Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

Image 1 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
5 articles on this page
Advertising

PLKASE CALL TO SEE OUH STOCK OP "W""— AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. K JV M U T SOI1 IBONMONGERS, HOUSE FURNISHERS. AID AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, c-A.iinvc.A.i^TiaiEDsr. Ironmongery—to Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-i St Mary Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. Telegrams-" Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone-No. i9 .I.. PRINTINGI, PRINTINGIN GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE "REPORTER" PRINTING k PUBLISHING OFFICES, 3 BLUE-STREET O^iR^M-TJEqiElsr i ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. p R ICE S ON A P P LIe A. T ION. Ihe Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED KVBBY THOBSDAT EVENING, Olrsolates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IROULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PJUOZ ONE IPRIRNT; POIST FERE 1/9 PZR QDABXBB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR &LL CtASSH8 OF ADVBXTISEMEKTS. NOTICES TO QUIT OM ANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, lity be obtained at the "RuroRTUB OFiriox," Blue-street, Carmarthen. PBIJРONE PENNY. EORGE 1 (piLE^ GRAVEL r jm B PILLS ,YZ A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. ¡ For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that 4 has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE JbORMS OF THIS REMEDY No. 1—George's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Pills for the Pilei, old everywhere in Boxes, 1/3 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. PROPfilEflOll-J, E. GigORGE9 N.K.P.S,, HIRWAIN, ABMlMKfi. X STOP ONE MOMENT Y Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, But trv TUDOR WILL JAMS' PATENT iiALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hitl« and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welah Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful' Cure for Gnildren's Coughs after Measles. it is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where ali other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is 3d, 3s Od, and 5s 6d bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says:— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER 1 Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUPOR WILLIAMS' PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands! It will save you I It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is. by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all oases of Coughs, OOids, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air veoseds. so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cuies Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakerli it has no ecfual, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notioeof Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the 'RZPORTER' OFFICE at heap Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Carir then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES, Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HKADHASTBB E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS; SCHOOL HZADWSTBESS MissB. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES:— £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The next term begins for the Boys, Tuesday, April 25th for the Girls, Tuesday May 2nd. On Saturday, April 22nd from 11 to 1, the head- master, and on Monday, May let from 2.30 to 5, the headmistress will be pleased to see the parents of new pupils. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. I/ij WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 IDIR,, rTm 7s DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS CVRB Constipation, Backache, In digestion, HeartWeak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12tb, 1912 I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendidj indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to aU who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Mak3r- S. J. CQLEY & CO. 57 HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. WEDDING CAPTDS, NEW SPECIMEN BOOK OONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on receipt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. REPORTER" OFFICE 3, BLUE 81

