Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
19 articles on this page
Advertising

-A- H. stoodlby, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. tgg" All Business will receive my Personal Attention. Lewis Clare High-Class Milliners Cavendish House, 41 King Street, CARMARTHEN. Bornum ESTABLISHED 1854. DAVID TiTOslLLIAMS IBOOIECBIIfcTIDEIR,, Etc, I CHAPEL ST., CftRMIlRTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVBN ALL WOBK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, CARMARTHEN. Established 1S36. COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN. WILD BIRD (ENGLAND). THE WILD BIRDS PROTECTION (COUNTY 1 OF CARMARTHEN) ORDER, 1909. DATED 20TH MARCH, 1909. IN PURSUANCE of the powers conferred on me by the Wild Birds Protection Acts, 1880 to 1908, and upon application by the County Council of the Administrative County of Car- marthen, I hereby make the following Order. TITLE. I. This Order may be cited as "The Wild Birds Protection (County of Carmarthen) Order, 1909." BIRDS. Additions to the Schedule of the Act of 1880. II The Wild Birds Protection Act. 1880, shall apply within the County of Carmar- then, to the following species of Wild Birds in the same manner as if those species were included in the Schedule to the Act:— Bullfinch, Black Jieaded Bunting, Reed Bunting, Buzzard, Honey Buzzard, Tree Creeper, Dipper or Water Ouzel, Golden Eagle. Kite, Linnet (all species). Robin, Shrike (Butcher Bird), Thrush, Blue Tit Long- tailed Tit, Marsh Tit, Common Wren, Golden- crested Wren. Certain Birds Protected during the whole of the Year. III. During the period between the 31st day of July in any year and the 2nd day of March following, the killing or taking of the follow- ing species of Wild Birds is prohibited throughout tho County of Carmarthen:— Bullfinch, Black-headed Bunting, Reed Bunting, Buzzard, Honey Buzzard, Tree Creeper, Dipper or Water Ouzel, Golden Eagle, Goldfinch, Gulls (except Black-backed Gull), Kingfisher, Kite, Linnet (all species), Nightingale, Owl. Robin, Shrike (Butcher Bird), Thrush. Blue Tit, Long-tailed Tit, Marsh Tit, Woodpecker, Common Wren, Golden-crested Wren. EGGS. Certain Eggs Protected throughout the County. IV. The taking or destroying of the Eggs of the following species of Wild Birds is pro- hibited throughout the County of Carmar- then Black-headed Bunting, Reed Bunting, Buzzard, Honey Buzzard, Tree Creeper, Dipper or Water Ouzel, Golden Eagle, Gold-, finch, Gulls (except Black-backed Gull), King- fisher. Kite, Linnet (all species). Nightingale, Owl, Shrike (Butcher Bird), Blue Tit, Long- tailed Tit, Marsh Tit, Woodpecker, Golden- crested Wren. REPEAL OF FORMER ORDER. V. The Order of the 7th day of March, 1907 is hereby repealed. Given under my hand at Whitehall this 20th day of March, 1909. (Signed) H. J. GLADSTONE. One of His ,)1aj0Sty'l1 Principal Secretaries of State. I 9 W. S. MORRIS, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, OA &.A.RT:a:EN. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchan Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST io & The Welshman's Favourite. io, MABON Sauce I tIIIF As good as its Name. fc DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. 2 § Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Pet«r St., Cardiff. 2 &Yt\V\\XXXV^V\\X^XX\\X\tS 0 IMy Mon's Sauce I ) Large Bottle 2id. I (Delightful Sauce and lots of it for • the money. Of all Grocer) and Stores. 6 Sole Makers—BLANCH'S, St. Peter SU, CARDIFF. J Galvanized Corrugated Sheets. For Excellence of Quality and Durability Buy the Brand, and for Good Value in GALVANIZED AGRICULTURAL FEEDING REQUISITES AND WIRE NETTING, ask for LYSAGHT'S MAKE. Catalogues and Articles are supplied by any Iron- monger or Agricultural Implement Dealer. Welsh War Hospital at Netley. ADDITION OF 100 BEDS. IN consequence of the extension of this Hospital at the desire of the War Office, a further supply of Blankets, Sheets, pillowcases, draw sheets, towels (huckaback and Turkey), dusters, tea cloths, glass cloths, roller towels, bandages (triangular and many tailed roller, etc.) pyjamas, and felt slippers are wanted as soon as possible and not later than March 1st. NO shirts are required. A donation of £3 will full equip a bed. Further particulars can be obtained from and gifts sent to Miss LOUISE PERRY, Old Mansion House, Cardiff. County of Carmarthen. APPOINTMENT OF VISITORS. LUNACY ACT, 1890, SECTION 177. MENTAL DEFICIENCY ACT, 1913, SECTION 40. VTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at the J3I Epiphany Court of Quarter Sessions held at the Shirehall, Carmarthen, on the 8th day of January, 1915, the following were appointed Visitors under the above Acts for the ensuing year Major T. H. Dowdeswell, The Cottage, Llan- stephan. Dr David George Lloyd, Bodafon, Newcastle- Emlyn. D. Williams, Esq., Box House, Llanelly. Dr Evan Evans, Llanelly. Lady Stafford Howard, Cilymaenllwyd, Llanelly. Clerk to the Visitors, J. W. Nicholas, Clerk of the Peace, County Offices, Carmarthen. Dated this 10th February, 1915. J. W. NICHOLAS, Clerk of the Peace County Offices, Carmarthen. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE "REPORTER. No. of One rhree Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. II d a did 20 1 0 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 3 6 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 5 6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and To be Sold by Private Treaty" clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged HALFPENNY STAMP3, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWBENOE, at Carmarthen. Replies may be made addressed to the Reportei Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are sent. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :-Station Road, Kidwelly.

