way he would be exempted. That was not loyal or right. Mr. John Pugh recalled that the decision in the case referred to was unanimous, and the Chairman replied that Mr. Lumley's 'statement was not correct.

MACHYNLLETH

MACHYNLLETH. County Court.—On Tuesday, before his Honour Judge William Evans, Mr. W. P. Owen applied on behalf of plaintiff for an order of substituted service in the case of Dr. Thomas Davies against G. W. Buchanan in respect of the occupation of Hafoty. It was stated that defendant had left England for South America. The Judge granted the order and directed that the summons should be served by regis- tered letter on defendant at his London residence, with a copy to he served on his solicitors. Parade of Horses.—The annual parade of Welsh cobs for the three premiums of LSO each offered by the Board of Agricul- ture for Welsh cobs of the old Welsh type to travel Montgomeryshire, usuady held at Welshpool, was held this year at Mach- ynlleth, in the hope that a few Cardigan- shire horsefe might tuirn up. Six cobs were paraded, and the judges put Messrs. H. M. and H. W. Jones's chestnut cob, "Mathrafal Brenin" at the top. "Math- rafal Flying King" was second—a horse with more size. which was sold to Messrs. Davies Bros., Barmouth. This horse won the first prize at the Welsh National show, also a Montgomeryshire premium last year. and one in Merionethshire in 1914. The third premium was given to Mr. J. M. Durd-ale for a nice cob bv "IIwvn Planet," out of "Llwyn Flash- light." a big winner at the Royal and Welsh National shows. This mare was also purchased from the Mathrafal stud. The reserve nOT"c was also from the Uwyn stud, a thickset cob by the fine old Welsh cob "Tdloes Fiver." I

Advertising

THE I SPORTSMAN HOTEL, PORTMADOC. First Class Family and Commercial Hotel. Under new Management. Situate close to Station, and near to all places of interest. Every Accown-lb&tion. Posting in all its Branches. Proprietress, MISS JONES, (Late of the Queen's Hotel). Tel. No. 15. m64

TOWYN

TOWYN. PETTY SESSlOMS, Friday, April 7tli.—Be- lore Ai. L. Lieftis keiiairiiiktil); 1-t. C. Anwyl, Vv. Jones Hugiies, David Lvahs, Henry J. Avails, jViereuitii Jones, Da via L1. iioweii, E. U. Rowlands, J..Uaetnion James, li. H. Sliuker, and Miciiaei iKoOerts, Eisqrs. Transfer.—Ine licence of the Flag Inn, Pemiai, was transierred to Joim Murdoch from Edward Fouikes. Cruelty to a Mare.—Isaac Jones, farmer, Abergoes, Aberdovey, was charged with having illtreated a mare by working it in an unlit state.—Defendant pleaded not guilty.—P.C. Roberts said that on March 2bth he saw defendant leading the mare attached to a cart on the Aberdovey load. The mare was extremely iame and hobbled on three legs. He told defendant that the mare was not fit to be worked and defendant replied that he was only going to fetch a calf. Witness pointed out that the animali seemed to be in great pain and advised him to take it home. De- fendant said he did not mean to do any- thing wrong, and took the advice.—In- spector W. T. Laird, R.S.P.C.A.. said he visited the farm and asked defendant if he had any explanation to give for work- ing the mare. Defendant replied that he had bought a horse to replace the mare, which he would have destroyed two months ago if she had not been in foal. llie mare was in very poor condition and lame in both fore feet. The feet were deformed and had no shoes. The muscles of the shoulders were wasted, showing that the animal had been lame for a considerable time. It was not fit to be worked or even to look for its own food. He was doubtful been killed months ago. He was doubtfuf! whether it was in foal. Defendant admitted to him that at times, when in the stable, the mare had to be assisted to its feet.— Defendant said the the mare was simply put out in the field for exercise and was fed in the stable. He toek her out in the cart for exercise as it was so colid in the field.—In cross-examination he said the mare would not be worth keeping unless it was in foal.-The Bench fined defendant Ll and recommended that the constable should visit the farm and see that the mare was properly cared for and fed until it foaled. No Light.—Maldwyn Morgan. Penowen Farm, Towyn, was charged with having ridden a bicycle without light.—P.C. J. H. Jackson proved the offence and defend- ant was fined 7s. 6d. Alleged Assault.—Margaret Winifred Griffiths, 6, Braichgocli-terrace, Corris, summoned her next-door neighbour, Mary Catherine Jones, for assault. There was a cross-summons.—Mrs. Griffiths said that on March 28th Mrs. Jones's little girl wanted to join witness's girl in skipping. Mrs. Jones would not let her do so, and beat her with a. birch rod. Witness's child said something to Mrs. Jones, and hearing a scream, witness looked out of the window and saw Mrs. Jones beating her (witness's) child. Witness opened the door, and as she did so Mrs. Jones hit her several times on the head with the rod. She did not attempt to strike Mrs. Jnes, but called her a cruel woman.— Cross-examined: She did not attempt to throw stones at Mrs. Jones.—Thomas Llewelyn Jones, said he saw Mrs. Jones beat Mrs. Griffiths's child. Mrs. Griffiths came out of her house and Mrs. Jones struck her on the arm and head.—Mrs. Jones said she was trying to get her little girl to bed. Mrs. Griffiths's girl cabled witness names and she beat the child. Mrs Griffiths assaulted witness but when she found that witness, who defended herself, was getting the better of it, Mrs. Griffiths called for the police.—Both parties were bound over in the sum of L5 for six months.

