Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
THE Welsh gamers

THE Welsh gamers' Friday, September 15th, 1916. CATTLE. LLANDILO, Saturday, September 9.— The fortnightly mart for the sale of live stock by public auction was held at the Fair Field, Newcastle Emlyn. Prices:- Cbws with calves at foot from E20 to £30, heifer aad calves from P,16 to j322, young fat cattle from C20 to £ 24, old fat cows from J310 to L23, yearling store cattle from J38 to E10, two-year-old ditto from L12 to £ 16 each porkers up to 13s. id., sows up to 12s 6d per score; sheep up to 4d., lamb up to 6d. per lb. CARMARTHEN, Saturday, Sept. 9.— There was a large attendance at the weekly market here to-dav, and trade was brisk. Quotations—Butter—in pats Is 8d and Is d, and in casks Is 7!d and Is 8d per lb; eggs, 11 for 2s; poultry—fowls 3s 9d to 4s 6d each, chickens Is 8d and Is 9d per lb, ducks 4s 6d to 5s 6d each; cheese- Caerphilly Is 4d, Welsh 7d per lb. CORN, ETC. OSWESTRY, WMiles(lay.-Now wheat 8s lOd to 9s; and old ditto 9s 6d to 9s 8d per 75s. lbs. OSWESTRY. Wednesday.—The numbers in the Smithfield were: 226 fat cattle, 1,757 fat sheep, 2.500 store sheep, 207 fat pigs. Official quotations: Shorthorns, fat (per live cwt.) 1st quality 56s 6d.. 2nd 50s.. 3rd 42s.; fat sheep, Downs lld, 9d, 84d. Welsh 10jd, 9d: crossbreds llld, 9d, 84d; bacon pigs (per 14 lbs.) 12s 3d, lis 9d.; porkers 13s, 12s.; fat lambs 14d., 13d. calves for rearing 60s.. 50s.. 378. LIVERPOOL PROVISIONS. Tuesday.—The American bacon market ruled slow owing to the limited demand, and sellers were easy to deal with, though quotations remained) unchanged. Long clears, 99s to 101s; short clear backs, 91s to 96s; clear bellies. 98s to 101s; Cum- berland cuts 97s to 100s. Shoulders in poor request with squares partly Is lower at 78s to 81s. Hams moved slowly and ofIlarlcd on (recent tf-rn-is-long cut. 103g to 108s; short out, 102s to 106s. Irish and Danish bacon quiet with freer sellers at 119s to 121s, and Oanadlian Wiltshires

THE Welsh gamers

(continued from previous column). offered at Ills to 115s. Lard on spot was weaker with American refmed sorts re- duced 9d to 2s 3d per cwt; pails 81s 9d to 84s 3d; boxes 80s 6d to 83s. Cheese mar- ket quieter with sellers of finest makes at previous figures—Canadian white 105s to 107s; coloured, 107s to 108s; States, 104s to 106s. Butter market firm with steady business, and quotations 2s dearer—Dan- ish, 196s to 200s.; Irish creameries, 182s to 186s. Eggs firm-Irish, 19s to 21s per 120. Refined law,-futures opened' easier but improved during the morning on sellers' reserve and early deliveries closed partly új. dearer—October -old at 78s lO!d to 79s; November, 78s 9d to 79s 3d: January, 77s. LONDON PRODUCE. Tuesday.—S

Thirty Years Purchaset

Thirty Years' Purchase. t SIR W WATKIN WYNN'S WYNN- STAi ESTATE. Messrs Frank Lloyd -and Sons offered for sale at the Wynnstay Arms Hotel, Oswestry, on Friday, outlying portions of the Wynnstay Estate situat-e near Oswestry, Llansilin, and Trefonau, in twenty-three lots, twenty-two lots being sold by auction and one withdfawn. A large company assembled and the bidding -L.J T- 8- J't was spirneu. in many instances xne tenants were the purchasers. In cases where the tenants did not wish to pur- chase, the competition was keen, £ 85 an acre being paid for accommodation land, and small holdings up to £ t0. One hold- ing near Trefonau. of 14t acres, made £ 1,070; a pasture field adjoining, 4 acres, 6310; a small tenement also near Tre- foneu, 7 £ acres, £ 500; and pasture field. Si acres, £ 450. The sale throughout realised thirty years purchase in the rental. After the sale of the Wvnnstay pro- fonnu. 74 acres, £,5Œ): find pasture field, 51¡- at Nant Mawr, Llanyblodwell. was put up and realized £ 430. Major Bull in this in- stance acted as vendor's solicitor. <

