Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
19 articles on this page
Carmarthenshire Standing Joint Committee

Carmarthenshire Standing Joint Committee- A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Stand- ing Joint Committee was held at the County Offices on Tuesday. Mr D. Evans, Manordaf (chairman) presided. There were also pre- sent Lord Dvnovor, Lieut.-Gen. Sir James Hiils-Johnes, V.C., G.C.B., Mr Dudley Wil- lianis-Drumiiioiid, Nir W. J. Williams, Mr T. Thomas (Llangennech), Mr Morgan Jones 'Llanmilo), Mr Mervyn Peel, Mr Thos. Jones (Penronw), Mr T. Jones, Mr J. Jones, Mr C. E. Morris, Col. Lloyd Harries, Mr Dd. Davie- Mr A. E. DuBuisson, and Mr D. E.. Davies (Llanwrda). (Llanwrda). CHIEF CONSTABLE'S REPORT. The Chief Constable reported as fo-Ilows:- "1 have the honour to report that the strength and distribution of the Force during the uqarter has been notified in the monthly returns duly forwarded to the Clerk of the Peace. Criminal and other offences dealt with by magistrates show an increase of 317 as com- pared with the corresponding quarter of last year, the figures being 1,482 as against 1,165. Hie increase is principally noticeable under the followin g heads: Drunkennes 115, Educa- tion Acts 133, assaults 16, railway offences 37, unlicensed sale of beer 26, Aliens Restriction Orders 16, Army desertion 10, wilful damage 9, embezzlement 5, false pretences 6. On the other hand there has been a decrease in lar- ceny 12. sleeping out 15, fishery laws 17, light on vehicles 21. Indictable offences num- bered 89 of which 15 were committed for trial representing a decrease of 19 in the number of offences and 1 in the number of committals. The increase in drunkenness is due to the incursion of the large number of navvies to the Pembrey Explosives Worke. The influx of this class of workman into a district is without exception accompanied by higher figure in re- spect of this particular offence, but in fair- ness it should be stated that in proportion to the number the increase does not nearly ap- proa.ch what might have been expected, as pinnated by previous experience, and it is satisfactory to note that the cases in which drunkennes was aggravated by disorderly be- haviour show no material difference to what prevails under normal cOllditiom. The state of the weather is nn important factor. Wet weather, .interfering with regular work, in- variably reacts unfavourably on the number of cases, and this has special application to Burry Port, where housing accommodation is inadequate, leaving licensed premises about the only convenient available place of shelter, and not the most desirable for navvies earn- ing high wages. The Llanellv justioes by an Order em- powered by the Intoxicating Liquor (Tem- porary Restriction) —ct 1914 have recently limited the hours for the sale of intoxicating liquor at Llanellv to 10 a.m., and at Burry Port to 9 p.m., where they had previously curtailed the hours of opening in the morning from 6 to 8. 52 informations were sent to the Coroners and 32 inquests held as against 43 and 26. 1 have_received for pedlars' certificates the sum of £ 5, which will be forwarded to the County Treasurer to be placed to the credit of the Superannuation Fund. Under the authority of the Dogs Act and Dogs (Wearing of Collars) Order, 1910, 42 stray dogs were seized by the police, of which 11 were claimed by the owners, 24 destroyed, and the remaining 7 sold realising the sum of £ 1 17s 6d, which with the sum of 14s received for the maintenance of those claimed will be paid into the County Fund. Another member of your Force, who was serving in Franco, has been wounded, viz.:— Constable iiiggins of the Welsh Guards, a youn^ constable of exceptional promise, wliose complete recovery and eventual resumption of his duties in this Force is looked forward to by his superior officers. His arm was badly fractured and otherwise injured by bullet wounds from a German machine gun. I am flad to say he is making satisfactory progress. '.C. Phillips has now recovered and has re- sumed his military duties. One inspector, 4 sergeants, and 56 constables have been attested under Lord Derby's scheme and transferred into the Army Reserve Section B. None of these will be called up unless thev can be spared. The "additional con- stables" appointed for the policing of the Pembrey Explosives Works where the em- ployees now number over 5,000 have been in- creased to 16. I beg to apply for authority to advertise for tenders for police uniform and that a sub- committee with plenary powers be appointed to deal with them. Tettephonic oommunicatio-n may now be con- nected to Newcastle Emlyn Police Station, if such is your wish. I have to report the death of Pensioner ex- Inspector Hughes, which occurred on the 13th November at the age of SO." PAUPERISM AND HAD ATTENDANCE. < Mr C. P. Lewis called attention to the in- crease in offences against the Education Act. In the Llandovery district they had made attendance orders in some cases. The attend- ance orders were sent back and they were asked to impose fines as the attendance orders were too expensive to enforce. The Bench were quite helpless as it was impossible to enforce fines on persons in receipt of out- door relief. Mr Peel: What is the remedy? Mr Drummond said that he thought this was a matter for the Education Committee. There had been several complaints in the Car- marthen Court as to the unsatisfactory in- formation supplied by the attendance officers. That was one of the questions which he in- tended to raise at the Education Committee when he had an opportunity, as the whole Council would soon be on it. Mr J. Jones What is the difficulty for the paupers children to attend school more than any other children. Mr T. Jones They are a class of people who neglect themselves and their children. Mr Dd. Evans said that this matter had cropped up in the Education Committee as well. The Education Committee complained that the magistrates in certain districts did not give the necessary help and sympathy to the Education Committee. In the case of paupers there was a very effective remedy. The mere threat to stop the relief would usually be sufficient to induce them to send the children to school. As a rule paupers are paupers because of their own general neglect and the neglect of the children was part of it Mr John Jones said that a good deal of the bad attendance might be due to the fact that labour was so scarce on farms. Mr C. P. Lewis said that the cases were in town. It was decided to call the attention of the Education Committee to "the matter. THE CAUSE OF DRUNKENNESS. Mr W. J. Williams (Brynamman), dealing with the increase of drunkenness said it was strange that not a single publican was pro- eeeded against. The Chief Constable said that lie did not agree that men get drunk in public house. They get liquor in public house; they get drink outsiae. They drank a certain quantity in the house. They are either put out, or they leave when they have had enough and they get drunk outside. They get drunk after they get into the open air. There is a lot pf drunkenness at Burry Port, and the publicans were doing their utmost. Mr J. Jones said that -he always understood that drunkenness was the effect of excessive drinking in public houses Mr Drummond said that a publican is bound to supply a man who comes in and astks for drink. People can buy drink in a public house and carry it out; or they can buy drink from a licensed grocer. Mr C. P. Lewis said that it was very diffi- cult for the police to watch every house. If any of the gentlemen who spoke saw a drun- ken man come out of a public house, would I they take the responsibility of reporting the case to the police. A good deal of improve- ment might be effected if the public houses in towns were closed at 10 p.m. as they were in the county. The Uhief Constable said that a restriction of hours could only be made on the order of the Mimister of Munitions or the competent military authority. PRUBRJÈY DIFFICULTIES. Lord Dynevor called attention to the over- crowding at Pembrev. The Cnief Constable replied that a certain number of huts had been put up. The Chairman said many of the men were engaged on temporary work, and it was diffi- cult to make the necessary provision for them. The works would be there after the war; but the navvies were employed on constructional work which was employment of a temporary character. PICKPOCKETS AT LAMPETER. Mr D. E. Davip8 said that a good deal of annoyance was felt that the. police did not proceed against three pickpockets found at Lampeter fair. The Chief Constable said that he was not acquainted with the facts; but lie was certain that the police would have proceeded had there been a case to proceed with. POPULARITY INAIDV, ISABILE! A letter was received from Kidwelly ex-