No title

It was reported at a meeting of the Welsh National Fund last week, Mrs Lloyd George in the chair, that £ 170 had been handed over to the Treasurer as the result of the patriotic meeting held at the London Opera House. Since the pre- vious meeting of the Committee, the Sec- retary stated that a iarge quantity of comforts had been sent to Welsh soldiers serving.

Advertising

Our New Spring Millinery now on how, ALSO BLOUSES. Our Stock of Guaranteed Serges and Costume Cloth is famous Gents' and Ladieg' Tailoring on Premises. Dressmaking by Court Modiste. BAIRD, PORTMADOC. L District Agents ;—" FORD & OVERLAND CARS. (FORD STOCKISTS). 'PHONB 32, Charles Hughes & Sons, Coach Motor Works, Portmadoc. Cars Overhauled. All Repairs, Painting, Vulcanizing, etc. Stock Tyres :—Michelin, Dunlop and Goodyear. 1IPWMT III HUM. Prevent Loss in all your Stock by using Morris Evans' Horse, Sheep and Cattle Oil. Full instructions with every Bottle. The change to winter food generally means .'0 A DECREASE IN THE M.ILK but by dosing your Cattle with Morris Evans' Horse, Sheep and Cattle Oil you prevent this Decrease. During the coming winter months by continually using Morris Evans' Horse, Sheep and Cattle Oil you can keep Your Stock Healthy in Stomach and Body. A HEALTHY Cow MEANS MORE MILK. Morris Evans' Horse, Sheep and Cattle Oil in Bottles, £1 Is., 10/6, 5/3, 2/8, and 1/7. Morris Evans' Household Oil in Bottles, 2/9 and 1/3. Grocers and Chemists, or direct for above prices from:- 1, MORRIS EVANS and Co., The Manufactory, FESTINIOG, N. Wales. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I Portmadoc Steam Laundry Co. W OMiiiitt UKBAJb Qt7 a sUTMd r*AV MBN HA TBI WASHING DAY A Postcard to the Company's Manageress will bring their Van to your door and ease » you of some of the worry. All descriptions of work undertaken, including Dry Cleaning. SHIRTS & COLLARS A SPECIALITY. Softest of Water used requiring no injurious Chemicals. ESTABLISHED 1880. RICHARD NEWELL, Purveyor or meat, PORTMADOC, PWLLHELI, CRICCIETH, BLAENAU FESTINIOG, AND BACHELLYN FARM, LLANBEDROG, Supplies best quality Home-fed Meats only at Moderate JPrice*. YOUR PATRONAGE BESPKOTFULLY SOLICITED. Tel. Nos.-Portmadoe, 2 Pwllheli, 12. Criccieth, 2. Biaenau Featinleg, JO. R"oh..livlI. liUnhndrng, 8 If You Have Hens That Don't Lay in Winter, CALL AT D. ROBERTS, Grocers, &c., Shop Newydd, Portmadoc, Where POULTRY MUSTARD at 7d. per lb. is Sold, which Poultry Owners haye found IN TlNTEReDEGG0pRODUCTIONt0 bri°g ab°Ut ^^SHING INCREASE OWEN ROBERTS & Co. General Ironmongers District Agents for NOBELS EXPLOSIVES Co., Ltd. And for Knight, Bevan & Sturge's CEMENT. Dealersln Agricultural