LLLANDILO POLJIJK COURT

L LLANDILO POLJIJK COURT. Saturday, before Messrs L. N. Powell, J. Picton, W. Hopkin, and D. Pritchard Davies, who after being sworn took his seat. CLAIM FOR EXEMPTION. Mr C. Hurley appeared on behalf of a far- mer and butcher to ask for an exemption license for a sheep dog.—Oswald Thomas said he occupied eight acres of land at Pantlas, near Llandyfan. It was a small holding. He had 20 ewes and lambs on it. He had cattle on it-two milking cows. He was a yearly tenant. He was a butcher. He sometimes had more than 20 sheep.—Deputy Chief Con- stable Evans pointed out that it had been laid down that a man who was a butcher could not be exempted.—Mr Bishop aaid there was the question whether he was not a farmer as well., and Mr Hurley contended that if he was a farmer as well he would be entitled to exemp- tion. The dog claimed exemption for was used on the farm and the Black Mountain.—By Mr Powell: If he went anywhere to buy sheep he took the dog with him.—The Deputy Chief Constable held in tha.t case that he used the dog for the purposes of his trade.—Mr Hurley submitted that it did not mean that the dog was to be used solely on the farm. He surely could take it with him to buy cattle, etc.—Mr Powell: The application is refused. In other cases, some were granted and some were refused, but they were of no interest. THE DRINK. P.C. Edgar Evans charged John Williams with being drunk and incapable at Lla-ndilo on the 2nd April. Defendant admitted the charge.—The constable stated that at 12.30 a.m. he found the defendant staggering drunk. He fell against a wall and could not proceed any farther. He had to look him up.—Fined 7s 6d. ASLEEP OR DRUNK. Dan Jeffries. Grip Farm, was likewise char-, fed. Defendant did not appear.—P.C. Edgar Jvans said at 11.30 p.m. on the 29th March he was on duty on the Llandebie road, and at the entrance to Troedyrhiw road he found the defendant lying down fast asleep. He woke him up and found he was drunk. Witness assisted him to his feet and took him as far as Troedyrhiw farm on his way home, and then loft him and returned to the Police Station. At 12.30 on the morning of the 30th the defen- dant called at the Police Station and spoke to P.C. Thomas and he told Thomas that witness had said he was drunk. Later on at quarter past one witness heard knocking a-t a house in Bank Buildings and witness discovered it was defendant. Witness told him to go home. He said he wanted Dr Lloyd. Witness told him Dr Lloyd did not live there. He said he knew he was drunk and that he would not go home. but would go and do away with himself. He then went towards Bridge street.—Deputy Chief Constable pointed out that May 5th last defendant was fined 12s 6d for being drunk in tharge of ahorse Mid gambo.—Mr Pttreil: Any reason why defendant is not present f-Deputy Chief: I know of no reason.—Mr Powell: We will adjourn the case for a month for his pre- sence. Warrant to issue. Before the Court rose defendant appeared. In reply to the charge he said he was guiltv of being found asleep not drunk.—Deputy Chief Constable: It is no offenoe to be asleep.—Mr Powell: I take that .to be a plea of not guilty. —De'eachnt said, lie was not asar the highway. -P.C. Edgar Evans repeated his evidence.— Defendant: Did you not walk back to town the same time as meP- Wi,tness: No.—Defen- dant We came back together until Ffairfach Station? We did not.—P.C. John Thomas corroborated the statement that defendant was drunk when he came to the police station as did also P.C. Beynon.-Defendant said he same back towards town &long with P.C. IWns and tolcl him he was going to tlie doctor, and the constable said 'hat iT he did come back he would lock him up. At I f.r- fach the constable walked fast before him and when defenda.nt got to the police sta-tion l. saw Evans coming out of the Inspector's office. —Defendant was fined 10s. ILLEGAL SALES Hannah Jones, a farmer's wife, pleaded guilty to selling calves on the public road.— P.C. John Thomas said that on the 27th March he found defendant in a carriage in Rhosmaen street. There were two calves in the back of the trap. John Harries came up and spoke to them and asked them to take the calves to the Salutation Inn for him. There he saw J. Harris. Brynmelin, again and defendant. He asked them if they knew they were doing what was illegal and they sad they did not.- Deputy Chief Constable said cases of the kind went on but they were difficult to detect.— Winess said he had seen notices similar to that produced by the Deputy Chief with refer- ence to illegal sales.—Mr Powell: Is this the first case we have had.Depnty Chief: Yes, for some time.-nie Bench were satisfied that the defendant did not know she was doing wrong and let her off with a warning on pay- ment of costs. 5s Sd.—Mary Lake, who was in company with the last defendant, pleaded guilty to a like offence and a like penalty was imposed.—Mr Powell said that defendant and others must take note. The Orders must be upheld and they would in future inflict a fine. LACK OF LIGHT. Mr 0. Hurley appeared on behalf of W. Thomas, Llanfynydd, who was charged as follows :—P.C. ga 1 "2? ons said he found the defendant driving a horse and car alter lighting up time. He had a ia.n,> in frcnt but not behind. Witness asked him for rn ex- planation. He said he did not know of the faw and would trv to get a lamp somewhere. Mr Hurley said that defendant was hke a. good many others, not aware of the new order. Jt was a question of ignorance though he (Mr Hurley) knew that was no excuse. There was no deliberate intention to evade the law.— P.C. Davies. Cothi Bridge, said that when he was posting up the notices about the lights months ago defendant came up to him and asked what they were, about.—Mr Hurley again urged that he did not think defendant was a man who would deliberately evade the law.—Fined 7s 6d inclusive. NO APPEARANCE. Daniel Lewis, Gwaencaegurwen, was char- ged with drunkenness.