Carmarthenshire Standing Joint Committee

pressing a hope that Sergt. J. W. Johns would not be removed. Mr Drummond That isi a matter entirely for the Chief Constable. The Chief Constable He has boen removed. Mr Peel: It is a good thing not to allow a constable to be too many years in the same place. A man is apt to get too many friends. Even unconsciously to himself it affects the execution of his duty.

Advertising

'LINSEED COMPOUND" with warm water is an excellent gargle for sore throat, colds, coughs., etc.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES. Instead of giving the usual prizes to the scholars of the Welsh Sunday School (St. Mary's) it was decided this year to give a tea. Besides those closely connected with the Welsh Sunday School, the following assisted at the talbles:—Mrs Ambrose Jones, The Vicarage; Misses Hilda and Vera Jones, The Vicarage; Mrs Wild, Hill Side; Mrs Hughes, Water st. Mrs Hughes. Priory st. Mrs W. J. Maliphant, Station road; Mi's Willie Thomas, Lady st.; and Miss 0. Rink. After a sumptuous tea, the following programme, arranged by the Secretary, Mr Cbas. Maliphant, was gone through :—Song, Miss Phyllis mower recita- tion, Missi Violet Anthony; song, Master Dl. Wm. Morgans; mandoline solos, Miss Olive Rink; recitation, Miss Frances May Gower; song, Miss Blodwen Gower recitation, Miss Bessie Evans; sweetly the Holy Hymn, by a party of girls song, Miss G. Anthony recita- tion, Miss Freda Gower; song, Miss Olive Ran; recitation, Miss Gladys Anthony selec- tions on the gramophone by Mr Freddy Stephens; "Far Away." by Misses Olive Rink, Phyll is Gowe, Gladys Anthony, and Blodwen Gower. Miss Bessie Davies acted as accompanist throughout. Valuable assistance was also given by the Rev W. Evans, curate. Before coming quite to the close of the pro- gramme oranges were freely distributed, kindly given by Mrs Davies, Plough, and by the Welsh Sunday School. The Vicar (Rev D. Ambrose Jones) presided over the proceedings, the children having spent a very nappy, even- ing. Before dispersing, the National Anthem was sung. We are asked to make it known that a sum of jE3 has been contributed to the funds of the Red Cross Society by the Committee of Capel Sul Band of Hope. This is part proceeds of a cantata performance held early in 1915. The Committee is composed of Mrs Davies, Park House; Mrs James, Capel Sul; Messrs E. Gravell, Stanley Rees, W. J. Jones, W. LI. Williams, treasurer, and T. Jones, Pelican Stores, secretary. The choir conductors is Mr W. J. Rees, and the accompanist Miss Cassie Rowlands. At a well attended meeting of the Belgian Refugees Committee held in the Town Hall on Monday evening last, Aid. T. Reynolds (Mayor) presiding, a letter of thanks was read from M. A. Binet, who has secured permanent: employment in Llanelly. The letter concluded with my "most sincere wishes for the coming year, and ask you to kindly offer my good wishes and thanks to the people of the town, Yours gratefully. A. Binet." Several important matters were discussed, and deferred for further consideration to a special meeting to be held on Monday next. The funeral took place at St. Mary's Church on Monday in this week of Mr James Jones, a former resident of Kidwelly, where he lived at Kymer terrace. For many years he had been employed as assorter at the Tinplate Works, but during the last 22 years he had resided at Newport. His death occurred at Swansea Hospital, whore he underwent a successful operation, unfortunately followed by compli- cations. He was 71 years of age. The corpse was brought by road to Kidwelly and interred in the family grave" in the churchyaru, the Rev W. Evans, curate, officiating. The vacancy caused by the removal of P.S. J. W. Johns, to Llanelly, has been filled by the appointment of P.S. Hodge Lewis, Llanelly, who is well nown as a smart detective officer. We trust P.S. Lewis will find his new sur- roundings congenial, amd that he will have a long stay in the ancient borough. Pte. Arlington Thomas. 4th Batt. Welsh Regiment (T.F.), SOJl of Mr and Mrs D. Thomas, National School, has just returned to England after a long period in hospital suffer- ing from the effects of a bullet wound in the stomach received in action at the Dardanelles. He is now in the Ninian Military Hospital at Cardiff, where we are glad to learn he is mak- ing steady progress towards recovery.

Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble

Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble. FREE TREATMENT. Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muselep, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is mostly the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel and dropsy. The success of Estora Tablets for the treatment of rheumatism and other forms of kiduey trouble, is due to the faot that they restore the kidneys to healthy action, aLd thereby remove the cause of the trouble, which necessarily removes the ill-effects that spring from it, and have curred numberless cases after the failure of all other attempted remedies, which accounts for them fast superseding out-of-date medicines that are sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. To prove Estora Tablets full warrant their descrip- tion -an honest lemedy at an honest price-o:)e full box of 40 tablets will be sent to readers of the "Carmarthen Weekly Reporter" as a free san.pleon receipt of this notice and 3d in stamps to cover postage, packing, etc. Sold by chemists, Is l|d per box of 40 tablets or 6 boxes for 6s. For full box sample, address Estora Co., 132 Charing Cross Road, London, W.C. j

Carmartheusliire Pnblic Health Committee

Carmartheusliire Pnblic Health Committee. The quarterly meeting of the Carmarthen- shire Public Health and General Purposes Committee -was held at the County Offices on Tuesday. Mr W. J. Thomas, Glantowy, pre- sided. VETERINARY VACANCY TEMPORARILY FILLED. A letter was read from the Chief Constable stating that Mr Jenkins, who had been acting as Veterinary Inspector for the Llandilo and Llandovery districts, had died on the 23rd ult. Mr W. J. Williams said that it would be advisable if possible to appoint a successor immediately. The Chairman said that it would not be in order to appoint one permanently a.t that meeting, The only thing they could do would be to appoint one temporarily until they were able to make a permanent appointment. Rev R. H. Rees: That will be at the next meeting of the County Council. It was unanimously decided to appoint Mr John Williams, veterinary surgeon, Amman- ford to the vacancy pro tern. BELLS FOR. COWS. A letter was read drawing attention to the necessity of animals carrying lights at night. Air Mervyn Peel: Why should there not be a bell as well or a horn? Mr Rich ards: Cows used to have bells. Mr Mervvn Peel: They have herns. ALLEGED MANUFACTURE OF SYNTHETIC Inspector Roderick stated that lie had dis- covered an establishment in which milk was being manufactured from milk powder. He found a young women dissolving milk powder in a vat of water and stirring it with a long pole. 'He was informed that this was done -h"n milk was scarce. As a chemical analysis might show the same constituents as in natural milk, he was very doubtful if a prose- cution under the Food and Drugs Act would lie. He suggested, however, that t was possi- ble that proceedings might be taken under the Merchandise Marks Act if the stuff were sent away in churns marked 'New milk.' He had reported the matter to the Board of Agricul- ture. Mr W. J. Williams said that the people in the industrial •districts were under the impres- sion that milk which came from the rural dis- tricts of Carmarthenshire was bound to be pure. It iiiever entered their heads at all that it was possible for the article to be spurious. They had read that the Germans were such clever chemists that they were able to make milk from grass without the aid of the cow. He had always been rather doubtful of that. It seemed however that in one district of Car- marthenshire they had solved the problem by means of a few tins of white powder, a vat of water, a long pole, and a young woman. Mr iMeryyn Peel asked if they did not intend to prosecute. The Clerk: Our officers cannot prosecute. Mr Peel: I should have thought it was for the police of the county to prosecute. I hope that somebody will move. What is this milk powder made off The Chairman It is dried milk. Mr Peel: It ought to be labelled "Old milk" not new. Rev R. H. Jones said that if the law as it stood were not able to deal with the offence, it was desirable that the law should be altered. It was decided to call the attention of the; Board of Agriculture to the matter. ONE DIP-XOT rwo. A letter was read from several sheep owners asikilg that the Black Mountain Sheep Dipp- ing Order should he altered so that the sheep need only he dipped once instead-of twice. Deputy Chief Constable Evans sa-a that his district was free from scab. The difficulty was in regard to Breconsliire. If they could keep their own district as clean as it was the one dipping would be sufficient. Mr Feel said that it was an extraordinary thing that the d'pping had not eliminated the scab from Breconsliire. That was a tribute to the Carmarthenshire police. Deputy Chief Constable Evans said that the Breconsih;re police and themselves arranged to do the dipping on the same day, and they carried it out on the same lines. 'He believed that the trouble in Brecon arose from the feheep being sent down there on "tack" from other counties. It was decided to approve of the application of the sheep owners for a modification of the order. MEASLES AND INFLUENZA. A long discussion took pla

PARASITIC MANGE AND SHEEP SCAB

PARASITIC MANGE AND SHEEP SCAB. Mr J. F. Rees, Vet. Inspector, reported an outbreak of parasitic mange at Ferrvside. Six colts had been affected. Cases of sheen scab had occurred in Abergwili and Llanegwad parishes.

