Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
Advertising

of course is Soldier Sam Who's dreaming out in France a11 the thin&s he'd eat c^ance' There's one thing in particular Would give him quite a treat, ^ts bird's and Gooseberries :J A dish that's hard to beat. <=:> 93irds {BLANCMANGE Buy to-day a 4d. Box, Vanilla Flavor; this goes splendidly with Stewed Gooseberries. AifkedBiriS I Vtftl,LLA FLAVOR 8J,AN(MuD :?: t This Box of BIRD'S Blancmange provides for a few pence more than enough for two meals, or twelve persons. It is ready flavored, and made in a moment. With BIRD'S Blancmange you get a real double-cream blancmange by using only ordinary milk. It is never stodgy, but just that right firmness wbi 1 melts in the mouth. S In 734d. Boxes (assorted flavors, and the cheapest size); 4d. Boxes, ld. & 2d. Pkts. w- LIGHT HORSE BREEDING- TANYRALLT FIREBOY 11229 BAY, 8 Years old. Property of D. R. THOMAS. Registered in the Welsh Stud Book, and holds the Board of Agriculture's Certificate of Soundness. 14 HANDS HIGH, WITH QUALITY AND SUBSTANCB. Winner of Numerous Prizes, Hand & Harness, London and Royal Shows Stud Fee Reduced this Season to Two Guineas- GROOM'S FEE, 2/6. For Stud Cards or further particulars apply to Owner or Stud Groom, Tanyrallt Stud, Talybont, Cardiganshire. MEMBER OF I MEMBER OP IOlk m,; LT D WATKINS, PLUMBER AND DECORATOR, 7, Custom House Street. Workshop—Sea View Place, STORES FOR MANTLES, GLOBES, SHADES, Etc. of all kinds and at all prices. Also ELECTRIC LAMPS. 8a, TERRACE ROAD. STEAM SAW MILLS, ABERYSTWYTH, R. ROBERTS and SONS, TIMBER AND SLATE MERCHANTS. EVERY DESCRIPTION OF JOINERY DONE QUICKLY AND CHEAPLY. OARS' and BOATS' SAILS made on the Premises; also all kinds of SAOKS, COAL BAGS, &a, ESTIMATES GIVEN. JOBBING DONE: FELLOES, FOB OART WHEELS, TRAPS, AND OTHER.) VEHICLES. I PETER JONES' Briton Slate Works I I 7-, I I CAMBRIAN STREET, ABERYSTWYTH. Plain and Enamelled Slate Chimney Pieces, and every description of monumental work in Slate, Marble, and Granite. Best Coal at lowest Prices Coke also Supplied -M ll The Oldest Billposting Establishment in the Town and District. JOHN LLOYD & SONS Town Oriers, Billposters and Distributors, Having the largest number of most prominent Posting Stations in all parts of Aberystwyth! and District, they are able to take large contracts of every description. OVER 100 STATIONS IN TOWN AND DISTRICT. Official Billposters to the Town and County, Councils, G.W.R. Co., Cambrian Railway Co., all the Auctioneers of the Town and District,. and other public bodies. Address-TRINITY RD., ABERYST WYTH.1 STEAM LAUNDRY, ABERYSTWYIH. 33. JOIsr ES DEGS to inform his numerous Customers that owing to the increase of business he has put down additional NEW AND MODERN MACHINERY to enable him to execute all orders with promptness and despatch, and hopes to still merit your esteemed patronage and support. HOTELS AND PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS SPECIALLY CATERED FOR. SHIRTS AND COLLARS A SPECIALITY. All Goods Collected and Delivered Free of Charge Send a Postcard and the Van will call. Particulars and Prices ou application. OAMBRIAN RAILWAYS ANNOUNCEMENTS. THFNATK^ Of WAf fS WILL BE HELD AT ABERYSTWYTH ON AUGUST 16th, 17th and 18tlt, 1916. Particulars of Railway Arrangements will be announcad in due course British Industries and the War. MANUFACTURERS AND INVESTORS Contemplating the Establishment of New Industries as a result of the War, are Z3 in vited to communicate with THE CUMBRIAN RAILWAYS Co., Who have a large number of convenient and suitable SITES TO OFFER with an abundant supply of Water for Generating Motive Power, admirably adapted for the erection of Works, Factories, Warehouses, and other Industrial Undertakings. The Company are prepared to assist in the establishment of such works by entering into arrangements for siding connections to be made with the railway, and will be pleased to obtain and furnish nformation as to suitable sites, siding facilities, rates for conveyance, &c. Applications should be made to :— S. WILLIAMSON, Oswestry, May, 1916. General Manager.