Advertising

Puritan Pictures No. 3. 7 I fir From an origmcrftfamtcm '§1 J by Fred. JpaTdver. 'JBa 4' A MOORLAND IDYLL The Story, of the Picture My painting is an endeavour to express the spirit of all things cleanly and undefiled. The Puritan girl kneels by the rushing moorland stream, happily engaged in imparting snow-white purity and cleanliness to her household linen with the help of Puritan Soap. Fleckless blue sky, clear sun-washed upland air and fresh, unsullied brook form a fitting environment for one whose thoughts, like her linen, are sweet and wholesome. tihis picture illustrates what thousands of women know to be true that PURITAN SOAP 0 is pure by name and pure by nature < 186 CHRISTR. THCMA9 & BROS. LTD., BRISTOL 'I jpi—i =]!S3E^SIC=g=lE lJRv Tbe Test of Time. J Father Time is the great revealer of all shams. Sooner or later he ex' L. I poses the false and the make-believe. Only the things that are true and IT j real can survive the test of time. Year after year, decade after decade, ) Beecham's Pills have been the one and only household medicine in many J J thousands of homes. In city and in hamlet, llike, they have been LL I equally appreciated. And their popularity, to-day, is greater than ever. They have emerged triumphant from the trying test of time. This is because they are really efficacious in doing what they claim to do. What they promise they perform. They are a true remedy and a very real relief in all cases of indigestion, biliousness, constipation, sluggish action of the Kidneys, and the nervous troubles resulting from these conditions. Hence they exert a corrective and curative action upon the whole system. ■J In all the qualities which commend themselves to the majority, who I*" require immediate and permanent return to health, Beecham's Pills FT" stand supreme. Time has proved the value of 8 j j Beecbanfs Pills, j ■j Sold everywhere in boxes, labelled Is. 3d and 3s. Od. m