Llanfynydd National Egg Collection

Llanfynydd National Egg Collection. In issuing the report for the quarter ended December 30th. 1915, the Vicar, in the name of the faithful band of collectors who devote themselves whole heartedly to the tasks allotted to them, has again the pleasing duty of expressing his sincerest thanks to all the contributors, of whatever creed or party, who have rendered their aid to us in our endeavour to supply our wounded warriors with fresh eggs. In spite f the recent scarcity in this commodity we have reason to be thankful that there has not been a break in the supply from this parish, for a week has not passed since the first in July last when the above depot was opened without a good consignment. In order to accomplish this it has been necessary some- times to augment the weekly collections with eggs purchased out of the money subscriptions wnich are carefully nursed by Miss Hayword, the hon. treasurer. Some contributors in the most unaccessable parts of the parish have dropped out, but we are glad to say that several fresh subscribers ha.ve come forward to help. The demand be- comes more urgent as the numbers of wounded increase; any additional support is therefore very acceptable. It is hardly necessary to say here how much the gifts of eggs are appre- ciiated, for the scores of grateful letters re- ceived in the parish from the recipients them- selves bear testimony to this. In the 27 weeks, from the formation to Dec. 30, 1915, Llanfynydd Parish depot, has sent 5.500 eggs to the distributing centre in Lon- don, and it is hoped that this beneficent work may not languish for want of support so long as the urgent demand for eggs fur wounded soldiers continues. District 1—Collector,, Mrs Cornish and Albert Cornish Brynberllian, 27 eggs Coy- nant, 7 eggs, cash 7d; Crossnant 15; Farmers Arms, Miss Lloyd, 17 and Is 8d; Miss Roder- ick 4 and 6d Pontarlyb, 12; Felindre, 25 Ffosrewyg, 3; Penrhos House, 6; Stangrach 34; Waunfawr. 41. District 2—Collectors, Miss Hayward, Doro- thy Cornish. Dd. and Sarah Evans: Aoersan- na.n, 5; Craclidy (Rees). 28; Ffynonwen 16; Glansannan (Davies) 22, do. (Thomas) 32, do. Mill, 20; Llwynifedwen, 12! Maespant, 43; Pendhos-issaf, 31; Penrhos-uchaf, 3; Peny- banc, 24; 'Rallt-isaf, 10! 'RalltHUchaf, 10; 'Rheol, 17 and lid; Tv'r Sar, 9 and Is 2d; Tyllwyd, 28; Waunlluest 10 and Is 6d, Whit- lera, 9 and 6d. District 3—Collectors Mrs Daven Jones, Miss Smith, and Cecil Smith Aelybryn, 8; Bancyffald, 9d; Bronsannan. 5; Chestnut Cottage, 14; City Cottage, 6d; Galltvllan, 8 and 3d; Greyhound Cottage, 39 and 6d; Old Post, Office, Mrs Evans, 14 and Is 3d, Mrs Jones, 6d and Is; Penybont, 19 and 4d; Plas- llwyd, 6 and Is 2d; Portisgate, 2s lid; Paen House, lid Red Lion House, 2s 6d Rhos Cottage, 2s 4d Sannan Villa, 2s 2d Tycanol. Is Id; Vicarage, 26s; Whitehall, Is 6d. District 4--Collector, Maggie Evans, Cas- glas: Beilibedw, 6; Blaencwmwl (Jones), 4; Blaenrihyd, 15 and 4d Bryn Dafydd, 12; Bryn Eglwys, 3; Caeglas, 15 and 3d; Cathelau. 3; Clawddowen School House, 12; Cvvrt, 24; Ffianant,, Is; Ffynon-bawel, 4; Gllandulas 2; Glanrhyd, 3; Lla in, 3; Llwyncelyn. 6; Llwyu- rhyn. 3; Maes If an, 15; Maesyrhaidd. 22; Myrtle Hill, 2 and Is; Nanutsebon, 6d; Pant- rhodyn, 6d Pantcerrig, 6d and 2s Pantydder- wen, 2; Pantyfedwen. 32; Pantygarn, Is 6d; Penybane, Is; Penygarn, 13; Pistyll North, 3d; Tirmaes, 4; Ynyscniw, 12. District 5—Collectors, Mr T. G. Cornish, Sallie and Mary Samuel, and Ronald and Caro- line Roberts: Bronglyn, 5; Cwmgelli-fawr, 10 and 3d; Dolybant, 39; Dyffryn-issiaf. 8; Dyffryn-uchaf, 4 Goitre, 12; Gwaelodymaes, 18; Hafod. 2 Keepers odge, 8 and 3d; Lletty- fors, 4; Nantgwilw, 2; North Lodge, 15; 'antglas, Mrs Williams, 36, MissjCoo, 24, Miss Rodway, Is Pantyglas Cottage. 39 Pencae- mawr, 7; Pengoitre, 7 and 9d; Penylan, H. Davies, 2 Rhandir, 6 Troedyrhiw. 27 and 6d Tirbedw, 5 and 3d. District 6—Collectors, Mrs Hayward and Miss Florence Hayward: Caellan House, 19 and 3d; Cwmsannan Mil, Is; Ffynongri, 41 Mount Pleasant. 6d; Myrtle Hill, Miss Evans, 1,'and 6d, Miss Morr.is. 1. and 6d; Pantawel, jl60; Pantygwyro, 40; Pantmawr, 19; Rock House, 2, and lid; Tynewydd, 10; Woodbine, 4 and Is 7d.

