Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 2 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
18 articles on this page
Advertising

i BTJZvEIMIISIE?,, 1916. MISSES LEWIS & CLARE I HAVE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THAT THEIR SUMMER SHOJ OF HIGH-GLASS MILLINERY MODELS IS NOW OPEN AND WILL CONTINUE THROUGHOUT THE SEASON Ostrich and Marabout Stoles, Fancy Neckwear, Veilings, &c., &c. a& Zil A cordial invitation is extended to visit their Showrooms. CAVENDISH HOUSE, 4J KING-ST., OAR:bLI:ARTHEN. BOOKBINDING. I Established Over Fifty Years. D. TITUS WILLIAMS BOOKBHsTDBR, ETC, ILI I CHAPEL STREET, CARMARTHEN. The Best and Cheapest House in South Wales for all Classes of Binding. Those who are taking any Histories of the War in parts, should get them put into cases or bound before they become torn and worthless. I Books bound in Publishers Cases at Publisher's Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. I I. BOOKBINDING. — — WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVES ALL WORK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, Established 1836. ————ii w—imi ■>—■ mi ii i mm m 1 WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THE CHOICEST DESIGNS CARDS AND PBICSS SUITABLE FOR ALL OL&BSES W. S. MoRitis, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, OA :1v.rARTHEN. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, "Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST! NOTICE TO BANK CUSTOMERS. ALL BANKS in Carmarthen, and throughout the United Kingdom, will be CLOSED to the Public on SATURDAY, JULY 1st, 1916, to enable the reduced staffs of the various Banks to complete their half-yearly accounts. Customers are, theretore, requested to arrange their Banking requirements accordingly. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE "REPORTER. No. of One fhree Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. s d s d 8 d 20 1 0 2 3 *3 6 28 1 6 3 6 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 5 6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets." and" To be Sold by Private Treaty," clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWRENCE, all Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressed to the Reportei Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are sent. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. YISITING CARDS from Is (id for 50; Printed on Ivory Cards.—Reporter Office, Carmarthen, — — TO LET, or FOR SALE, near Llanstephaa, DOLAN," a compact Farm with a desirable Dwelling-house and commodious Out-buildings together with 27 acres, or thereabouts, of excellent pasture and arable land, principally the former possession, Michaelmas, 1916.—Apply, D. Morgans, Supply Stores, Llangennech. TO LET a fully licensed free Public House in centre of Carmarthen.—Apply, Lloyd & Thomas, Auctioneers, Carmarthen. f-pO LET—No. 1 Barnsfield Terrace, Carmarthen X (immediately).—Apply, Morgan, 24 King St., Carmarthen. WANTED-COOK-GENERAL (Welsh) for W Welsh family in healthiest part of London mod home and good wages.—Apply by ietterv to A.B," Reporter Office. WANTED — NURSE-HOUSEMAID, age 16 (Welsh), for Welsh family in healthiest part of London good home and good wages.—Apply by letter to A.B. Reporter Office. WANTED TEMPORARY LADY CLERKS, competent knowledge of Shorthand and Type- writing and essential qualification. Wages 20s. to SOs. per week.—Apply by letter, Surveyor of Taxes, 1 Hall Street, Carmarthen. J ( I WEDDING CARDS-Prices and styles to suit TT all Classes, Speciment Book, containing the Latest and Choicest Designs, sent on application.- Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WANTED (immediately) Good GENERAL SERVANT.—Apply, Mrs Morgan, Hillside, Carmarthen. IN MEMORIAM CARDS—We have a large and assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit (all classes—Reporter Office, Carmarthen.

IN S PCC AND CHILD NEGLECT

N. S. P.C.C. AND CHILD NEGLECT. The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children investigated 3,447 com- plaints of neglect and cruelty in England, Wales and Ireland during the month of April. Of the 3,238 completed cases 3,145 were found true, affecting the welfare of 9,799 children and involbing 4.034 offenders. Warnings were issued in 2,782 cases; 131 were prosecuted (re- SUillliiUg H1 IZrT ixiUViuOiyua), uuù 14Z were deBIt with by transfer or in other ways. From its foundation in 1884 the Society has dealt with 909,017 complaints involving 2,546,912 children In the Carmarthen and Pembroke Counties Branch during the same month 21 oases were dealt with, affecting 61 children.