No title

INFIRMARY.—The Secretary begs respect- fully to acknowledge the receipt of the follow- ing:— £ 7 10s, Water street Chapel, Carmar- then Ll 7s, Union st. Chapel; £2 3s lOd, Bethel Congregational Church, St. Clears; 16s 8d, Blim Congregational Church, Llan- ddowror. Periodicals: Mrs Gwynne Hughes, Glancothi; Mr R. M. James, Nott Square. BILLIARDS.-Tlie final of the billiards handi- cap of the Unionist Club, Lammas st., Carmar then (for the Silver challenge cup pres ited by Mr H. C. Bond, J.P.) was played on Mon- day night. The finalists were Mr Harry Lew is (owe 40) and Mr Stanley Evans'(owe 25) in a game of 150 up. Mr Harry Lewis ran out the winner by 'the narrow margin of eight, i 1 o final score reading: Lewis 150, Evans 142. Mr Lewis is therefore entitled to retain the cup for one year, the cup having to be won twice before becoming the absolute property of the wanner. The winner also secures a cue in case valued at £ 1 Is (given by the Club) and the second a prize value 15s. Last year's winner was Mr Ernie Davies.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES. Sickness of the influenza type is very pre- valent in the town and neighbourhood. Among those attacked is the Rev W. C. Jenkins, the revered pastor of Cape! Sul, who has, however sufficiently recovered to take outdoor exer- cise. The Rev D. Geler Owen, also, we are glad to hear, is making gradual progress to- wards recovery. The death occurred in Swansea early in last week, at the age of 42, of Mrs M. J. Woolgar, daughter of Mr and Mrs Dd. Davies, Peny- gaer, Kidwelly. Her mortal remains were brought by rail to Kidwelly on Saturday last, and conveyed direct to Capel 8\11 in the grave- yard attached to which the interment took 1 place. There was a large and representative attendance at the funeral, along the route of which general signs of mourning were dis- played. The service at the chapel was con- ducted by the Rev Mr Rees, pastor of the English Congregational Church, Swansea, who had officiated at deceased's residence prior to the cortege leaving Swansea. The Rev H. R. Jones, Siloam (B.) and the Rev E. J. Herbert, Morfa C.M., assisted at the last sad rites. The chief mourners were: Mr Geo. Woolgar (husband), Masters George and Victor Woolgar (sons), Mr and Mrs David Davies (parents), Mr and Mrs S. H. Evans, Kidwelly (brother-in-law and sister), Mr and Mrs David Lewis, Abertridwr (brother-in-law and sister), Mr T. Davies, Burry Port (bro- ther),, Mr and Mrs J. M. Davies, Abertridwr (brother and sister-in-law), Mr T. T. Evans, Masters Willie and Hubert Evans, Kidwelly (nephews), Mr Parker, Neath, and Mr T. Lewis, Trimsaran (uncles). Widespread sym- pathy is felt with the sorrowing relatives. Sunday last and Monday evening were ob- served by the Welsh Wesleyan Church of Bethesda as anniversary days, and although the weather conditions were very unfavour- able, the services proved thoroughly success- ful. The attendance at each was satisfactory the preaching was excellent, and the financial addition to the chapel funds very creditable to the members and their friends. The special preacher was the Rev Llewelyn Mor- gan, of Mountain Ash. The weekly meeting of the Belgian Refugees Committee was held at the Town Hall on Monday evening the 8th inst., the Mayor, Aid. Thos. Reynolds in the chair. Routine busi- ness was transacted. A donation of 10s from Miss Bo water, The Priory, was reported, and on the proposition of Ald. Wilkins, seconded by Coun. H Wilkins, the thanks of the com- mittee was accorded the donor. The trea- surer's and collectorrl reports were satisfac- tory. "Single versus Married Life. "This was the subject of a -debate which took place at last week's meeting held in the Parish Room of the C.E.M.S. The case for the single state was ably espoused by fr Payne, who had as a doughty opponent Mr Harry Gravell. Among those who took part in the interesting discus- sion which followed were the Chairman Rov D. Ambrose Jones, vicar), Rev W. Evans (curate), Mr Clarke, Messrs N. Williams John Davies, and Dd. John Hughes. On a vote being taken it was found that a pre- ponderating opinion favoured the ma;?:el state. The pulpit at the Parish Church at the 10 a.m. (Welsh) and 6.30 p.m. (English) services on Sunday last was occupied by the Rev J. Thomas, curate of LIandebie, while the Vicar of Kidwelly was the special preacher at Llan- debie Church. On Wednesday the 3rd inst. Mr Ben Jones died at his residence near the Kidwelly Arms, Mynyddygarreg, aged 54 years. For the past six years, owing to illness, he, had been unable to follow his occupation as rolterman at the Tinplate Works. Many friends would best remember him as a brother of Mr John Jones, Cilffriw, for sometime -roll-turner at the local works. Deceased had been for a number of years a member of the Philanthropic Benefit Society whose headquarters are at the Castle Inn. The Rev E. J. Herbert officiated at the funeral which took place on Monday last at Horeb C.M. Chapel, Mynyddygarreg. **• The Cinema continues to be well patronised. This week, after the installation of a new engine, the series of first class pictures in- cluding the well-known "Freda," were shown with admirable effect. •«* We regret to record the death which took place on Sunday last at her home in Lady st., of Mrs Hughes, mother of Mr T. Oldham Hughes, with whom she residad. Deceased had been a sufferer far some long time. The funeral took place on Wednesday. We hope to give full particulars next week.