A Castle and a Canal

A Castle and a Canal. (By Edgar S. Shrubsole). Chance, or Fate- term it which you will —plays us funny triicks. To it we are in- debted for some of the most pleasant |i>x$er&e»nces puid most bitter disappoint- ments as we journey on through this life. Quite by chance I recently spent a week- end in Llangol'.en and that same chance made me acquainted with a most agreeable companion with whom I had a delightful ramble, and incidentally, enjoyed the cosy comfort of a realty homelike hotel. At Ruabon Stat:on-which is chiefly famous for the isolation of its refreshment bar- I found it quite impossible to get to Fes- tiniog that evening. The last train for that remote village had left some time previously; and, having a mind to visit some friends in Balla, I had decided to make that my stopping O.ace for the week- end, when chance stepped in. On the platform I met a pedestrian whom I had previously fallen in w.ith while walking from Barmouth to Dolgelley. We exchanged greetings and then adjourned up the stairs, along the corridors, across the yard, and into the refreshment bar. where a modest quencher, served in most courteous manner by a robust and rosy-cheeked damsel, paved the way to an interchange of views concerning the best manner of passing the week-end. Both were of the opinion that weather conditions were tikely to favour a ramble on or over the hills and I required very little persuasion to abandon my journey to Bala and stay at Llangollen with my new friend. "I know of such a comfortable hotel there," he explained, And have mapped out a cajpitali jaunt in the district for to- morrow." He proved to be right on both points. At "The Grapes" we found that comfort and good feeding, which go so far to make pleasant the programme of a walk- ing tour. M/ ss Hughes is fully deserving of these few kind words, which may go to prove to her that one never knows when one may entertain an angel unawares! The morning broke bright, beautiful, and breezy, and as we crossed the Dee by way of Llangollen Bridge, (by-the-by wasn't the Principality rather hard up for wonders when that was included as one ?), I was reminded of Thomas's fines:— "Tell me not oif Rhenish beauties, Or of Alpine glaciered peaks, While the Vale of sweet Llangollen With resplendent glory speaks." From the bridge we made our way direct to the Shropshire Un on Canal and walked along the "touring path" to Berwyn. Much has been written recently concerning our British canals and the use that could and should be made of them. To my way of thinking there can be no doubt that the vast network of inland water-ways should be utilised to a far greater extent than lit is; but that is a subject which can- not be discussed in the present article. My companion was "great" on canals. He had spent several holidays travelling by oanal boats through different parts of England, and his knowledge of them, and of canal life proved to be very similar to that of Sam Weller's knowledge of Lon- don. Personally I have never lived on a canal boat, but I have travelled manv miles by them and have often crunched my pebbly way along the towing-paths. There are canals and canals. For the m,ost part they are terribly monotonous and uninter- esti ng, but I can call to mind many very pleasant rambles amidst very picturesque scenery associated with some of them. The Shropshire Union Canal between Llangollen and Berwyn struck me as being the most beautiful stretch of any. How- beit the time of year prevented me from seeing it at its best. I had not, then, seen the same oanal in the direction of Chirk, which is. if possible, even more beautiful, as I have ascertained since. Other canals I know of are as beautiful in themselves- but none have such rich surroundings; and the close connection of ra.il, river, road, and oanal forms by no means the least in- teresting feature. Imagine a water-way formed on the, sides of charmingly-timbered hills,—in many parts actually cut from them,—that gently slope down to road or rail as the engineering difficulties necessitate the latter to be now this side now that of the former; the embankments and the rising ground behind clad profusely with wild flowers, fern, bracken, and undergrowth. The canal itself passes through a long, continuous avenue of noble trees, with here and there patches of multi-coloured rock exposed-where the water-way has been blasted from the hill-side,—studded with ferns and flowers and smothered with moss, kept marvellously fresh and bright by the continued drip, drip of the springs bursting from the sides of the ex- posed surface. Here and there little stone bridges by way of which the road crosses the canal. Now and again a flower- laden garden extending down to the waters of the canal from some charming nome perched picturesquely above. Down below- is the glorious Dee-Queen .of Welsh rivers --th read,ing its way between road and rail; boiling among huge boulders, rippling over gravelly shallows, murmuring among wooded islets, gurgling around deep qu;et bends roanng over some natural or artificial dam, sullenly rushing through savage-looking chasms and anon widening e'o out into a deep, guiet, steady-flowing pool, ending in a, grallilstream the tail of which makes the angler's heart leap with hope- ever onward in its never-ending journey to the sea, which commenced thousands of decades ago and will end,-alil, when? Men may come and men may go, but I go on for ever!" sings Dee from its rock- strewn bed. From the banks on the side opposite to that by which we are following the canal rise more granny-timbered heights, backed here and there by hills- and now and aga.'n. looking up the valley! we get a glimpse of the more important mountaJnw -that from- thefr proud peaks a glorious sky overhead, and you have some idea of the surroundings of the Shropshire tnion Canal at D'angollen as we saw it,-until the chain bridge at fd' w',hen tlle wondrous beauty of the place absolutely defies des- cription by such feeble pens as mine. The Cham Bridge at Berwyn and the adjacent hotel are weO-known landmarks tn the counti-viiido. The hotel is very pleasantly and picturesquely placed and affords capital accommodation for anglers cychsts pedestrians, and general bolidiv fl u w,1 the b?ck of the hotel we 4,allowed tho efa.na.1 lip to its (source, /at the head of the famous Horse Shoe Fall wh'eli are to Ii'angollen what the Swallow Jails are to Bettws-y-Coed; and ha vine roasted our eyes on this beautiful spot, we followed the pathway through the fields to Llandvsilio Church, a verv pretty 'and charmvngly secluded biiildl n d so to the road above the river and canal here we.had a grand view of the Horse rMioe bads, the river and valley above and below, and the surrounding hills. A succession of similar beautiful views opened out as we walked down the road in the direction of LlangoFen our next destination being Vale Crueis Abbev. Keening the cana'l on our right we presently reached a nnint where the Ruthin road turns abruptly into the of the Cross" another lovely spot, ^nd in a little more than half-a-mile further w^ renohed the Abbey—known to the Welsh as D'anegwest.—of whieh wo had beird so much. The ruins irinv's- furthcr ahead, where this lovelv volley I

