Collection Title: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: This resource is copyright of Cambrian News Ltd.

View full details

First Previous Image 5 of 8 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
RIVERS AND MINES

tically brought in the Scotch verdict of "not proven" and even went so far as to say that fish lived in mine water alleged to be killing fish in the Teify and causing the death of horses put to graze on the banks of the river. N o one wishes to hamper, much less to injure, the mining interests which bring a large amount of capital into the county and provide employment for labour. At the same time if present methods of mining result in destroy- ing fish and vegetation on the banks of rivers and if reasonable remedies can be found, a useful conclusion will be arrived at if they can be applied in such a way as to preserve mining as well as fishing and agriculture. At any rate, the county owe a debt of grati- tude to Dr. Harries for convening the conference and for bringing to it his scientific knowledge and the results of his experience and investigations ex- tending over many years. It is satis- factory also to know that Dr. Fleure of the College Zoological Department was present and that he expressed the willingness of the College to aid hi solving a problem which has puzzled the brains of Governmdnt and other experts for generations and have been the subject of more than one Govern- ment enquiry at Aberystwyth within ¡ the past half century without arriving at practical results. With the aid of Dr. Harries and Dr. Fleure and the co- operation of the mining companies and the public authorities interested, accom- panied by patient tests and investiga- tions, the position at the present time is one of great hopefulness.

EDITORIAL NOTES

EDITORIAL NOTES. For trespassing on a war allotment and wil- fully damaging the crop a woman has been fined E5 at Hendon. It is difficult to conceive the state of mind of a person who can damage gardens designed to provide food for the com- munity at the present time. It is to be hoped that every encouragement will be given to the movement in Aberystwyth to establish classes during next winter in elementary economics and industrial history. Never in the history of the country has the need been greater for an enlightened and culti- vated democracy. Every effort to bring such means within the reach of the masses deserves strong support. It. is the ill-informed section of workers that succumb to the whiles of the charlatan and are enamoured of wild-cat theories. It is stated that the framework of New- castle Emlyn Town Clock, one of the most con- spicuous objects in that picturesque Cardigan- shire town, is in danger of collapsing. The Council's attention has been drawn to the fact; but, true to the traditions of such authorities, nothing has yet been done or is likely to be done until collapse occurs and posibly a few persons are killed and others injured. Then the Council might bestir itself in feverish haste to rectify their sins of omission. < If the country is so short of food and if petrol has to be imported, it passes the comprehension of the ordinary man why every garage in Aberystwyth should have been full of pleasure cars over Whitsuntide. That there are many ways of evading the petrof orders is evident, but that the rich should still be able to take all they choose in food and petrol while the poor cannot get bread or sugar for their children, is a state of things which cannot exist for long. Something will break-and it will not be the back of the poor. The Govern nent's prompt decision to appoint commissioners to inquire into and devise means for combating the causes of labour unrest is a welcome indication that the gravity of the question is at last recognised. That a certain section of the men are being seduced from their work by agitators is quite evident. It is equally evident that the situation has in many cases been grievously mishandled by officials whose tactlessness has precipitated the very results they sought to avoid. The issues are too vital and the consequences too serious to allow con- ditions that breed a discontented and rebellious [. section of the workers to continue. Festiniog and Portmadoc ratepayers continue to be badly hit by the depression iu the slate trade. The poor rate of Festiniog is 7s. 6d. this year, or Is. 6d. higher than that of two years ago, and Portmadoc poor rate has had to be increased to 6s. 2d., or 4d. higher than last year. The increased rate in Portmadoc is almost entirely due to the heavy drop in the ratable value of Festiniog Union, consequent on decreased quarry output. By rigid economies the district rate has b2en kept at the same figure as last year in the two towns—2s. at Festiniog and 2s. 5d. in Portmadoc. The memorial to the men of North Wales who have fallen in the war is being well sup- ported by the six counties. Anglesey, which is being organised by Mr. R. J. Thomas, the promoter of the Memorial, has done best up to the present. The movement is also being taken up with enthusiasm by North Walians in Man- chester, Liverpool, and London. The sum to be raised is £ 150,000, and the total promised to date is C35,000, of which E20,000 was contri- buted by Mr. R. J. Thomas and £ 5,000 by Colonel David Davies. The memorial is to take the form of science buildings at Bangor College, with the provision of a substantial fund for scholarships end grants-in-aid for the children of the fallen. No building is to take place until the war is over; and meanwhile the money raised is to be invested in war loan. Farmers in particular should give liberal support to the Memorial, for agriculture is to be given a prominent place in the proposed new buildings Moreover, the agricultural industry has probably never been more flourishing and profit- able in North Wales than it is to-day. Merionethshire Appeal Tribunal had a two days sitting at Blaenau Festiniog last week to deal with appeals by quarry owners for the exemption of workmen. Alderman William Owen, Plasweunydd, chairman of the Tribunal, vacated the chair during the con- sideration of appeals for workmen at Llechwcdd Quarry, of which he is manager. Tie explained that the quarry owners had more than kept to the compact entered into some time ago with the military authorities, under which forty per ¡ cent of eligible quarrymen were to be drafted into the army and sixty per cent. to be retained I, at the quarries. Of 2,500 men employed at the quarries at the outbreak of war, there were only 907 left, the remainder having joined the colours or undertaken work under national service, etc. Of the 907 left 180 were over sixty years cf age and sixty under eighteen years. He pleaded and we sympathise with his plea, that inaSml1C1] as practically all the slates turned out by the quarries were sold to the Government, the quarries should be placed on the list of essential industries. Temporary or conditional exemption was given in the majority of cases, exemption being refused to A men, except where it was conclusively shown that their services were indispensable to carrying on of I works where they were employed, or that there j were personal ressojifi which made their cases clearly exceptional. Aberdovey fishermen are prompt to take advantage of the increased demand for fish, and exceptionally good catches are being made, the greater part of which is sent to the English markets. Skate, which used to be of negligible value, is now fetching good prices and a ready sale. With a little enterprise what is achieved at Aberdovey can be repeated elsewhere along the coast. Barmouth Council at their recent meeting gravely discussed the advisability of dispensing with one of their workmen on the ground of economy. As several members pointed out. the man was needed in winter his labour is still more necessary during the season when it is essential for a watering place to be kept clean and tidy. There is an economy of the penny wise and pound foolish order to which public bodies are sometimes addicted. The deliberations of the forthcoming Irish Convention will be watched with intense interest. Whatever the nature of the constitu. tion and machinery devised to meet the needs —and whims—of Ireland, one thing is certain. Whatever is devised cannot possibly be worse than the autocratic rule of Dublin Castle. Hitherto the fruits of that rule have been the agrarianism, the Fenianism, the whiteboyism, the Sinn Feinism, and the Carsonism that have cursed that unhappy island and mocked the earnest endeavours of the most enlightened section of British statesmen. Happily, to-day there is every indication that the impossibility of the continuance of present conditions have become apparent to every reasonable politician, with the exception of a small clique who, like the Bourbons. "learn nothing and forget iiotliing. In spite of drawbacks imposed by the war, Mr. E. D. Jones, Fishguard, chairman of the Building Committee, was able to report at the Shrewsbury meeting of the Welsh National Library Court of Governors that the building contracts at present undertaken had been com- pleted and paid for, and Mr. Ballinger, the librarian, was able to report steady progress in organisation and usefulness of the institution. The Library has so taken hold of the imagina- tion of the people of Wales and of Welshmen all over the world that difficulties have only to be mentioned to be overcome. Thus when other resources were withdrawn for the pur- chase of books and MSS. desirable for the Library, an anonymous donor came forward and provided £1,000 a year for five years for that purpose. "The progress made by the National Library," says Mr. Ballinger in his report, "since it actually came into existence, just over eight years ago, is marvellous. When the proceedings of the Royal Commission on Educa- tion in Wales are published it will be seen that the Library is expected to take a very important place among the educational institutions of the Principality."