NxibDAYSPHEAiiiRSI at farmarthen Places of Worship

NÊxi-bÙDAY;S'PHEA;iiiRS I at f-armarthen Places of Worship. BETHANA C.A-l. CHAPEL. Rev J. Jeffreys, Cwmbach. ELIM (IND.), FFYNONDDRAIN. Rev D. Roberts (pastor). ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. Rev A. Fuller Mills, Carmarthen EBENEZER WESLEY AN OHAPEL. Rev Joseph Jenkins (resident minister). ENGLISH BAPTIST CHAPEL. Rev J. H. Rees, Bristol. LAMMAS ST. INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Rev T. Glyndwr Richards, B.A., B.D. PARK-Y-VELVET UNITARIAN CHAPEL. Rev Prof. PhiJemon Moore, B.A. (pastor). PRIORDY INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Mr D. R. Phillips, Cambridge University. TABERNACLE BAPTIST OHAPEL. Rev E. U. Thomas (pastor). UNION STREET INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Rev J. H. Rees, Burry Port, j ENGLISH WESLEY AN CHAPEL. Rev Vincent Tavlor, B.D. 1 mui'Vt "> PENUEL' BAPTIST CHAPEL. Rev Professor Morris B. Owen, B.A., B.D. iVefeh Services: 10 am., 6 p.m.; English 11 a.m., 6.30 p.m. (

LlST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES

LlST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES. 1916. March 20—Bethania C.M. May 21—Elim Cong. Ch un h. May 21-22—Lammas street Cl.)el. Sept. 10-11—Lammas street Chapel Sept. 10—Elim Cong. Chur.ii. Sept. 24-Bethania.

MOTOR MISHAP ON THE QUAY i

MOTOR MISHAP ON THE QUAY. On Thursday morning, the 13th instant, the greasy condition of the roadway on the Carmarthen Quay resulted in a mishap which might have had serious consequences. A commercial motor had a. side-slip and had a very narrow escape of damaging a steamer anchored at the Quay.

INLAND FLIGHT OF SEAGULLS

INLAND FLIGHT OF SEAGULLS. On Thursday morning over 500 seagulls were counted feeding in one field alongside the Towy. near Carmarthen. The inward flight of seagulls on Thursday was very marked.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A st;.tch la tirn. saved nine" and if upon the first jyniptoms of anything being wrong with our health we weie to resort to some simple but proper means of correcting the misohie1, rine-tenth* of the suffering that invades our homes would be avoided. A doae of 0 nJjm Evans' Quinine Bitters taken wbon j u feel the least bit out of sorts is jnst th. t "atitoh in time." You can :-et Gwiljra E ans' Qiunine Bi ttera at any Chemists or Stoi ea in bottles, 2s ftd and 4s 6d each, but ranerl.ber that the only guarantee of genuine,r.g is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the la cl, stamp an,4 bottlo, without which none t te genuine. Sole I Proprietors: Quinine Bitten Manufacturing Company, Limited, Llanelly, South Waie