Obituary

Obituary. 7 MR J. LLOYD MORGAN, RHIWFELEN. A well-known Carmarthenshire agriculturist has passed away in the person of Mr J. Lloyd Morgan who expired at his residence, Rhiw- felen Farm, Abergwli, on Friday, after an illness which had lasted since November. Mr Lloyd Morgan wa,s one of the best known breeders of Shorthorn cattle in South Wales, and had taken prizes at numerous agricultural shows from the Royal downward. The history of the large number of famous cattle which he bred would fill a large and highly interesting volume for agricultural readers. Mr Morgan who was fifty years of age had practically lived all his life at Rhiwfelen. His parents brought him there when he was 12 months old. The deceased who was a. bachelor is survived by a brother and sister—Mr Charles Morgan, M.R.C.V.S., Angel Hotel, Carmarthen, and Mrs Lodwick. Spitre, Pantteg. The funeral took place at Llanfihangel-uwch-Gwili Church- yard on Tuesday. The Rev T. Thomas (Vicar of Abergwiii) officiated. MR RICHARD JONES, MILLER. Mr Richard Jones, miller, died at his home in St. Catherine street on Tuesday. Deceased, who was 70 years of age, had been in ill-health for some time. He is survived by a widow and two sons. He was a brother to Mrs Chas. Morgan. Angel Hotel, Carmarthen. MR W. J. WILLIAMS. MOLD. Mr W, Price Williams, solicitor. Carmar- then, suffered a bereavement this week in the death of his father, Mr John Williams, retired schoolmaster, who eypired at his residence at Mold. The Rev Evan Jones (vioar) and the Rev Parry Williams, M.A., pastor of the Welsh C.M. Church officiated at the funeral.

The Churches

The Churches. -7 The Sunday School anniversary services will be held at Zion Presbyterian Church on Sun- day next, when the Rev Gwilym Edwards, M.A.. of Oswestry—a former pastor of the church—will preach. Mr Edwards will also deliver an address to the members of the Eng- lish Nonconformist Sunday Schools of the town in the afternoon. • Mr W. T. Hopkins, of the Presbyterian College, Carmarthen, has received a call to the past-orate of Painscastle and Rhosgo i: churc-hes, Radnor, and will commence his ministry on the 2nd July. O Whit-Monday the Independent churches of Rama, Penygraig. and Philadelphia, held a cymanfa at Penygraig. The Rev J. P. Evans, Penygraig, and the Rev Mr Thomas, a North Wales minister, presided. The conductors were Mr Davies, Philadelphia; Mr B. Morgan, Pen- ygraig; Mr Thomas, Rama; and Mr Gomer Morgan, who led the children. The event was ono of the most successful ever held at Peny- graig. Hospitality was provided for visitors in the schoolroom. On Sunday evening a memorial service to the lato Lord Kitchener was held at the Eng- lish Wesleyan Church, Carmarthen. The Rev Vincent Taylor took as his text the verse re- ferring to the burial of Moses, "And God I buried him there and no man knows hi sepulchre." The sermon was a very inspiring me. Appropriate hymns were sung, and the Dead March (Saul) was played by the organist (Miss Ethel Jones). A baptismal service was held at the English Baptist Church, Carmarthen, on Saturday. Five candidates were immersed by the Rev Gwilym Davies, the former pastor of the Church, who preached .at the anniversary ser- vices the following Sunday. There were large congregations on Sunday at Priordy and on Monday evening when the Rev W. J ames, of Swansea. ex-chairman of the Welsh Cong,regational Union, preached. The Rev J. Owen. of Anfield. Liverpool, who preached at the anniversary services at Water street this week, is a weH known member of the connection. When at Mold he was the j pastor of Daniel Owen, the Welsh novelist, and wrote the official biography of that famous litterateur. He was a personal friend of the laet Tom Elli.9 and preached his final sermon.

