Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
8 articles on this page
THE PASSING WEEK i i i

THE PASSING WEEK i i -i "Let there be thistles; there are grapes, If old things, there are new; Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpses of the true.—Tennyscn. The Germans are at present playing the Yankee card .for all they are worth. It is beginning to dawn even on the dullest German who is acquainted with the facts that the Oenral Empires cannot possibly be expected to defeat the Allies. They would like there- fore to embroil the United States with Great Britain. By so doing'they hope that things would get so hot that the Allies would be glad to stop the war and call it a draw. Or if that did not happen, they would be only too glad for the United tSates to declare war against Germany. Then the Ka,iser would be able to say "We could fight England, France, and Russia, but we^-can't fight the whole world. We can without any disgrace throw up the sponge." The Germans are the best organised people in the United States. There are English Societies in America, but the bulk of the Eng- lish people do not belong to them. The so- called "Clan-na-Ga.el" only represents a small and a very ignorant section of the Irish. There are several Italian Societies but they are frankly hostile to eadh other, and they exist more for the purpose of perpetuating Italian animosities than for the purpose of preserving Italian national unity. But the case of the Germans is quite distinct. The whole capacity of the German genius for organisa- tion is devoted towards preserving German nationality united and distinct in the welter of races which form the "American people." Where there are enough Germans in a town there is a German Cricket Club. In the same way all other forms of athletics are organised ] on German lines. There are German literary societies; German insurance clubs; and even German "lodges" of the various benevolent societies. The German Protestant does not join any of the English-speaking churches. He organises his own German Lutheran, Re- formed Evangelical or Baptist Church. The German Catholics won't go to Mass with the Irish and the Italians; they have their own special churches with German priests. In the business quarters there are German res- taurants where natives of the Fatherland can lunch in their own peculiar style. No matter how much the Germans may differ among themselves they are all thorough Germans. The German anarchists in America are quite as anxious as the pious Lutheran to see the Kaiser victorious. It does not matter what their political or their religious views are- they are Germans first and foremost. This is a state of mind which after all we cannot help admiring. In whole-souled patriotism they beait us hollow. If one is to believe some of the things one reads in this country from time to time there are "patriotic" Conservatives who still allow their animosity towards Mr Lloyd George land Mr Redmond to take prece- dence of their hostility to the enemies with whom we are at war. The pretence which these Germans in America adopt is to ask the United States to intervene to prevent the British blockade of Germany. The Germans at home say that they are invincible, and that they have plenty of provisions, and that they can carry on the war for years. The German agents in America on the other hand draw harrowing pictures of the poor little German children and the poor devoted German women being- stairVed by the barbarous British. Both these pictures cannot be true but they prove that German agents are pretty good adeptis at circulating the par- ticular lie which suits their purpose for the time being. Is America likely to intervene even if she helieved that the British were acting towards Germany in a barbarious fashion. The Americans have put themselves entirely out of court even if there was a case for interven- tion. Germany attacked Belgium-a country whose neutrality she was pledged to defend. This was a most flagrant act of criminality and placed Germany outside the laws of nations. But Uncle Sam thought it was none of his' business. *#* Germany burned down the beautiful city of Louvain. Uncle Sam did not see that it was any of his business. Hundreds of civilians were murdered in cold blood by German soldiers. Uncle Sam never stirred. Un- speakable atrocities were committed on Bel- gian women and children. Uncle Sam was quite unmoved. German battle cruisers dashed over to Scarborough for twenty minutes and murdered English children on their way to school. Uncle Sam went on minding his own business. German airmen dropped bombs on undefended English towns and succeeded in killing an old woman. Uncle Sam felt that this was not his affair. German pirates tor- pedoed the "Admiral Ganteaume," and drowned a number of Belgian refugees. Other pirates sink merchant ships and drown the crews. One pirate actually tried to torpedo an hospital ship in St. George's Channel, and he only failed because the captain was ton clever for him. And all the while Uncle Sam felt that he was not called upon to interfere. It will be seen therefore that America has placed herself enirely out of Court. Whilst the most atrocious crimes were committed by Germany shelooked the other way. I f the Americans say that they do not feel called upon to interfere in European affairs well and good. We can quite understand their atti- tude. It is not for a small insignificant Power like the United States to get mixed up in a battle of the giants, and they are wise to keep out of it. The United States is a great country commercially, but as far as fighting goes it is about equal to Denmark or Switzer- land. But if the United States after shutting their eyes now begin to hunt for technical breaches of the Laws of Warfare on the part of Great Britain, we shall know that America like Turkey has been captured by Germany. Some of the "American" pronouncements betray the voice of Jacob in spite of the hand of Esau. Sane Americans are hardly likely to stand by and see their country utilised by the Kaiser as Austria and Turkey have been; (but that is what the German-Americans are striving to do.