AGRICULTURE

AGRICULTURE. IN WAR-TINE-AND AFTER. (By an Oocasional Correspondent.) The Final Report of the Departmental Committee on the Settlement of Soldiers and Sailors on the Land. The final report is a most valuable docu- ment and one that should be read by all students of the land problem. The mem- bers of the Committee did not agree in their decisions. Thus the report is divided into majority and minority reports; and of the two the latter is by far the most ex- haustive and interesting. The majority report touches the ques- tions of wages, housing, conditions ot agricultural labour, how to assist ex-ser- vice men to find employment, reclamation of land, and afforestation. On the ques- tion of wages of agricultural labourers it points out that according to the Govern- ment enquiry of 1907 they varied from 12s Id in Dorset to 17s 6d. in the West Ridino- of Yorkshire, in addition to which in most districts labourers get cottages free and many allowances in kind. Since 1QIT7 t.ViP. wao-n rose to 14s. at the end of 1913 in Dorset, and from 17s. 6d. to 19s. 6d. in the West Riding in the same period. According to Board of Trade re- ports there was a rise in wages generally of 7.0 per cent. between 1907 and 1913; hut against that th-ere was an estimated rise in the cost of living of about 7.2 per cert. Since the beginning of the wn the rise in wages has been from 3s. to 5s. per week; but, again, the cost of living has 'counterbalanced these rises. According to the report, since the beginning of the war farmers and labourers in the county of Norfolk at a conference agreed on a wage of £ 1 a week which represents a rise of 58 per week compared with pre-war rates." There is no evidence as to what has happened in Wales; but we may feel certain that there been a rise in wages of farm workers all round since the begin- ning of the war. In order to maintain a higher standard of pay for land workers, the minority re- port recommends that District Wages Boards should be set up: but the majority considers that "legislation dealing with agricultural wages would be regarded as controversial and could not be passed during the war." Indeed they end with- out any definite recommendations on the point. The minority, on the other hand, think a district wage board system desir- able by which a statutory minimum wage would be settled for each district-because there is no doubt that hitherto the farm labourer has in most districts found it impossible to protect himself by combina- tion. This is mainly attributable to his isolated position and comparative want of ^mobility jn -seeking better-paid employ- ment." We cannot but admire the courage of the minority in reeommending a District Wage Board to settle the wages of agri- cultural workers. In theory the idea is good., but in practice there would be great difficulties in carrying it out successfully. So much would depend on the constitu- tion of the boards. If made up of farmers themselves and employers of labour gener- ally, the results would be disappointing. On the other hand, to meet the varying conditions of agriculture, if statutory tribunals were set up to settle this most important question, District Wages Boards would be the best machinery, composed of employers and employed with an inde- pendent chairman possessing firstr-hand knowledge of agriculture. Amongst the signatures to the minority report is the ffon. Edward G. Strutt. who has a wide experience of the agricultural problem and who runs farms on a co- partnership basis for his brother (Lord Rayleigh), the proprietor of the famous milk shops iR London. On the housing question the report states that one of the great obstacles in the way of retaining men in the country in the years before the war was the lack of good cottage accommodation in many parts of England and Wales, and it will be found 10 pre- sent difficulties in arranging for the em- ployment of ex-service men on the land." It recommends more public utility societies and that landowners should be encouraged by the offer of loans to build Mr Roland Prothero, M.P., in his evidence, supplied remarkable figures regarding the matter. He said he had returns relating to 22,000 cottages scattered er every county in England and Wale3 and all built by agri- cultural landowners for housing the agri- cultural labourers on the land. Out of lliat number, 13,000 only of these are occupied by agricultural labourers; 3,000 by old-age pensioners; 1,000 by Govern- ment and local authority employees; 350 by railway men: and 5,000 by employees of trade and industries other than agri- ron 1 t, n t." ) The reason that these cottages are not occupied wholly by agricultural labourers is, of course, that this class has left the land; and from the point of view of receiv- ing economic rents it pays the owners better to have the classes mentioned as tenants than agricultural labourers. Reference is made to tied cottages; and the representative" of the Agricultural Labourers Union, in his evidence, stated that tenants of such cottages are not free men and that they were deterred from joining the Union more for fear of the farmer turning their wives and families out than from the fear of losing employ- ment. The report states that the prob- lem would be largely solved if more lem would be largely solved if more cottages were provided by local authorities. I cannot see any hope of local authorities providing cottages for agricul- I tural labourers. They were very reluctant in pre-war times to provide housing accom- modation of any sort; but after the war, with the dislocation of trade and the scarcity of money, local authorities, I am afraid, will not move in the matter for many years. This thing must be done by the State, either directly or through a system of financially-aiding private in- dividuals. I The trouble, of course, is that agricul- tural labourers on low wages cannot pay economic rents. Private individual enter- prise would provide housing accommoda- prise would provide housing accommoda- tion if there were hopes of adequate re- turns. Building houses, like making rail- ways, is a business undertaking, and un- less there are prospects of returns on capital outlay the thing is left undone. With a prosperous agriculture I venture to say that in ten years hence thousands of cottages would be built in country dis- tricts but with a decadent agriculture the cottages will ,continue to diminish in number. On the question of general conditions of agricultural labour the report states "that onp great drawback to the life of an agri- cultural labourer is that, no matter how persevering and industrious he may be, he has little prospect of obtaining a position of independence." It further states that the opportunity of obtaining allotments and small holdings is a great asLstanoo to agricultural labourers. An improved organisation of co-operation and agricul- tural eredit will enable them to take more advantage of the opportunity which exist." Agricultural labourers do not require