Implements, Sporting Cartridges, Fishinor Tackle. u5li Telephone-S3 Portmadoo; 5 Bala. ENGLISH EVAN JONES <5r SONS, AHPSJS™ Timber & Coal Merchants SAW MILLS, PORTMADOC, and at BALA. BUILDING TiMBM-Red and White Deals, Planed Boards, Pitch Pine, Mouldings etc. WHEELWBIGHT'S TIMBEB-Spokes, Shafts, Felloe., Barrow, Cart. and other timber sawn to requirements. QUARRY TIMBEB-Sleeper8, Crane Poles, Waggon Frames, Props, etc. xWJ SEED SEASON. The seed season is now drawing near. Before you decide on your requirements in Oats, Barley and ——— Wheat, send to us for samples and prices. -—— We have a stock of Manx, Abundance, Black and Goldfinder Oats. Manx and Welsh Barley, Spring, Autumn & Winter Wheat. The Portmadoc Flour Mills Co., PORTMADOO. Telegraphic Address Millers," PORTMADOC. Telephone No. 14, Telegrams: II Riohards, Llanbedr." TeL No. c ESTABIASHICI ibit). Cambrian Coast COALS, Lime, Bricks, & CEMENT. Best House, Steam, Anthracite and Smithy Coals. Furnace and Gas Coke. Sanitary Pipes. Building and Agricultural Lime, Agents for J. B. WHITE Bros.' CEMENT and for BIBBY'S FOODS. Richards Bros., Pensarn, Llanbedr, R.S.O. Also at HARLECH. V8311 ARTIFICIAL TEETH, on Vulcanite. Dental Alloy and Gold. Finest Quality. All Prloes. MR. WILLIAMS, Garmon House, Glan-y-Pwllf Bl. Festiniog LLANRWST Tuesdays and Fair Days, at Comet Stores, Station road. PBNRHYN" DEUDRAETH Thursday, at Mrs Roberto, Market-square (opposite Griffin Hotel). 2 to 8. POR I'MADOC :-Friday, Mr Hughes, Photographer (opposite New Poet Office) 11 to 5. TRAWSFYNYDD 1st and 3rd Saturday, Mr M. W. Morris, Draper, Clifbon House, 3 to 6. eft Portmadoc QUEEN'S HOTEL, PORTMADOC. Commercial, Family and Posting Establishment. MOTOR GARAGE. BILLIARDS. Public and Private Sitting Rooms Tourists, co-m ercial gentlemen and visitors will find every attention, at moderate charges. Boots meets all trains. m64 Proprietress—Mrs HARRISON Tel. No. 52. THE PARK MOTOR GARAGE I»OK,TM:A..T3OC 5 & 7 SEAXER CARS FOR HIRE. Repairs to Motors and Cycles. Petrol, Tyres, fyc., in Stock. SECOND HAND MINERVA CAR, 22 h.p. FOR SALE at ridiculously low price. Private AddressJOHN ROBERTS, 41, New-street. (z866) Proprietor feL No. 46. Dicks' Boot Stores, NETHERTON, 2, BANK PLACE, PORTMADOC. Highest Grade Boots for Ladies and Gentle. men-The Perfeota" Brand, Boots for country wear-The II Dryfoet" and "Holdfast" Brands. vU7 M. E. Morris, CHEMIST, 3, & 73, HIGH STREET, PORrHADOC Invalid and Toilet Requisites. Photographic Materials. r7t BILL POSTING. THE PORTMADOC, HARLECH and CRICCIETH BILL POSTING COMPANY. Bills also distributed, Address Parcels to the proprietor, G. PRITCHARD, 6, Brynhyfryd, Criccieth EASINE THE VERY THING