Advertising

ENO'S- COUCH CURE The Ideal famil),bremedy. Contains The Ideal family remedy. Contains no opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at all ages, COUGHS.COLDS & INFLUENZA Veno's is the 'surest and speediest cure for these winter ills, the best pro- tection against more serious dangers, Childhen'S COUGHS Soon yield to Venn's—even AVhonping cough. And there is no trouble in giving it, children simply love Veno's. m Other sizes 1/1\ end 2/0, L. Ci i" G 3 #1 from c/nm

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT. Corne, come, and sit you down; you shall not budgo, ft- shall not go, till I act you cp a glass Where you may see the inmost part of yoo. SMAKursAitin. The researches of Dr Langdon who lectured at the Presbyterian College show that in Babylonia, six thousand years ago perjury was treated as a criminal offence. If we had a similar law in these days, no one who has had an extensive acquaintance with our courts would doubt that its application "would be responsible for more deaths even thair the war. Whatever be the cause of the dearth of teachers in Carmarthenshire it certainly cannot be the war. There were vacancies at the last meeting for three certificated head- mistresses, and there was not a single appli- cant. ft** An Inspector from the Board of Agriculture came down here last week and held an in- formal conference with the members of the Fishery Board on the proposed change in the "close season" for salmon. Part of the pro- gramme prepared waa the capture of a few salmon to see how they looked in the month of March. I am really afraid to enquire II whether this part of the programme was car- ried out. It would clearly be the duty of the Board to prosecute if this were done. The District Council had to consider the ethics of the "Merchant of Venice" on Satur- day. A firm with whom the Council had a contract wanted an extra Is 6d a day on account of the rise in the price of coal. A suggestion that the Council should adhere to the contract was met with a reference to Shylock. This led to a member making a quotation from Portia's speech on the quality of mercy, and the Council were so moved by the sentiment that they allowed an extra shilling. This is a problem which often arises at the present time, and it is likely to occur pretty frequently until the war is over. Should business men be expeoed to adhere strictly to their contracts during a, time of uncertainty like the present. Has a man a right to say that he never expected suoh circumstances that he never expected such circumstances, and that he ought to get higher prices? Do public bodies as shabbily in enforcing con- tracts art the present time I And do they act honestly to the ratepayers when they release contractors? That is the dilemma. # The problem raised by the "Merchant of Venice" is a very real one. It marks the conflict of two ideals. A Christian gentleman like Antonio would keep his word if he could and expect everybody else to do the same. But when a "hard case" arose he would not exact the letter of his bond, and on the other hand no other member of his class in Venice l would exact the full penalty against him in an extreme case. This attitude was pretty well understood; it was part of the etiquette of the trade guilds not to deal too harshly with defaulters until they had at any rate a reasonable time for settlement. # Up against this ethical code coimes another character. Shylock the Jew represents ab- stract justice. He expected everybody to stick strictly to their bargains. On the other hand he would stick strictly to his. If the agreement had been the other way about, Shylock would have given the pound of flesh without even bringing the case into court. Be would never have had any wrangling; about I an agreement. His code was strict commer- cial probity which asked for no mercy and gave none. If a world were composed entirely of Shy looks it would work well enough in its way; if it were composed entirely of Venetian gentlemen like Antonio it would work pretty well too. The trouble arises when you get Shylock and Antonio living in the same town and entering into transactions with the other. Shylock thinks Antonio a dishonest knave, and Antonio thinks Shylock a heartless vampire. We have Shylocks and Antonios to-day, and we have people who act lik £ Shylock towards their debtors but expect all their own credi- tors to be regular Antonios. What we want is some definite understanding whether we are, to have universal justice or universal meroy. A business man who ruthlessly holds everybody to their contracts with him and who pleads for fair treatment from people with whom he is under contract can make a fortune. On the other hand if he is tender- hearted to others, whilst everybody is ruth- less to him, he will become bankrupt very quickly. We want some uniform standard. We hare had a good deal of discussion at various public bodies about the rate paid for billeting soldiers. On the one hand it is argued that the Town Council might forego jB50 charged for the horses at the Fair Ground because we are making so much money by billeting. I quite agree that it would be a very good thing if the people who are making money out of the billeting would subscribe this R50. But if it comes out of the rates, it will have to be paid to a large extent by people who have made no money out of the biMietting. t The Town Council might very well remem- ber that even those of us who have made noth- ing out of billeting will have to pay the rates. There was never a bigger piece of sophistry than the theory that "The Town is making money." The town is not making money. Some people in town are making money; but they are making it for themselves. They are not paying their profits into the cioffers of the Corporation. The billeting has put up the price of milk and of many other articles of food in the town. To this extent it has made life harder for those who have no f soldiers billeted. This is quite enough with- out clapping an extra halfpenny on the rates. If the Town Council can levy a special rate on billets well and good. Otherwise they had better deal in a business way with the ;£50. As has been pointed out, a Government which is spending two millions a day on the war will never miss that R50. There are four or five people in Carmarthen who ,aremetting outdoor relief and who have soldiers billeted on them. With a fine busi- ness instinct the Carmarthen Board of Guard- ians has decided to- "oonsider" these cases. Is it really bolieved by the Board that the paupers can live on 3s 6d a week or so at the present price of potatoes and bacon? Will the British Constitution be upset if some poor woman earns a few extra pounds this y#ar ? There is a text which says "Blessed are the merciful." I know it is considered old- fashioned just now; but surely in Wales at any rate it should be remembered. **» The hardest case is that of the men who are "billeted" at home. They get £ 1 a week. If a man has a wife in Llandilo she gets 17s 6d a week and he gets his pay and is billeted at 2s Hd a week. If his wife lives in Carmartuo: he gets tj altogether for pay, billet and wite. Surely this is illogical! > ALEIHEIA.