Protection of Fruit Trees

Protection of Fruit Trees. IMPORTANT EXPERIMENTS. Mr. D. V. Howells, of the Agricultural Department of the University College of Wales, gave a demonstration in spraying against codlin moths, apple scab, and brown rot in fruit at the Mill at Llan- rhystyd and several other 1a,(;es reCH tly. There was a marked impr.iv anient in the oappearance of the trees after the pre- vious experiments carried out near Christmas. Insect pests and fungus diseases attack- ing fruit trees are very prevalent. The only effective method for their eradication- is by spraying with a wash. The method of treatment is as follows:—(1) Woburn winter wash; 1! Ibs. copper sulphate. i lb. lime: 5 pints petroleum; 2 lbs. caustic soda. and water to 10 gallons. This should be applied during the winter months and not oftener than once in three years. Follow this by 4 lbs. copper sulphate: 5 lbs. washing soda; and 50 gallons of water just before buds expand. Against codlin scab-2 lbs. copper sul- phate 2s lbs. washing soda; 3 lbs. arsenate of lead: and 50 gallons of water. Where copper sulphate is used a wooden vessel is necessary. Use this mixture just after blossoms have fallen.

No title

(continued from previous column). ceases and wild, weather-swept, gorse and heather-clad moorland, and rugged mount- ain fastnesses reign triumphant. Add to the foregoing the song of birds, bursting their throats at the advent gif spring, and takably discover the importance of the structure, and the lavish expenditure of expert skill is manifest in what remains of the dog-tooth ornamentation in the west- end, the decorated windows over the door- way and the really beautiful round window in the gable. Valle C'rucis Abbey is, probably, the finest object of its kind in North Wales; but to compare it with such magnificent monastic remains as those of Tintern and others in Great Britain, were extremely absurd. Certainly it should not be missed by anyone holiday-making in the district, and a. very pleasant hour can be spent exploring it by even the unlearned lover of these links with the long, Vong, past. Returning once more to the canal we I resumed our journey down the road in the direction of Liangollen. Now on our left the conical height of Dinas Bran becomes the prominent object, and we turn off the I road just before reaching Llangollen and, following a lane, make direct for the sum- mit and the ruing of the Castle, so plainly observed from every vantage point for miles around. Dinas Bran, and the castellated ruins that cfrown it, are to Llangollen what the Prince of Denmark is to the play of Hamlet. It is a thousand pities the remains of this historical struo-| ture should have fallen into so a deplorable a state. Its better presea-vation would not have been difficult or expensive. The loss from its ne^'ect is very real indeed. The view from the top is a very fine one, and we were fortunate in being there on a clear day. Looking down the Vale of liangollen the eye travels to the famous viaduct and to the plains of Shropshire beyond. North of this is a deep glen which extends to "The World's End," and is backed by the precipitous heights of the F-g-wyseg limestone rocks. Looking up the valley, i.e., west, we have a lovely view Hacked bjv the shapely form of M'oel-y-j Gamelin and other important peaks.! Right below, due south, lies Llangol'en, with the Gteraint to the right, and behind the dark forms of the heather-clad Ber- wyn mountains, or elevated moorland as they have been very appropriately termed. We were told that we should be able to see Snowdon from the top of Dinas Bran; but fine and rfear as the day was we were unable to make it out. However, we were delighted wiith wliat we could see, and were reminded of Thomson's liaes.- "These the haunts of Meditation, these The scenes where ancient bards th' Estatic felt." iBSP™g Wth The author of the "Beauties, Harmoniee, and Sublimities of Nature" thus describes his ascent of Dinas Bran. The sun was shooting its evening rays along the Vale, embellishing everything they touched. It having rained al l the morning the freshness with which spring had clad every object, gave additional im- pulse to all our feelings. Arrived at the summ t, the scene became truly captiva- tmg; for nature appeared to have drawn the veil from her bosom, and to £ lory in her charms. The season -if only' spring which, in other countries, serves only to exhibit their poverty, displayed new beauties in this. Nature had thrown off her mantle of snow and appeared to invite the beholder to take a Cast look of her beauties, ere she shaded the cottage with woodbine or screened with leaves the fan- tastic arms of the oak. The clouds soon began to form over their heads and a waving column tightly touched their hats. Around was one continued range of mount- ains, with Dinas rising above the river. Immediately below lay a heautifully diver- sified vale with the Dee—Milton's'Wizard Strøam-combining aU the charms of the Arno and the Loire, winding through the middle of it: while on the east side of the mountain several villages seemed to rest in calm repose. Tliffc beautiful sceno was soon converted into a sublime one. For the clouds assuming a more gloomy character, the tops of all the mountains around became totally enveloped: and our heads were nmv and then encircled with a heavy vapour. A more perfect IInicn of the beautiful and magnificent it were dimcult to conceive. No object was d's- cernilie above: but below, how capti- vating! Their feet were illumined by the sun; their heads, as it were, touching the clouds. Above, aK was gloomy and dnrk- helow, the sun, from the' west, stili illumined the villages and spires, the oottalges and iiooods, the pastures and fields, which lav scattered in every direc- tion; while the Dee, at intervals, swept in manyoa graceful curve, along the bottom of the vale." We descended to the Grapes and did nmple justice to the excellent menf Miss Hughes had ready for us. Of our other wrtlks in that district over that week-end I hope to have something to say in another article.

Advertising

SA VE LABOUR I SA YE TIME t SA YE MONEY! Three economicsse d the use ofan 4At.fA"U"' LAVAL TRY TEST ONE FOR YOURSELF. Sent on i1. month's Free TriaL Fixed Started Free. I StJnd Postc.d it ¡ Pariiculars. I MR. J. W. DAVIFS. Ironmonger, Lampoter. I .3.t: :îk;?i:à.: ,>