Aberystwyth Tribunal

Aberystwyth Tribunal. The Tribunal for the borough of Aberystwyth was held on Friday, present Alderman John Evans, chairman; Alderman Edwin Morris; Councillors Captain Dougliton, David Davies, J. D. Willia ms. Rhys Jones; Mr. John Evans, clerk: and Mr. T. H. Edwards, military repre- sentative. Mr. Edwards said it would shorten proceed- ings by his stating that there were several cases in the list which the military would be satisfied to leave to the Tribunal. The military were satisfied that Hugh Owen James, oil sales- man, Greenfield-street, and Edward Davies, foreman storeman, High-street, were over mili- tary age. In the cases of Chas. Williams, upholsterer, Queen-street, Albert Geo. Thatcher, dental mechanic, Penmaesglas-road; Evan Wm. Thomas, accountant and cashier, Dinas-terrace; Lewis Thomas, clerk in County Council Office; Henry James Savcell, Northgate-street; and T. Lewis Old, accountant and manager, North- road, were Class C and the military were satis- fied that they were engaged in occupations of national importance.—Conditional exemption was granted in each case; but Mr. Edwards said the military would be at liberty to review at any time. Mr. W. P. Owen appeared on behalf of Mr. Hartley, Queen-street, to apply for exemption of George Jenkins, book-keeper and stock- keeper, C2, married with four children, expert seedsman.—In reply to Mr. Edwards Mr. Hartley said a woman could do the book- keeping, but a man was necessary to lift heavy weights and to classify seeds or much confusion would result in sowing.—Conditional exemption. Morris John Walters, grocer's apprentice, 18, single, C2, in the employ of Mr. Owen Hall, applied for exemption. Mr. Owen Hall sup- ported the application by saying he was not in good health himself, that four men had joined, and he had no one left but Walters to lift weights.—Exempted till September 25th. Evan James, 35, B2, married with two children, town postman, Edgehill-road, not well since an operation, aged mother partly de- pendent.—25th September. Thomas Samuel, 39, master plasterer, Chaly- beate-street (represented by Mr. Emrys Wil- liams), married with two daughters over age for allowance, in partnership with W. H. Jen- kins who was refused exemption on the ground that he was single and that the business could be carried on by Samuel alone. The completion of contracts had been delayed by last winter's frosts and plasterers could not be now obtained. -By Mr. Edwards Plasterers had left Aberyst- wyth to get work but not since the war.—25th September. Mr. T. J. Samuel appeared for John Edwards, bread vanman and horseman, in the employ of Mr. J. R. James, 31, and stated that Edwards oftered his services to his country several times and had been rejected, and thinking himself finally rejected got married and incurred responsibilities. He had khree brothers in the army and a fourth brother in Glamorgan was joining.—Mr. Edwin Morris said that though Edwards was rejected for the army he was not lejected in marriage. The Military Repre- sentative objected to a remark by Mr Samuel to the effect that the man was being harassed. —Mr. J. R. James said that Edwards was in charge of the van and horses.—Tn reply to the Military Representative (who said that though rejected Edwards had passed Bl), Mr. James said he had recently engaged Daniel Hughes of Penparke whose only son had been taken and Hughes had to ask for employment. He had also in his employ a man of military age who went to Bath but was sent back by the military though lie had passed everything. He had not now two more men than when last before the Tribunal, for a man named Morgan Jones had gone to work on timber.—25th Sep- tember. Mr. Emrys Williams appeared for Edward Jones, boot and shoe dealer and repairer, Buarth-road, 35, B2, married with one child, in partnership with his father, aged 68, since 1904, and having charge of the business. He was rejected under the Derby scheme and re- jected at Brecon. An assistant had joined and promised to return but had gone elsewhere for improvement in his trade. Had had a com- pound fracture of the leg and could not walk long distances or stand long on his feet. He employed one workman in HId one out.—Mr. Williams contended that Jones was in a re- served occupation, being over 31 and B2.—Con- ditional exemption. Mrs. Geddes Smith, Penynant, applied for exemption for Rd. Morris, 40, B2, gardener, Skinner-street, only man kept and engaged in the cultivation of six acres of land and the produce of potatoes, oats, and vegetables. Mrs Smith said that casual labour was unsatis- factory and on her replying that Morris did not do a single thing in the house, the Mili- tary Representative said lie had seen him clearing snow for tobogganing.—25th September. John Samuel Davies, linotype operator and mechanic, Dinas-terrace, 39, C2, was given conditional exemption on the ground that as he was engaged in minor repairs in the course of his work he was in a reserved occupation.

