Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
Advertising

B L B sT' A Delightful Surprise Your linen will last longer-look quite as well-and H| cost you far less-if you starch it at home with ROBIN, ll the new powder starch-the starch with the gloss in it. =3. ROBIN I STARCH I J? is a powder starch-easy to mix-easy to use, and sure 3 to give satisfaction, if used according to directions. Try it for your Table Linen-it will make it just as you like it. e StarP-h BARKER'S BIG BARGAINS. Strong Cheap Field Gates. The Lincolnshire House. fL OVER 200 4x3ixoft., WIEKLY. 70/' 20^~0rr^er |gH6 x hii^' 8ft long. 9ft long. 10ft long. II111 13/- \ij. 15/. Creosoting, Creoroting. 1R 3d extra 4s. extra. Planed for Painting, Is 6d extra. 7tt x Sffc x ifl high, 10ft X 5ft x 7ft high Hanging Irons, 8s 6d per set, 155/- 225/- Strong Sheep Hurdles. k C"T°^\ „• ° i These nouses are made of the best Jin. to^gvea, grooved, V-jointed Maichbo rd on strong frame- 8ft long 6s. 6d. m < work, and mounted on four heavy 12in, wheels, Creosoting 9d extra |a The Fancier House. 20s Order Carriage *gl^FgF*f ^'E rir ■?■ Paid. | | OUR PRICE, A The Reliable 24/- ||§| I|j JJ Coop. Ix3x 3ft high, RR 1 IfH H M I 48 6d. each I Carriage Paid. jmrjl (I [||||j| HH11111 53s- per dozen- 9'wn I I Creosoting 6d extra pE^T jnd CHE VPEST house, on tbe mar. SSI^I S |HH| Sj R Shutters'or ^et, can only lv tua*^e aC »l>ove low I SLflb n,r„ »t.i„ T?i price because of the enormous quantity we sell. Movable x loors, They are m'de infections of the B»st K-d Deii Hd each extra. Matchboards in ssctions to s?rew together, and are «TT!f»ir WIBP Tf\p DITK complete with two up and down shutteis sliding «** i i At J eEo over lin, mefh wire netting, trap door for fowl's «»ft long, 4s 4ft os bft 8a, entrance, perchts, and lock up attendant's ^ioor. Strong Sitting Boxes. Long W<

THE Friday June 30th 1916

THE Friday, June 30th, 1916. LOXDOX PROVISIONS, Monday.— Butter all descriptions quietly steady without material change in quotations; Dutch shipments are to be resumed, but none have been landed; Danish quoted 174s to 178s, Siberian 116s to 140s, French 146s to 155s, Irish 142s to 160s, New Zea-. land 160s to 120s, Canadian 160s to 164s, and Argentine 154s to 156s. Bacon- Irish and Danish firm; Canadian steady; American quiet; shipments of Dutch are resumed: Irish quoted 100s to 110s, Danish 104s to 110s. Dutch 100s to 106s, and Canadian 94s to 100s. Hams steady- American long-cut quoted 86s to 98s, and ditto short-cut 84s to 88s. Lard quiet- American pails quoted 798 3d, and ditto boxes 78s. Cheese slightly steadier on improved Canadian oadviceg Canadians quoted 98s to 102s. New Zealand 100s to 104s, and United States 94s to 100s. Eggs quiet; supplies small—Irish quoted 17s to 17s 6d, Danish 17s to 19s, Russian 13s 6d to 15s, Egyptian lis, and English 18s to 18s 3d. LIVERPOOL PROVISIONS, Monday- American bacon showed no practical alteration in prices despite shrinkage in values of hogs, owing chiefly to higher rates in products. Only a quiet country business. however, was done. Shoulders steady, with quiet sales. Hams firm and unchanged. Irish and Danish continue steady, and Canadian held for Saturday's level. Lard spot was 6d dearer for choice Western on better cables. Cheese remained in only quiet request without change in values. Butter steady, and again moved off quietly, while eggs were firmer for Irish hen at 15s 9d to 17s. Refined lard futures opened 4!d to 6d dearer—July done at 73s 3d and Septem- ber 74s 3d. OSWESTRY, Wednesdgy-The numbers in the Smithfield were: 176 fat cattle, 462 store cattle, 166 dairy cows, 135 calves, 2,130 fat sheep, 600 store sheep, 210 faT, pigs, 355 store pigs. Official quota- ti.OllS :-Shorthorns, fat (per live cwt) 1st quality 69s, 2nd 64s, 3rd 54s; store cattle: yearlings. L14 10s. £ 13, 211; two year olds. £24, £ 20; shorthorn dairy cows (per head) (in milk) t33, £2.6, L21 10s; calvers: -027, t22, £ 18; fat sheep: Downs, 124d, lld: Welsh: 12d, lld; crossbreds 121d, 4 lljd; store sheep: Welsh, ewes with lambs, 45s, 38s; shearling wethers, 26s. 23s; bacon pigs (per 14 lbs.) 12s 7d, 12s 3d; porkers 12s 9d, 12s 3d: store pigs (per head) 8 to 12 weeks old 50s, 41s; 12 to 16 weeks old, 95s, 70s; fat I-a nibs 13d, 12d; calves for rearing 92s 6d. 72s 6d. 45s. OSWESTRfc, Wednesday.—Wheat 7s I 2d to 7s 4d per 75 lbs; oats 21s to 22s per 00 lbs.