t Talybont Egg Collection

Talybont Egg Collection WOUNDED SOLDIERS' THANKS. In April, 1915, a fortnightly collection of eggs for wounded -soldiers was started at Talybont. During that period 6,801 eggs were despatched. As contributions of money were received in the winter months, eggs were procured and sent regularly. It was encouraging not to have to give up the collection even in winter and for the special appeat at Easter for one million eggs, the number sent from Talybont was 496 and no fewer than 1,425,310 eggs were received at Headquarters. Recently it was decided to send a box from Talybont to the Welsh Hospital at Netley. The generous response of 35 dozen enabled a box of 18 dozen to be sent to Netley and 17 dozen to London. The following is ex- tract from a letter received from the Matron (Miss Evans, formerly of Aber- ystwyth) in her acknowledgment.—" If the contributors could only see how much the men really enjoyed the eggs they would never tire of collecting more and more eggs, for them." As messages and addresses are written on most of the eggs, numerous letters have been received from patients in hospitals in France and from all parts of the British Isles. All sav how much they appreciate the eggs and the kind thought that prompted their being sent. It is impossible to enumerate all the instances of help to the collection, but a list of all contributors is kept and will be published in due course. A donation of two dollars was sent from Toronto to purchased eggs for the collection. The School children and Staff of Talybont Council School have. given great help and grateful thanks are due to them. School children and friends at Rhydypennau are also untiring in their efforts and from June to Christmas have despatched over 900 eggs. Thev are continuing their fort- nightly collection. Taliesin School chil- dren are doing well as will be shown when particulars are published. Eglwysfach school had several collections last summer and are probably commencing to collect again this summer. Elerch School has lately started and is ending eggs every fortnight. Mrs. Smith, Cwmsymlog, and Mrs James, Post Office, Penrhyncoch, have both kind y undertaken to collect for their districts. It will thus be realised the grea.t interest taken in the district in this most necessary work of providing eggs for our wounded soldiers and sailors. It is hoped that during the summer months still more satisfactory results will be achieved, so that even larger numbers of eggs may be forwarded to meet anticipated greater demands. At present a supplv of 500,000 a week is required for immediate needs.

LLANON

LLANON RETURNED.-Mike Hogan, who has been well known in the district for nine years, joined the army at the outbreak of war and was sent out with the first ex- peditionary force to France. He was in the retreat from Mons, wounded on the Maine, and was in hospital for a time. He fought on till Christmas, 1915, and was finally discharged last March after having been four times wounded. The news reached Llanon some time ago that he was among the killed. CORRECTION.-Lieut. D. L. Jenkins and Private John W. P. Jenkins, Eukrateia, joined the ranks from the N. and P. Bank. and not as previously stated. PROMOTION.—Captain David M. Jones, Carlton, a second lieutenant in the R.N.R., has been further promoted to be first lieutenant. SUPPLIES.—The army men are now busy clearing a Way stored hay for the use of the service. The hay is being carted to Aheravron Stat;on.

LLLANILAR

L LLANILAR. Y.M.C.A. The children of Llanilar School took part in the special effort made on May 20th in respect of the Y.M.C.A. Hut Flag Day, and are to be congratulated on their success. The results were as follows:—Jane Louisa Davies, and Ruby Peel, 61 Os. 2d.: Letitia Jones and Lizzie Jane Williams, lls. 3d.; J. Llovd Jones, and Richard Theoph Thomas 10s. lO^d. Gwladys Jones. 9s. 3d.; Evan John Evans, and John Richard Evans, 5s. 7d.; Olwen Watkins, 4s. Ada Grace Edwards, 2s. lid. Jiijnetta Evans. and Sarah Jane Evans, is. 10(i., Arthur Morgan, Is. Total, JB3 6s. 101d.

No title

NEWCASTLE EMLYN, Mon., May 29. -Quotations:—Best young fat heifers and steers up to t3 per cwt, fat bulls 58s, old fat cows 45s. cows with calves R21 each, heifers and calves £ 19; porkers up to 15s per score, baconprsi 14s;- IciinVir, .1 l'çJ. Ib, sheep 6d; rearing calves L2 each, yearling store cattle Lio to R12, and two- year-olds £15 each. OSWEiSTR Y, Wednesday. Quotations 5d per I b: eggs Is 4d to Is 3d per doz; chickens 5S to 8s per couple, fowls 5s to 7s 6d; ducklings 6s 6d to 8s 6d; trapped •rabbits Is 8d; she* rabbits Is 6d per Couple. Jj-STY, Wednesday.—Quotations: to 8s ,)et' 75 lb- oaty 21s to 22s per 2COlh.