WANTED AT THE FRONT. Private John Davies, 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers (who has been at the front since the com- mencement of the war) writing from the trenches iD France, says "I find EASINE the best thing to cure the AWFUL HEADACHES we get here I and my mates in the trenches use it very often, is the very thing we want, please send some more." .l> ——— J EASINE was aleo highly praised darinz the Soutk African War as a most effective cure for Headache. A well-known Artist writing from Rome says there is nothing better than EASINE to cure Headache due to heat and stuffiness. EASINE is the best, safest and quickest cure known for Headache and Neuralgia. Sold in 1/- packets. Send for it to-day—to the manufacturer. HUGH JONES, F.B.M.C., CHEMIST, THE MEDICAL HALL BLAENAU FESTINIOG. Portmadoo. TKLKPHONB No. 13. STEAM SAW MILLS, PORTMADOC. J. OW AIN HUGHES (Late Thomas Parry), Timber Merchant, has a Urge stock of Timber Doors, Windows, Bashes. frames suitable for BUILDERS and CONTRACTORS. nJlBEB SAWN BOB CUSTOMERS. Picture-Frame Mouldino In great v&M"7. 81iOck of and lP1re BrIoD. Lathe '1"11- WILLIAM MORRIS & Co., SHIP CHANDLERS AND IRONMONGERS PORTMADOO. All hinds of Ropes, Paints, & RsquisiUt for Ships and Yachts always its stock SHIP BISCUITS MADE TO ORDER Tel. No. 16, Tel. No. 29. "n J. THOMAS, 7. ROBBR". HIGH STRUCT, PO&TMADOO. Fish and POULTRY Merchant. LICENSED GAME. DEALER. All kinds of Fish in season. Poultry always in stock. Ice supplied. Orders promptly attended to. OJT7 Telephone Ne 21. Established nearly a Century. ELIZABETH OWEN" SONS, TIMBER MEROHANRS, HO., PORI BUDO(L A LARGE Quantity ot Building Timber always in stock, also Doors, Windows* Mouldings, at most Reasonable Prioes, Speoial attention paid to Orders by Post. Timber Sawn be required shoo for Oustenters. 71 HOUSE DECORATION. PURNELL & Co., Painters, Glaziers &o., PORTMADOC. Lleyd A lion. Printers Booksellers, Stationers, 125, HIGH STREET, PORTMADOC, BAVB AN EXCELLENT STOCK OF ACCOUNT BOOKS, MANUSCRIPT ACCOUNTS, OFFICE UTENSILS, AND FILES, COPYING LETTER BOOKS, etc., eto. 1AGENT FOR GOSS'S WARE. Pwllheli. THE TOWER HOTEL, PWLLHELI. FAMILY AND COMMERCIAL HOTEL, High-olass Accommodation for Visitors. Motor Garage free te Hotel visiters. Within 10 mlnntes ef Gelf Links (18 Holes), Head- quarters ei R.A.C. and Motor Union. 1188 M. JONES, Proprietreat. THE INFALLIBLE CURE J SEOOTHA,* INSTANTLY RELIEVES. SPEEDILY CURIB Indigestion, Flatulence. Wind, Fullness and Pain after Eating. Price, Is. lid. & 8s. 9d. Prepared only by B. 0. GRIFFITHS, M P.S., Pharmacist, (Silwer MedeMitt of Wegtminater egaog& LondonJ 60, HIGH STOUT, PWLLHELL Telephone—No. 38 J