t ICOMMANDEERED WOOL

t I COMMANDEERED WOOL. The Executive Committee of the National Farmers' Union and representa- tives of the War Office and the Board of Agriculture have met in London to discuss the Government's intentions with regard to purchasing the 1916 clip. It is under- stood that the War Office is preparing lists of approved wool-staplers, who will act as authorised agents. It is proposed to divide the United Kingdom into areas, in each of which an executive officer will be appointed by the Government to organise the purchase, and the various interests concerned will be represented on an advisory committee. On behalf of the farmers it was urged that the scheme should be put into operation as early as possible and that the Government should arrange to pay the major portion of. the price as soon as wool had been delivered. The War Office representative announced that it is the intention of the Government to draw up a schedule of prices based on the prices ruling before the war, with the addition of thirty per cent. Farmers' representatives urged that this percentage would be insufficient to meet their in- creased expenses and the meeting unani- mously asked that the Government should fix a. higher price. At the request of the War Office an advisory committee was appointed to discuss details of the scheme.

Advertising

LOVEDAY, Registered Plumber and General Decorator, 22, Chalybeate Street, ABERYSTWYTH. Telephone 21 P.O. This Season's Pattern Books sent out immediately on application. GARDEN SEEDS J. VEAREY, Has now in Stock a large variety of NEW GARDENT SEED, OF THE BEST QUALITY. FRESH VEGETABLES Daily from our own Gardens. Sweet Peas a Speciality. Note Address: 17, Northgate Street, STEAM LAUNDRY, ABERYSTWYTH. B. JOJ5TES BEGS to inform his numerous Customers that owing to the increase of business he has put down additional NEW AND MODERN MACHINERY to enable him to execute all orders with promptness and despatch, and hopes to still merit your esteemed patronage and support HOTELS AND PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS SPECIALLY CATERED FOR. SHIRTS AND COLLARS A SPECIALITY. All Goods Collected and De ivered Free of Charge Send a Postcard and the V^n will call- Particulars and Prices on application. The Oldest Billposting Establishment it the Town and District. JOHN LLOYD & SONS Town Criers, Billposters and Distributors, Having the largest number of most prominent Posting Stations in all parts of Aberystwyth and District, they are able to t&ke large contracts of every description. OVER 100 STATIONS IN TOWN AND DISTRICT. Official Billposters to the Town and County Councils, G. W.R. Co., Cambrian Railway Co., all the Auctioneers of the Town and District, and other public bodies. Address-TRINITY RD., ABERYSTWYTH