LONDON PROVISIONS

LONDON PROVISIONS. Monday.—Messrs. Samuel Page and Son leport:—Butter steady at unaltered rates 7 quoted 170s to 174s, Siberian 112s to 138s, trench 146s to 150s, Irish 140s to JAAS- \S-7A dn ,15?'s to 164s> Zealand LbUs to 170s, and Argentine 154s to 160s Bacon quiet without change in quotations —Irish quoted 106s to 112s, Danish 104s to 110s, and Canadian 92s to 100s. Hams steady—American long-cut quoted 88s to 100s, ditto short-cut 86s to 90s. Lard in good demand—American pails quoted 80s "'Z,J _1 _1.1" 1 0L1, ami en 110 ooxe.s ,S. Cheese slow and somewhat irregular; stocks of old Canadian practically exhausted. Canadian new quoted 108s to 110s, New Zealand 108s to 112s. and United States 106s to 110s Eggs firmer-Irish quoted 15s to 15s 6d Danish 18s, and Egyptian 9s to 9s 3d. Monday. -Sugar-home refined in good demand at previous rates. Coffee—spot market steady and unchanged, futures quiet-September sold 51s. Oocoa quiet pending auctions. Tea sa le.4 7,7 (M ■ packages Indian offered and met a good inquiry at full rates. Pekoes realising lid and broken Orange Pekoes Is 0|d to Is 3^1 per lb. Pepper steadv but verv qi,"i — Singapore black July-September quoted /4d. Rice quiet at late rates. | -Jute very quiet, and quotations more or less nominal.

LONDON PRODUCE

[ LONDON PRODUCE. I -Al,aricet dull. English wheat 2s iower 011 the week—white quoted at 54s 6d to 57s. red do; 54s 6d to 57 per qr. foreign and American do. ls lower on the week. Town, country, and American flour 6d to Is lower on the week. Grinding barley steady, malting (h. firm. British. Plate, and American oats unchanged. Loans and pease firm. lentils firm. Arrivals: -British—wheat 1,700 grs.. bar- ley 1.027 qrs., oats 5,343 qrs.. maize 8,008 01 s., malt J.,903 grs., beans 88 qrs., peas 53 cit-s. flour 19.013 sacks; foreign—wheat 124,490 qrs.. barley 5,374 qrs.. oats 37,307 qrs.. maize 29,153 qrs.. beans 11,514 qrs., peas 1.456 qrs., flour 45,552 sacks.