NOTICE

NOTICE. In consequence of the greatly increased costs now being borne by all newspapers, we have to announce that all successes (such as the pass- ing of music examinations and obtaining certi- ficates for shorthand) if accompanied by the names of the teachers, cannot be inserted with- out the prepaid charge of 2s. 6d. This does not apply to teachers who are regular advertisers in our columns.

INational Library of Wales

National Library of Wales. ANOTHER L'BERAL CIFT. PRESENT BUILDINGS COMPLETED AND PAID FOR. The adjourned annual meeting and the half- yearly meeting of the Court of Governors were held at Shrewsbury on Friday when there were present the Right Hon. J. Herbert Lewis, M.P., vice-president, in the chair; the Hon. Mrs. Bulkeley Owen, Mr. J. W. Willis Bund, F.S.A., Mr. J. H. Davies, M.A., Professor Edward Edwards, M.A., Sir E. Vincent Evans, J.P., Alderman T. H. Howell, J.P., Mr. E. D. Jones, D.L., J.P., the Rev. H. Elvet Lewis, M.A., Professor J. E. Lloyd, M.A., the Right Hon. Lord Mostyn, Mr John Owens, Alderman W. J. Parry, Mr. D. C. Roberts, J.P., Princi- pal T. F. Roberts, M.A., LL.D., Mr. Henry Taylor, F.S.A., Mr. D. Lleufer Thomas, M.A., Alderman Morgan Tutton, J.P., Mr. J. B. Williams, and the Librarian \Mr. Ballinger). At the adjourned annual meeting fr. Herbert H. Vaughan, Plas Llangoedmore, was appointed a member of the Court, and Mr. John Owens of Grey Friars, Chester, a member of the Council. I The Vice-President, in proceeding to the business of the half-yearly meeting, said—We meet in the absence of the President (Sir John Williams), who sends his hearty greetings. We regret his absence and the cause of it: but I feel sure I shall be- expressing your feelings when I say we heartily reciprocate the greetings and wish Sir John long life and success to the Library to which he has been so generous a benefactor. We meet under the shadow of war but notwithstanding all the preoccupations which the war necessarily involves it is right that we should keep our national institutions going for the sake of the country after the war, and I am glad to be able to say that the work of the Library, nowithstanding all the diffi- culties during the past six months, the great depletion of our staff, and other causes, has been adequately maintained, and that its work and influence have been extended in various directions. (Hear, hear). The Librarian will report on the work during the past six months, from which you will be able to gather gener- ally the work that has been accomplished. When I said we ought to keep our national in- stitutions going in time of war, I could not help remembering that our gallant ally, France, a large portion of whose territory is in the occu- pation of the enemy—France that is bleeding from many wounds-is even at the present time engaged in the task of preparing for establish, ment after the war of continuation schools for the young people who will have left the elementary schools. That is an idea that our own country will have to consider and Parlia- ment, I hope, will have the good sense to follow so excellent an example, and carry out the recommendations of the Departmental Com- mittee on education after the war. I cannot, of course, venture to predict to what extent they may be enlarged or modified; but this I do say, that Parliament has work to do during the war which it can carry on perhaps more effec- tively at the present time than when the external conflict has come to an end. In the same way we who are concerned with our national insti- l l' tutions win do well to see that they do not fail during the war, but that they are kept up to a reasonable level of efficiency. (Hear, hear). I think those of us who are connected to a reasonable level of efficiency. (Hear. hear). I think those of us who are connected with Wales cannot do anything better than to help forward that orderly progressive develop- ment which is typified by the growth, of insti- tutions like the National Library, one of its glories being, if I may be allowed to use so prosaic a term, the fact that its buildings stand on a sound foundation, being free from debt. (Cheers). We can be proud of belong- ing to such an institution, and Wales may be be proud of it: and in conveying our greeting to Sir John Williams I venture to say on your behalf that we thank him for all the magnifL cent work he has done for this institution, and that we are looking forward to a great future of success to our native country through the National Library. The Vice-President moved an expression of sympathy with Mrs. Summers, whose son, Lieut. Summers, had been officially posted killed; to the family of the late Mr. Oliver Henry Jones, a member of the Court; to Sir John Llewelyn in his bereavement; to Mr. Evan D. Jones in his great anxiety about his son who has been reported missing; and with Mr. D. Jones in his great anxiety about his son who has been reported missing; and with Mr. Ballinger, the librarian, whose son was pre- viously reported missing, but has now been officially posted as killed. A letter was read from the Clerk to the Privy Council stating that the Lord President of the Council had appointed Mr. D. Lleufer Thomas a member of the Court in the room of the late Mr. Oliver Henry Jones. The Vice-President spoke in appreciative terms of the services rendered to the building fund by Mr. D. Lleufer Thomas, and especially his campaign for funds in Glamorganshire. The following list of appointments to the Court was submitted :-Bv the University of Wales Mr. J. H. Davies, M.A., the Right Hon. S. T. Evans, LL.D., and Lady Verney. By county councils :-Anglesev, Air. H. O. Hughes, J.P.; Brecon, Principal Thomas Lewis, M.A.: Carmarthen, the Rev. William Davies; Carnar- von, Alderman W. J. Parry, Gamorgan; Sir John T. D. Llewelyn, Bart.; and Pembroke, Mr. Evan D. Jones, D.L., J.P. The appoint- ment to the Court of Mr. John Hinds, M.P., by virtue of his office as lord lieutenant'of the county of Carmarthen, was reported, and of Mr. Henry Radclitie, J.P., Druidstone, by virtue of his donation of E500 towards the building fund. The following appointments to the Court by virtue of their office as high sheriffs for 1917- 1918, were reported:—Anglesey, Mr. H. M. Grayson, Ravenfi's Point, Holyhead; Breck- nock, Mr Morgan W. Morgan, Bryntawe, Aher- crave; Cardigan, Mr. A. Cecil Wright, Brand- wood House, Brandwood End, Birmingham, and Borth; Carmarthen, Mr. David Williams, Glesin, Old-road, Llanelly; Carnarvon, Sir Frederick Henry Smith, Queen's Lodge. Colwyn Bay Denbigh, Mr. George Benjamin Behrens, Vron Yw: Flint, Lieut.-colonel Henry Hurlhutt, Lhvyn Offa, Mold: Glamorgan, Mr. Daniel RadclifTe, Tal y Wervdd, Cardiff: Monmouth, Mr. J. W. Beynon, Bryn Ivor Hall, Castleton; Merioneth, Mr. Howell Jones Williams, 263, Camden-road, N.; Montgomery, Mr. J. B. Willans, Dolforgan, New-town: Pembroke, Mr. C. J-1. R. Vickerman, St. Tssell's House; Radnor, fr. Albert Simpson, Burghill Grange, Here- fordshire :and Haverfordwest, Mr. William C. Llewellin, Wyon House. The Chairman of the Building Committee submitted the report of the Building Committee with reference to the buildings and the present position of the building fund. The report stated that the whole of the building contracts had been completed. Subscrintions,ete.,tothe building fund up to May, 1917. amounted to P,60,581 N. 3d. which, with the Treasury grant of E49,000, made a total of E109,581 9s 3rl.. The Treasury grant to be received was £1,000 and outstanding subscriptions E231, 8s., or a total of E110,812 17s. 3d. The total estimated ex- penditure as reduced after the outbreak of war was £ 110,563. Subscriptions since the previous meeting of the Court were—Mr. Henrv Rad- cliffe, £ 500: collected by Mr. T. Evans, Cardiff, E3; and E25 balance of subscriptions by Nanty- moel Workmen's Hall and Institute. Taking the £ 1,000 Treasury grant tn(I outstanding subscriptions into account, there would be just sufficient to pay for what had been done. There remained, however, the fittings and furniture and other works not contracted for when war commenced and abandone for the time being. It would be necessary to proceed with the abandoned work and the fittings and furniture as soon as possible, so that the buildings might be put to their full use. The Treasury might reasonably be expected to contribute pound for pound for those purposes, but it would be neces- sary to ask for further P11 blic support. The Chairman added that lie was glad to say that the duties of the Building Committee was now practicallv complete an hoped before the next meeting Ilie Committee will have been formally di<;s,Iv;¡1. The Vice-President thought they might con- gratulate themselves that. owing to the con. tracts having been made before the war, the buildings have been completed within the estimates. (Hear, heaT). Lord Mostyn, in moving the adoption of the report, said it was a great pleasure to lipnr so satisfactory a report. He did not think that hitherto any building of importanc(> in the Prin- cipality har] been carried throvg-"h with such success as the report indicated. Tt did credit to nil those concerned with the Library and he wished