Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 4 of 4
Full Screen
10 articles on this page
TOE PASSING WEEK

TOE PASSING WEEK "Let there bt. kittles; there are g If old things, there are ne?r; Ten thousand broken lights find frhips# let glimpses of true."—Tknntscn. Same Germans who have been asked to sub- •sc: • bo to the war ioan helve blwn asking whe- ther by fodo ng they would prolong the war. They are evidently divided between a desire t-j help their country and a desire to el' the war ended. So many pcuplo have asked litis ques- tion that a noted German publickst has been moved to express the official views ot the Gov- ernment on the subject. Ho says "The con- chi-icn of peace is not a matter which lies with Germany. Even if Germany wanted peace, she could not have it." **# This is not true. Jf Germany really wanted peace &he might very easily have it. The first step which Germany ought to take is to clear out of Belgium and Northern France. When Germany dees that we shall be prepared to dis- cuss the terms of peace. As long as Germany tholds territory which she violated in defiance of her own pledged word and of the seal and signature of her own ambassador it is impossi- ble to treat with her. When the German General Staff gather up their armies and fall back on a line entirely inside Gorman terri- tory we shall be prepared to discuss with them the amount which they will have to pay for the wilful damage and beastly conduct in the in- vaded territory. There are some things, of course, which can't be paid for in cash—like the murder of Nurse Cavell and the assassina- tion of Capt. Fryatt. These accounts can only be settled by a rope. #*• This is what the Germans mein when they say that they can't get peace. They mean that they can't get peace on their own terms. The filthy German brute has brawled all over Europe and given full play to his innate black- guardism in all sorts of horrors and vileness whenever he has found people unable to light him. Now that he has had his fling he wants to go back to his happy home to make cheap toys for English children and to organise the German bands which u-ed to come through our towns 'tooting" for coppers. He says that tho war is over. That's where Fritz makes the biggest m'stake of his life." It is only just be- ginning. The Germans of the next generation won't ever "swank" and swell out their chests when war is mentioned. War will become a word for Germans to shudder nt. ■# The present day Germans wc re brought up with the idea that war is the most glorious (sport in the world. Of course it was. The German armies used to march out in summer, have a few battles, plunder the towns they passed through, and then return home in the autumn staggering under the spoiL The father of the present Kaiser was one o' the mildest Germans of the ninetenth century but even he sent home to his palace trainloads of rare furniture which he "collected" in the beautiful mansions of the French aristocracy. And there was not a private in the German Army in 1870 who did not have his knapsack full of brooches, watches, silver forks and spoons and all the other little knick-knacks which they could pi k up in French cottages. We must be under no misapprehension. The German Army is simply and solely a robber gang. Ali Baba and his Forty Thieves were mere dabblers in the bandit trade compared with Wilhelm and his Ten Million Thieves. If tho German people really want to make peace, the first thing they ought to do is to get rid of the Kaiser and the whole of the accursed Hohenzollern family which has plagued Europe for so many centuries. It would be farcical if it were not pathetic to think that a people of intellect like the Germans should hold a pair of vulgar hooligans like the Kaiser and the Crown Princo in such reverence. There is not a collier or a dock labourer in England who is not a better man—morally, physically and in- tellectually—than either of these two scoun- drels. Physically they are degenerates. They are both the victims of the sarno hereditary disease which carried off the present Kaiser's father. Intellectually they are only one degree above idiocy. If they were turned out of their present positions neither of them could earn JE1 a week at any honest occupation. There is a strain of "eccentricity" in the family which would have landed most of its members in