—A constable stated at 11 p.m. on April 22nd he found the defendant staggering drunk in Bridge street. He was aocompanied by a woman. Witness spoke to him about his condition and told him he would be reported.-W-axmnt to issue. A SUNDAY TRIPPER. Thomas Williams, of Merthyr. was charged with being drunk on licensed premises.—P.C. John Thomas said that on the 20th of April he visirted the Castle Hotel at 10.20 a.m. It was a Sunday. In the back room he found defen- dant among others. He was drunk. Witness called him on one side and spoke to him as to his condition. A woman present said she would -,ee he got no more drink that day. Wit- ness told him he would be reported. Defen- dant was amongst a party of trippers in a motor van from Merthyr.—Fined 10s. NO LIHGT AGAIN. E. Jones, Red Cottages, was charged with not having a. proper light, etc. His employer appeared for him as he could not leave his em- ploy.—P.C. John Thomas said at 8.20 on the 15th April he found the defendant in charge of a- four-wheeled wagon. He had no lamp a-t the front. He said ine had meant to be home sooner.—Deputy Chief Constable said he found he had been detained at the railway station.— Fined 7s 6d. MARiRIED LIFE NOT APPRECIATED. A case, was down for hearing in which a woman applied for a separation order.—Mr Hurley Appeared for the woman and said that the parties were outside trying to come to terms.—Mr Thompson, Swansea., who appeared for the husband said the parties were only married in December, 1914, and had not been married long enough to appreciate what mar- ried life meant.—Mr Powell: I hope you will succeed in a settlement.—Mr Thompson: Thank you, sir. THE CALVES AGAIN. John Harris, the purchaser of the calves referred to in the previous case, pleaded not guilty.—The evidence of the constable was largely a repetition. He asked Harris if he did not know it was illegal to buy calves on the road.He said Yea and that Tie would go down to the Mart to pay the tolls. He weofc away toward the Mart. Witness ifterwarfl saw him in the Salutation Inn yard. He aw him make out the cheques for the woman. Witness asked him if it was in payment for the calves and he said Yes. He saw the calv-es knocked down to the defendant in Rhosnium street.—Defendant: What do you mean by knocked them down.-The consta;ble expla.ined that he and the woman clapped hands over the sale.—Defendant: I want him to say when I bought the ealvee. -Witness: In Rhosmaen street at 10.30 a.m. on the 33rd of last month. -Defer),dan,t: I did not buy them there. I was too quick for you that morning. I bought them at the Salutation. I told him I had bon to bigger boroughs than LLandilo (laughter).- By the Clerk (Mr Bishop): The calves were on the spot in Rhosmaen street and he was treaty for the sale of them. -Defendant, is defence, said that the women told him they could not takp the calves to the ring at the mart, and he told them to take them to the Salutation. He told Thomas the policeman not to be nasty to the women as they looked as they did that day very weak. He knaw when he.went to pay the tolls where the fox had gone. He could prove he paid the tolls.— Deputy Okof Constable: We do not cbarge feira for not paying the tolls.—Defendant aaid he was not going to deceive the borough over 21 for each calf. He was acting a little agent for the women. Would you lake, Mr Bishop, he asked to send these two women to the mart?—Mr Picton You have nothing else to say, Mr Harris?—Defendant: What else d* you want me to say ? There is plenty on that (laughter).—Mr Picton: Defendant will he fined ;Cl. -Def endant: I will earn it in one day your worships (more laughter). FOOLISH YOUTHS. David William* and Cyril Davies, aged 2S and 22. respectively, were charged with annoy- ing Mary Jane Jenikins. Preswylfa, Jvlan- fynydd. She said that on Saturday, Marcfc 25th. she was at home and in bed at 10 o'clock. About 11 o'clock she heard a noise. Dirt was thrown up to her bedroom window. She got up and went to the window. She told defendante not to do it and went back to bed. After sfhe did so the &ame thing happened again and she got up and went to the wndow a second time, and saw the two defendants. She asked them again not to do it. She then went down to the kitchen. Cyril Davies said he would do it if it cost him £ 10. When she got down she heard a noise in the back. She opened the door and David Williams came in. She opened the front door and went out to the road and saw Walter Davies, the Post Office. Defendante had now gone. She asked Walter Davies i. and then Dd. Williams came to the house. He said nothing and Walter Davies said nothing to him. The windows were all covered with dirt. She had had a bit of a fright.—By Mr Hurley: She was afraid they hadbroken the window. She was not afraid of defendants. She knew both well personally. Williams had netver been in her house sitting down by the fire. She complained to Walter Davies about p wn Williams.—P.O. Davies said he enquired into the case and interviewed Cyril Davies. He told defendant what the complaint was, and Davies said he did not mean any harm. D. WiUiams, Portisgate, asked defendant to go with him to knock Mine Williams up for a bit of fun. He hoped the constable would let him off. He would not do it again. Witness saw D. Williams on April 2nd and he said that Davies and he saw someone in with Miss Jen- kins and they wanted to see who it was. They threw mud to the window and she wrd sao would oome down. She opened the back door ( and he went in and lit the match. He .aT a mon on the sofa and failed to know him. AN he said was he is here. There was no Ila; m meant, simply a bit of fun. He kuew nothing would be said about it only that they aad left Spite Chapel. He told them that per,pie v-ere sax the window was in a oad j-ts.te n tse Svrday morning.—By Mr Hurley: He did not see it himself. --Ar Hurley for de.-feiiivits M'4 that MiM Jenkins only complained of l.< r fear of the window being broken. -Mr J. P cton said thev were satisfied there whs nn:u\\an