Advertising

THE BACK WARNS yõu. 1. f B"Iff PietfW, 1&UIa 8corr. lob Any Stubborn Pain in the Small of the Back is good cause to suspect your Kidneys, for that is where the Kidneys are. Do you sutter from shooting ol IonttAtIOUS polnoning, gravel, dropsy, rheumatism, or pains in the back: Bright', disease. Or from a heavy, tired ieeltog on Thing to A kidney and bladder medicine is needed the morning? to help the kidneys throw off this poisonous waste. That is what Doan's Backache Kidney Heavy, throbbing backaches, ana sharp They Rre soleiy for the kidneys twinges when you Btoop, bend or give year nrin system. They do one thing only, back a sudden twist, tell of swollen, dQ one thing well. They regulate trfiamed kidneys, kidneys Bore, overworked ki(jneyg an(j bladder like ordinary medicines ai>d tired. regulate the bowels. They are guaranteed to The kidneys have enough to do when you 00ntajn no p0is0n0UB ingredients or injurious ire in good health, to filter the blood free ^jug8 whatever, and they have no bad after- jf uric poisons. Colds, fevers, overwork, or eff eats. excesses of any sort, congest and overwork the kidneys. The kidneys weaken, and unless In Sj9 0«7y, tlx loxtt iSjO. KtvtriM loon. Of promptly relieved, what waa at first a simple M orj^d-Strut, London, JF. Rtfvtt icfammation, will turn, in time, to uric mbititutes. DOAN'S Backache Kidney Pills