them everv success. The Rev. H. Elvet Lewis, in seconding the proposition. said the report ought to i-riq k e them grateful that in the midst of great diffi- :( > cutties, and especially in the final difficulties they were there that day with a clean balance sheet. It might, however, be well to remember how much was due to the friend of the insti- tution who had just presented the report. It was owing to the untiring attention and the wisdom of Mr E. D. Jones that -they were situ- ated as they were, and he thought that they should express their indebtedness to Mr. Evan D. Jones. The Vice-President said he took it for granted the Court was grateful to Mr. E. D. Jones for having given the Library the benefit of his expert advice and also to the Committee over which he had so ably presided. The report having been adopted, Sir Vincent Evans moved that cordial thanks be accorded to the several donors of subscriptions received since the previous meeting. Mr. J. E. Lloyd, in seconding the proposition, said he was sure every friend of the Library was pleased at the position in which they founu themselves, in spite of the troubles and neces- sities of the past few months. It was most gratifying to find that the building had been completed and that tne money necessary to pay for it had been found to the last penny. The position was in every way most gratifying. The Vice-President, at the opening of that day's proceedings, referred to the necessity of carry- ing on national institutions in this time of stress. There were times when they were all tempted to feel that nothing except the great struggle mattered but there were duties which rested on some of them, and those who could not serve in any other way might feel that they were doing considerable service in securing the welfare of the great national institutions which would mean so much to the country when peace is restored and peaceful activities are-once more possible. The motion was carried with applause. A letter was read stating that as the Council of the Library had no lands at* their disposal by which they might be able to acquire rare books or MSS. or literature of a general character a sum of ES,000 will be placed at the call of the Library during the next five years, payable by instalments not exceeding £1,000 a year. The Vice-President remarked that the Court would remember that shortly after the outbreak of war grants for purchases by libraries, museums, etc., were stopped by the Govern- ment. The generous donors of that E5,000 had come forward to help the Library over a diffi- cult period, and surely never was more timely assistance given to an institution. (Hear hear). The Court passed a cordial vote of thanks for the offer, which was accepted, no name being disclosed. The Librarian, in presenting his report on the work of the Library, said lie had written the concluding paragraphs of the report, referring to the need of a book fund, before it was known that so handsome a contribution for the purpose would be reported at that meeting. In his report Mr. Ballinger said the work of organisation was going steadily forward, in spite of difficulties owing to lack of fittings, and the Library was open daily to readers. The much appreciated exhibition of MSS and rare books would not be closed until the autumn. In addition to the four members of the staff, a fifth (Mr. Evans) had been called un for mili- tary service. Mr. R. F. Middlehurst was now a second lieutenant in the Yorkslire Regiment. The contractors having finished, an effort had been made to improve the Library grounds, but with limited funds not much could be done. What little had been done showed that a suitable setting for the buildings can be pro- vided later on. A list was now before the Special Committee of books required to form the basis of a library of agriculture. Selection had been restricted within the grant of f200 by the Development Commissioners, but if a further sum up to P200 could be found other- wise than out of public funds the Commissioners would give pound for pound up to that amount. The need of every aid to the development of agriculture had become increasingly obvious. In accordance with instructions by the Council, the Librarian had drafted evidence and pre- sented it to the Roval Commission on Univer- sity Education in Wales, dealing mainly with the aims of the Library, progress made, the scheme of organisation, and dfcs t*la lions, actual and possible, with other educational institu- tions, especially with the University and its constituent colleges. Stress was laid by the Commission on two important questions-a school of higher Celtic studies in which the Library would fulfil important functions, and the practicability of establishing a school of library service. With regard to Celtic studies, evidence had been put before the Commissioners by Mr. J. H. Davies and Dr. Gwenogfryn Evans, and the Commission seemed to fully recognise the importance of provision for higher Celtic studies. A preliminary step had been taken in regard to the school of library service. The University College of Wales had arranged a course of lectures and classes in connection with its summer school. It was a great pleasure to mention the additions which the President of the Library (Sir John Williams) continues to make to his already fine collections. He had recently given a complete set of the books printed for William Morris at the Kelm- scott Pi ess and many other standard works of Francis Bacon, James Russell Lowell, Long- fellow, and Ruskin. A small collection of MSS relating to the family of the WVnns of Wvnn- stay had been acquired from a special fund given anonymously. The MSS of the library I of the late Professor Hugh Williams, D.D., Bala, bequeathed to the Library by his widow, had been received. Alderman T. J. Samuel had I made a valuable gift of books, pamphlets, broadsides, and printed items useful for his- torical purposes and for illustrating local life. Additions by purchase had been restricted from l lack of funds; but lists were being prepared of the most-needed books in some classes which might be printed for the information of those who desire to help the Library, but were not sure how far what they could offer would be really helpful. Offers of books need not be re- stricted to books not in the Library, for dupli- cate copies were desirable for lending pur- poses, the calls for which were many and various and sometimes difficult to meet. The calls come from all parts of the thirteen counties; very often from men and women struggling to pursue some piece of study. By the gift of such duplicates the Hon. Mrs. Bulkeley Owen had enabled the Library to make Joans which otherwise would have been impossible. Welsh, and English books useful for the Library were also found among waste paper sent by an officer in charge of boy scouts in North ..vales If old books were being turned out, -t was desir- able that the Library should have an oppor- tunity of seeing them or a list before they 'Hre destroyed. The Library was continually receiv- ing voluntary gifts of books and manuscripts from far and near. which showed interest in the institution and were a token that the fne effort of the Welsh people in raising lunds for the building had won the sympathy of the vide world. They were almost without exception contributions to knowledge and to the enrich- ment of life. One purchase had been made of a selection from the library of the late Arch- deacon Thomas—430 volumes of printed books and some MSS. Additions under the Copyright Act were fewer of larger books, but larger of small books, pamphlets, and propaganda. Printed literature relating to the war was assuming large dimensions. He urged the desirability of sending every scrap of printed war material relating to the existing state of society as it aftect°d Wales, which would be valuable material for students in years to come. Tn conclusion, Mr. Ballinger urged the importance of a book fund for the purchase of the great books in every department of know- ledge. The Hon. Mrs. Bulkelev Owen moved the adoption of the Librarian's report and. "Jr. J. H. Davies, in seconding the proposition, said they must all feel plateful for the immense energy which the Librarian had thrown into his wnrk. Much of the Library's progress was practically one to that energy. He 'fcellevt-d that the Library was never out of the Librarian's t-ind. With regard to the school of Celtic studies. fr. Davies said they had the building and also the great books necessary f™- Celtic studies. The point now was to so organise P1;:d.01" Lhat. the students nr1 thp books could he brought- together at the National Library, which was not a difficult matter. The idea 11"t the students in the ¡ three Coll, should in 0'11e way or other 'he nrjv n privileges to take advantage of the Tlib"rv. 1{", behaved sue1! a cn0m, would not be '1. ope: but it routed upon now they had the material nnd the establishment, to make it as easy as possible for the young men and women who wished to devote them- selves to this study to do so. The small nations of Europe had led in that matter. Wonderful work had been done in Holland, Belgium, and

