Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
11 articles on this page
j1tfr THE PASSING WEEK 1L10111VLL

j 1 t' ".r THE PASSING WEEK 1 L:1 \)011 \1 V ¡ LL "Let there be tSajatiee; there arø grapes, If old things, there arc new; Ten thousand broken lights and ebRpaa Yet glimpses of tlio true.—TBHNVSCN. It is said tlue the wife oi an hi, I landed proprietor remonsti a tod last wcrk with some old women whom found ia her park break- ing: timber and carrying li off for iire-wood. But the old women net n hit daunted. "Sure." said on > 0: them "there's martial law in Ireland now. and we can do as we like." #*» This. is supposed to illustrate the proi-ounu ignorance of the Irish people. A", a matter of fact it illuminates the profound thinking cf the comonest pcoplo in Ireland. It is an old saying that "Martial law is no law." The, aphorism is well known to lawyer-. The fact that there is martial law in Ireland means that there is no law in Ireland—using the word in the proper sense cf the term. The Duke of Wellington once said that martial law means the will of the Commander-in-Chief. The old women who were "pinching" the timber fi cm the park were quite correct in their reasoning. There is no law in Irsland, and there are some people who can do exactiy as they like. When martial law is proclaimed there is not j half the iuss about a trial that there is under I the civil law. If a man is charged with steal- ing a pair of hoots he has under the civil law to be brought before a magistrate with in 24 hours. He is usually remanded until the evi- dence is piepared. Meanwhile the accused can demand to be released on bail. He has an opportunity of consulting a solicitor and arranging his defence. If the case looks as if thera were something to answer, the magis- trates give the accused the choice of being dea.lt with summarily or of going to the assizes. If the accused thinks he is unjustly charged, he asks to be sent to the assizes. He is then released on ba i. if he can find security. At the Assizes he has counsel to defend him. If he is too poor to pay for counsel, there is a method by which he can obtain legal assist- ance for nothing. Then the trial takes place before twelve jurors—farmers, grocers, shoe- makers or drapers. If these twelve men are not satisfied on the evidence that the prisoue.- stole the pair of boots the prisoner is dis- charged. On the other hand they may find him guilty. If they do and the prisoner feels that he ha* not been fairly treated he has stiH another chance. He can ask that his case be retried before the Court of Criminal Appeal'. There his counsel can point out any errors which have been made in the trial, and if the Appeal Court considers that any substantial error were made they can quash the verdict. There is none of this when martial law is in force. The popular mind is apt to get confused between "martial law" and "court martial." A soldier is always triable by court martial. A court martial is about the slowest process known to science. If an officer is charged with having had a drop too much 011 duty, a court martial takes about a week to hear the evi- dence. A cou.rt martial in &uch case- takes a- day to hear as much evidence as a bench of magistrates would hear in half an hour. When however "martial law" is proclaimed the case is quite different. The ordinary lav," courts are suspended, and military eouits take their place There is nothing very slow about marital law. In Dublin a. batch of prisoners was tried on Monday afternoon and buried on Tuesday by 10 There is no judge or jury or counsel or publicity about it. Nobody knows yet what the evidence against some of the executed men were. It has been said quite seriously that one young man was executed simply because his name was Pierce—that the military autho- rities mixed him up with another Pierce whom they were seeking. This allegation has been made in the House of Commons, It may of course be a grim satire on the action' of the Military Authority a.nd not be true. But it illustrates the possibilities of martial law. One can certainly believe anything of the Military Authority in the face of the finding of tho court martial ontlie