Advertising

FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkes Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever oause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all chemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take au imitation

Kidwelly Builders Bankruptcy

Kidwelly Builder's Bankruptcy. The Carmarthen Benkruptcy Court was held at Carmarthen on Tuesday before Mr Registrar Mr D. E. Stephens. Mr H. W. Thomas (Official Receiver) conducted the examination. William John and John Evans, lately carry- ing on business in partnership under the style of Evan and John, Garden Villa, Penydre, Kidwelly, came up for their public examina- tion. The statement, of affairs showed gross liabilities of JE533 118 Id and a deficiency of L25 lis 6d. Wm. John filed a petition on be- half of himself and his partner, John Evans. They started in partnership in December, 1912. They had no capital, but John borrowed t- 100 and Evans JE50, which was paid into the partnership. There was no formal deed of partnership, but the profits were to be divided equally. They built two houses on land leased for 99 years f,rom 29th September, 1913 ground rent R3 2s per annum. These houses were mortgaged for JE800, and the Official Receiver estimated a surplus of jE90 10s from same. They contracted to build two houses at Kidwelly for £825, but as they were unable to complete the same, the architect on the 30th November gave notice that he would take over the work. From that day they ceased to carry on business. They were paid t260 on account of the work done. They aJso entered into a. verbal agreement to build a house at Kidwelly for R275 10s, which had never been commenced. Mr W. Davies, solicitor, Llanelly appeared for the debtors. The examination waa closed.