a lunatic asylum long ago were it not that they were hedged round by the superstition which attaches to royalty. They are mere feeble- minded dolts who have an extraordinary amount of self-esteem. They are ignorant to a degree appalling in a.n educated country. Of course to start with they are more thick- headed in youth than ordinary mortals, and no tutor has the courage to whack a young man Prince as he should and to try to diive a little learning into his silly head. There is not ft Royal Prince in Germany who could pass the examination necessary to become a Post Offi e clerk, and yet those dunderheads have full control of the affairs of State. **» As for the moral character of the Gennan Royal Family we can't in fairness say very much. A feeble minded loafer who has never had to earn his living can hardly be judged from the same standpoint as ordinary men. We all know the kind of character which develops under such circumstances. These fellows are naturally vicious to begin with they have any amount of spare time, and they are surrounded by people who never gainsay their lighest word. When a depraved idiot is flattered into the belief that lie is a god. it is not difficult to foresee the result *## Can we really discuss peace with this gang of criminal lunatics? We really can't. It is quite impossible. The Kaiser and the Crown Prince are quite convinced that anything they do is not to be judged by normal standards, We all know the problems* which were pre- sented by the Greek Mythology. The stories of the old gods of Greece are" some of the filthiest and most objectionable to be found ill any literature. When the Greek intellect attained to its highest development, this fact gave rise to a great deal of criticism. One Greek sceptic remarks that "we honour the gods despite the fact that they were guilty of conduct which we would despise in our feltow- men." Such a problem would not have troubled the earliest Greeks. They simply made up their minds that the gods had a right to do as they liked. But later developments of the Greek conscience show that people had begun to realise that good is always good and bad is always bad in the conduct of gods and men alike. «** It is about time the Germans began to get sceptical about their Royalties. There is noth- ing to say in favour of the' Kaiser and the Crown Prince except that they are Royal. If they were stripped of their Royalty they would hardly be fit society for a common lodging v house. They might suit a common lodging house which is frequented by thieves and loose characters, but not a common lodging house frequented by respectable tramps and hawkers. The Germans are still obsessed with the Fuper- stition that riyalties are quite different from the rest of humanity. England and France have risen to the moral level of killing kings. The finest chapter in the History of England is the execution of Charles I. It established once for all the doctrine that a King is responsible for his actions like anybody else. A good king: is worthy of all respect and honour as the'head of the State. But a bad king is the worst of criminals. Until the time of Charles T., the English people believed that royal blood was I sacred. From the time of Charles J. onward they realised that the execution of a king is in no way different from -on of a labourer, Every criminal ought to get Irs deserts what- ever his station in life, indeed there is often more excuse for the ignorant labourer, as poverty and the want or a proper education aie often responsible for driving him to crime. «*• The French have risen to the moral height of beheading a false treacherous king who played a double game with the cause of liberty. On Queen Marie Antoinette a good deal of sympathy is wasted by sentimentalists who are quite oblivious of the fact that she tried to betray Franco to Austria and conspired to procure the invasion of France by a foreign Army. France and England have this much in common—that they are no respectors of persons. What the Germans have to learn yet is to deal with royal criminals. The average Ger- man has as much reverence for the Holien- zollen fmily as an uneducated Chinaman has for his "Jo- There is no hope for the modern German until he executes a few Royalties. And he had never to his hand specimens better adapted for that purpose than he has at the present moment.