officer who murdered Mr Skeffington. the Dublin journalist.. Skeffing- ton was not even executed under martial law. t He was assassinated by an English officer. And the finding of th. court martial is that the officer was insane. The ground of the acquittal is more damaging to British prestige in Ire- land than any conviction of the officer could possibly be. It opens the way to very obvious comments. # Still one week's fighting has brought tho Irish question nearer a settlement than years, of Constitutional agitation. And it is the Unionists who are anxious for the .settlement now. They are extremely anxious to avoid the discussion of the little doings of their own party in Ireland. The Irish people remember that Sir Edward Carson openly boasted of his intention to rebel. They see that he has now a seat in the Cabinet. They know that the Unionists imported arms either to fight the British Army or else to murder the Xationaf- ists. They know that the Unionists did this with impunity. They know that the British Army officers "mutinied" at the Curragh and declined to take any part in suppressing any Carson rebellion. They know that the Union- ist organs stated that the Nationalists were a. mean-spirited set who would never fight and had no arms even if they so desired. The Unionist leaders really believed this—which shows how little Irish Unionists know of the majority of their countrymen. It has been a perfect revelation to them to find that a small section of Dublin rebels requited six times the numbeT of British soldiers and a gunboat to beat them in a week's hard fighting. Where would Ireland be to-day if Mr John Redmond had been another Carson and had fanned the rebellion amongst his followers instead of doing his "best to suppress it? No wonder the Unionists are anxious to hush It all up. It is very hard to stand up on a platform and attempt to explain away these awkward facts. Of course- an Orange leader in Belfast would have no difficulty at all in stating the case. He would honestly say that the majority of the Irish people are only a lot of savage rebels who ought to be dealt with as the American pioneers dealt with the Red Indians. When the Ulster plantation was formed in the year IGlO. several counties in the North of Ireland were handed over to English and Scottish settlers, and a Woyal pro- clammation was issued warning the natives to clear out and to betake themselves to other parts of Ireland. It was hoped then to extend j the scheme until the Irish people were nil, cleared out of Ireland or exterminated as many native races have been by foreign settlers in other countries. These facts still give the key-note to Irish politics. The Ulster plantation failed even in Ulster. Outside the town of Belfast, the Unionists are in a minority in Ulster. It is impossible now to advocate the real "loyal" attitude on English platforms. It was a per- factly clear attitude when the Irish Unionist could My "The natives must be kept down." Burt when Great Britain is the champion of small nationalities this attitude is impossible. The extreme Orange attitude is no longer a political possibility. Even an English Unionist can hardly put the British rule in Ireland 011 j the same level as German rule iu Belgium. Of f course it may be argued that the safety of the 1 British Empire demands that Ireland bo ruled f by England. But that argument is valueless. I The safety of the German Empire demands that <• the Germans slie.il occupy Belgium. A\ e roy-u- (1 7 t t niin ask, d t o-ff Would th:-y vot be b: ttcr off under the British Parliament?'' A German oiffcer might ask. "Why should the Beig'ans want a little Gov- ernment of t!i c. i, own? If they came into the C, .1;ll Empire like Bavaria they would be muc-li better cfi."Erom a strictly materialistic standpoint there is much to be said in favour of that attitude. But it is an attitude which has never been reeognised by the conscience of humanity. And Great Britain which stands for the right of every people to choo-e its own government must be consistent. Wo can't pieach one doctrine to Germany and net on another ourselves like Stiggins spouting toe- totalism and swilling the pine apple rum.