Mr Llewelyn Williams KCMP Opposes Conscription

Mr Llewelyn Williams, K.C.,M.P. Opposes Conscription. BUT WON'T VOTE AGAINST IT. A meeting was held at the Llanelly Liberal Club on Monday evening, Mr D. Williams, J.P., presiding. Mr Llewelyn Williams, K.C., M.P., said he challenged anyone, in spite of the vile misre- presentations that had been made against him, to quote a single sentence which showed that he had done nothing in support of the war. He was no friend of the shirker (laugh- ter and applause). Let them show a single word from beginning to end to enable anyone to prefer such a charge against him. He had never said a word in support of the shirker. If he did not come to the colours he (Mr Wil- liams) was not one who would say the shirker was not to be compelled to come. The ques- tion of the shirker was a small one, and far greater issues were involved. it was because of these vaster, greater, profounder and eter- nal issues that were at stake that he had taken up such a stand. He objected to the Bill for two reasons. In the first place because it was premature; and secondly, the voluntary system had not been given a fair trial. He agreed with the volun- tary system as a great principle, but even great principles such as this could not stand in the way of national safety (applause), and if, therefore, a fair trial had been given to Lord Derby's scheme, and it had failed, he for one would have stood aside and said "You are right; I am wrong. You can carry your views into execution." The Government had brought in a Compulsion Bill before the actual facts and the precise figures were known, and that was not dealing fairly with the House of Commons or the Country, and he protested against it. This trumpery little Bill would not excite his passion or anger for one moment if it stood for itself and there was no previous ,history behind it. He was afraid this was only the beginnning, and knowing the men that were behind this agitation, he thought his suspicion was well founded. They were out to get conscription, not to get this "erthygl" they had produced now; they wanted the whole thing. In a month or two, we would find this distinction drawn between the umarried and the married. Why should the unmarried man of 40 years of age who has lived a temperate, thrifty life, and who has not entered the state of matrimony till he has earned sufficient sustenance to give his wife a comfortable home be forced while that young shirker of 21 or 22, who married last August in order to hide behind his wife's petticoat to evade it be allowed toremain at home? That would be the next question. Once one aaid one was in favour of compulsion how could one evade the logical conclusion ? If it is right to compel the unmarried how is it not right to compel the young married men who were far better fitter for military service than the men of 40 years. In no other conscriptionist coun- try in the world-in Russia, France, Italy— was this unoarthly and illogical distinction drawn between married and unmarried. With- in a month or two after they had the unmar- ried men into the net their cry would be, "Why should the married slacer remain?" It was being done even now. People were be ginning to ask why should a man at home who happened to be working in a tinplate, steel. or munition works, live at home with his wife and children in comfort and even in affluence while his brother was risking his life in the trenches for a shilling a day? it was being said that if they were going to conscript men they must conscript wealth, and the question would be, "Had the man of 50 or 60 a right to remain at ease among his wealth while men were compelled to go to the trenches?" That was a terrible and far-reaching question. It raised all sorts and kinds of tremendous issues; and it was because he was a Liberal he did not want this question raised in the middle of a great war—a- question which would rend asunder the very foundations of society. In conclusion, Mr Williams said: "1 have taken my stand at the very first moment I could to enter my protest against the beginn- ing of this terrible curse which will lead to ruin and disaster unless we are careful, be- cause I beileve that this old country which had survived many a great crisis in the past-and which is to-day triumphant over her enemies, not one of which has trod the soil of Great Britain since the war began because we are slowly winning a great victory, strangling Germanp by the invincible fleet that guards our shores. I believe we are in sight of a tre- mendous and far-sounding victory if we could only keep national unity till the end, and it is in order to preserve and enhance that national unity that I have taken the stand 1 have, and I throw myself with confidence upon the goodwill and good feeling, loyalty and liberalism of my old followers here (applause). BOROUGH MEMBER'S ASSURANCE. In reply to a question as to his future con- duct, Mr W ill i a ins said he proposed taking no further part in the debate or divisions upon the Bill. Let the Government take upon it- self its responsibilities. Having made his pro- est no one could say that he was a party to the Bill, andhewouldbe free to argue against Conscription in. the future, whatever form it took. Replying to another question, Mr Williams said he bad voted for the Navy Estimates every year with the exception of 1907, when he, with 67 Liberals, ente,red,t-lio "o" Lobby in fulfil- ment of election pledges. Coun. E Willis Jones asked Mr Williams if he could not vote in favour of the Bill in the remaining stages if it were seen that his con- stituents were in favour of it. Mr Williams: I cannot accept that. What a silly object your member would make if, after voting against the Bill he turned round and voted for it. Coun. W. E. Clement thought that Mr Wil- liams had a perfect right to vote against the Bill on the reasons given. Ho had promised to take no further action, and in that he (Coun. Clement) thought- lie was perfectly reasonable. A COWARDLY RELMARiv." Rev J. Lewis (Caersalem) paid that it was a striking fact that all those wlu spoken v%-eiT-over 41 years of age. I Coun. Clement: I am not over 41. Rev J. Lewis (to Coun. Clement): But you will not go, and I am going to prophesy that you are not going. There were several cries of "Withdraw, and Coun. Clement rose to a point of order. Mr E. Hopkins: It is a cowardly remark, and you cannot expect anything else from him. There were further cries of "Withdraw," and the Rev W. R. Wat-kins (Mori ah) objected to the observation of Mr Hopkins, which he thought was a reliection upon Rev J. Lewis. Mr E. Hopkins: I will withdraw after Mr Lewis has done so. Coun. Clement: Mr Lewis had no right to say such a thing. I pay every respect to him that his son is Aghting in France. I have no son old enough to fight, but although I am close on the limit I am working as hard aa 1 can in my business for my country. TWO WTEHDRAWAL8. Rev J. Lewis then withdrew, as did also Mr E. HopkLn. Mr Llewelyn Williams proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman, and Mr W. B. Jones seconded. A vote of thanks was also accorded Mr W. Llewelyn Williams on the motion of the Chair man, secondede by Mr R. J. Edmunds.