I WOMEN FOR FRANCE

I WOMEN FOR FRANCE. Excellent Prospects. l OPPORTUNITIES FOR CLERKS AND TYPISTS. An advertisement in another column gives particulars of a unique opportunity for women to act as clerks in France. The scheme for utilising the services of women in clerical occu- pations and so relieving trained soldiers has been very carefully thought out, and in all parts of the country there has been a keen desire on the part ot women between twenty and forty years of age to take up service with the troops. The Commissioner for Wales under the Women's Section of the National Service Scheme is Lady Mackworth, and from the more populous districts there has been a steady flow of women ready to accept such work as they might be required to undertake—munitions, work on the land, supervision, etc. This is the first time such an attractive proposal has been made public and there is certain to be a very ready response—a response which probably will mean that those who delay in sending in their applications will find that they are too late. As already stated the age limits are 20-40 and the rates of pay vary according to the effici- ency of the worker. For general clerks and those who are typists only the rate is 23s. to 27s. per week, clerks employed on higher duties and supervising receive 28s. to 32s., and shorts hand typists the same. There is a weekly deduction of 14s. for board and lodging, and in addition to the standard rate of pay there is special pay for overtime and also a bonus. Great pains have been taken to make the living conditions reach a very high standard. All women workers will be accommodated in hostels under the care and supervision of lady superintendents, and the conditions of work generally will. it is safe to say, be found to con,pare very favourably with conditions in this country. It should be clearly pointed out that women on the stalls of Government Departments or engaged in work of national importance can apply only with the written consent of their employers and this wise provision makes it all the easier for women who whilst possessing first class training are not at present fully employed. Those who apply, and there will be a very large number from West Wales, should write for particulars, conditions of service, and forms of application, to Lady Mackworth, Commis- sioner. National Service Department, Law Courts, Cardiff, from whom they will receive fullest help and guidance. When it was first announced in London that women would be accepted for clerical work, the office receiving applications was beseiged by women of all ranks ready to volunteer for the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps and in the streets of the Metropolis the neat khaki uniform is no novelty. The work now has the added attraction of being carried on in France, and the way in which the arrangements have been made coupled with the adequate remuneration offered make the prospects exceedingly attractive. To deal with candidates from North Wales a Board will sit at Liverpool on Wednesday, June 13th; to examine candidates.