LOCAL WAR ITEMS

LOCAL WAR ITEMS. Official information has been received that ( the body of Private Percy Evans, of the Royal Marines (son of Private Walter Evans, Welsh Horse, and Mrs Evans, St Catherine Street, Carmarthen) who was lost on H.M.S. Hampshire was, recovered. The interment took place at the Naval Cemetery on the island of Hoy. Ie .0 Sappers John and Horace Evans, of the Welsh Field Company, Royal Engineers, were home on leave last week end. Both are soni of Mrs Evans, fishmonger, Bridge Street, Carmarthen. o' o. '0 Private Harry Richards, of the 4th Welsh Regiment, arrived at his houae in Cambrian Place, Carmarthen, on Monday from hospital in Cardiff, where he has been for several months, suffering from dysentery contracted at Gallipoli. .0 .0 Sailmaker D. Jones, of the Royal Flying Corp-, was home on leave last week end. He resides at Tycoch cottages, near Carmarthen Junction. '0 Mechanic D. Davies, of the Royal Flying Corps, a brother of Mr A. J. Davies, Union Street, Carmarthen, was home on leave this week. 0, °, Sergeant Kirk Hearder, 1st Battalion Monmouthshire Regiment, youngest son of the late Dr Hearder, medical superintendent of the Joint Counties' Mental Hospital, Car- marthen, who was reported to be missing, is now officially reported to have been killed. .1 He was a clerk in the National Provincial Bank at Newport at the outbreak of war. .e Gunner D. A. Stephens, son of Mrs Stephens, 39 Stone Street, Llandovery, and a brother of Mr Arthur Stephens, Brecon Villa, Llandovery, was a member of the crew of H.M.S. Invincible. The casuality list issued by the Press Bureau onSunday contained the name of Private R. Griffiths, 63926 (Ponr.yberem), who had been killed in action. Pte. Griffiths was attached to the Royal Army Medical Corys. o..0 Lieutenant Carson, Llanelly, managing clerk with Messrs Roderick and Richards, solicitors, previously reported missing, is now reported dead. Inquiries made through the Queen Victoria Jubilee Fund Association Geneva, elicited a reply from the Countess E. Blucher von Wahlstatt, in Berlin, stating that a German officer on leave told her that he and some of his men found the body of a young English officer, who could only have been dead a few hours. Papers on him bore the name of Carson. They buried him with military honours and marked his grave. o. Captain Stanley Phillips, of the R.A.M.C., is home on short leave. He is the son of Mr and Mrs George Phillips, Chemist, Hall-street, Carmarthen.

Local Wedding

Local Wedding. WILLIAMS-ROBERTS. On Tuesday a marriage was celebrated at Water street C.M. Chael, Carmarthen, between Mr Thomas Williams, farmer, Iianarthney and Miss Elizabeth Roberts, of Llanarthney. The Rev John Davies, Llanstohan, officiated. Mr John Phillips acted as Church registrar.

Theft by Tumble Collier

Theft by Tumble Collier. TIME ALLOWEITFOR RE-PAYMENT. At Carmarthen County Police Court on Sat urday, David James Jones, aged 17, a colliery labourer, was brought up on two charges of theft. The first charge was in respect of two 91 Treasury Notes, which he took from a follow lodger at Drefaeh. The second charge was in respect of jE9 10s. stolen from Margaret Anthony, Four Roads, Llangendeirne, with whom he had lodged last November. jE8 was kept in Q. chest of drawers ant! £ 1 10s hidden in the bed; both rams were missed after the defendant left. Supt. Jones said that defendant offered to re-pay the money, and sthe Bench adjourned the case for two months in order to enable him to do so.