Farmers War Economy

Farmers War Economy. WEEDS AND THEIR SUPRjESSION. The special attention of farmers is called to the great need for combating weeds, which are usually responsible for heavy loss in the yield of crops. It is most important that the maximum yield of foodstuffs should be obtained from the land. That can only be done by keeping the land free from weeds, and in a high state of cultivation, and by sowing pure seed of high germinating power. As a rule, weeds are permitted by bad farmers only, and a determined attempt, notwith- standing all difficulties, should be made to get rid of the weeds So that the yield per acre of the crops we grow may attain the highest standard. Weeds may be annual, biennial or perennial, and must be com- bated by somewhat different metheds according to their habit of growth. What- ever methods are adopted, they must be promptly, vigorously and faithfully carried out. Systematic well-timed effort is the foundation of success. The most obvious means of suppressing weeds is to prevent them seeding. When it is recognised that an ordinary charlock I plant produces from 1,000 to 4,000 seeds, and a moderate-sized poppy 10,000 to 15,000, and large plants 50,000 seeds, the torce of the adage that "one year's seed- ing is seven years' weeding" is obvious. In destroying weeds of this tvpe the fre- quent recurrence in the rotation of root and other crops which permit thorough cleaning is an advantage. Seeding of weeds growing in hedgerows, on roadsides and waste places, and round farm build- ings, should similarly be prevented. IT nder no circumstances should imper- fectly-cleaned seed be either purchased or sown. The Board of Agriculture impress on farmers the great importance of taking steps to ensure that there shall be no failure of crops due to the sowing of poor iseed. Deep ploughing is soimetimes restorted to with considerable success, many seeds lotting when deeply buried. Others, how- ever, remain dormant under such condi- tions and may subsequently be brought to the surface. Where practicable shallow cultivation and the preparation of a good tilth prior to the sowing of a crop will encourage the seeds to germinate, when they may be destroyed by further stirring of thp soil. Such a method will help to clear the ground of many annual and biennial weeds, such as poppy, charlock, and some species of thistle. In view of the present shortage of manual labour, in districts where hand- hoeing is usually largely practised, corn crops may usefully be drilled in rows wide enough apart to permit of horse-hoeing, Sa~ f T 'n' aPar^- This is especially \vi 111 cas? °f spring-sown corn. ♦Vliere horse-hoeing cannot be practised, the wetter the climate, or the more the land is subject to the growth of annual weeds, the closer the drill coulters should be set. When weeds are plentiful it is advisable immediately after harvest to disc or lightly scarify the surface with a view to encouraging the germination of annual weeds. These should afterwards be ploughed down. Hand-pulling, digging with fork or spade, and total removal of weeds are efficient mean, of destruction, but these methods are all expensive, and are only resorted to when other plans have failed or are inapplicable. In every case the weeds collected should be burnt. The application of dung nrd artificial manures induces considerable charges in the character of the herbage 07.1 matures and of the weeds on arable 1: nd. The application of five to eight cwt. of basic slag per acre to pastures on stiff day land often has a wonderful effect in encouraging clovers and generally improv- ing the herbage, while a mixture of super- phosphate and sulphate of amonia is often an effective means of reducing such weeds as buttercups, daises, and plantains. Suit- abe manuring may so stimulate cultivated crops that many of the worst weeds will be crowded out, a fact which i, of especial significance at the present time in connection with the growing of successive corn crops. Farmyard manure, believed to contain wped seeds in any quantity, should be allowed to rot well before application to the land. Weeds may often be suppressed or much reduced h", the growth of denge, heavy" smother" crops which choke them out. Close feeding with sheep will often (,he-k certain plants and prevent the-m seeding e.g.. ragwort, yellow rattle, and hardhead or knapweed.

Tribunal and the Amalgamated Press

Tribunal and the Amalgamated Press. DISGRACEFUL ACTION." An engineer's turner applied at South- ward Tribunal last week tor exemption. He said he had been for two and a half years employed by the Amalgamated Press. The Mayor inquired if he were included in the list of fifty-three employees for whom the Amalgamated Press had applied -and obtained conditional exemption for twenty-one. Applicant replied that he was not. The firm, he said, only appealed for single men and left the married to shift for them- selves. He volunteered as an engineer for munition work and obtained a situa- tion, being give-n a certificate and a badge by the firm who employed him; but the Amalgamated Press claimed him, and he had to give up the munition work. The Mayor—Are you correct when you state that your firm fetched you away from munition work?—Yes, that's quite correct. Mr. P. Haynes: I think it is most dis- graceful. Councillor We-aver said he agreed that it was a disgraceful action. The Tribunal decided to allow the appli- cant a month's extension with a view to his obtaining work in a Government-con- trolled munition factory. The military representative stated that he had consulted the Mayor and the tri- bunal with reference to the certificates which had been granted to the Amaga- maed Press for the exemption of the twenty-one single young men who had been granted six months' extension, and, with the consent of the tribunal, he had reduced the certificates to two months. The consequence was that these young men had now got to join up.