LLANILAR

LLANILAR. The annual choral festival of Calvinistic Methodists of Tabor district was held on Friday at Carmel. The day was fine and the chapel crowded from Lledrod, Llangwyryfon, Bethel, Moriah, Blaenplwyf, Elim, and Llanilar. The conductor was Prof. T. J. Morgan (Pencerdd Cynon), Cwmbach, Aberdare. It was Mr Mor- gan's first appearance and he gave great satis- faction, promising well for his future as a con- ductor of gymanfaoedd. He had full control and it was pleasant to note the religious fer- vour which permeated the services, some of the hymn tunes being sung with hwyl. The afternoon meeting was presided over "y Mr. Evan Evans, Lledrod, and the evenin^ >eting by the Rev. O. H. Jones, B.A., B.D. The greater portion of afternoon meeting was devoted to children's tunes, the singing of the various numbers being pleasing. The anthems, "Teyrn- asoedd y Ddaear" and "Duw a sych Ix; deigryn," were splendidly sung. The organic. (Mrs. Davies, Bungalow, and Miss Enid Jones, Llwynyreosi did their work excellently. Food was supplied by the good folk of Carmel for all visitors free of charge. Official news was received last week that Pte. David M. Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Evans. Penbont, had been killed in France, i Some time ago Pte. Evans spent a period of convalescence at home after being wounded. He rejoined and has now made the supreme sacrifice. He was 31 years of age only and was of a genial disposition, and the deepest sym- pathy is felt with the bereaved parents, brothers, and sisters. The scholars of Llanilar School are encouraged to be always helpful to all charitable objects. 10 In connection with the Anglo-Russian Hospital Flag Day they-did so well that £ 2 8s. has been forwarded by Mr. Jones, the head teacher. The names of those who assisted were Henry Peel, Willie Lloyd Jones. Rd. Tlieopllilus Thomas, Ivor Evans, Edwin Morris, John P. Morgan, Peter Sidney Davies. Elizabeth J. Williams, Annie James, Letitia Jones, Sarah J. Evans, and Ada Grace Edwards.

PERSONAL

PERSONAL. The wedding of Miss Olwen Lloyd George will take place at the Castle-street Welsh Baptist Chapel, London, where Mr Lloyd George attends when in London. Miss Margaret Lindsay Williams, the Welsh artist, is engaged upon a picture of the pre- sentation of the freedom of the city to Lord Rhondda. The group contains above a hundred figures, including the Premier, whose portrait at present is just roughly sketched in, and the artist intends proceeding to London shortly, where Mr. Lloyd George has arranged to give her sittings for the completed portrait. Mrs. Lloyd George paict a visit to Cardiff on Thursday as the guest of Lieutenant Colonel J. Lynn Thomas, C.B., C.M.G., and Mrs. Lynn Thomas, at Green Lawn, Penvlan. Mrs Lloyd George visited the Prince of Wales Hospital for limbless soldiers and sailors, where she was entertained to lunch by Mr. J. P. Cadogan and Mr. W. Percy Miles, and visited the wards, chatting with the wounded soldiers and the staff. A meeting of the Council was subsequently held, at which arrangements were made for the formal opening of the institution. On Friday Mrs. Lloyd George visited the Welsh Metropoli- tan War Hospital at Whitchurch. During the afternoon Mrs. Lloyd George visited the Food Exhibition at the City Hall, Cardiff, and ex- pressed delight at everything she saw.

CHILD NEGLECT

CHILD NEGLECT. The report of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children is encout ag ing reading. There is a fall of 1,216 in the number of cases of illtreatment and neglect: but the number dealt with is still 129,089. The Society has done excellcnt work in caring for the children of soldiers and sailors and is deserv- ing of great praise.

No title

(Continued from previous column.) also in Denmark in connection with the history of those countries. It had been neglected in Wales; but he hoped it would soon be remedied. Principal Roberts thought the report con- tained very interesting tilings, and what Mr. Davies had stated was the gist of the matter. The problem was how to make the Library, brought together by such sacrifices, nut only a great home of national literature, but also to secure that the use made of it in the future should- become a national effort. The Royal Commission was prepared to assist in the task of Welsh research on a national scale in the future. They might therefore hepe that it would be real work undertaken not only by a few but by a great multitude of competent workers. Alderman T. H. Howell moved that the Librarian be directed to convey the cordial thanks of the Court to the donors of MSS. documents, books, prints, etc.. referred to in his report. Alderman W. J. Parry, seconding the pro- position, said he had taken interest in libraries for over fifty years, having done his share in assisting libraries at Cardiff. Aberystwyth, Swansea, and Bangor. He had the plea.su ~e and honour, jointly with Colonel S. SackviTp West, to start many years roe-o the library at present in the University College at Bangor. He believed there was much yet to be done to get the books, MSS, etc.. from out-of-the-way places. The pronosition was agreed to and a vote of thanks to Shropshire County Council for the c; of the Shire Hall closed the proceedings. e245 i <