WHITLAND AUCTION MART

WHITLAND AUCTION MART. The Whitland Auction Mart which has fallen into misuse for a number of years has been re- fitted up by Mr T. Bevan Arthur, auctioneer, Carmarthen and Whitland. The first sale took place on Tuesday last, when Mr Arthur secured tip-top prices for horses, cattle, sheep, etc. -U-

Advertising

K. NEXT SUDA Y'S PKEAOHERS at Carmarthen Places of Worship. BABE,LL, PENSARN. Kiev 0. Evans (pajtocr). BETHANlA C.M. CHAPEL. Rev Thomas Williams, L1 angammarch. EBBNEZER WESLEY AN CHAPEL. Rev Joseph Jenkins (pastor). MAAI (IND.), FFYNONDDRAIN. Mr Gwilym Nicholas, Presbyterian College. ENGLISH BAPTIST CHAPEL. Rev J. L. Roderick. Birmingham. ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL CHURUtl. Rev D. J. Thomas (pastor). ENGLISH WESLEYAN CHAPEL. Mr Bailey (morning), Mr R. J. Jones (evening). LAMMAS ST. INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Mr D. E. Peregrine (student). PARK-Y-VELVET UNITARIAN CHAPEL. Rev Prof. Philemon Moore, B.A. (pastor). (Evening only at 6.30). TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHAPEL. Rev E. U. Thomas (pastor). PRIORDY INDEPENDENT CHAPEL Mr Gwilym Williams (student). PENUEL BAPTIST CHAPEL. Professor Morris B. Owen, B.A. B.D. UNION STREET INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Prof. Oliver Stephens. M.A., B.D. (pastor). WATER ST. C.M. CHAPEL. Rev J. T. Davies, Llanidloes. ZION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Rev Gwilym Edwards, M.A., Oswestry. (Sunday School anniversary services).

LIST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES

LIST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES. 1916. June 25th—Zion Sundav School. Sept. 10-11—Lammas street Chanel Sept. 10-Elim Cong. Chuivj. Sept. 24-Bcthtnia. Oct. 29-30-Eng. Cong. Church Anniversary Decem. 3-Zion Presbyterian Church. Dates of fixtures should be sent to the Rev i "Zpdwr Seoreitary of the Oarmar. then Free Church Council.