AGRICULTURE

r->- (continued from previous column). allotments. What they require are small holdings which would occupy the time of wives and children while they are away at work and room to keep a cow, poultry, and T)igs, which would help them to bring up families. Allotments are more suitable for people who do not work on the land during the daytime-men from offides, artisans, railway men, postmen, and colliers who tare good allotment holders whenever they take to the work. It stands to reason that a farm labourer does not want to do any gardening after working on the land all day. What he requires is rest after returning home and the pleasure of seeing his family thriving. In short, allotments are for town dwellers and small holdings for country dwellers. The report states that a brighter vil- lage life is also hiffhlv desirable. All villages of any size ought to have a olub- room, public library, recreation grounds, and the like to break the monotony of country life." Certainly these amenities should be provided for the younger genera- tion of country folk; but if given land and opportunities to occupy small farms the labourer will be contented. In Wales the opportunities for the labourer to rise to be a farmer are better than in England on account of the exist- ence of smaller farms. There are num- erous instances of farmers occupying hold- ings of 10) acres or thereabouts in the Principality at present who were at one time working labourers. No one gave evidence before the Com- mittee on behalf of Wales, although the Agricultural Council was invited to send two witnesses; but did not accede to the invita.tion." It would be interesting to know why the Council did not accede to the invitation, because one feels in re.,id- ing the report that information regarding the condition of things in Wales would mako it more complete. Doubtless, had Wales tendered evidence showing how our agricultural labourers have a "ladder" it would have assisted in getting our request granted for a colony for discharged soldiers and sailors granted.

Village Water Supplies

Village Water Supplies. COST AND QUALITY. Aberystwyth Rural Council met on Monday, there being present Messrs. R. L. -Thomas, Brysgaga, chairman, presid- ing; David Lewis, Llaarhystyd, vice-chair- man; E. J. Evans, Cnwcybarcut; Daniel Jenkins, Bryncamedd; T. Oliver Jones, Thomas Jones, Llanfihanegl Upper; Dd. James, Penrhyncoch; D. Bonner, Lian- afan; John Roberts Uchayndre; David Jones, Llanbadarn Lower; LI. J. Lewis, J. Ll Powell, Cwmrheidol; Evan Hughes Issayndre; David James, Melindwr,; and Hugh Hughes, clerk Lengthy correspondence was read re- garding the tolls charged for bathing huts and tents on the beach at Borth and was referred to the local members. Mr. W. S. Davies, Erwtomau, attended as a deputation from Llanbadarn Upper Parish Council with regard to the water supply of Capel Sion. He said the water was obtained from within fifty yards of the burial ground, and the inhabitants I were auspicious of its quality before it was analysed. He also contended that part of the expenses should be charged to Uan- I badarn Lower, because children from that parish attended the school. 1- The Inspector (Mr. James Hughes) said the water had been twice analysed. No objection had been raised to the water and he knew it was used by the people of Capel Sion, who also used it for members or the Monthly Meeting. (Laughter). Mr. Daniot Jenkins thought the objec- tion was more to the cost than to the quality of the water. It was decided to take no further action in the matter, except that the water should be analysed. Elancynfelin Parish Council wrote com- plaining of the water supply at Borth, which the Inspector said had been attended to. The application of the Parish Council to pay the expenes of the new waterworks by instalments was not entertained. It was agreed to allow an horonarium of £ 20 to the Clerk in recognition of his ser- vices in connection with national registra- tion. The Sanitary Inspector reported that, though the scarcity of labour and high price of materials Had practically stopped the building industry, the repairs recently ordered were taken in hand and cottages were being re- paired which would have been left un- attended to but for the Council's efforts. Two cases of scarlet fever were notified at Owmrheidol as the result of infection from South Wales. The water supply at Chan- cery was defective. The Inspector also complained of the nuisance caused bv the roadside channelling at Pentreboiat and Pont Llanio.