WANTED BUTrERMAKERS

WANTED, BUTrERMAKERS. British Butter is unquestionably better than foreign, yet the latter is often bought in preference. This is an injustice both to the British producer and the buyer It is an injury which could easily be avoided. The British housewife believes that butter presenting a rich uniform colour is the ideal. The foreign producer meets her wish, and all his butter has the golden coiour which sells. A perfectly safe means is provided whereby the British maker can impart to his butter just that golden colouring which will commend it to the eye, as decidedly as its quality will commend it to the palate. The remedy is the Silver Chum" butter colour, manufactured by Oldfield. Pattinson, and Co., of Manchester, the successful survivor of the severest tests at the principal shows, where it has gained First Class awards for 25 years. Equally satisfactory is the high praise it has won ia the numerous dairies where it is regulary used. These competent approvals are due to the absence of any unevenessor muddiness in the colouring, and to the fact that the use of Silver Churn does not affect the butter- milk. The butter itself is not injured in the process; it is improved. Its delicate creamy flavour is enhanced. It should be clearly understood that Silver Churn is a vegetable product entirely free from any aniline dye. (A guarantee by the makers to this effect will be given any user desiring it). It may be obtained from Chemists and dairy supply men in 6d., la., 2s., úø., 8J., and 14s. bottles. To secure satis- faction obtain the Silver Churn brand. Free trial samples from the manufacturers.—Advt.

LOCAL WAR ITEIS

LOCAL WAR ITEIS, This week about a dozen men left Carmar- then to join the Carmarthenshire Battalion at Rhyl. ««• Mr Basil Parry Ghiffiths—son of the Rev Parry Griffiths, vicar of St. Peters, Carmar- then-has received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Reserve Battalion of the 4th IVelsh Regiment. Corpl. Ishmael Phillips-son of Mr George Phillips, Red Lion-yard—has been promoted to the rank of Quarter Master Sergeant. Pte. Ben Halliday, df the King's Royal Rifles, whoi was serving at the front, has been invalided home suffering from frost-bite. He is well-known in Carmarthen, having been engaged for some years on the, staff of the "Welshman." ••• Pte. H. Evans of B. Co., 2nd Batt. -Welsh Regiment, writing to his home in Station road Carmarthen, states that Pte. H. M. Barnett (attached to the A.S.C.), whose home is in Brigstocke terrace, died from natural causes in France on the 3rd February. Major C. H. D. Cass, D.S.O., who has taken over the control of the Cardiff Recruit- ing Station at the Labour Exchange, Custom House-street, has rendered valuable assist- ance to. the recruiting authorities in Glamor- gan since the outbreak of the war. A retired officer of the Army, living at Dol-llan, Llan- dyssul, the major has served in the Welsh Regiment, C'onnaught Rangers, and Worces- terghire Regiment. He entered the Army in 1878, was appointed captain in 1888, and major in 1902, two years prior to his retire- ment. The major served through the South African campaign, was mentioned in de- spatches, and was awarded the D.8.0. in addition to the Queen's Medal with two clasps and the King's medal with three clasps. He is a J.P. for C'ardiganshire, of which county be was high-sheriff in 1913. MW Mr Islwyn Evans, of Glanyrafon ierrare. Johnstown, has joined Kitchene's Armv this week. He is the tenth attendant from thf Joint Counties Mental Hospital who bus en- listed His place is taken by A temperaiy attendant. Lance-Co,rporal W. G. Brunker-headmaster of Abernant School—who has loeell seuii.g with the 4th Weloh, has returned lit,ine in. valided as a result of rheumatism.