Corporation v Electric Light Company

Corporation v. Electric Light Company. LEGAL OPINION AGAINST THE CORPORATION. A meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council was held at the Guildhall on Wednesday. The Mayor (Mr John Lewis) presided; and there were also present: Messrs W. Evans, J. Cross- man, A. F. Mills, W. Gibbon, T. Davies, David Williams, W. Dunn Wiliiiiis,, Oliver Jones, D. J. Davies, K Collier, W. J. Martin, David Samuel. WELCOME BACK. The entry of Mr David Samuel into the room was the signal for an outburst of aplause. The Mayor said that they were glad to see Mr Samuel once more. He had been one of the most faithful members of the Council; and it was a pleasure to them all to see him return after his illness (applause. Mr Samuel thanked the Mayor and the* members for their kind expression. DO YOU WANT TO HEAR? During the reading of the list of bills by the Town Clerk, a good deal of conversation went on. The Mayor Gentlemen, do you want to hear what is going on ? It does not matter a bit. THE COUNCIL AND ELECTRIC CO. The Town Council read the Counsel's opinion which he had obtained on the various points in dispute between the Electric Supply Co. and the Council. The "opinion" was of a very elaborate character and filled several pages of foolscap. Briefily it amounted in effect to (1) That the Council could not claim any substan- tial abatement for the extinction of -the lights and that if the Company offered them JE35 or any substantial sum, the Corporation would be well advised to accept it and (2) that the Company were not entitled to raise the price to private consumers. After reading the opinion, the Clerk said: Taking it on all fours it is against the Cor- poration. Mr D. Williams: The agrement was also in favour of the Company. Mr W. Evans: They won't allow us £ 35 now. Mr J. Grossman moved that the Corporation accept the offer of the Company in regard to the public lighting, but not in regard to raising the price to private consumers. Rev A. F. Mills: I am told they won't accept that. Mr Oliver Jones: In that case we had better get the lighta back again. i Mr Dunn Williams: I think we should make the offer. We can't tell whether they will accept it until we make it. Mr Oliver Jones I move that we ask them to put the lights back as they were. The Mayor: I am afraid if we ask them they will charge us for putting them back. Mr Oliver Jones: According to that opinion they had no right to take them away. Mr Dunn Williams seconded Mr Crossman's proposal. Mr W. J. Martin In their own letter it says "It is only on this condition that they are able to make tliiisoffer." I do not see any good asking them. Mr Grossman: That letter was a very badly written one. It was contradictory, Mr David Williams If the letter was badly written, the agreement was very carefully drawn. Mr W. J. Martin I was talking to a director He told me that it was on this condition they would allow us E35. Mr D. Samuel: I move that wo have the electric light as before. 1 Mr Orossman's proposition was unanimously carried. BONUS FOR WORKMEN. The Finance Committee recommended that the war bonus to the workmen be, increased from 2s to 3a a week. It was agreed on the motion of the Rev A. F. Mills, seconded by Mr Collier, that the re- commendation be adopted. The Mayor said that the Surveyor's clerk who was 17 years of age was only paid 9s a week. He ought to get the war bonus. It was decided to give this clerk the 3s a week bonus. Mr Grossman asked if the resolution applied to the park-keeper. The Clerk said that it did. Mr Crossman: I think he ought to. He is working an hour extra. I Mr D. Samuel called attention to the case of the assistant mason, Thomas Jones, who did not get the war bonus. If this man left and went to the munition works they would have to pay full wages to a man t-o fill his place. He did not think it fair that they should sweat this man. The Council however decided not to grant this man the increase. AUXILIARY WATER SUPPLY. On the passing of the bill for 98 for the water supply from Penlan, Mr David Williams asked if that sourcewere of any use at all. The Surveyor: It is very useful in the early part of the summer; it goes into the reservoir. Mr D. Williams: It would be as well when the Committee goes up there to go to the source to see how much we get. Mr Dunn Williams asked if they were not supposed to get water for the watering carts from Mr King Morgan. The Clerk: Yes. Mr Dunn Williams I saw one taking water from the main in front of the Butcher's Arms. The man told me that it was dried up with Mr King Morgan. The Surveyor He could not get it on Satur- day. There are times when they can't get it. The Mayor: WhyP The Surveyor: There is none to spare. Mr E. Collier said that he saw the cart getting water from the main near Butchers Arms. The Surveyor: I think the understanding is that we are only to have the overflow. The Mayor: In that oase we might not have a drop. THE COUNCIL AND ST. PETER'S CHURCH Mr Oliver Jones asked why they paid 5s 3d a quarter to the sextoness of St. Peter's Church. The Clerk: For cleaning the Corporation pew. Mr Oliver Jones: How often does the Mayor attend there? THE FIRE AT THE MARKET. The Clerk read a Jetter from which it ap- peared that the Insurance Co. offered to pay the amount required to repair the damage done by the recent fire at the clock tower in the market. STREiET WATERING. Rev A. F. Mills asked why the watering cart did ifot go down MoTfa-lane. Mr W. Evans asked a similar question with regard to St. Catherine street. Mr Oliver Jones referred to the case of Fran- cis terrace and Richmond terrace.. The Surveyor said that there were no facili- ties for watering the side streets. Mr Oliver Jones thought that they ought to have more tar macadam. They ought o ha>«, it from Picton terrace down to Lammas st. Rev A. F. Mills: Let them all be tarred with the same brush. Mr Oliver Jones: It is something cruel to walk long the road. Mr VD. Samuel: If the County Council take them over they will tar the lot. FUkG DAYS. A discussion again arose over the multi- plicity of flag days. It appcarei that the pro- moters of Alexandra Rose Day wanted the option of postponing it for a week if Saturday next was wet. It was derided to allow this. ? ATTACK THE WOMEN. The Rev A. Fuller Mills suggested that the 6f flags, etc., should make an attack on the women and not always on the men. MATERNITY COMMITTEE. The Notification of Births Committee recom- mended that Miss Richards, of Picton terrace, be elected to a vacancy on the committee. Mr D. Williams said that he did not think it right to let a single lady on the Com- mittee. The others were all married. Mr E. Collier: I think you ought to have a married district nurse then! The Mayor It is the same thing. (Miss Richards was unanimously elected ,to the vacancy.