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE Iit Hr S E A HOELLIGr B T

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE ..Ii; t. H r S E A HOELLIGr B T, Joflse, Cûm, and ait you dowu yju sSall 1+et bsdge, 5LC-. ehsil not ;0, till I set you 7) a K,la £ 3 Vv rierc JOi1 may sse tha inmost purt of yoa. SaAKBflrsAua. Hnir of quite a new colour is appearing Oil the heads of women and girls. It is caused by the va.pours generated in the factory in which thoy work, and is called the munition tint. Even women are dyeing for their country. ♦ ■*» There appears to be some misunderstanding over the fact that Saturday next is a Bank holiday. It is a holiday for the bankers—and for nobody else. Banking can't be carried on without an occasional "stop-day" on which money is neither paid nor received, and the fact that the banks did not have Whit-Monday has made the holiday on July 1st imperative. Still fcr everybody else except bankers it is "■business as usual." ih¡. Some people actually came to town on Sacur- day with wild rcses from the hedges in their buttonholes in order to escape being canvassed to "spring" a penny for Alexandra Rose Day. In -these day sof reckless extrabaganee it is I hopeful to find such efforts being made in the direction of economy. We are shortly going to have a l'Tag Day on belia'f of Horses. I have nothing to say against I the horse—who is usually referred to as the noble animal. But what about donkeys ? Isn't there somebody who will start- a flag day on behalf of poor eùdy ? It is high time some- body did something for poor Neddy who does i not at all get his due. **■* There is a regular colony ot donkeys down at. Llansaint. They usually wear an expression of profound melancholy. I suppos? none of us would fed particularly cheerful if wo carried bags of cockles from Llansaint to the Ferryside railway station regularly. It is not much u^e asking the Llansaint donkey "Are we downhearted?'' If he could speak I fancy I I lte would say. "'les. quite fed up with it." People who wcrk hard ought to have a fellow loeiing for Xrddy. Wlini a man has been working particularly hard he can hire a motor car and take a cask of beer along with him I and go riding with three or feUI" others like himself. He can frighten dozens of taliyc-i- people who eat their cockles in the quiet luxury tho police court with a fine of 10s—and the fan is cheap at the price. Having had his littlo blow out, the two-legged donkey goes back to his work refreshed, Isn't it time we. got up a flag day to give long-eared quadrwpsds an outing Easy going 1 peopb will eat their cockles in the quiet luxury of their happy homes never give a thought to the laborious life of the patient donkey to whom they owe their dainty delicacies. Notli- ing has been done to give the donkey an in- sight into a higher and life. **•» It is high time therefore that somebody should organise pleasant week ends for do 11kays Neddy might be taken away for a couple of It days to some quiet spot where there would be plenty of grass on which he could frolic in comfort. A liberal diet of carrots and lettuces would be provided for him. and there might bp every facility for. musical competitions. A singing competition in which a dozen donkeys take part is a most elevating and entertaining performance for the audience. If we are going to have a flag day for horses, I am going to organise a committee to get up a flag day for donkeys. I know that there are many folks who will scorn the idea but then some people are always down on their poor relations. Then as animals are going to have flag days I think we ought to get up one for the white rabbit. After that our oldfriend the walrus will send in his claim. For my own part, I am going to see that justice is due to the mock turtle and the Teddy Bear and Bully Boy and all the old favourites. We have reached such a stage now that flag days have become a habit. "e c.,iii't do witlio(it oiii- lfa_ Illv more than a smoker can do without his packet of "fags," and I am perfectly certain that the suggestions which I have thrown out arc as sensible as a good many others which are heard on the subject. *1: Two subjects were mentioned at the Carmar- then Town Council last week which are on the face of it. as far as the poles'asunder, but which are in fact intimately connected. There was a reference to tho need of curbing infantile mor- tality. a.nd there was a i-effrenco to the fact that there arc no facilities for watering many of the side streets of Carmarthen. Nobody suggested that there is any relationship bl- tween these facts, and yet any scientist will tell you that dust is one of the most fruitful causes of infantile mortality. **10 Dust is really more deadly than dynamite. Some two or three hundred British children were killed since the war started by Zeppelin bombs; at the very lowesit estimate twenty or thirty thousand were killed by dust. All sorts of objectionable matter lies about the streets and the roads. In wet weather the rain carries it off into the gutters and the drains. If wo got our water from open wells, the rain would he the cause of an epidemic. We have learned enough to avoid that danger. There is not a spot in the Kingdom in which the people do not realise the danger of contamina- tion washing into the wells, and in the towns we 1 Lave our water supplies from pipes so there is 110 possibility of the water supply being affected by surface pollution. But water pollution is not half as dangerous as air pollution. If you know that water is polluted you can boil it. and you run no risk. You can be careful of your drink. But you can't be careful of the air you breath. You have to take that as it comes. And. dry weather pollutes the air. After a week of drought, all the foul matter which lies about the street is pulverised. It forms into dust and blows into the houses. The human lungs get filled up with all the abominations which the dry weather reduces to dust. *3* Thi., is dangerous to humanity at all stages. Of course we all know that life in the early stages is most sensitive. A gardener knows that all the ills which attack plants have to be guarded ago Mist in the care of the young seed- lings. When the plants reach a- sturdy stage the pests do them very much damage.