Carmarthenshire Education Committee

Carmarthenshire Education Committee. The monthly meeting of the Carmarthen- shire Education Committee was held at the County Offices on Thursday the 11 till inst. Mr W. N. Jones, Tirydail, presided. PROPOSAL TO EXCISE SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. The Clerk said that he had received a letter from the Board of Education asking for infor- mation as to the number of children excuesed from school attendance. There are only two in the county. Under the agricultural bye- law there is only one who has been excused. Mr Mervyn Peel said that he supposed they had had some applications that children be allowed to engage in agricultural work. The Clerk said that for other purposes there had been three or four applications within the last few weeks. These applications related to children who were within a few months of 14 years of age. A letter was received from the Carmarthen- shire Chamber of Agriculture asking that boys between the ages of 12 and 14 be allowed to work during the spring and the harvest during the continuance of the war. No resolution was cornel to on the subject. A letter was read from a farmer who stated that his three labourers had enlisted. He asked that he should be allowed to keep his boy who was 13 years of age away from school to work on the farm. Mr D. Davies (Rhiblyd) said that he thought they ought to give the Clerk and the Chair- man power to grant exemptions in specially hard cases. This was agreed to. LLANELLY RURAL V. LLANELLY URIBAN. A letter was read from Mr Blake asking that the free places in the Llanelly Dural District and the Llanelly Urban District in the proportion of the, rateable value of each district. Rev J. H. Rees pointed out that Lla,nelly Rural had a larger population and a larger rateable value than Llanelly Urban. On the other hand the Urban chidren got more than their share of the free places because of their greater educational facilities. He proposed that 13 places be aillotted to the Rural Dis- trict and 12 to the Urban, and that each dis- trict have a separate competition. This was agreed to. HERBS FOR MEDICINAL PURPOSES. Mr D. Johns, B.Sc., the County Agricul- tural Organiser, drew attention to the leaflet recently issued by the Board of Agriculture with regard to the desirability of cultivating medicinal herbs especially dandelion and fox- glove. During recent years the direct culti- vation of these plants in Great Britain had been somewhat restricted by competition with foreign countries, but the war had completely changed the situation. The roots of the dan- delion and the learves of the foxgloves, which were in great demand, grew as weeds in this country. He suggested that the children in the schools should be encouraged to collect such herbs and dry them ready for disposal to manufacturers. This would bo work of edu- cational value, because it would tend to de- velop the powers of observation and give stimulus to the teaching of nature study, which was very important to the rural dis- tricts. Dried roots of dandelion were sold last September at Is per lb, and many of the shools eotfkl, by this means, make quite a schools could, by this means, make quite a utilised to extend their school libraries. He also enclosed a list of probable buyers of herbs. Lady Dynevttr: I think tha,t is rather a nice idea. Mr Thomas, Llanarthney. said it would be rather dangerous for children to play with plants like foxglove. Mr Mervyn Peel said that he hoped that they would not destroy all the foxgloves which were one of the beauties of the country. Lady Dynevor said rbhat they would have to leave enough for seed. It was decided to call the attention of the various head teachers in the county to the matter and it was stated that the Agricul- tural Organiser would be able to put them in communication with firms who would buy the herbs. SPECIAL MEETING Tt) CONSIDER H.M. I. REPORT. A discussion took place over the repo: i of H.M. Inspector's report on Education in The County. Extracts from the report appear at the end of the report of this meeting. Mr Ben Evans, Gwasbod Abbot, said it was a very important report. He ventured to Bay that under the old system of payment by results the education imparted to the child-ren of the county was of a. more efficient and thorough character than that of the present time. That system was carried to the ex- treme, but now the pelliciuluID had swung round to the other extreme. The inspectors now devoted more attention to the externals of education—premises and general equip- ment-than to the other side. It would > Ot be out of place for the committee to give them one recommendation on that score. With regard to the introduction of practical sub- jects into the school instruction, he found from the report that only nine schools had gardening classes in such a. large agricultural county, and only in one sohool had they an attempt at manual instruction. They were the only county in Wales in which no instruc- tions were given to girls in domestic subjects, and he did not think that state of things should be allowed. They had no classes in metallurgy in their industrial districts. He did not think there were more than half-a- dozen farmers' eons in the county who had received no more than an elementary educa- tion who knew anything about farming sub- jects. They wanted evening classes for such. He moved that a special meeting be called to consider the recommendations made in the report with a view to carrying them into effect. Rev A. Fuller Mills seconded, and it was agreed to. THE DEARTH OF TEACHERS. Applications had been invited for the fol- lowing posts:— Certificated Head Teachers: Blaentwrch Council School; Old Llanedy Ch. of England School; Llangunnor Oh. of England School. Certificated Assistants: Oefneithyn Council; Lle-ihyfedach Council; Saron Council; Tycroes