Welsh National Library

Welsh National Library. A GENEROUS GIFT. The half yearly meeting of the Court of Governors of the Welsh National Library was held in the Library Hall, at Aberystwyth, on Saturday morning, under the presidency of Sir John Wdl- liams, Bart. There wefe also present the Rjigiht Hon. J. HdrWtert Lewis, M.P., vice-president: Mrs. Wynne, of Peniarth; the Hon. Mrs. Bulkeley Owen, Mrs. Davies and Miss Gwen E. Davies, Llan- dina.m; Lord Mostyn, Mr. E. D. Jones, Fishguard: Mr. Herbert M. Vaughan, Llangoedmor; Mr A. W. Williams Wynn, Principal Roberts, Sir E. Vincent Evans, Mr. D. Lleufer Thomas, Col. Charles J. Mainwaring, Mr. Henry Taylor, Chester; Mr. James L. Greenway, Mr. W. J. Trounce, Cardiff; the Rev. J. Fisher, Mr. Morgan Tutton, Swansea; Mr. Illtyd Thomas, Mr. H. O. Hughes, Dr. Gwenogfryn Evans, Pwllheli] Mr. C. M. Williams, Mr. J. H. Davies, Mr. D. C. Roberts, Mr. T. J. Samuel, and Mr. John Ballinger, librarian. The Vice-President said Sir John Williams had asked him to relieve him of the task of presiding over the meeting and he was sure the Governors wished him to say how delighted they were to see Sir John Williams among them—(cheers)—in good spirits as he well might be at the approaching completion of his great life work. (Hear, hear). That noble hall in which they were assembled was a fore- taste of the glories of the National Library that was to be. When the books had been placed on the shelves and when the equipment was complete there would be few institutions in the world able to boast of so magnificent a spectacle of its kind. (Hear, hear). Votes of condolence would shortly be moved at that meeting with those who had lost relatives in the war. Whatever the Governors might be doing or wherever they might be their first thought must always be for those who were gallantly fighting the battles of thair country at that moment, and, above all, with their brave allies who were fighting the battles of the liberties of Europe on the heights that surround Verdun. (Hear, hear). Might he add that one member of the Counoil and of the Court of Governors a few days ago had a gigantic task laid upon him by the unanimous desire of his colleagues in the Cabinet. He felt certain that his colleagues in that meeting would wish him every success in the task to which with his accustomed courage-and indeed it needed the courage of a Lloyd George to do it-he liid set himself—a task which had been the despair of British statesmen for generations—namely to bring peace and harmony to discordant and troubled Ireland. They who had been Jhis colleaguei in oonnection with that institution of which he had been a loyal and true friend wished him god-speed in the great work he had undertaken. (Cheers). A letter was read from the Clerk to the Privy Council stating that General Sir Francis Lloyd had been appointed a member of the Court in the room of the late Dr. Bbb, principal of Lampeter College. The Librarian read a list of other appointment?. Votes of condolence with Mr. E. T. John and Mr. John Hinds in the loss of their sons in the war were accorded and with the relatives of Mr. Llywaroh Reynolds, Merthyr, who had passed away since the previous meeting of the Court. Mr. E. D. Jones, chairman of the Build- ing Comnnittee, asked to report on the progress of the building, said the report would be short, but he hoped a pleasing one. The fact that the Governors were met for the first time in the Library Hall was the best report of progress he could present. Mr. Jones described the three contracts into which the work of building had been divided and humorously added that he hoped this summer to be rid of contractors and architects and all other unpleasant people. The grounds and roads were in an unfinished state, but in as finished a state as they could be until after the war. The report was adopted on the proposi- tion of Mrs. Bulkeley Owen, seconded by M rs. Edward Davies. The Vice-President, reporting on the present position of the building fund, said that subscriptions, interest, and dividends up to May 25th totalled £ 49,366 12s. Id.: Treasury Grant, £ 49,000; promised subscriptions outstanding considered good, £ 269 12s.; and balance of Treasury Grant to be received, CI,000, making a total of Lgg,636 4s. Id. The actual expenditure ou the buildings amounted to A representative deputation recently waited on the Chancellor of the Exchequer. It was introduced by Sir Herbert Roberts, and the chief spokesman was Mr. E. D. Jones, who would give a brief account of thepnx-eedings. Mr. E. D. Jones said the deputation was favourably received in the sense that it was evident the sympathy of the Cilan- cellor was with the Library. There were, I nowever, certain reasons why he did not feel able to aocede to the deputation's request for an increase of grant to the building fund; but he intimated that he would be prepared to consider later on a grant of 91 to Ll subscribed for the furnishing of the Library. That was an /important concession. The de^ciency ,in the building fund was something like £ 10,600 and it was estimated that0some- thing like £ 15,000 will be required for furnishing the Library. The deputation were greatly indebted to the Welsh mem- bers of Parliament. The Vice-President said that left the Court with about to