The Widows Relief

The Widow's Relief. OItUEL GARMARTHENSHIRJE THREAT. A good deal of discussion took place at a meeting of the Llandovery Board of Guard- ians ,held on the 27th uit., over a letter fromv the county education authority with reference to the alleged irregular school attendance of the two children of a widow, and the Board was asked to threaten the mother with the stoppage of her outdoor relief if there was no improvement. The Relieving Officer said he did not pay the relief without seeing the school oard. The attendance had been very good the last quar- ter, and the children had only been absent went unwell. They were delicate Children. Alderman Watkins protested against the ounty authority's attitude. He considered r. a very cruel suggestion.

LLANDOVERY

LLANDOVERY. The Llandovery Board of Guardians appoint ed Mr David Davies, ohaiman for the fifth year in succession. Alderman T. Watkins and Mr Rees Lewis, Brownhill were reappoint.— ed vice-chairmen. Aldermen T. Watkins reappointed chairman of the Assessment Com mittee. At the annual meeting of the Llandovery Rural District Council, Mr Isaac Williams, Llandre, was unanimously elected chairman, and Mr Thomas Jones, Penrhyn, Calycwm, was appointed vico--chaarman. Mr William Morris, Caerhyn. LLangadock, was appointed a member for Llangadock in the room of Mr E. P. Lloyd, deceased. MrDarid Jones, Accheth, Llanddeusant. was appointed a mem- ber of the District Tribunal, m room of Mr Pryse Rice, resigned. Mr Morgan, Blaen. llianant, was appointed a member of the Assessment Committee, in room of the late Mr L E. P. Lloyd, Giansevin.

BURRY PORT

BURRY PORT. The annual meeting of Burry Port Urban District Council was held on Thursday, the 27th ult., when Mr Daniel Davies was unani- mously %.ppointedehairman. Mr Davies, who is a native of the parish of Llanybyther, Car- marthenshire. has been a resident of Burry Port for 32 years. He has been a member of the council for five years and was vice-chair- man last year. He has two sons and two sons in-law serving with the colours. Inspector t Dan-id Arnold, G.W.R., was appointed vice- ( chairman.