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE Iit Hr S E A HOELLIGr B T

—- We who have reached maturity may be armour plated against germs; but young children are sensitive to every microbe that hops in the sunbeam. So let us have those streets watered in dry weatli-er. There are more children in poor neighbourhoods to begin with. and the children are always in the street because the houses have no, nurseries. Even the babies are taken out by children not very much older than themselves. Hence no watering of the streets means more deaths of iniaaits. "t It is probable that some effort wiii he made to la-.v before the Royal Commission facts which have .been ascertained as to the high prices in Carmarthen and neighbourhood. There are one or two articles which are cheaper in this district than in London but there are several articles which are much clearer in Carmarthen than in London—and which in the very nature of things ought to be as cheap and even cheaper. A meeting is to be called shortly to form life te the facts. ifH Arrangements are being made by the V.T.C. to hold sports at Carmarthen Park oil August Bank Holiday. ALETHEIA.

Advertising

4m c CAUTION A man Would be Mad to Swallow -1 a Ioison-yet-When the Kidneys are Diseased, the Human Body is I a Veritable Poison Factory. I i j Uric acid is a poison that attacks the weakest part first. A brain worker will have nerve trouble or rheumatism. A strong, healthy-looking person will be liable to gravel or stone, heart trouble, dropsy or gout. TJRIC ACID and poisonous waste are always retting into the blood from your food and from the wear and tear of the body. But the kidneys filter it out and keep ths blood pure. Every tweaty-four hours they remove about 500 grains of urinous poisons and three pints of water from the blood. But when the kidneys are weak, they leave some of this poisonous waste in the blood and It gets carried to all parts of the system. It makes you feel dull, heavy and drowsy; your back is bad, your head bad; dropsical swell- ings may appear in the ankles or about the eyes; you may get rheumatic twinges, lum- kago attacks, or dizzy spells. The bladder aets too often; there may be sediment, gravel or oloudines9 of the water. When the kidneys are ill, they need a kidney medicine. Ordinary medicines won't do—they cannot cleanse or relieve the kidneys. Doan's Backache Kidney Pills are solely for the kidneys and bladder. They relieve the kidneys and urinary system like ordinary medicines relieve the- bowels. They take out uric acid and other kidney poisons, the great cause of stone, inflam- mation of the bladder and rheumatism, and they drain away the accumulated water in dropsy. An Analyst's Certificate that the Pills contain no poisonous drugs or harmful ingre- dients accompanies every box. in 2{9 fozes only, six boxu &IX Kever fold loose, of all chemists and 510us or from Fosicr-McChllan Co., 8, Wells-ilrttt, Vrford-sirctt, London. W. R'jutt substitutes, NNW Backache Kidney Pills

THE JULY WIXDSOR MAGAZINE

THE JULY "WIXDSOR MAGAZINE." 'Several articles on War themes ill the Juiv number of the "Windsor Magazine" arc of timely interest, which is enhanced by the wealth of illustrations, accompanying them. Under the title of "Lords and Commons and their Share in the War," for instance, is grouped a very remarkable series of recent photographs which will have quite an historical value in years to come, and the survey of indi- vidual activities which accompanies the pic- tures presents many facts which should not be overlooked in the mass of cui-realt news which ail students of the War must follow. "With an Anti-Aircraft Battery at the Front" is the theme of another well illustrated article; and few will read unmoved the account of the great work ofbringing home our wounded men, which is also lavishly illustrated in an article on "The Fleet of Hospital Ships." The work of the league formed under the a-uspices of the YJM.G.A. for sending snapshot photographs from their homes to the men at the Front is describee) In another paper, with details which. givo special emphasis to the importance of pre- serving as far as possible the home ties of our fighting men. A11 attractive programme of fiction includes a notable new .story by Edgar Wallace in which the characters of the.author's "Sanders cf the I River" and other West African books, make 11 welcome reappearance. Halliwell Sutfeliife's charming romance. "The Gay Hazard," is carried a stage further in an episode as delight ful as any of its predecessors. War theme.s of varying kinds find dramatic expression in com- plete stories by Ethei Turner, Vincent Brown md O. M. Matheson. Other contributors of remarkable stories are Frem M. White. E. M. Jameson, and Theodore Goodridge Roberts, ltnd the wealth of fiction, grave and gay, is attractively illustrated by such distinguished artists as Fred Pegram, G. C. Wilmhurst, Maurice Greicenhagen, Harold Copping, Cyrus Utineo, and others almost equally well known. Altogether this is a notable number.