I Food Economy

Food Economy. SUCCESS OF ABERYSTWYTH MEETINGS. The Food Demonstrations held at the Aber- ystwyth Rink during the past week were in- tended to lead up to a time when the opinion lof the town with regard to the question of a war kitchen might be ascertained. On Wednes- day Mr. Ballinger spoke on economy. He dwelt on the reasons for food shortage, the poorness of the wheat crop, loss of potatoes during the heavy frosts, the scarcity of sugar and the submarines. The situation, he said, was very grave and would be worse. The only way to escape disaster was by care, reducing the con- sumption of certain foodstuffs, where possible, growing more food and preserving as much of it as possible. It was an obligation of honour to eat less; but health would not suffer by doing so. Children must not be starved and men engaged in physical toil require nourishing food; but the consumption of bread must be reduced, and therefore it is necessary to use substitutes. This was mainly a question for the women and it gave them a chance to help in winning the war. We were beating the Ger- mans on land, sea and in the air and their only chance was to starve us out. The people of this country although slow to grasp the mean- ing of things, could make sacrifices, and it was the duty of each to take the pledge on this food question and to influence all to do the same. On Thursday a demonstration was given by Miss Maud Powell, assisted by Miss Richards.The dishes were pot au feu. savory roast, oatmeal pudding, lentil sausage and syrup pudding. At the close of the demonstration Dr. Stephenson announced that the Government was anxious to help in the matter of fruit-bottling and vege- table preserving and would provide bottles at a cheap rate and get trained instructors to demonstrate the method of bottling. People were urged to do what they could, even where fruit was scarce as in Aberystwyth. He also said that the Committee wished to find out what the ladies thought of a war kitchen. The outlook was not so dark as some weeks ago. but apart from the submarine menace there was a great shortage of food all over the world. He thought it would be a boon if people could obtain a nourishing meal for a moderate slim-he had heard of one town where a good three-course dinner was to be had for sixpence. Mrs. Griffith said she did not think such a kitchen would be a success and thought it would not justify the initial expense. Mme. Barbier said the ladies should overcome their shyness and help the Committee as much as possible. One lady thought that all should be allowed to visit the kitchen and another opinion was that it would be impossible to tell whether a kitchen was needed till it had been started. It was worth while trying. It was suggested that the best time to start might be in the autumn. At the request of some of the ladies it was decided to take a vote on Friday evening. The War Savings Committee met at the close of the demonstration on Thursday. The ladies were asked to re-canvass the town with the new pledge cards. It was pointed out that the new pledge was better than the old. as lodging- house keepers could take it without loss. Another point was that if Aberystwyth could show a good percentage of signed "pledges and if the tradespeople co-operated, there would be no need of compulsion in the town. Some of the ladies who seemed reluctant to take up the work again were asked to get substitutes and to meet on Friday to make arangements. There was some discussion or the question of a communal kitchen and it was felt that the committee of ladies who had to work the scheme should have an assurance of financial aid in starting and a paid cook to do the work. It was suggested that in taking round the pledge cards the opinion of the inhabitants with regard to the 1 kitchen should be ascertained. A vote of thanks was accorded the Town Council for their helpful co-operation in the demonstrations on the motion of Dr. Stephen- son seconded by Mr. Read: and the Chairman (Councillor T. J. Samuel) a.nd Councillor Barclay Jenkins, as the members of the Council pre- sent, proposed and seconded a vote of thanks to the ladies' committee and executive. On Friday Miss Bertha Jones demonstrated to a large audience how to cook barley blend bread, fish soup, fried skate, savory skate pudding, and sugarless jam crepe:, "fr Jenkin James was not present owing to a oavement. The vote on the question of a communal kitchen was deferred.

MACHYNLLETH

MACHYNLLETH. A meeting of the School Governors was held on Friday afternoon, present Mr. Edward Hughes, chairman; Mrs. Davies, Messrs. J. Thomas, T. R. Morgan, J. Pugh, R. Rees, Cunilo Davies, Dr. Davies, and Dr. Edwards, and Mr. Meredith Roberts, clerk. A circular from the Board of Education was read, asking the pupils to take up the cultivation of vege- tables and increase the land under cultivation. A committee of Messrs .T R. Morgan, Richard Rees, and J. Thomas was formed to further the matter. The Headmaster (Mr. H. Meyler) wrote asking for the annual grant of JS5 towards the school games fund, which was granted. A concert was given on Thursday night by the English Presbyterian Children's Choir and others. In the absence of Mr. J. Williams. Mr Henry Lewis presided. The proceeds are to be sent for the Y.M.C.A. Credit is due to Miss Francis Lewis and her helpers in training the children so successfully. The accompanists were Mrs. Trevor Jones and Mary Thomas. The following took part:-Misses Bertha Caffrey, May leaver, Myra Lewis, Ena Lewis, Jennie Oliver, Olive Banks, Elsie Rose Oliver, Tegwen Evans, Masters Norman Latham. Trefor Edwards, Alun Hughes. Miscellaneous items were given by Misses Martha Jenkins, Jane Jones, Ceridwen Jones, Elsie M. Lewis, and Llywela Humphreys. Messrs. Trevor Jones, H. R. Humphreys J. Lumley, G. Weaver, and J. O. Williams. Sergeant T. E. Owen (Edgar), son of Mrs. Owen, Penrallt-street, has died in Angora. He was wounded in Suvla Bay and taken prisoner by the Turks in 1915. His mother last heard from him in October. 1916. Sergeant Owen was formerly employed on the Cambrian Rail- ways and his death is much regretted. His mother is the widow of Mr. John Owen. of the Cambrian Railways. Another son (Willie) is serving his country and was in the Suvla Bay landing. The friends of Mr. James Rogers, late secre- tary of the Druids Lodge have moved to acknow- ledge, in some tangible form his twenty years faithful service. The Management Committee has approved the proposal. Mr. Ellis, the new Lodge secretary, is acting as secretary. Mr. E. R. Humphreys and Mr. Fern left last week to join the colours. Mr. Humphreys was a clerk at Mr. E. Gillart's office, and Mr. Fern was Lord Herbert Vane Tempest's coachman. Private Bernard Jones. only son of the Rev R. W. Jones (W.). and of Mrs. Jones, after spending a few days at home left on Monday on active service. Mr. and Mrs. D. Phylip Jones entertained the members of the Presbytertan Choir to tea on Thursday. Lord Herbert Vane Tempest has issued an appeal for subscriptions towards the Red Cross Hospital shortly to be opened in the town. Dance-corporal E. Wesley Lewis arrived home on Sunday morning from France. He is the second son of Mr. Rhys Lewis. Tudor House, and has been out in France for sixteen months. His brother, Lance-corporal L. P. Lewis, is also in France. Corpora] R. H. Pugh. Manchester House. spent the week-end at home. He was wounded and returned last November. Private Evelyn Humphreys has been home.

FENRHYNBEUBRAETH

FENRHYNBEUBRAETH. The Board of Guardians last week on the suggestion of Mrs. Casson appointed a com- mittee to enquire further into the condition in which a boy of weak intellect was sent to the workhouse recently. In a letter home Pte. leuan Jones. Maesydd Llydan, says he has been to the grave of Lieut. O. Gwilym Jones, who fell at the battle of Gaza. The grave is in the Holy Land and is marked by a wooden cross.