Advertising

Simply boil the clothes for thirty min- utes, no rub, no scrub, no soak. The SIMPLE SIMON way. Ask your grocer; he knows. j Costs a groat; worth £ s. 2

Geography and Citizenship

Geography and Citizenship INTERESTING ADDRESS BY PROFESSOR FLEURE. The summer meeting of Carnarvonshire County Association of the National Union of Teachers was held on Saturday at the Boys Council School, Pwllheli, when Mr. ■ H. Stephens Llandudno, presided over a large and representative attendance The principal feature of the conference .1 was an address by Professor Fleure, D Sc University College, Aberystwyth, on Geography and Citizenshin." Dr. Fleure, who is one of the greatest authorities on the teaching of geography in time w^sh^uli1 18 fittiug that in these fSn of +h gT Wi,th a general con- We hivf> w e Poverty of our citizenship. VVe have worshipped statistics of imperial Donulati expo't. and import trade, of population and income, of all manner of external things, whiile the mo™ Z Jd ne< leSed o g+ to° much neglected Our towns have grown haphazard in ugliness and vulgarity Hear hear). Our chapels in thei/evSy line deny thE> great purposes they were G n b't pllUi f ° t'Xpress- We sell the Umlet Rock for quarrying though we should regard ourselves as trustees of its 11. p »>eauty tor posterity. We displace our u+Pn\-l furniture and household utensils and buy factory things with hideous designs that destroy our aesthete appreciation and make our children 