IFELINF ACH

I FELINF ACH. PARCELS FUND.—The Secretary of the Local Fund Committee has received acknowledgment of receipt of parcels from Sergt. D. Hughes Jonathan and Sergt. Daniel Jonathan, Tynygwndwn Villa; Pte William Morgan, Cottage Meurig; Pte. J. W. Evans, Red Lion; Sergt. W. R. Davies, Lloyd Jack; Pte. J. Idwal Davies, School House; Ptes. W. Scott, Llanlear; E. E. Davies, Rhos; W. C. Revells, Cwm- cafan Factory; and W. E. Davies, Ystrad Vicarage, and Sapper Walter Jones, Cwm- ere. MIIATARY.-Pte. T. W. Jones, Alder- gate, has arrived home, having obtained his discharge. It is hoped he will have a speedy and complete recovery after a little rest amidst peaceful surroundings. Pte. D. J. Saunders Davies, R.F.A., Commer- cial House, returned on Monday to re-1 join his unit. after a few days furlough. Pte. David L. Evans, Brynaeron, 28th Regiment of the Australian Imperial Forces, is reported to be a prisoner of war in Germany. He is the only son of the veteran C.M. minister, the Rev. John Evans, Abermeurig. News has been re- ceived of the death of Pte. Dan Davies, Dowlais, son of Mrs. George, Gwynfryn. He was a well-known musician and leader of male voice choirs. His officer in a letter to his wife says-" He stuck to his gun during the intense bombardment and was struck by an enemy's shell. His end was painless and instantaneous and worthy of a fine soldier."

GOGINAN

GOGINAN. PARISH COUNCIL.—On Friday even- ing a Parish Council was held, there being present Messrs. Wm. Griffiths,, Goginan- fach (ohiairman), Isaac Lewis, Exchange, Hugh M. Evans, Post Office, Benjamin Vaughan, and D. Herbert, C.M. Minutes of last meeting were read and confirmed. An application received from the Clerk for an increase in his salary was deferred. Complaints were received of the state of the path leading from Pistyll to Doll- wern. It was decided to improve the path; Messrs. H. M. Evans and D. Her- bert to see that the work be done pro- perly. The Clerk was instructed to call a meeting at an early date, and to inform absent members that they are expected to give their attendances more regularly especially when important matters have to be decided.