0 Carmarthenshire Education Committee

0 # # Carmarthenshire Education Committee. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Eduea- Committee was held at the Carmarthen Guild. hall on Thursday the 13th inst. The meeting used to be held at the County Offies; but this the first meetingunder the new scheme WM too large to be accomodated at the County Offices. All the members of the County Coun- cil are now members of the Education Com- mittee. Tnere were present Mr O. E. Morris, Carmarthen; Mr W. Griffiths, Abergwili; Mr T. P. Jones, Llanelly; Mr T. Thomas, Uan- gennech; Mr B. John, lalandissillo; Mr David Davies, Rhiblyd; Mr D. Morris, (rafnant; Rev R. H. Jones, Llangendeirne; Mr W. Thomas, Whitland; Mr Phillips, Trelech; Mr W. J. Thomas, Glantowy; Mr Bowen, Llandefeilog; Mr W. N. Jones, Tirydail; Rev E. B. Lloyd, Bwlchnewydd; Mr B. Evans, Gwastod Abbot; Mr D. Evans, Manordaf; Mr W. Harries, Dryslwyn; Mr W. Griffiths, Llanelly; Dr G. Lloyd, Newcastle Emlyn; Mr J. Lloyd, Peny- bank; Mr W. J. Williams, Brynamman; Mr Mervyn Peel, Danyrallt; Rev W. Thomas, Llanboidy; Mr H. J. Thomas, Penrhos-uchaf; Dr Williams, Burry Port; Mr H. E. BLagdon- Richards, Carmarthen; Mr Dudley Williams- Drummond, Hafodneddyn; Mr T. R.. Jones, Pantglas; Rev A. Fuller Mills, Carmarthen; Mr D. Davies, Llandebie; Mr Greville, Llan- non Rev Hugh Jones, Llanelly; Mr J. Jones, Pontardulais. The Rev A. Fuller Mills proposed that the arrangements of the old committee as to the chairmansrip and vice-chairmanship remain in statu quo until March, when the appointments would be made in the ordinary way. Mr Wm. Thomas seconded the proposal, which was carried unanimously, and Mr W. N. Jones took the chair. DISINFECTION OF SCHOOLS. A report handed in showed that an epidemic had broken out at Cefneithin, and that the school had been disinfected by the attendance officer. Mr J. Lloyd: Has Mr Mills a right to speak on this question? Rev A. Fuller Mills I have a right to speak on a question of public health. Dr Lloyd said that the local Sanitary Autho- rity could deal with the matter. Mr Mervyn Peel Baid that it was the duty of the Sanitary Authority to see that the work of disinfection was properly done who- ever did it. Mr D. Davies (Rhiblyd): We found it far cheaper to have the work done by attendance officers. Dr Williams: And shoddier. The matter was left to the Building Com. mittee. EXEMPTION & SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. A lengthy discussion took place on the sub- ject of exemption of school attendance. A letter was read from the Board of Education refusing to reduce the age of eexmption from 14 to 13. Mr Dudley Williams Drummond said that he felt that the cases which had come before the magistrates were not properly thrashed out. They fel that some of the cases ought not to have been sent before the magistrates. A com mi tee of five was appointed to deal with applications fo reexmptions. AR.E TEACHERS INDiPENSIBLE ? A letter was read from a teacher at Bank- ffosfelei rstating that he had recently got mar- ried. He had however married recently and would therefore be regarded as a "single man" under the group system. He asked if the com- mittee could enable him to be relegated to the "married" group. He could prove that he had intended to get married before the group system was adopted, as he had given his con- templated marriage as a reason for an appli- cation which he had made some time ago. Mr John Lloyd said that they ought to decide definitely whetner they were going to appeal on behalf of the teachers called up. If they did not, it would mean closing up many of the schools. Mr Mervyn Peel said that employers could appeal when employees were called up. Was the Education Committee going to appeal ? Mr James Phillips, St. Clears, said that the Committee ought to make a definite statement on the point. The Chairman said that if an appeal were made on behalf of every man called up they would never get an Army. Rev E. B. Lloyd said that they ought to have a clear understanding whether they were going to close the schools, or to transfer teachers to fill the places of the men called up. The subject was referred to the Staffing Committee. NO BONUS FOR THE TEACHERS. The application for 'a war bonus of £10 for every teacher in the county was considered. Dr Williams moved that the application be granted. Mr Peel: How much will it coet T The Clerk (Mr J. W. Nicholas): £ 6,900. Dr Williams was not seconded, and the application fell to the ground.

Advertising

FOR TBE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkes Blood Mixture is warranted to eleance ibebloodof all imparities, from whatever eauac ariaing For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abacesaea, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and tflood diaeaaea Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous Over 50 years sucoeas. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all chemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take an imitation

LLANDILO

LLANDILO. DEATH.—The death occurred on the 6th inet. of Mrs EvanSj the wife of Mr Hy Evans. of N Heddington Villa, Ffairfach, and formerly of Gelly Farm. The deceased had been ailing for some time. She had been to her husband a true helpmeet a-nd had become more devoted than ever to him since his unfortunate afflio- tion with blindness. She had attained to her 77th year. The funeral took place on Mon- day at the Tabernacle Chapel, and the large number who attended was a tribute to the esteem in which she was held. The funeral services were conducted by the Rev Dilliam Davies, of the Tabernacle, of which deceased was a faithful member. The principal mourners were Mr Hy. Evans (husband), Mr D. Evans, Mount Pleasant (eon), and the Rev Mr Jones, Cellan. and Mrs Jones (daughter). The following ministers also took part in the services: Revs D. Bowen, Hermon; D. P. Roberts, M.A., B.D., Stephen Thomas, H. T. Jacob, Fishguard; Corns Davies, D. Harris, and Silyn Evans, Aberdare. Mr Claud R. Davies presided at the erg-an.

Advertising

'^UNSEED COMPOUND" is a good oough mixture. Effective and economical. chemists only.