Yn Amser Rhyfel

Yn Amser Rhyfel. NODION AMRYWIOL. fVvvvd "^vn r rhyfol bob cylch <* AuddiMt dTddordebymdeithaT1A g°r" ngweithrediadau' cyhoeddus ar ..hail i ta,*n byr^dau cenedlaethol. Cymer v [ ° ,bwys 0 amser a modSS*Jl,,(w'>UUaIS IIool, ac o'r braidd r °ynshorau flaw y Cj-hoedd heb dd» yn argraS y rhvf b 4! rediadau'r Senedd ac ifid weith" 1 ymdrafodaeth eithriadol^l8^! cysylltiad unionevrchol a'r /htf i ddaI cyfeiriad. Yr u vrlW\ Jv yn mhob tevrnged uchel i ff l lu eddaf talwyd Kitcl5W«plidf° £ ?'TeW! >rslwydd ■ddo. SiaratUvvd yn hv w>r| i '"W" ac vr nprlH hj nod o deimladvvy Ki j,™nrhr £ fr1 Sr g,vr eadarn yn yr^ ond er eu galar ni lesghant ac nM^f jeu Penderfyniad i orchfygu. ant yn°y ieneSrSSd 3:dra'?d"r^ Uvivodraetlr11 ^OT ddethohiyd S' y ar e„ » i,th „ rK!eUO?,d « ed, codi yu ifresvmrT ,Pnsiau "«^»^V"Ttre*edPSJ™an,,e^d Meddylie;trS'dCh V » gyflemvad na° Hy„«ld uwch am y rheswm, meddir v tnsori/v cyflenwad gogyfer a'r dyfodoL Os ydvw "11 fod masnachwyr yn codi anghenrheidiau bywyd er mwyn cyfoethogi imfam ar.drauI J wlad sydd vn dd? f Z'tmuit nis Sellir cosPi pobl mw ddi-egwyddor yn rhy drwm. Ond Z o Ssvm™ bufdd, Persono1' eeir llawer i 0 resymau anorfodol yn gyfrifol, megys diffyg ongau a llafur. Gwelir er hyny fod | masnachwyr a chanolwyr yn elwa er oWaethaf yr holl ddiffygion. Er fod cyflogan wedj codi yn gyffredinol nid yw'r codiad yn gyfatebol i'r prisiau ychwaneg- ,)I ,i lialvlia'r gii-eitliwyr yn naturiol i'r Llywodraeth ffrwyno'r elw masnachol Ar ,\r un pryd nis gellir gofalu gormod ar jn°?aeth y Llywodraeth i beidio gwas- traffu i fvvyda yn ddoeth. m j aynyddu f'vn^vrdl y tir hyd yr eithaf posibl 7 „ | L | amaethyddiaeth rhoddir cyfle neillduol i torched Cymru. Mae miloedd o honynt am gael cyfle i helpu eu gwlTd Pan ma-e prisiau bwydydd mor uchel eglur jw mai r gvvaith goreu i'r rhai sydd yn P?, y.wlad ydy\x gvvneud pobpeth yu eu gallu i ychwanegu at faint cynyrch v tir Os na cheir help merched y wlacf bydd y cynhaeaf eleni yn llai ac nid vn "L8m frd iCynifer ° ddynion £ fyddin Gydag ychydig ymdrech gallai'r ™€1? ied ad-drefnu eu gvvaith er mwyn gaiddio ychydig neu helpu ar fferm ger- Gallant odro unwaith neu ddwy bob ydd' Sal'ant orffen eu gwaith arferol yn ystod y boreu i roi help llaw yn y cyn- haeaf am y gweddill o'r dydd; gallant hel ttrvvythau a gwneud cymaint ag svdd bosibl o "jam"; a gallant wneud llawer o gymhwynasau eraill, pe ond gofalu am blant cymydoges tra y mae yn y caeau neu gyda'r gwartheg. Mewn llawer o ardal- oedd cedwir rhestr o enwau'r merched sydd yn barod i helpu'r wlad yn vr argyfwng presenol, er gwybodaeth i ttermwyr ac eraill mewn angen o help Os nad oes restr felly mewn unrhywl ardal ymofyner a r "Labour Exchange" agosaf. Dylid gofalu am gyflog teg am bob gwaith ar y tir. Disgwylir i blant yr ysgolion ac ysgolteistri gynorthwyo'r ffermvvyr hefyd, fel y gwnel pawb eu rhan tros eu gwlad, canys os pery'r rhyfel fisoedd eto bydd v cwestiwn o gael digonedd o fwvd o'r pwys mwyaf. Un o r cwestiynau hyny sydd a'u perth- ynas a r rhyfel yn cynhyddu'n fwy union- gyrchol Iel y gobeitlxir y dynesa'r diwedd yw setydiu r mdwyr dychweledig ar y tir. £ nidrafodaetli yn y Senedd dro yn tod yn anffafriol ac er i gynyg Mr. Dvd Da vies, A.S., jLlandinam, gael ei ia-rtliod, rhoddir lhesymau cryf dros i'r Llywodraeth sefydlu man-ddaliadau yng Nghymru i'r milwyr, a gobeithir y der- byniant ystyriaeth ddyladwy. Naturiol yw meddwl y disgwylia rhan fwyaf o'r milwyr a'r morwyr Cymreig ddychwelyd i'r tir y magwyd hwynt arno, a gall Cymru hawUo'r devrnged hyny am fod y wlad fechan wedi cymeryd rhan mor fawr yn y rhyfel. Bydd gofyn am gwell awdurdod na Deddf y Man-ddaliadau cyn y gellir boddloni'r newyn am dir sydd mor nod- weddiadol o hanes Cymru a chyn y gellir rhwystro dibobli'r ardaloedd gwledig a gwella safle amaethyddiaeth. Mae'n dda fod byrddau lleol fel Cynghor Trefol Aber- ystwyth yn symud i anrhydeddu'r gwyr aberthant eu bywydau ar allor gwlad- garwch; ond heb amharchu unrhyw fudiad o'r fath, oni fyddai yn fuddiol pe svmudai'r cynghorau sirol a gwledig i sicrhau byw- ioliaeth i'r milwyr a'r morwyr ddychwel- ant wedi'r rhyfel? Bydd hyn yn sicr o greu dyddordeb yn en gweithrediadau. Nid yw yn debyg y dychwela'r arwyr i'r swyddfa a'r siop. Y tir a'u gal want a'r tir ofyna am eu gwasanaeth. Oni chant le ar y tir ymfudant i'r trefedig- aethau a cheir y gweddill ar grwydr neu i or-boblogi'r trefydd mawrion, i gynyddu tlodi, ac i iselhau cenedlaethau dyfodol. Pa bryd by nag y daw heddwch a pha fodd bynag y penderfynir y telerau, nis gall y cynghorau lleol na'r Senedd esgeu- luso parotoi yn y cyfeiriad hwn. Yn wir, mae'r Senedd wedi rhoddi arweiniad, ond nid oes argoelion fod cynrychiolwyr y trethdalwyr yug Nghymru yn barod i ddilyn ac i symbylu'r mudiad i. gael tir. Cyfeiriad pwysig arall y rhoddodd y Senedd arweiniad iddo. tra yn gwahardd gwario yng ngyfeiriadau eraill, oedd ynglyn a gwelliant-au iechvdol. Mae'n syndod cyn lleied o ddyddordeb a gymer cynghorau gwledig yn v cyfeiriad yna pan vstyrir yr heintiau a'r marwolaethau gellid osgoi. Difudd hollol fydd ymdrechu cvnvddu poblogaetli yr ardaloedd gwledig os na ofelir am wella manteision a budd- innau cartrefol.

No title

(continued from previous column). The other delegates agreed and a cordial vote of thanks was given Dr. Fleure, and i.t was also agreed to reprint the address. At the business meeting which followed it was decided to make a contribution of P,50 to the national fund for broken Welsh warriors from the teachers' war fund created to relieve necessitous cases in the county. The question of reverting to the use of sletes i.n the schools was referred to the consideration of the local associations of ,the county.