Yn Amser Rhyfel

Yn Amser Rhyfel. GWRONIAID FFYDD. Bu farw'r cenadwr eyn dod yn waredwr I r pagan a garai mor fawr; Dymuniad ei galon, A'i awynol freuddwydion A chwalwyd, fel man us y Hawr. Fe gladdwyd y prophwyd, A'i ganwyll ddiioddwyd Cyn claddu tywyllvvch y byd; Fe'i riwdäwyil I huno Cyn gweled yn gwawrio Y bore, ddisgwyliodd gyhyd. I Fe gwympodd y milwr Cyn bod yn orchtygwr, Yn angerdd ei boenau a'i gur; A chrechwen gelynion Drywanodd ei galon Yn fwy na phicellau o ddur. Ha! dirion wroniaid! Os cauodd eich llygaid Ar fyd o drueni a braw; Mae grym addewidion Tu ol i'ch breuddwydion, A llwyr fuddugoliaeth gerllaw. J.J., Drenewydd. Deil y newyddion o'r gwahanol cadfeus- ydd yn dra ffafriol a boddhaol .ac y maent yn gwella dydd ar ol dydd. Mae'r cyd- ymosodiad gan y Prydeinwyr a'r Ffrancod yu frainc ac yn Salonica yn cadw ymlaen a chymerir safle ar ol saffe oddiwrth y gelyn. Ymddengys fel pe bai lluoedd Germani wedi cael digon o frwydro yn Ffrainc. Un rheswm am hyny yw fod y shells a'r gynau mawr o'n ochr ni yn curo arfau'r gwrth- wynebwyr. Rheswm arall paham y medd- ylir fod gafael y gelyn yn gwanhau yn y gorllewin yw fod Rwsi-a a Rwmania yn pwyso n drwm yn nwyrain Ewrop ac yn peryglu rheilffordd y Balkan sydd yn cano adnoddau rhyfel i'r Twrc a'r Bwlgar. Pan penderfyna llywodraethwyr Groeg yn ol meddwl y Groegwyr bydd y sefyllfa'n galetach fyth. Er fod y newyddion mor ffafriol nid oes sail i'r dyb fod y rhyfel bron gorffen; ond pery'r proffwydi i bro- ffwydo'n amrywiol, ac yn eu plith mae'r nofelydd enwog, Mr. H. G. Wells, yn pro- ffwydo'r diwead yn mis Mai nesaf. Pa bryd bynag y daw y diwedd, nid oes am- heuaeth nad yw'r fantol wedi troi a bod ar £ Aon S^ell. Yn ddiameu hefyd m*ae pobl Geraam'n dechreu teimlo oaled- rwydd eu sefyllfa ao yn gwingo'n erbyn eu siomedigaeth. Maent yn colli eu gobaith ac yn drwgdybio ymffrost hunanol a rhy- rygus eu tywysogion. Fel yaglyn a'i englyn buddugol yn Eis- teddfod Aberystwyth, bu llawer o son am englyn buddugol Eifion Wyn yn Eistedd- fod Oarnarfon oherwydd na nodwyd y testun "Blodau'r Grug" ynddo. Achoswyd rhyfeloedd cyn hyn heb reswm digonol a chodwyd baldwrdd uchel yngylch gwa- hanol faterion yn tjdi-raid. Dyma'r englyn- Tlws eu tw, liaws tawel—gemau teg Gwmwd haul ac awel; Crog glychau creigiau uchel, Fflur y main, ffiolau'r mel. Os na. nodir yr enw yn yr englyn, cyn- hwysa bob gymhwysder arall ellid ddis- gwyl. Yn benaf oil, cynhwysa brydferth- wch y testun ac nid oes bai ar ei arddull. Rhaid yw chwilio bai yn rhywle mewn cyfansoddiadau buddugol ac yn fynych os na cheir bai llwydda y cywrain gyda microscope y siomedig i ganfod rhywbeth allan o le. Rhyw bwnio mae rhai beunydd A llunio bai lie naJ bydd. Dengys yr englyn beth yw y testyn heb ei enwi ac heblaw'r gynghanedd swynol mae ynddo llawer mewn ychydig—un o ragor- olion englyn.