raise on build ing fund account. The war'had brought to a stand the work of collections in which Mr. Lleufer Thomas had taken so active a part. He (the Vice-President) had the honour to announce that anonymous donors had handed over a cheque for I £ 5,000. (Cheers). The Court owed them a great debt of gratitude for their generosity to the institution at a time of considerable need. He hoped it would be regarded as an incentive to further exer- tion and not as a sedative and that steps would be taken to raiise the remaining P,6,000 as soon as possible, and so clear off the debt on the building. They wanted to know that they were in their own freehold and that. that national institution was not in debt for any loan or mortgage. On the proposition of Mr. Lleufer Thomas seconded by Sir John Williams, A cordial vote of thanks was accorded the donors. The Librarian presented a list of subscriptions, amounting to C612 13s. 6d., received since the annual meeting of the Court. The list included a third donation of OO from Mr. J. Herbert Lewis, M.P., B25 from Llandilo Fawr Rural District Council, L,30 from the Abercynon Work- men's-hall and Institute, JB250 from the Powell Duffryn Steam Coal Company, j625 from the Nantymoel Workmen's-hall and Institute, and P,25 from Margam Urban District Council. Proceeding with his report, Mr. Ballinger said the books had been removed from the old premises to the library by March. An exhibition of books of interest to Wales would be made for Eisteddfod week and kept open during the summer. Readers, it was hoped, would be admitted to the Library within the next few weeks. The war had stopped the purchase of books. Four members of the staff were with the colours and three others had been called up with the married groups. Mr. Herbert Vaughan remarked that the Library was very near to his heart and it was a pleasure for him to be there that morning, and to have been shown over it by Mr. Ballinger. He thought Wales owed an immense debt to Mr. Ballinger for what he had done for the Library. (Hear, hear). He (Mr. Vaughan) had had some experience of libraries all over the world, and for convenience and beauty and -arrangements he had seen no library to surpass or even equal it. The Vice-President did not think any formal resolution was necessary, but ho was sure Mr. Ballinger highly appreciated those remarks. The late Sir John Rhys bequeathed Ms bust, by Sir Gos<*>mbe John, to the Library, and the Governors had great pleasure in accepting it. (Hear, hear). The Mayor of Aberystwyth was present and he was sure the Court cordi- ally welcomted him, and additional interest was attached to that first meeting of the Library by the presence of Lord Mostyn, president of the Welsh National Museum. The National Library deeply .appreciated the generosity of the town of Aberystwyth to the institution at the outset and hoped it would be continued in future. The location of the Library at Aberystwyth had reciprocal advantages. He trusted that the Library would draw students and visitors from far and near to the salubrious town over whose des- tinies the Mayor at present presided. When the National Eisteddfod was held in the town in the summer he trusted that every possible encouragement would be given to those who attended the meet- ings from all over Wales to view that niagnificent building and inspect the most interesting collection of Welsh books and MSS. The Mayor (AMerman John Evans) thanked the Court for its cordial recep- tion and for the kind words of the Vice- President. All that he could do for the town, for the eisteddfod, and for the National Library he should have great pleasure in doing. (Hear, hear.) Dr. Gwenogvryn Evans narrated a little bit of history of the Library and site. Sir John Williams, he said, was first of all in favour of establishing the Library at Cardiff because a penny rate in that city would produce a large sum. He (Dr. Evans) pleaded that Cardiff was practically out of the world. It was a very inaccessible place which took him a couple of days to reach. Sir John Williams went to Cardiff to see a collection of books 4 had bought. It was not the Public Library. H« had a difficulty in getting the key and when 4 got it he found the books disarranged and covered with dust. Then he went to Aberystwyth, was shown the College Library by the late Rev. Penllyn Jones, the librarian, Sir John Williams was secured for Aberyst- wyth, and the Library site was secured and paid for. (Cheers). Mrs Wynne of Peni- arth, had been also a friend of Aberyst- wvth, for the acquisition of the Peniarth MSS. had assured the establishment of the Library in the town. (Cheers.) The members of the Court made a tour of inspection of the buildings and were greatly interested and pleased with the o|rra ngeirtents. Mr. H. R. Davies, of Treborth, Bangor, has just sent L250 as a second donation to the building fund of the National Librarv of Wales. Mr. Davies's fiirst donation was E500. The Rev. William Evans, M.A., Pem- broke Dock (formerly minister of Bath- street Presbyterian Church, Aberystwyth), has sent a donation of L10 to the building fund. Mr. Evans, who has already pre- sented many rare Welsh books to the Library, was moved to make his donation bv the newspaper reports of the meeting of Governors on Saturday.