Council; Brynamman Council; PParcyrhun Council; BllaenanCouncil; Llangadock Coun- cil LLangennech Council; Pontihenry Coun- cil Llandbeie Ch. of England School. Uncertificated Asaisttanfts: Oefneithyn Coun- cil; Garnant Council; Ystradowen Council; Hillfield Council; Mountain Council; Llan- saint Council; Hendy Council; Burry Port j Council; Trimsaran Council; Kidwelly Ch. of England Tycroes Ch. of England Laughame Ch. of England; Felinfoel Trinity Ch. of Eng- land LlanSitephan Ch. of England; Penyboyr Ch. of England. There were no applicant for the head- tea eherships. There were only two applicants for the 14 posts as certificated assistants, and there were four applicants for the 18 Vacancies as uncertificated assistants. EXTRACTS FROM INSPECTOR'S REPORT The following are extracts from the report of H.M. Inspector:—■ It is pleasant to find that the Welsh lan- guage is now receiving proper attention in nearly every school in the county. In some schools there are teachers who know no Welsh, very little; but where this occurs other teachers, who are Welsh-speaking, exchange classes and take the Welsh lessons. The young children now invariably learn to read Wel-.h before English, and are found to acquire the latter with greater ease and facility in consequence. The Authority have been very far from liberal in the supply of Welsh read- ing books, and in numerous instances classes have been compelled to use the same books for a second year instead of having fresh ones. It is evident that this tends to make reading uninteresting and unattractive to the children. In most schools Welfoh composition and letter writing are practised, and it should be the aim of all teachers to see that the chil- dren who leave school should bè able to write a simple letter both in English and Welsh. The use of poetry books, as mentioned before, has had a great effect in evoking the interest and stimulating the intelligence of both the younger an dolder scholars, and this is espe- cially noticeable in Welsh-speaking districts, when, for example, a collection of Ceiiriog's lyrics is used. In many schools several poetry books, English and Welsh, are studied during the year, the plan being to read as much as possible and to learn the best pieces or selee- tions or even parts of the best. Some teachers] adopt, the plan of encouraging the older scholars to note in their evercise books any particular beautiful -or striking passages or lines. It is very desirable for the children to be taken occasionally over the pieces of poetry which they learned in previous years, for the knowledge will be very quickly and usefully revived. In the report of three years ago, it was stated that the "most glaring defioi,ency was the absence of any instruction in domestic subjects." In spite of various representations made to the Local Education Authority by officers of the Board, no steps have yet been taken to remedy this serious defect. The value of practical work as a means of educa- tion is so widely acknowledged, and the im- portance of giving some training in the affairs of the home to the girls before the completion of their school life is so obvious, that there is n need at this date to bring forward argu- ments in favour of the inclusion of domestic subjects in the curriculum of the upper stand- ards of all schools attended by girls. It is understood that the Committee asked that an inquiry should be made as to the possibilities of utilising the rooms and equipment provided for the teaching of cookery at the secondary schools in the different localities. It was forund that a satisfactory arrangement could be made with at least two of these schools, but in an interview at the Office, it was state-d that the Commiitice felt that it was not worth while beginning the work, as only three of the elementary schools would be able t>o send theii girls to these schools. It is impossible, how- ever, not to think that, had a beginning been made even with so small a number, it would at any rate have been an indication that the Committee had the best educational interests of the children at heart, and were ready to move in the highrt direction. It is much to be regretted that there is still one county in Wales in which the girls are not given the advantages which are enjoyed by girls in all the other counties, and from the industrial districts. The school has already an effi- school at Ammanford with eventually absorb all those who come from the latter districts, and the problem of adaptation at Llandilo will be easier. The school has already an effi- cient domestic subjects eide (including hy- giene, cookery, laundry-work and housewifery) and a less completely developed commercial cide, in which commercial subjects are sub- stituted for Latin. An Qgricltural bias is now possible, and it will not only make the educa- tion of intending farmers morb emcient, but add interest to the general course. It would also make the education of teachers, for whom Llandilo is a most promising centre, much more useful. The destruction of part of the school building by fire, though it involved the loss of the library and valuable equipment, has enabled the Governors to provide a more convenient substitute for the rooms demol- ished. This successful sohool, with its able and conscientiolUs teaching, will survive the loss of the Amman Valiley children, if there is enough differentiation between its curriculum and that of the new school at Ammanford. In the Whitland school a. general course, dictated by the needs of external examina- tions, is still very prominent. But an effort is being made to introduce greater adapta- tion. The boys now take rural science in the first two, forms, gardening is to be introduced into the school curriculum, and possibly an expert teacher of agricultural subjects will be appointed. On the gilils' domestic sides side, Latin