CARMARTHEN U a I K Li T11JC SEA KCHLIG B Tj

CARMARTHEN U a I) K Li T11J-C SEA KCHLIG B T, j Coyne, come, alul out. moti down you aiiall net badge, ft. ehall not go, till I let you up a (tlua tiere you may soo the inmost part of JOB. gHAKESi'RABB. It is a signicafint fact that in the two recent robbery cases at Carmarhen. the victims were munition workers. It requires no expert to know that these are the best subjects to tackle. i »• The Carmarthen Corpe-ration some two years ago allowed a water pipe to be laid on to Christ Church for the purpose of blowing the organ. Now when they find out who water has been wasted, the members of the Corporation are "blowing" the organ. At the Rural Tribunal it has been pointed out that every farm is specially laborious. In the hilly districts the lan,dis hard to plough, and the corn has to be cut with a scythe. On low lying farms extra labour is required to keep the ditches open. This is a familiar instance of the "fork" as it is called in chess. The best "fork" in politics was that of a certain Talbot who\\vas a minister to King Henry VII. I should fancy that lie was a Welshman—a sort of prototype! of Lloyd George. He made everybody "stump up" to the Exchequer. Whenever lie found a man who lived meanly he said "You are bound to have plenty of money you never spend any." When lie found a man who lived in fine style he said "If you can livo in this style, you can aff,ord to pay plenty of taxes." So he had them both ways. The Carmarthen Board of Guardians on' Saturday passed a resolution protesting against the increased price of coal. There were excellent philanthropic principles enunciated in the speeches; but I regret to say that the remarks made betrayed no respect at all for the sacred principles of commerce. f **» One has to go no further than the Board of Trade enquiry to see how the thing is done. When it was proposed to raise the price of coal the Board of Trade held an enquiry. W hat did they enquire into? They• enquired whether; the colliery owners could make their usual profits without an increase in the price. And after going through the books they decided that the colliery owners were bound to get 2s (id a ton more in order to allow them the same profits as they had been getting before. «** It is to be noticed that the Board of Trade never enquired whether the public could pay the extra 2s 6d. They did not institute any researches to ascertain whether the public j would bo able to find the money to pay the extra charge. Not at all. That is not business my friends. The enquiry was to find out the price at which the owners could afford to sell, The price at which the public could affcrd to buy was not entertained for a moment. *It* | It is as well to get this fact well fixed into our skulls—there are two sides to everything but market prices. If a question of rent comes 1' up or any other dispute between landlord and tenant, there is an enquiry as to what- is fair to the tenant and what is fair to the landlord, If it is a question bf wages, there is always an enquiry as to what is fair to the employer and what is fair to the employee. Look at the dis- pute between the Electric Co. and the Cairiiiar marth-en Corporation. It was quite recog- nised that there were two sides—the Company had a. right to their return on tiv.-ir capital and the Corporation had a right to get pubic lighting at a reasonable cost! This principle is so well recognised that it is ■foo'ish to labour it. But there is one decided exception. Who in fixing the price of coal, beef, bacon, bread or butter ever considers what the public can afford to pay. It is not "\Yhat is a. fair price?" It is "How much can we get?" All the rubbish which has been written and spoken does not explain why the price of food should have doubled. It only explains why the shipping and other rings have got into a position to "put on the screw" but it docs not at all prove that the prices a.re fair. That of course would not be business. • *« I can quite understand that it is a very dangerous thing to protest against the 1-Jd a eni-t. oil coal. Tho Carmarthen Giiai.-diins have been very foolish to allow it to pass. How much coal does the average working class family use in a week? One or two hundred- weight. Some use as little as a hundredweight a week. Many use no more than two hundred weight. Even if a household uses between two and three hundred weight a week, 2s 6d a ton only means 4d a week, d a week is a serious item. but we must not strain at a gnat and swallow a cainel. «#« In the summer, eggs used to scfll at Id each, Now they are 2d. In August butter before ] the war was Is to Is 2d a pound. Now it is J Is 8d. Beafsteak used to be Is a lib now it is Is 6d. Bacon used to be IOd to Is now it is Is (jd to Is 9d. Bread used to be 5td to Gd a loaf; now it is 8d to 9!d. It is hard to give prices exactly as they wobble so much. j **# Let us consider how much the increase in the i price of farm produce takes out of a. small t working class family. I am taking a small x family so as not to go to extremes. ( 5. u. 31b loaves (Tibs) up 3d a loaf. 0 9 31 bs beef., up Gd a lb 1 (j 18 eggs, up Id each 1 (5 lib bacon, tip Gd 0 ft 21bs butter, up Gel 1 0 281bs potatoes, up Is 1 0 ft 3 That is what the increased price of food means to an average working class family. The coal will perhaps cost 3d or Id a. week, and a resolu- tion is passed against it. Food costs fts 3d a week and not a word is said about I t. The farm produce is ,) times a bigger tax than the coal. The Vicar of Llanliawddog did give the farmers a hint. hut they took it in a jocular sp: lit. Ti]. never for a moment entertained tho idea that they are not free to do as they liked. 1 lie Board of Trade does not interfere with them. Ananias has "broken out" again after lying lo-.N- foi- i Tie threw Carmarthen into t frant'c state of excitement on Sunday with tile, report of a big naval engagement in which 1! British ships had gone down-Admiral Jelli- coo's flagship amongst the number. A Carmarthen prcachor on Sunday thought his hearers unusually apathetic. "1 do 1 t seem to be getting many Amen's i' o n the Bis Seat," he said. Time was a dead silence, and then a, passing motor screamed "Toot! Toot!" "I'm getting it from the cars anyway" re- marked the preacher as lie proceeded. ALETHEIA.