By the WayI

By the Way. "Prams" must now carry lights at night. Those in the know are all making prepara- tions lor a General Election. tionst for a General Election. ••• I Mr T. E. Brigstooke has acted as secretary of St. Peter's Christmas Tree for 28 years. M.P.'s of military age are subject to mili- tary service. It is not proposed to exempt them. Parliament does not regard itself as indispensible. The proceeds of St. Peter's Christmas Tree come. we learn, to over 1:300. This does not exactly touch the record, but it places the Tree of 1916 in line with the best three or four years, and is an improvement on 1915. ««« A lady who waa taking a walk by herself on one of the main roads outside Carmarthen was attacked by a. man about 3 p.m. on Sun- day. The matter has been reported to the police; but the difficulty is that the lady is unable to identify the assailant. «** The report of the Chief Constable of Carmar- thenshire for the past quarter shows that seven stray dogs were sold by the police and realised El 17s 6d. This shows that the dogs kere only worth 58 4d each. One can understand the desire of the owners to lose 6uch dogs. ww At Saturday's police court a defendant was alleged to have described himself as the "cannon of Llansaint." As he did not state ir,bether,he spelled it with two "n's" or with three, one is left in doubt whether he claimed to be an ecclesiastical dignitary or a piece of heavy artillery. • The Duke of Cumberland and the Duke of Albany, two Gorman officers, are still en- titled to sit in the Hou-e of Lorùs. The leniency shown to traitors in high places is an outrage. When they realise that they have failed to oust King George and to sat up the Kaiser. they'll come back and shake hands and say "Let bye-gone be bye-gones." A striking instance of the prevalence of duplicate names is afforded this week in Car- marthen. The Rev J. H. R ecs is announced to preach at the English Baptist Church and at Union st. Cong. Church next Sunday. But the former pulpit is to be occupied by the Rev J. H. Rees, of Bristol, and the latter by the Rev J. H. Rees. of Burry Port. *«• Mr Noah Williams, the Superintendent of the Prudential Assurance Co. at Carmarthen, has been promoted to the important appoint- ment at Holyhead. Mr Williams's departure* will be a. great loss to the town as he is greatly esteemed in musical circles, several of his compositions having been sung at I-oc-il musical festivals. He will he succeeded at Carmarthen by Mr Reid, of Merthyr. ♦## A Carmarthen veterinary surgeon stated at Monday's court that a certain horse was over 20 years old, but. declined to pledge himself that it might be 40. There is no saying. Once a horse pasqes. 20. nobody can tell whether it. is 30 or 100. One occasionally sees a horse whose venerable appearance suggests that it is the charger which Wellington rode at Waterloo. At the Carmarthenshire Public Health Com- mittee reference was made to the belief that everybody must have measles once in his life and that the sooner he has it the better. If that is so, men who have not had measles would be valuable recruits for the Army. They can't possibly be killed until they have had measles, and they are not likely to catch measles in the trenches. c, At Friday's Quarter Sessions:— Mr Llewelyn Williams: Are you a Llanelly man? Detective Hodge Lewis: No; I am a Car- marthen man. Mr Llewelyn Williams: Then I shan't say what I was going to say. As P.S. Lewis is now transferred to Kidwelly he is not even a Llanelly man by adoption. *•* The Carmarthen Corporation had to pay the bill for the recent damage to the weathervane although the Guildhall on which it is fixed is the property of the County Council. It appears that the clock and the weathervane belonged to the Town Council. The weather- vane was, by the way, presented to the town many years ago by the late Mr James Buckley, of Guildhall Square, the father of Archdeacon Buckley, of Llandaff, and of Miss Buckley, Carmarthen. Canon Hannay (Geo. A. Birmingham) vho is himself a Unionist writes as follows in the course of an article in the "Nineteenth Cen- tury and After" for this month "The pure- bred Ulsterman does not like being lumped together with the rest of the inhabitants of the country. He hates being appealed to as an Irishman, a. term which he applies to the benighted inhabitants of Dublin, Cork, and such places, but which ought not in his opinion to be used about him." **« The members of the Whitland Rural Dis- trict Council on Friday were all perfectly unanimous that the expenses of road making ought to be reduced and that if possible less materialist should be used. But a good many of the members however hoped that their own particular parish would be well looked after. There is a good deal., of this kind of thing. We are all quite agreed as to the advisability of economy—on the part of other people. Economy is. a splendid thing until it touches ourselves. The custom of holding "Hen Galan" (Old New Year's Day) still lingers on in remote parts of Carmarthenshire and Cardiganshire where a "pwnc" or a Sunday School festival i6 still held occasionally on the 13th January —which would have been the first before the reform of the Calendar when eleven days were skipped by Act of Parliament. For half a century after the reform of the Calendar, M.P.'s used to be taunted with the cry, "Give us back the eleven days we've been robbbd of." ••• A good deal of correspondence has been going on in some of the London papers as to the difference between the sixpenny or "common" margarine and the shilling or, "high grade" margarine. One writer states the cheaper margarine is largely a vegetable product being made of nut oil, whilst the hitgiher grade margarine is made of purified animal fats and has ten per cent. of real butter mixed with it to give it the appro- priate aroma. Experts believe that the day is coming when it will be possible to make a margarine which even analysts will be unable to distinguish from butter. A gardener has been very much interested in a query which appeared in this column two or three weeks ago regarding the advisability of using road-scrapings as manure. He says that in the spring of 1914 he made a large sowing of sweet peas and that they all failed. He afterwards in endeavouring to find a cause came to the conclusion that the seeds had been killed by a liberal top-dressing of road scrap- ings which he put on the ground. Road scrapings in these days of tarmac nnd petrol is not the same as road-scrapings in the days of horse traffic over fimestome. Gardeners and farmers are walking up to the fact that road- scrapings so far from being a manure are now a poison.