CRICCIETH

CRICCIETH. Mrs. Lloyd George arrived at Brynawelon on Saturday and returns to-morrow to London. She addressed meetings at Bangor on Tuesday and Wednesday. The Rev. R. J. Campbell, of the Birmingham Cathedral, and formerly of the City Temple, has accepted duty at St. Deiniol's Church for the month of July.

Advertising

/Tt F L)O you prefer m -o touch of Lumbago" to half-a-teaspoonful of Kruschen Salts in a tumbler of hot water ? If not. get the Kruschen habit Every morning! Of all Chemists 1/6 I per bottie. All British

Intercropping

Intercropping. ABERYSTWYTH LECTURE. GROUND IDLE FOR 14 DAYS ONLY. Organised by the Aberystwyth Allotments Association, jointly with the local Horticultural Representative of the Board of Agriculture, an interesting meeting was held at the Town Hall on Friday when Mr. Dudley Howell, of the t'niversitv College, spoke on "Intercropping." Mr. Edward Evans, Baker-street, presided. On the question of spraying potatoes, the advice of Mr. Howell was sought and he kindly offered to assist local growers by lending a machine belonging to the College when it was not in use for demonstration purposes, and also to give a demonstration on the allotments. The in- gredients of the mixture would be copper sul- phate, now about 8d. a pound if bought retail, and washing soda, 2d. a pound. That would make the Burgundy mixture. A pound and a half of sulphate and two pounds of soda would spray a ten-rod allotment at a cost of roughly 2s. a plot. It was the cheapest forn-, of insur- ance that could possibly be secured for spraying and would give an increase of sixty to eighty per cent in the yield even if no disease appeared, and if disease was about it was a perfect protection. Spraying, he added, should be compulsory. The gooseberry caterpillar was making terrible ravages and could be best exter- minated by spraying with proper mixture. Mr. Howell's offer having been gratefully accepted, he proceeded to deal with the subject of autumn cropping and iatercropping. He deplored the tendency to put in all the seeds in the spring, for the whole year, reap a crop, and then leave the ground idle. The whole matter was one of intelligent anticipation. You must be able to forecast when a piece of ground will become vacant, for the more ground is culti- vated the more it is capable of producing, both in number and variety of crops." There was too great a desire to plant potatoes only when it was equally as easy to plant haricot beans, and there should be a proper rotation of crops on the ground, as potatoes, roots, greens: roots, greens, potatoes: greens, potatoes, roots. These crops should follow one another in permanent order. He urged the use of early varieties, so that two crops might be obtained, and gave a typical instance of crops as follows —Early potatoes lifted second week of June, late crop of peas of early variety, followed after manur- ing by turnips. Such examples could be multi- plied almost indefinitely. If early peas were followed by a crop taking a long time. two valuable crops could be secured in one year. Autumn sown onions lifted second week of July could be followed by Colewort cabbage, broccoli or brussel-sprouts sown earlier in the year. If difficulty was found with cabbages running to seed and not heartening up. a penknife run through the stalk would stop it and it would be found that twice transplanting from the seed bed to another place and then to the perman- ent bed would retard growth where necessary in between crops and produce much sturdier plants. For intercropping there must be feed- ing between the rows. just as the garden was fed annually. Weeds must be kept down and the crop not overcrowded. Where potatoes were planted twelve or fourteen inches apart and the rows two feet apart, dwarf or haricot beans might be planted between, or if two feet six inches apart, runner beans could be planted between and there would be a heavier crop of potatoes than if potatoes were planted only nine inches apart. Between all late potatoes dwarf beans should be planted: between earlies and second earlies runner beans. The latter did not need sticks if the leading shootings were nipped back. There would be only about three quar- ters of the yield, but the crop would be a fortnight earlier. Cauliflower, etc., could be grown between first and second early potatoes. For the broad bean fly two pints of paraffin and one pound of soft soap to ten gallons of water would be found an excelleni spray or wash. A pint of paraffin and as much naphtha- line (camphor balls) as would dissolve in two quarts of water and mixed with 2]bs. of soft soap used li parts to 100 parts of water was a very useful wash. Crops which could be inter- cropped wereSpinnach, turnips. radish, lettuce, potatoes, beet, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, Brussel srpouts, colewort. French beans, haricot and runner beans. Between onions twelve to fifteen inches between the rows could be grown lettuce and between the lettuce and the onions radishes. The radishes would be out of the way before the lettuce were ready, and the lettuce when pulled would leave a free course for the growing onions. When inter. cropping between potatoes the haulms should be cut with shears if they grew too wide. If early peas were just in flower, a new crop could be sown in a line at the heel of the plants that had been moulded up and they would grow up each side of the same sticks. Between the peas could be planted Savoys or cauliflowers. Peas took very little nitrogen from the ground but required phosphates and limes. A little superphosphate made a vast difference in their growth. Peas could be intercropped with turnips after the potatoes and the distance between the rows should be two to three feet. Early peas should be cleared the last week in June. second earlies having been sown between the rows can be later cleared and Brussel sprouts put down. These would be ready before the brocolli the following year and the ground ready for early potatoes. Brocolli would stand the frost better. '"The garden." said Mr. Howell, should never be idle for a longer period than a fortnight at any time." He advocated the use of artificial manure and of liquid manure. To keep the leatherjacket down and also the wire worm the ground should be kept stirred and air-slacked slime put in along the edge of the rows (not touching the plnnt: just rwneath the surface of the ground. In conclusion Mr. Howell urged his audience to bring their diffi- culties to the College staff, who would be very willmr- 1 l.eln m "< =

LLANYBYTHER

LLANYBYTHER. LLANYBYTHER RURAL DTSTRTCT cnrN. CIL.—Mr. Daniel Davies, Gwarcwm. Maesv- crugiau, presiding. Evan Jones, Ffosgoy. Llan- llwni. was engaged as a road labourer. The Superintendent of West Walis Sanatorium wrote on behalf of the Committee of the Insti- tution complaining of the condition of the road from Llanybvther to Alltymynydd.

Advertising

We Buy Your Waste Paper Any quantity Is cart- loads or pounds, and we will PflY at the best market price of Ss. for every 112 lbs. Cardboard boxes, old catalogues, paper of all sorts is acceptable, And We Pay Cash. I