is dropped in order to give more time to needlework, cookery end laundry work. A commercial side has also been formed, for commercial correspondence, book-keeping, and shorthand. It is noticed, however, that this welcome adaptation is largely confined, so far, to forms below those generally prepared for examinations. Recent additions to the buildings of this growing school will make adaptation easier. The Grammar School at Carmarthen worthily maintains the old literary traditions of the school by able teaching of a, wide general course, including Greek. The course at the hard-working and efficient Carmarthen Girls' School is also a general one, domestic subjects being included in the lower part of it. It s much to be regretted that necessary attention is not paid to the grounds of these two schools; a very small outlay would make them useful to the schools and worthy of them. On the whole it may be said that secondary education is slowly becoming more adapted to the needs of the pupils. Adaptation often re- quires further expenditure, more expert teach- ing, and greater originality and effort on the part of the headmaster and the governors. -it is comparatively easy to prepare all the pupils for general external examinations; it requires much more thought and labour to provide a curriculum formed after a close and continu- ous study of the needs of the pupils. The only cookery classes in the county were those held at the Pentrepoeth Council School, Carmarthen, and at the Co-unty School, Llan- elly. At the former, on the occasion of the visit of inspection, the class was so large that no paaotical work by the students was possible This class has been held for many years, and is very popular, 37 students having been en- rolled in it. It is, however, advisable to limit the number in$cookery class and to admit only that number for whom there is both room and equipment for practical work. The arrangement both at Carmarthen and at Llanelly with regard to the provision of materials for the cookery lessons is most un- satisfactory. The students are obliged to bring all the materials they wish to use for practical work, and any materials which, the teacher may require for her own demonstra- tion or for the use of the class she has to bring and unless by the sale of the di-shes she is able to "make it pay," the loss, falls upon her. The Local Education Authority should, however, understand that, the financial re- sponsibility for the materials used at the cookery class is their affair. The teacher is unduly hampered and restricted in the choice of dishes, which she teaches and wishes her students to practise, V the fact that she has herself to bear any deficit on the working of the class. Carmarthen Borough Evening classes have been carried on at the Carmarthen Pentre- plaeth Council School for three years. A Welsh class was established some four years agio, but was discontinued, presumably from lack of interest and dwindling attendance. A variety of subjects was offered, and the most popular seemed to be Shorthand, History and English. The classes are under the super- vision of the first assistant teacher in the boys' S hod. The students were chiefly young men and boys who had lately left the day school, and a few young girls. The telegraph are required by the postal autliori ties to attend the school. A cookery class was also held in the school, and has been referred to under the heading of domestic subjects. Some classes in machine construction and geometry are held in connection with the School of Art. The number of students is rather small, and, in the absence of equip- ment, it has not so far been possible to organise a suitable engineering course, though it has been suggested that fuller pro- viision for this subject, which is useful for the students engaged in foundries and motor and electrical works, shocld be made at the Pen- trepoeth Council School. It should be possible to make the latter a much more important centre for further edu- cation in the Borough. Suggestions: In reviewing the progress cf education in Carmarthenshire during the last. three years, it cannot be said that the county occupies a position worthy of its service to education in the past. It can, and it certain- ly ought to, stand much higher among the counties of Wales. The earnest attention of the Authority is invited to he following sug- gestions:- (i). Elementary school education should be made more efficient and more valuable by the introduction of practical subjects to the course of instruction. For girls, in addition' to needlework, cookery, laundry work and housewifery should be introduced wherever passible; for boys, provision should be made for the teaching of woodwork throughout the cunty and for the teaching of metalwork in the industrial districts. For boys and girls, instruction in gardening should be available. In the other counties of Wales the introduc- tion of these practical subjects has almost given a new life to the schools, especially country schools; it has enabled children to obtain an education that fits them bettor for heir life's work and duties, and -it has given a now meaning o the older subjects taught in the schools. But, in Carmarthenshire, so far, the influence of the new and welcome de- parture in education has hardily been felt at all. Ca rmarthenshire, and especially its agricul- tural districts, ought to produce twice or three times the number of elementary school eacheirs it produces now. In justice to their schools, and to the prospects of theiir own eons and daughters, the Authority should consider whethe,r their present system of selecting and educating teachers is suitable. • •■• A more generous expenditure on equipment, and the establish- ing of more evening -cle"es. especially for women and in manual subjects, appear to be among the imperative duties of the authority