DAMAGE TO CROPS BY AIRCRAFT

DAMAGE TO CROPS BY AIRCRAFT. The Board of Agriculture end Fisheries desire to caN the attention of farmers to the possibility of loss of, or damage to, growing el crops by hostile aircraft. No liability can be accepted by the Govern- ment and no ciaim can be entertained in re-- spect of damage to property by aircraft or bom bardment unless the property has been insured under the Government- sch, particulars of which can be obtained at any Posf Office or fi-omi any Fire Insurance Company, j1

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal A sitting of the Carmarthenshire Inter- mediate Appeal Tribunal was held at the Car- marthen Guildhall oil Friday. Mr Dudley Wil'iams-Drummond presided; and there were also present: Messrs Joseph Roberts, Llanelly H. E. B. Richards. Carmarthen Dd. Evans, Manordaf; W. W. Brodie, Llanelly; T. Morris, Grurnant; John Lloyd, Penybank D. Williams Llanelly and W. Griffiths, Llanelly. The military representative was Capt. Cre-mlyn, and the agricultural representative Mr H. Jones-Davies. LLANYBYXHiuil CHEMIST'S ASSISTANT. Cvupt. T. O. Edwads appealed against the decision of the Llanybyther Tribunal Inst April in granting temporary exemption (which had now expired) to the apprentice of Mr Davies. chemiist, The Pharmacy, Llanybyther. Mr Wains-Jones appeared for Mr Davies, who stated that his wife was ill, and his only asisttMit was his apprentice. The app-cal of Capt. Edwards was allowed. ONE MUST GO. Capt. Edwards also appealed against the exemption granted to two brothers, who with ther sister, occupied Caemalwasfawr, Rhyd- cymerau, and the exemption to another bro- ther who was on Rhiwvnerfin farm, Pencarreg, Rhydcymerau, with his parents. Caemalwas- fawr comprised 20 acres and Rhiwynerfin 17(3 acres. Mr Wallis Jones appeared for father and S011S. The elder brother replying to Capt. Cremlyn said that on Caemalwasfawr they were four working sons and a boy in school. Not one of the family was serving in the Army, but the fourth son who waa s bank clerk had attested and was waiting to 'be caUed up. Capt. Cremlyn: Can't you work the two farms as one so that one of you boys can go Y Witness No we could not do that. The Thibunt'l decided that the younger son on Caemalwasfawr must join the colours. The other son on this farm and the son on Rhiwynerfin were exempted. LLAXDEBIE BOOT DEALERS APPEAL. A master boot dealer at Central Buildings, Lland-ebie. in support of his appeal, Baid he had 600 customers on his books, and the business could not be carried on in his absence as he was in sole control. He employed two men to boots. Air J. C. Edmunds, solicitor, L'andilo, appeared for the appellant. An adjournment was granted until July 31, on condition that no further appeal was made. EXEMPTION FOR PONTYATES SLAUGHTERMAN. A Pontyates butcher who said lie was un- able to do much work owing to an accident lie had received was granted exemption for his son who acted as Mr David Jennings, solicitor. Llanelly, appeared for the appellant. EXEMPTION FOR PANEL CHEMIST. A Brynamman chemist who appealed for his only assistant said it would be impossible to carry on the work of dispensing under the Insurance Act without assistance. His assist- ant was not qualified, but lie dispensed under appellant's supervision. Appellant had failed to got a substitute although he had advertised. Capt. Cremlyn: Have you heard that there arc ladies in the big chemists establishments in London?—Yes, but ladies will not suit agricultural districts, although I have made every effort to got a lady and have failed. The appeal was allowed. PENY GROESTRADESMAN. Exemption till August 24th was granted to a Penygrops grocer and china dealer.—Mr 1. Ungoed Thomas, Carmarthen, appeared for appellant. FIVE TONS OF BEEF IVE, EKLY. I Exemption until July 31 st was given to tho son of Glyuhenllan, Llandebie, which comprised GG acres. He sold 93cwt. of beef every week. It was announced that the exemption granted in theso two casts won!d be final. ST. CLEARS GENERAL FACTOTUM. An appeal was hoard against the refusal of the C'.lrnl:wU,E'U Rural Tribunal to giant exemption to an a distant at Pentre Store-. St. C lears. Exemption till Oetober 10th was asked for. The man was described as general fad-otum who assisted in the farming work, the baking and the business. An adjournment till July 31st was granted, it being stated that tlrs would be final. NO EXEMPTION FOR ABERNAN I SMITH. The appeal of an Abernant smith for his son was refused. The other son was also a blacksmith. blacksmith. LLANDDAROG WIDOWS APPEAL. With regard to an appeal of a. widow occupy- ing Cap-el Evan Farm, Llanddarog. for her son, itwas stated that two sons had been exempted. An adjournment till July 31st was granted as final exemption. NO FURTHER ALLOWANCE FOR FERR Y- SIDE FARMER'S SON. T11:, appeal