The Churches

The Churches. An excellent Concert was given at Rhydy. gorse on Friday of last week by the Salem (Johnstown) Juvenile Choir conductor, Mr Tom Davies, Magazine-row). There was a good attendance of the Belgian refugees. The Rev J. Dyfnalit Owen occupied the chair, and Mrs Owen ably presided at the piano. An en- joyable evening was spent, the choir and the soloists acquitting themselves in a most cre- ditable manner. The following was the pro- gramme gone throguh :-Chorus, The Choir; duett, Maggie and Lily Evans; eolo, Dolly Harper; solo, Trooper Gordon Rees; solo, Miss Ceridwen Davies; chorus, The Choir; solo, Mr Willie Davies; recitation, Miss Annie Jones; duett and chorus, Maggie and Lily Evans; solo, Mr Jack Thmoas solo "Mr Willie Davies; duett, Missies D. Harper and Lizzie Jones; solo, Mr Brinley Jones; duett, Messrs Tom Davies and Brinley Jones; solo, Trooper Gor- don Rees; chorus, The Coair the National Anthems, French, Welsh and English. On Monday evenng the Rev Arthur Hughes (pastor of Zion) delivered an address at the English Congregational Guild on "Mark Rutherford." The Rev D. J. Thomas pre- sided. Mr Hughes gave a brief sketch of the life oif his subject who was born in Bedford and brought up in a Calvinistic atmosphere. He was destined for the ministry, but his heterodoxy caused his expulsion from college. He was repelled by the remote absolute God of Calvinism, but converted to a belief in the intimate God of Wordsworth. With a jour- nalist named McKay he engaged in social work in Drury Lane. It his writings he showed that he was impressed by the awful and the horrible in life. The romantic tendency in literature is responsible for the novels in which the hero marries a girl and they all live happily ever after. That is how we should like things to be; but Mark Rutherford was a realist. He described life as lie found it- not as he would like it to be. He was a great admirer of Carlyle whom he once visited, and lie owed a great deal to Caleb Morris, a man whom Carmarthen has known, At Lammas st. Young Peoples Society on Tuesday evening, the Rev J. Dyfnalit Owen delivered an address on the story of Lludd and Llevelys in the Mabinogion. At the start he pointed out that there were three ways of look- ing at life. The first is the Realistic Method. This is the method adopted by modern novel- isu; and dramatists and consists in observing facts and things as they are and not knowing beyond them. The Idealist has a scorn of material and visible things and considers them unworthy of his great intellect. The Roman- tic School adopts a medium between these two. It observes and has communion with visible things, but recognises that there is a spiritual meaning behind them. The last cen- tury had shown in the Renaissance of Wonder a renewed interest in the Romantic School. The Mabinogion which were of the romantic style were not the creations of the singers— bards or troubadours. They were the crea- tions of popular imagination; and the singers merely shaped them. Everything which the masses of the Celtic people saw and felt be- came part of their lives. Lludd was a king of Britain and Llewelys king clf France. Three great plagues were sent on Britain. The first was the Coronites, a small invisible people, who were present everywhere and who could hear the lightest whisper. The second was a terrible noise which was heard on the first of May and which frightened people out of their senses. The third was an invisible enemy who, lived in the King's palace and stole all the food. Lludd went over to France to con- sult hie brother, and modern journalists might find the description of the embarkation and landing of the Army very useful. It was diffi- cult for the two kings to talk on account of the pre-senco of the Coronites; but they managed to talk through ahorn which had been woslied with wine and so expelled the demons. They arranged a. plan by which the Coronites were to be killed by means of insects ground up and dissolved in water. This was used at a conference to which Lludd invited them. The speaker left his hearers to guess who the Coronites were; but suggested that they existed in Carmarthen to-day. The noise was caused by the battle of the White and Rex Dragons. A pit and a. Cietfaen fitted with mead was prepared at Oxford. By a stratagem, the Dragons were got into the cistfaen and when they were overcome by the mead they were covered up in the pit. This was explained by the Brut as typifying the contest .between the Saxon and the Celt as set forth in the story of Merlin. The stealing of the food was found to be the work of a Black Magician and a means was found of putting him to sleep. The whole trend of such litera- ture was simply to consider the material visi- ble world as part of life, and to live in close communion with it.

Obituary

— Obituary. MRS SUSAN~DAVIES. Mrs Susan Davies died at her residence in Bridge street, Carmarthen, on Saturday. The deceased who, had been in ill-health for a con- siderable time was 67 years of age. The funeral took place at Llangunnor Churchyard on Wednesday.

MR T MORGAN

MR. T. MORGAN. Mr Thomas Morgan, retired woollen manu- facturer, died at the residence of his sister-in- law (tMrs Nicholas Morgan, 34, St. Davids- street, Carmarthen) on Sunday last the 7th inst. in his 80th year. Deceased was a faith- ful member of Penuel Baptist Church, Priory street, Carmarthen, but owing to his great doatfness of late, he did not frequent his place of worship as usual. Deceased was a familiar ,figure in the woollen trade, and was much re- spected in the town. The funeral took place on Thursday (yesterday) at the Carmarthen Cemetery, and was buried according to the rites of the Church of England burial service, as it was his wish, to his last moment, to be buried by a clergyman of the Church of Eng- land. The Vicar of St. Dav-ids (Rev Griffith Thomas) read a (portion of Scripture in the house and prayed, and conducted the service at the Cemetery Church and at the graveside. Heddwch i Iwch yr hen bererin duwiol.