I Llaydiio Rural District Councili

Llaydiio Rural District Council. Mr W. E. Richards. Volingwm (chairman). OPERATION AT LLANELLY HOSPITAL. The Council had under consideration bills for an operation at Llanelly ITospita. Mr Spowart (Clerk to the Llanelly'Council) wrote that a patient had been admitted into their hospital "by direction of your people alter consultation with your medical officer of heaith." He en- caused two bills each for 15 guineas. One was for the operation and the other for nursing, maintenance, etc.—Mr L. N. Powell askcid if they were under the impression that the patient was a pauper?—The Clerk: I don t know. He stated that she was not.—Dr Lloyd, the Medical Officer of Health, said that all he knew about the case was that lie was called on the telephone by Dr Cluttcrbuck, who wanted him to give his opinion as to sending a patient to Llanelly Hospital immediately to undergo an operation the case being an urgent one. He (Dr Clutterbuck) had previously sent the patient to Swansea HospitaL but they re- turned her because the case was an infectious one. She was suffering from scarlet fever, and a mastoid abcess was following upon it. Dr Lloyd suggested that the best plan would be for Dr Clutterbuck to have a chat with Mr W. Williams, the local member of the Rural District Council, and Mr Lewis, their Clerk.— The Clerk said that this Council did not authorise the case being sent down. Dr Clutterbuck might have done it. So far as he was aware the patient was not a pauper.— Dr Llovd said the case was a serious one and required immediate attention —Mr Williams, the member referred to..said that Dr Clutter- buck called with him and tolfl him that the child was suffering from a mastoid abcess and that unless she was operated upon within the next 24 hours the child was going to die. The doctor seemed to be in a very troubled state of mind over it, and said it was very hard if it should be allowed to die when he knew it could be saved if an operation was performed. He had sent her to Swansea Hospital, but as she suffered from scarlet fever they would not ad- mit the patient. The doctor pointed out that Llandilo Rural District Council was the local Sanitary Authority, a.nd as he could not do the operation he suggested to save the child's hfe sending it to Llanelly to do so. The question then arose as to whether the child was a pauper. He said it was not, but the pa-reiits could not afford to bear the cost of the opera- tion. The child could not be admitted without some authority as to payment. He (Mr W. Williams) was no.t quite certain as to the position but feeling that some responsibility rested on this Council in the matter of supply- ing a proper isolation hospital he told Dr Clutterbuck that whilst he sympathised with him "v ery much and the parents as well because he knew the child was going to die unless some thing was done at once and they were not in a position to bear these expenses that he would support his action at the meeting of this Coun- cil1 and try to get something towards the ex- pense. Further than that he told him 1)9 could not go. but he advised him to try to get Mr Shipley Lewis on the telephone, and he gave him to understand that he had. The Clerk was understood to say that he had not been communicated with.—Continuing. Mr Williams said he sympathised very much with the case for the very reason that the parents could not afford it and it was their duty 10 try to do something to save the child's life. H- also sympathised with J)r Clutterbuck in the position in which he was pjaeed. If the Council did not do something he would have to pay. — Mr J. L«. Williams asked if Dr Lloyd considered the charge reasonable or excessive. Dr Llovd said that seeing that it was an object of charity lie thought one half in each case reasonable.—Mr W. Williams observed that sometime ago before the outbreak of war this Council was considering tho question of providing jointly with Ammanford and other local bodies an isolation hospital, but ip con- sequence of the outbreak of hostnties the matter was defe-red. That came into his mind when this case< ropped up and he felt that they were a. little deficient in not having one in the localitv and rather than hold themselves open as an authority to all kind of criticism on account of this and other cases he gave his support in this matter. He had no idea how- ever that it would cost anything like this. He suggested that the Llanelly atuhorities be asked to reduce the charge to what could be j considered a reasonable sum—Mr L. N. Powell who seconded Mr Williams could not see how the latter and Dr Clutterbuck could have acted different. It was an urgent case and re- quired immediate attention.