for the ecn on Bronyn Farm, Ferrysine, ws adjourned till August 31st. with the intimation that no further time would be allowed. TEN LINE FORGE APPEAL. Exemption 1::1 September 30th was granl-ed to au assistant at Penlino Forge, Llangfihan-gcl Aborccwin, on the understanding that he would be icp'accd in the mC111Lilllc. LL ANGEiXDElRNE APPEAL DISMISSED. Application was made for exemption over the harvest for the son at Croesasgwrn, Llan- gendeirne. The appeal was dismissed. PENIEL POSTPONEMENT. Capt. Mai grave appeal ed against exemption granted by the Carmarthen Rural Tribunal to a son at Brynceir, Poniel road. It was stated that the respondent worked two farms. Exemp tioii until September 1st was granted, with the intimation that it was final. — Mr Wallis- Jones appeared for respondent. SECOND DAY. Tho Carmarthenshire Intermediate Appeal Tribunal continued its sitting at the Carmar- then Shire Hall on Saturday. Mr W. Griffiths presided, and there were also present: Mr D. Wllliams-Drummond, Mr J. L-loyd, Mr Joseph Roberts. Mr T. Morris, Mr D. Williams, and Mr D. Evans. Capt. Cremlyn represented the War Office, and Mr H*. Jones-Davies the Board of Agricul- ture. j TINPLATERS EXEMPT. Joseph Stanley -Madge, a shearer in the Raven Tinplate works, appealed against the decision of the Ammanford Tribuna.1 which had refused him exemption. The appellant is 25] years of age and lives at Garnant. A letter frcm the Company stated that the man could not be replaced, and thait ho worked seven days a week. Mr T. lorris said that there had been a supplementary I.Vst of certified occupations handed to them last Tuesday. Tho whole of the tinplate trade had been starred until tho 1st of August. Capt. Cremlyn: Is there any age limit? The Chairman: Xo; there is none at all. Mr T. Morris: After the end of July there is. Exemption was granted until tli3 end of July. EMPLOYEE HAD LEFT. The Star Tea Co. had an appeal in respect of Garfield Thomas, of Llandovery. A letter was read from the appellants in which they stated that they did not intend to proceed with the appeal. The man had left their service, and had, they believed, joined the Army. The appeal was dismissed. SHOEMAKER INDISPENSABLE TO THE COLLIERS. Messrs J. Harris and Son, Penvbont. Brvn- amman. appealed against the decision of the local Tribunal in respect of a man named James Raddle. Appellants stated that this was the only man of military age whom they had loft. Several of them had already joined tho Army. If Raddle, who was a skilled bootmaker left. they would have to disimuss all their staff and to close down the factory. They did a consider- able wholesale trade. The man had been in their employment for 20 years and knew the requirements of their customers. They had a great trade in colliers' boots which they made. They supplied two oc-operaitive societies/Owing to the difficulty of getting .suitable boots for the colliers from other quarters their factory was indispensable for the colliers of the dis- triet. Customers came a considerable distance and asked for the miners boots which they made. I Mr G. Ha r lies, the sole partner, in answer to questions, said that his whole time was re- quired in the management of the retail branches and the wholesale trade. This man tookle charge of the factory. The annual turnover of the business was £ 3,00CT a year. Of this about a half would represent the sale of ready-ma.de boots from Northampton. The otho riialf were made on the premises. Total exemption was granted. FARMING CASES. Mr Howell Davies, solicitor, appeared for Mr Ben Phillips, Clunbele, Conwil. who ap- pealed against the decision of the Carmarthen Rural Tribunal in respect to his son, David Phillips. The application was adjourned for the pro- duction of a medical certificate a,4 to the state of health of a son who was stated to be unable to work on the farm. Mr Howell Davies also appeared in the appeal by Mr David James, of Nantgwynne Farm, in respect of his son Arthur James. Exemption until 31st October was allowed. The appeal of Mr D'. Davies, Cwniblewog, Trelecli, in respect of Albert Highter was ad- journed untii the 31st October, and also the appeal of Thomas Evans, Gilfachmaen, Conwil in respect of W. Rees. Mr Howell Davies also appeared in the appeal by Daniel Jones, Lan, Cbnwil. in respect of Henry Jones. Postponement until the 31st October was granted. The appeal of D. Davies, Gellygatrog, Llan- gendeirne, and W. Thomas, Hendre. St. Clears were allowed. The appeal of Dan Davies, of Blaendyfod, St. Clears, in respect of Alfred Williams, was dis- missed. The appeal of Daniel Lewis. Glasfrvn Park, St. Clear s in respect of Joseph Lewis, was dis- missed. The appeal of the same employer in respect of D. Davies was dismissed on condi- tion that the man was not called up for a month. A lAX ESSENTIAL. Anne