SALVING POLHALLOCH WRECK

SALVING POLHALLOCH WRECK. Lloyds Agent calls the attention to the advertisement inviting offers for the wreck of the above-named ship, and to state that there are hundreds of tons of steel platings lying on St. Patrick's Causeway, which can be secured, at the present value of steel, there would be a small mine of wealtn to the salvers. Give your visitors your card. SmaCI cards for those who let apartments are a speciality at the "Cambrian News" Office. Any quantity from 50 upwards.

Advertising

0.. I u FROM INFORMATION RECEIVED" | P and that information be it said, not at all difficult to obtain, there is t C over-whelming testimony in favour of Beecham's Pills. Nor is this at all surprising. Consider the long period during which the medicine has V y served the public, think of the countless thousands that the pills have > X benefitted, remember that a sense of thankfulness does not often remain V B unexpt cssed, and you will realise tnat from information received" B it can confidently be stated that there is no other preparation equal to ■ | BEECHAM'S { PILLS I for removing most of the common ailments of to-day. Indigestion— M that almost national scourge—easily and completely yields to their J H operation. Co'nstipation—another too frequent condition, and often of ■ ■ long standing-is quite cured by these pills. By their use the stomach I is strengthened, the liver brought into healthy action, the bowels reg- I ulated, and the nervous system regains its tone. From all parts of the J W world testimony is forth-coming that in those disorders marked by C Indigestion, Constipation, Biliousness, Headache, and depression t J Beecham's Pills < DO A WORLD OF GOOD. I H Sold everywhere in boxes, labelled Is. 3d. and 3s. Od. I