—Mr J. L. Wil- liams said they acted as well as could be ex- pected under the circumstances. He felt that they were all to blame in not having proper accommodation for the-e cases. If the parents would come to meet them he had no doubt the hospital authorities would reduce their charge in the case of a child like this.—Mr J. Rich- ards proposed that the Clerk .should write to them explaining the circumstances fultv.-The Clerk said he could point out to them that they gave no direct orders as a Council, but that under the circumstances they were jilea^ed to make an offer without prejudice of lo guineas. —Mr L. N. Powell said that legally they were not liable at all.-The Clerk agreed.-lt was suerirested that the parents bhould be asked to make a contribution.—The Chairman said that Williams would see the parents and the latter said lie would endeavour to get all they could from them.—Mr Clyn Jenkins failed to see why they should trouble the parents at all if they were going to settle for 15 guineas.—A Member: If"we ure going to assist, why can't they?—The Clerk said the parents were legally liable. It was stated they were haw- kers.—Mr J. Richards remarked that if the Council offered 15 guineas they might go to the parents for the other 15 guineas. Then they would be in a serious position again.—Mr L. N. Powell did not think the Llanelly authorities would go at the parents after the Council paid the 15 guineas.—The Cle k said that in making an offer of 13 guineas in full payment without prejudice he would tell them that this Council was not liable, that the parents were not p.upers, that LV Clutter- buck was not one of thew officers, and that no one authorised in the matter definitely.—This was agreed to. THE SUPPLYING OF ANTI TOXIN. The k said that some ti r, t- ago they passed a resolution authorising the Medieai Officer of Health to order anti-toxin and to hand it out to doctors requiring it. hut there was a stipulation that it was not to be sup- plied gratis to doctors unless it was for people in poor circumstances. They did not say pan- per. but it was not to be supplied indi.scrimin- ately to patients who can well afford to pay for it. They had applied for five phials for Dr Clutterbuck. Hc) (I*d not know whether lie wanted it for people in poor eircunistanoes or rich patients.—Dr Lloyd asked for the post- ponement of the consideration of the hills until the next meeting in order that he might go fully into tlte matter and ascertain how much it would cost the Council to supply every case md to go into statistics for a number of years  supply it in every case where necessary was Jiat it not only was for the protection of the -hild attacked but to prevent it,4 spreading to itlier cases.—The doctor's suggestion sa to itatistics, etc- was adopted. The L.G.B. wrote for particulars concerning 28 recent cases of diphtheria. In the district, and the steps which had been taken to combat its spread. TYCROES WATER SUPPLY. The Surveyor (Mr Evan Jones) reported having visited Tycroes in regard to its water supply. rl he supply of the village was ob- tained from the L'anelly Council. From the Llandebie main 157 dwelling houses, shops, etc. were supplied and the National and Council Schools. Besides the above there were 14 in Penygarn road proposed to be supplied a.s soon as the water pipes and mains were laid. Stand- pipes had already been fixed. There were 18 nouses which drew their supply from a well which had almost dried up. The original agreement was from three standpipes. Now a further number had been fixo: and some coii- nected with the ma'rs and used. MiJo terrace Pantyflfyiun. got their water from Amman-t ford Council at a. charge of 8s pee house. Th.> (;■'e-;lio;i we.s whether they wore go ng to write j to Llane'lv Council as to charging 2: per houso The amount they paid worked out at 2s Gd per to Win. Williams, tilca iio-titi.,ig of tho number of ste;ripip s they were supposed to have. They supplied the water at £ 20 a ye :r. Tlie Water I Ceinmittee went into the matter at t'he time. — Mr W. Williams asked if any houses had been conneced with the main.