MRS MARGARET DAV7ES

MRS MARGARET DAV7ES. Mrs Margaret Davies, wife of Mr William Davies, engine driver on the L. and N w.n died at her residence in Penuel itreet (:n Tues- day. The deceased, who was 59 years of is survived by three sons and two daughters. The funeral, which will be private, takes p aco on Saturday at Carmarthen Cemetery.

THE REV POLYCARP CLIFFORD

THE REV POLYCARP CLIFFORD. The Rev Polycarp Clifford, C'.P., died on Tuesday in the house of the English Passion- ists in the Avenue Hoche, Paris. He had been for six years rector of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Carmarthen. He afterwards went to the Paris house of the Order which takes charge of the Church of the English- spealking community. As an Englishman he remained in France despite the laws against the Religious. Orders passed in 1902. He was recently appointed by Bishop Mostyn one of the trustees of the Catholic endowment at Carmarthen.

CARMARTHEN TOWN COUNCIL

.————— CARMARTHEN TOWN COUNCIL. M* John Lewis (Mayor) presided at a meet- ing of the Carmarthen Town Council held at the Guildhall on Tuesday. THE INCOME TAX ON "PROFITS." Mr Holmes asked what the amount of the tax was that they had to pay on the Water- works. He asked the question so that the public should know. The Clerk said that the amount was tll6 odd. Mr Holmes It is getting on for over a penny rate Mr Holmes: That is for profit on the water works. I don't know where the profit comes in. UNIVERSITY COLLEGE.^ The Clerk pointed out that they had to elect a governor on the niversity College of South Wales and Monmouthshire in the place of the late Professor Jones. 5Ir J. Morgan proposed, and Mr D. Samuel seconded that the Mayor be appointed. This was agreed to unanimously. ST. DAVID'S DAY CELEBRATIONS. A letter was read from the Lady Mayoress of Cardiff suggesting that collections be taken up 'on St. Davids Day to provide comforts for the Welsh troops. Amongs the means sug- gested were the sale of flags at Id, 3d, and 6d and the taking up of collections in churches, chapels and cinemas. It was decided to call the attention of the War Relief Committee to the matter. WOOL ROOM WANTED. A leter was read from Capt. Long Price who required the use of the Wool-room in the market for the purpose of a store room for the Yeomanry. It was decided to refer the matter to the market lessee. FLOODS AT JOHNSTOWN. Mr T. Williams called attention to the cul- vert in Johnstown on the Asylum road behind the Royal Oak. The culvert had got clogged with the result that the whole place was covered with mud. It was terrible to see the state in which the houses were. Mr Holmes called attention to the state of CoUege road. The Mayor also referred to a gutter through a field and which the County and Corporation men were supposed to keep clean jointly. Mr T. Williams thought that there ought to be a permanent man who^e duty it would be to keep the cluverts clean round about Maesy- prior, Alltycnap, Pentrehydd, Nantylnyla, etc. It was not the 'traffic but the floods which were destroying the roads. Mr John Lloyd agreed, but did not think that a permanent man would be required. It could be done by a man who gave a couple of days a week to it. It was decided to call the attention of that foreman to the matter. IN LIEU OF LEAVE. On the recommendation of the Watch Com- mittee it was decided to give an extra week's pay to the constables who had this year been deprived of their annual leave. REPORTS. There was no quarterly report from the Surveyor (Mr Finglah) who is ill. The Veterinary Inspector (Mr J. F. Rees) reported that .there had been HO disease in the Borough during the quarter.