CRICKET

CRICKET. GRAMMAR SCHOOL V. TRAINING COLLEGE. On the 15th insit. a match was played be- tween the Grammar School 1st XI. and the Training College 1st XI. on the latter's ground. The School batted first, and scored 55, every player contributing to the score. The match resulted in a win for the College. Scores:— Grammar School: A. J. Jones b Rev J. Mel- huish. 2; J. R. Evans, b Rev J. Melhuish, 5; T. W. Griffiths, b H. Brown, 18; G. R. Davies, oE. Williams, b Rev J. Melhuish, 5; E. F. Lewis, run out. 5; D. J. Griffiths, c E. Williams b Melhuish, 3; D. A. Lewis, c H. Brown, b Melhuish, 1; T. R. Treharne, E. Williams, b Melhuish, 1; T. F. Lewis, c T. C. Thomas, b Melhuish, 2; W. J. Thomas, c B. C. Thomas, b Mostyn Jones, 6; S. H. Jones, not out, 2; eaxtrs, 5; total, 55. Training College Eb. Williams, lbw, b J. R. Evans, 0; N. Williams, c Griffiths, b Evans, 17 M. W. Rees. c T. W. Griffiths, b W. J. Thomas, 1; J. Mitchell, c T. W. Griffiths, b W. J. Thomas, 3; H. Brown, not out, 43; E. T. Evans, b J. R. Evans, 0; Rev J. Melhuish, b J. R. Evans, 7; H. Samuel, c and b W. J. Thomas, 0; D: M. Jones, b T. F. Lewis, 1; T. C. Thomas, not out, 16; J. Canton did not bat Extras, 1; total, 89. Bowling: J. R. Evans, 4 wickets for 43; W. J. Thomas, 3 for 24; T. F. Lewis, 1 for 21.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND, YOUNG. MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPIMG COUGH, ETC., ETC. OfER — 70 YEARS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELLBRA.I ED WELSH REMEDY Is now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle. Tht larger bottle it by Jar the cheapest.

IThe War After the War

I The War After the War. RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE PARIS CONFERENCE. The recommendations of the Economic Con- ference of the Allies," which was held at Paris on June 14 to 17, were issued on Tuesday night by the Board of Trade. The following is a summary of the chief proposals:— That the benefit, of the most-favoured nation treatment should be denied to the Enemy Powers for a term of years. Resources of the Allies to be conserved for the benefit of the Allied countries. A period of time to be fixed during which the Enemy commerce shalll be subjected to special treatment. Exchange of Allies' products to be facilitated by cheap and rapid land and sea transport. The new economic policy to be adopted forthwith.