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A stitch hi time saves nine" and if upon the first tymptoms of anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple, but proper means of correcting the mischie, rine-tentba of the suffering that invades oar homes would be avoitled. A dose of G viTym Evans' Quinine BittfefS taken when y ii feel the least bit out of. sorts is jesfc thi fc ;stitch in time." You can fet GwiiTra E ans' Qiunino Bitters at any Chemists or Stoi to in bottloo, 2s 9d and 4s 6d each, but rmien.ber that the only guarantee of genuinei. res is the name "Gwilym Evans" on the la el, stamp and bottle, without which none TA genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitteji Manufacturing Company, Limited, L'mnelly, South Wale

ByeElection in Carmarthen Boroughs

Bye-Election in Carmarthen Boroughs. MR LLEWELYN WILLIAMS RETURNED UNOPPOSED. On the lltli inst. a writ was ordered to be issued for the, electioii of a member for the Carmarthen Boroughs to fill the vacancy caused by the appointment of Mr Llewelyn Williams, K.C., to the R-cco,rdersliii), of Cardiff. The writ was received by the Sheriff of Car- marthen (Mr W. Evans) on Friday. He, in conjunction with the Under Sheriff (Mr Th-.s Walters) fixed the lith as the date of ine nomination, and the 22nd as the day of elec- tion in caseof a contest. A meeting o,f the Llanally Liberal Associa- tion was held on Saturday for the purp. se of nOlllimatmg Mr W. Llewelyn Wi:tl:tr>is. K.C., as Liberal candidate for the C.iriT.nrthen Boroughs, the bye-election being rendered necessary by his appointment as Reoorder of Cardiff. Writing to the President (Mr D. Williams, J.P.), Mr Llewelyn Williams said:—"I have great pleasure in submitting myself to the favour of the electors for the fifth time in less than ten years. As we are living at pre- sent in a time of political truce, I presume there will be no contest. I gladly take this opportunity to thank the electors of Llanelly through you for the warm and faithful sup- port they have accorded me during the whole of my political connection with the town. 1 believe I hold the record both as to the length of my Parliamentary sea-vice and as to the largeness of the majorities with which I have been elected. "I am deeply grateful to the good people of Llanelly for their undeviating kindness to me in storm and sunshine, in times of political quiet and in strenuous electiion times. I am sorry to say that I am at present prostrated by a severe attack of influenza, and I shall not lie able to come among you justnow. 1 hope soon, however, to be at Llanelly again, and to see you and all my friends face to face." The President formally moved that Mr W. Llewelyn Williams be again nominated as Liberal candidate for the Carmarthen Boros. Mr R. J. Edumnds seconded, and Mr H. D. Evans, having supported the motion, it was carried unanimously. The executive of the Carmarthen Liberal Association met at Carmarthen on Monday for the urose of nominating Mr W. Llewelyn Williams, K.C. (who seeks re-election on his apointment as Recorder of Cardiff) as Liberal candi.ate for the Carmarthen Boroughs. The Mayor (Mr John Lewis) presided. In a letter read by MrPriee Williams, the Liberal agent, Mr Llewelyn W illiams thanked the Carmar- then electors for their kindness to him during the years he had been their member, and re- gretted that ha-- would not be able to attend for the nomination day owing to an attack of influenza, but he hoped to have the honour of coming amongst his Carmarthen friends soon. The Chairman formally moved that Mr W Llewelyn Williams be adopted as candidate. Mr Henry Howell and Mr John Jenkins sup.- ported, and this was carried unanimously. No action was taken by any other political party and on Wednesday Mr Ll. Williams was returned unopposed.

Advertising

FOR TBE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkes Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands ot testimonials. In bottles, 213 9d, each of all chemista & stores Ask for Clirke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuadr d to take an imitation CARMARTHEN Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. Lawrenoz. at her Offices. 3 Blue Street), Friday, March 19th, 1910.