By the Way

By the Way. It is a curious fact that the dearer bread gets, the more of it is used. People can't afford cake. «** Several Carmarthen people have been offered hospitality by friends in other parts of the Kingdom, because these friends have read that a German submarine was seen off Fish- guard The late Mr D. C. Davies, the well-known Carmarthen conductor, was not a brother of Mr D. Davies, the Emporium, as stated in the obituary notice last week. They were friends but not relatives. **# The Carmarthen Guardians on Saturday decided to go on with the Cottage Hemes whatever the cost. They could not make up their minds to face the expenditure of £ 1,000 last summer; but it seems probable that they will have to pay a good deal more now. It is intended to have the usual national celebration at Carmarthen on St. Davids Day; but on account of the present European crisis refreshments will not form a part of the pro- I gramme. This is a course which is being adopted by most societies at the present time. This (Friday) evening the Rev J. Dyfnallt Owen lectures to the Welsh National Sooiety of Liverpool on "Marchogion Arthur." «t* At a. meeting of the local branch of the Commercial Travellers Association held at the Ivy Bush Royal Hotel, Carmarthen, on Satur- day, the following resolution was passed unanimously: "That this meeting notes with great satisfaction the new gcale of allowances to the wives, widows and dependents of our soldiers and sailors rcommended by the Select Committee, and urges the Government to give immediate effect to the same."

Advertising

¥EN0'S LIGHTNING COUCH CURE The Ideal family remedy. Contains no opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at all ages. COUGHS.COLDS & INFLUENZA Veno's is the purest and speediest cure for these winter ills, the best pro- tection against more serious dangers. CHILDREN'S COUGHS Soon yield to Yeno's—even Whopping cougli. And there is no trouble in giving it, children simply love Veno's. Othir si:cs 1/1\ and ~/f. Large I Jk from chtmitu and s tor it -j-_i — | B1 H — evtrywhtre. J<(fuse tub- ■ 'f, 9 • ttitvto, they ar* not BOttle mh just at good, as Vtnc'$.

Burry Port Sensation

Burry Port Sensation. AMERICAN WANTED ON MURDER CHARGE. An American, Barney McClung, was brought before the Llanelly justices on Wed- nesday. Supt. Samuel Jones said the man had given himself up at Burry Port, saying that he had absconded from America before completing a term of imprisonment for burglary. Supt. Jones said lie had received information subse- quently that prisoner was wanted in America on a charge of murder. He further stated that he had communicated with the Commis- sioner of Police in London, but nothing was known of the man there. The Commissioner of Police, however, agreed to get into touch with the American Consul, who would get into communication with the American authori- ties, and let him know the result. P.C. John Williams said that on the 8th inst. defendant approached him near Burry Port Railway Station, and said: I want to give myself up. I have escaped from prison in Indiana, having been sentenred to eight years' imprisonment for burglary. I did six years, and was then let out on parole for two years. When I was reporting myself one day a Jew asked me to post a letter for him. 1 did so, and received a reply from him. When I thought they might get to know that I was taking letters for him I came to this country. I left America on January 10th, and arrived at Liverpool on February 3rd. I want to get back to America so as to complete my time 'there. Then I can make a fresh start, Supt. Jones applied for a remand until Saturday. McClung: If up to that time you receive no reply, what then ? The Clerk: You will be further remanded. According to McClung lie came to this country on February 3rd with horses from New Orleans, and had signed himself as James Teele.

CARMARTHEN MALE VOICE CHOIR

CAR/MARTHEN MALE VOICE CHOIR A Sacred Concert will be given by the Cor marthen Male Voice Choir, assisted by well- known artistes, at the Empire Theatre, Blue street, on Sunday evening next, Feb. 14th. Admission by silver collection. A splendid programme has been arranged and the cotioert is being given in aid of patriotic funds. The chair will be taken at 8 o'clock by the Rev B. Parry Grffiths.

LLANDILO

LLANDILO. CHURCH PARADE.—For the fourth Sunday —in succession the local body of Reserve Territorials, which now number over 100, attended Divine service in a Nonconformist place of worship, under the command of Capt, W. L. Roberts and Lieut. T. C. Thomas. On Sunday Ebenezer Baptist Chapel was the x laca of worship attended. DEATH.—After a very brief illness the <12rdh occurred on Saturday last of Mrs Edwards, uf Cwmcib, widow of the late Mr Rees Edwfuda who predeceased her by a few years. She has left a son and a daughter, both in their teens, and with whom the greatest sympi+hy is felt. She had attained to her 58th year. Sire was a member of the Tabernacle Indeffu* dent Chapel,

CARMARTHENSHIRE FOXHOUNDS

CARMARTHENSHIRE FOXHOUNDS Feb. lO.—Maddox Cross Roads; 11 p.m. leb. 19.-LQgill Liangunuor; 10.45 p.m.