s Premiers Tribute to Earl Kitchener

.s Premier's Tribute to Earl Kitchener. In the House of Commons yesterday, Mr Asquith moved:— That this House will to-morrow (Thursday resolve itself into a Committee to consider an humble address to his Majesty praying that his Majesty will give directions that a monument be erected at the public charge to the memory of the late Field-Marshal Earl Kitchener, with an inscription, expressing the admiration of this House for his illust- rious military career and its gratitude for his devoted services to the State. He said when the House adjourned for the Whitsuntide recess Lord Kitchener had just received a strong and unexampled expression of its confidence, and the next day he met in private conference a large number of its mem- bers, including some of his most persistent, and, as it then seemed, irreconcilable critics, with the result that he and they parted on terms not only of mutual respect, but of com- plete understanding. (Hear, hear.) I am glad to remember (said the Prime Minister) that at our last interview he ex- pressed his pleasure at what had happened, and his hope that this was the first step in a relationship of growing confidence and sym- pathy (hear, hear). When we said farewell after- nearly two years of daily intercourse, which had gone on through all the strain and stress of the war, there was no thought on either side of more than a temporary parting, no foeshadowing of a separation which neither twno nor space can bridge. Providence in its wisdom was preparing for him a sudden release from his burden of care and toil. We vdio for tho moment remain—those of its, in particular, who shared, as I did, his counsels in the great- est emergencies of our time with ever growing intimacy and fulness—can only bow our heads before the Supreme Will in whom are the issues of life and death. Lord Kitchener, in whatever environment of ci omnstance or conditions he might have been placed, would have been, as he was always and everywhere, a great and a dominant person- ality. He wras tried in many different ordeals, and he always survived and conquered the test. He began his careor in the Royal En- gineers without any advantage of birth or of favour. I remember well about a year ago, when we were talking one day of the import- ance of promoting young officexs who had dis-1 tinguished themselves in the war, that he told I me that he himself had been, for I think 12' years, and had remained a subaltern in that one and illustrious corps. He never chaffed nor fretted after the fashion of smaller men. The hour came to him, as it comes to all men who have discernment, faculty, and will, and from that moment his future was assured. His name was inseparably associated with that of Lord Cromei- in the emancipation and regeneration of Egypt and the Soudan. From Egypt he was called in a great Imperial emer- gency to South Africa, where in due time he brought the hostilities to a close, and helped to lay the foundations of that great and rapidly consolidating fabric which has welded alienated races and given us in the great con- flict of to-day a unique example of the service which local autonomy can render to Imperial strength (hear, hear). The next stage of his life was given to India, where he reconstituted and reorganised our army, native and British. Recalled to Egypt he was displaying the same gifts in civil administration which he had already illustrated in the military sphere when at the outbreak of the war he obeyed with the alacrity of a man who has become the willing servant of duty the summons to direct and to recreate our Imperial forces under supreme circumstances of our national history. His career has been cut short while still in the full tide of unexhausted powers and possibilities. No one is less fitted than I feel myself at this moment to be to make an analy- sis of his qualities or an appraisement of his services to the State. I will only say this—1 cannot say more—that few men that I have known had less reason to shrink from submitt- ing their lives to the pure eyes and perfect wisdom of all-judging God (cheers). Mr Bonar Law, in seconding the resolution, said Lord Kitchener's strength, like thait of most, perhaps of all men, lay not so much in any mental process of logical reasoning which carried him to his decisions as in that instinct which is so often deeper and trueir than their thoughts. It was that sure instinct which at the outbreak of the war warned him of the nature of the terrible struggle in which we were involved, and induced him at the beginn- ing to set about the formation of armies on a scale such as we had never dreamt of, and at a time, as he believed, when no statesman of any party would have formed a conception so gigantic and yet, as events have shown, so necessary. And it was for us who remain to close our ranks with a single eye to securing that victory the ultimate attainment of whicn lie never doubted (cheers). Mr G. T. Wardle (Lab.) said that the work- ing men of this country had a sure instinct for recognising worth, and in the case of Lord Kitchener he believed there was no man in whom they had greater confidence and believed more firmly; that they believed him to be absolutely straight, and they could rely upon his word (cheers). By the circumstnces of his death they had been stirred to their deepest hearts. He would say on behalf of his col- leagues and the workmen of England thrft they had lost a gnoot, leader whom it would be very difficult to replace. But the work which lie began, in which he was more than interested, and in which they all felt that the future of civilisation was at stake, that work they would assist in carrying to its final and conclusive victory (cheers). General Sir Ivor Herbert said he had had the honour of Lord Kitchener's acquaintance fo over 30 years, and he valued it. In that House, in accordance with what he believed to be his duty, lie had been a critic of the ad- ministration of the Department over which Lord Kitchener presided with such conspicuous distinction, but in any oriticism which he might have directed against acts of admiinistraton he ° j hoped that he had never gven the smallest hint of a personal attack upon Lord Kitchener him- self. He had never consciously, and, he hoped, inadvertently, said that which could he inter- preted as detracting in any way from the great qualities of one of the greatest commanders we had ever had. TJiere was one quality in Lord Kirtebenor which always appealed to him, and that was his unflinching courage. At his last ) meeting with Lord Kitchener it was his plea- sure and good fortune in a committee, room of that House to second the vote of thanks moved by Mr W. Crooks to Lord Kitchener for having made what he regarded as a notable precedent and one which it required great moral courage 1 to make- He ventured then to express his view that in making that precedent he had done work in bringing closer together than had ever been done before the Executive and the Parliamentary elements in our C'onsititution. He aJso ventured to express the opinion that great results to the advantage of the com- munity would follow from that precedent. The resolution was unanimously carried.