Advertising

I Nobody's Dauqhter, Our portrait is of Miss Ruth O. Hart of 129 Pedro Street, Clapton Park, London, N.E., who writes:- "I was suffering from abscesses in the glands under my left arm. having eight or nine in succession, and was in such agony I did not know what to do. I was under a doctor for many weeks, but did not de- rive much benefit. Then I was recom- mended to take 'Clarke's Blood Mixture' by a friend who had been completely cured of iRheumatism by it, so decided to try one of your small bottles, and it gave me such relief it was reallv marvellous. Hav- ing finished it. I bought an 11/- case, which completely cured me. It is now 12 months since I took your 'Clarke's Blood Mixture,' which did not fail." If it's any disease due to impure blood, such as Eczema, Scrofula, Abscesses. Ulcers, Bad Legs. Boils, Pimples, Sores of any kind, Glandular Swellings, Piles, Blood Poison, Rheumatism, &c. don't waste time on lotions and ointments-to be oured permanently you must cleanse the blood of the clogging impurities, the root cause of all your suffering. There is no other medicine that purifies the blood so thoroughly as Clarke's Blood Mixture, that's why so many remarkable cures stand to its credit. Pleasant to take, and free from anything injurious. Clarke's Blood Mixture Cures All Skin & Blood Dipeases OF ALL CHEMISTS k STORES 2/9 PER BOTTLE I n- -u- -7777777 MOTOR COMPANY, Queen's Road. THE AUTHORISED AGENTS FOR FORD CARS. COMPLETE STOCK OF SPARE PARTS. BUY YOUR FORD from the AUTHORISED AGENTS. Touring Car £ 135; Delivery Van 2130. Two-Seater, £ 125. dl53 j PARIS HOUSE, DOLGELLEY. NEW AUTUMN GOODS. PRETTY HATS TO TRIM FOR PRESENT WEAR. LOVELY MILLINERY AT ECONOMICAL PRICES. WE INVITE INSPECTION TO OUR MILLINERY SHOWROOMS. W. A. MEREDITH. ———- [ BARKER'S BIG BARGAINS. Strong Cheap Field Gates. The Lincolnshire House ,rJR OVER 200 4x31x5ft.t "C-c: <, SOLD <, WEEKLY. 70j- I-r "f"ê 208. 6 x 4 x 6ft. Carriage Paid. hi o1.h, long. 9ft long. 10ft IODIt. 100/- 13/- 15/- Creosoting, Creosoting. Is 3d extra. 4s. extra. Planed for Pointing, Is 6cI extra, 7ft X 9ft X 7ft bigh, 10ft X 5ft X 7ft high Hangmg Irons, 8s 6d per set, jggy. 225/. Strong Sheep Hurdles. carriage PAid. These houses are made of the best fin. toigted- grooved, V-joiBted Matchboard on strong frame, oil long os. od. a » a w work, and mounted on four heavy 12in, wheels, CreoaotinR 9d extra ^^7"' "}9 The Fancier House. 20fe0i^et Cairifgc 1 B rarrs mi. mi i■ Paid. | 1 OUR PRICE, The Reliable 24/- |j§ij|| J Coop. 4 X 3 X 3ft high, JSgR j| J J ■ Hill 533. pi ton. 17arriage Paid. I l'HHK~I I CreosotiDg 6d extra The BEST and CHEAPEST house on the mar- II fl Shutters or ket, They can only be made at the above low Movable Floors, price because of the enormous quantity we sell. iij v. They are made in sections of the B«st Rrd De*l '■.■uiifHsiiiiiiW'fljflj nr ila e&Czi extra. Matchboards in sections to screw together, and are STRONG WIRE TOP RUN complete with two up and down shutte-s sliding 3ft long, 4s 4ft 6a 6ft 8a, over lin, mesh wire netting, trap door for fowl'* 0.. — entrance, perches, and lock up attendant's door, otrong bitting i>OXe8. Long Wide High Floors Next Box j.. 4ft x 3ft x 3ft 24s 6s 5s 6 t 1 division 4s. —"7 6ft x 4ft x 4ft 37s 6d 12s 5s 6d 2 divisions 8s. ifrTTllTTOI- ,5? ti* x 3d 11 10ft x 5ft x 5ft 100s 25s lis 3 divisionslls.6d. Wi J Carnage Paid to any Station 5 divisions 16s.6d. Creosoting, 2a extra, PORTABLE SHEDS from 35s 6d. All 20s. Orders Carriage Paid. MOTOR CAR HOUSES from 42a. F. W. BARKER & Co., Ltd., Carlton. Nottingham. Celebrated Cotton Wash Fabric in White, and in a Variety of Colours, will never Jade, 1 no matter how often worn and washed. TO BE OBTAINED AT Daniel Thomas 22 & 24. LITTLE DARKCATE STREET, ABERYSTWYTH "mummy won*# mind, SEE WINDOW THIS WEEK FOR THE VERY LATEST CREATIONS IN Millinery, Gowns, Neckwear, &c., Discriminating Buyers cannot do better than visit The Misses M. & E. COMPTON EYANS, Queen s Square, Aberystwyth (Oppssue Town Hall.) c768 l Write for Coal. Prices. D. E. HOWELL, 6 & 8, Exchange Chambers, Mt. Stuart Sq., I CARDIFF. forest of Dean and Cannock House Coals. Also Ikst Smithy Smalls. Gas, Steam, House and Anthracite Coal delivered to any Station. m -dI.. t' ;Á U1571k I BOB n s TABLE ALE J per Doz, Imperial Pixit, I" Supplied in Screw-Stoppei ed Bottles. A wholesome Ale, strongly recommended for family use, BOTTLED BY Dd ROBERTS & SONS, Ltd., BREWERS, 7JO