Morgan, Tyllwyd, Llangendeirne, ap- pealed for an exemption in respect of John Morgan. The farm was 19$acres. Appell- 4 ant said that there was a lot of trespassing or. the farm. A woman could not deal with tha trespassers. She could not attend fairs and markets alone. Postponement until 31st August was granted SEVEN DAYS ONLY. Richard Davies, Ferry Farm, Llanstepban, appealed in respcet of Richard Davies, junr. Secen day's postponement was granted. SCHOOLMASTER JOINS THE NAVY. Dd. John R ees, schoolmaster, Llangunnock, who had appealed on personal grounds, had, it was stated, joined the Navy. The appeal was dismissed. NO EXEMPTION FOR TIMBER FELLER, j Daniel Jones, Llwynyreos, Half Way, Llan- dovery applied for exemption for Edgar Jones. Appellant said that he was a. timber merchant and that the man in question was a tiiiiiber feller. He had been employed on the County [ Council steam Roller. It was not truo that lie had left tlllt employment tQ evade the Act; he had done so becausc there was such a de- mand for pitwood. A letter was put in from Western Valleys Anthracite Co. stating that they required tho timber supplied by the appellant. Tho Llandovery Rnrri Tribunal had refused the application for three months extension. Mr Drum 111 ond said that the appellant had already got all lie had asked for whilst waiting for the appeal to be heard. Appellant said that if the war stopped to- morrow he would have eighteen months work for this man. Mr Drummond referring to the letter handed in .said that anthracite coai was not supplied to the Government. The Tribunal dismissed the appeal. A JOB FOR A SLAUGHTERMAN. Capt. Edwards, Recruiting Officer, Amman- ford appealed against the decision of the local Tribunal who had granted an exemption to James F. Rees, GJyn, Glanamman, in respect of a slaughterman. Capt. Cremlyn (to appeallant): You look about 50. Appellant: Xu. sir; you can look again. What is your age ?—1 am 02. You mu-fc excuse me making the niistako OIJIV because you only look 50?—Well, I am 02. Capt. Cremlyn: I think you could spare 0110 of these slaughtermen to kill Germans. They would be doing very good woik. Appellant said that his whole time was taken up by attending fairs. He paid the price of three farms every week. The appeal was d.'sm'sscd. PRIVATE HEARING REFUSED. Walter Thomas, Trip, Mydrim, an employed at Llysonen Gardens, appealed for exemption for himself. Appellant asked that his case bo I heard in private. Capt. C-remlyn said tha.t there did not appear to be any ground for such an application. The only ground for asking that a. case be heard in private was that an appellant did not wish to disclose his financial position or family affairs or something of that sort. The appeal was h?ard in public. The appel- lant stated that lie had been passed as unfit for active service. He thought lie could serve his King and Country better in the munition factory than in the fighting line. The Local Tribunal stated that they had re- fused the appeal. He had been passed as fit for labour at home and abroad. Capt. Cremlyn: On the 14th April you said your could serve your King and Country by working at munitions? Appellant: Yes. Have you been to the munition factory?- Not yet. This was in April?—My application was not granted at the local tribunal. Mr D. Evans Why didn't you go to tlio munition works ? Appellant: I thought I would hear from the Appeal Tribunal first. The Tribunal dismissed the appeal. ST. CLEARS FARMERS SONS. Mr Howell Jones, Great Newton, St. Clears appealed for exemption for W. Joseph Lewis a workman employed by him. Mr I. Ungoed Thomas, solicitor. Carmarthen, appeared for' the appellant. The farm. it was stated, is 300 acres. Fifty acres are ploughed, and there are 60 or 70 acres of hay. Capt. Cremlyn said that if the Tribunal were satisfied that this man's two sons had not left and gone to other farms to evade military ser- vice, the appeal ought to be allowed. Appellant aid that they had gone to make homes for themselves. The Tribunal allowed the appeal. LLANSTEPHAN FISHERMAN. William John, Pleasant View. Llanis-tppiiofl, a fisherman, applied for exemption until the end of the fishing season. He said it was diffi- cult for his father to get anybody to assist with the nets. Capt. Cremlyn: The great difficulty is to prevent people using nets not to get them to use nets. Exemption was granted until 1st August.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR J COUGHS, COLDS, "WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. OVER 70 YEARS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELEBRATED WELSH REMEDY Is now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by all eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of thisspecific Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle, TItI larger bottle is byfar the cheapett*