WELSH SOLDIERS COLONIES

WELSH SOLDIERS' COLONIES. A sub-committee of Welsh M.P.'s, consisting of Messrs John Hinds. E. T. John. Ellis Davies and Col. Piryse Jones, have had another confer. ence with a sub-committee of the Welsh Xa. tional Agricultural Council in reference to a settlement in Wales for soldiers and sailors after the war. As a result Professor Bryner Jones ha.s had an interview with.Colonel David Davies, M.P., in reference to the offer by th* latter of a site, and both are now agreed thv. f. the site irfhardly suitable. Meanwhile aojM'er site in the neighbourhood of Cardiff has b"!1 offered. The Welsh IM.P's have to see lord Se-Ihorne again in the matter.

KINGS RAMS ON FRENCH FARMS

KING'S RAMS ON FRENCH FARMS. The gift of highly-hred English sheep made by the Agricultural Relief of Allies Committee (16, Bedford Square, London. W.C.) to small French farmers ruined by the war has proved of great benefit in helping the recipients to make a new beginning and in improving the native flocks. It will be remembered that the gift included five splendid rams presented by King George from his Sandringham Estate, and these animals are specially prized by the peasants. < English farmers and breeders are ready with further donations of live stock for distribution among stricken agriculturists in Allied coun- tries when a favourable moment arrives. In the meantime the Committee is strengthening its fund-which now amounts to £ 80.000—in ordeir that adequate practical help of every kind may be given the instant the Germans are forced to retire.

Haverfordwest Appeals

Haverfordwest Appeals. SIR CHARLES PHILIPPS, AND SERVANTS At the embrokeshiire Appeal Tribunal at Haverfordwest on Saturday the military ap- pealed against the decision of the Narberth District Tribunal in granting exemption to Thomas Lloyd Moore, gamekeeper, employed by Siir Charles Philipps, Picton Castle. The local tribunal granted exemption on the ground that it was in the national interest that the m%n ni 1 in his I>resont employment. n wir I hiJipps said the man could not really be considered a gamekeeper, as they now ceased to rear game. Moore was chieHy em- ployed in feeding and looking after poultry. The Chairman (Mr Sketch): Can't vou frAt, 1:)-- a man over military age to do the work Sir Charles Philipps This man is 40 years of ,age and in delica-tio health. He would be of no use for combatant service. The Chairman said that was not a matter for the tribunal to deal with. The appeal was allowed'. The military also appealed against the de- cision of the Narberth Tribunal in respect of James Edwards, valet and butler at Pioton Castle, who had been granted conditional Lieut. Clark Williams said there would be no hardship if this man Went. Sir Charles said the man was his personal attendant, and sifnee a serious accident twelve months ago it was impossible for him to attend to public work unless he had a personal attendant. Appeal dismissed.