NAIU5KUTH APPEAL TRIBUNAL

NAIU5KUTH APPEAL TRIBUNAL. At IXm-berth District Appeal Tribunal ott Monday, Mr Seymour Allen. J.P., Cresselly House, Cresselly, appealed for John Howell- age 3o, teamsnian. Nine of Mr Allen's men had gone to the Army or munition works. There were GO to 70 acres of ay to cut and about six acres of corn. Howell was a married man with one child. Conditional exemption was granted. Mrs Lewis, Henllan House, Llanddewi. neai' Na.iibertb, appealed for the exemption of Arthur Edward Owen, aged 31, lamp,-tof Velfrey, gardener. Mrs Lewis said that Oven- was a trained gardener. He assisted with the hay harvest, an dahd also helped farmers with the hay. Two months' exemption was given.

WEATHER AND THE CROPS

WEATHER AND THE CROPS. The weather of June has improved, but tho very cold which lasted three full weeks has kept plant, growth back. The proverbial G3 days between the ear and the sickle would bring East Anglia to August 17 for the com* mencement of the harvest as the earing period was about mid-June, and in the South it was a wedi: earlier. The season is perhaps ten dttyg late in the most fav oured regions and 20 behind hand in the least favoured. The pre- f-nt cereal year will have to find two weeks beyond its proper share. This would steady the ordinary markets, but the current change will not be robbed of its presont depression.—Jb'ronl Monday's "Mark Lane Express."

Advertising

y § The Welshman's FavouriteTf | MAB0N Sauce i As good as its Name, DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. £ » Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Peter St., Cardiff. 2 CARMARTHEN—Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LAWRENCE, at her Offices, 3 Blue Street, IBIIMY, June oOth, ltJl6.