—Mr Evan Jones said there were no house, only standpipes.—Mr L. N. Powell: Who authorised the extra, stand- pipes?—Mr Evan Jones replied that it would scorn that it was the Llanelly Council without permission. —Tlie mattelr was referred to the Water Committee.—Mr L. X. Powell said they onlv paid for three instead of six. TROEDYIMTIW AND PENNSYLVANIA WATER SUPPLIES. Mr John lVchards aid that the committee appointed to go into the matter of these Sllp- plies had met. Mr Powell was not present, and Lord Dynever had written to say that he was in London and could not attend. The conur.itt.ee visited I,ro(-Ivi.lilw and Pennsyl- vania and two sources of supply.—Mr Caleb Thomas and himself were the only two local representatives present. As Loid Dynevor was unable to be present it would not be fair to his lordship to present the report that d-,iv.-It was decided that the same committee should meet Lord Dvnevor at the Board-room. HOUSE FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS. Another item on the agenda was "To con- sider the qque-rtion of providing a house for we-unde I soldiers in the Amman Valley."—The Clerk said they had no power as a Council to do so. He suggested that Cwmamman mem- bers from which district the suggestion had emanated should act on the committee which went into the matter in that district. As a Council they had no power although they sym- pathisod with the movement to provide sub- scriptions from the i-at(- i- J. L. Williams a«kcd what power they had for subscribing to Nursing Aecoiations?—The Clerk replied that it was quite a different thing. They had power there.—Mr Glyn Jenkins: But wounded soldiers require nursing.—Mr J. L. Williams: We have had under consideration for" years the desirab lity of providing something like a Cottage Ho.pit-al. The C'¡'l,'k: That was put off owing to the war.—Mr J. L. Williams: N% e fully realise the urgent need for it in our valley. I see so many cases of those who have to suffer near my home. A young boy is carried from the works injured and there is no accommodation for the local medical man to treat them without an operating table such as would be provide 1 in a Cottage Hospital. So we have to telephone or telegraph to Swansea and wait. Meanwhile the young fellow has to suffer.—T'he Clerk; Wo considered the matter adjourned over the war.—Mr J. L. Williams: It. is worthy o: consideration.—Mr W. Williams asked why should they appoint any com- mittee if they had no power to subscribe.— Rephing to Air Glyn Jenkins, the Clerk said Rephing to Air Glyn Jenkins. the Clerk said this Council could not subscribe towards the wounded soldiers. They could subscribe to the maintenance of an i olation hospital.

i Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. The fortnightly meeting of this Board was held on Saturday Ni-licii r < present: Mr R. Matthews (chairman), Messrs Arthur W liams, W. Roberts. W. Stephen", I) Jon -s. Dan Davies, D. W. Lewis. W. fililf,I". Evar. Davies. John Lewis. Hy. Herbert, W, lb j ),\in. Evan Morris. J. Richards. J. Hughes. Caleb Thomas. J. Humphreys, Jacob Davies, J. Thomas, D. Thomas, W. E. Richards, L. N. Powell, J. L. Williams, Glyn Jenkins, W. Lewis, WT. Griffiths, W. Roberts. THE M ASTER'S 11EPORT showed that in the house there were 53 against G3 in the coresponding period last year. The I vagrants numbered only 13 against 45 last year A service had been held by the Rev J. Davies. C.M., whilst Archdeaein Williams and the Rev Coris Davies, Wesley an minister, had attended a funeral service at the Ho-use. A NURSE FOR LLANSAWEL. The Clerk drew- attention again to the appli- cation for a contribution towards the mainten- ance of a nurse for Tallev and Llansaw; I. He said that in accordance with what was done at the previous meeting he had written to Miss Davies. Froodvale. to inform her that the sub- ject would be considered that day. He had had a letter from her that morning in which she stated that she was glad to see that the Guardians were going to consider her applica- tioji for a. contribution of £ 10 for the Llansawel and Tallev nurse. A public meeting had been held at Llansawel on Thursday evening when it was unanimously decided to obtain the ser- vices of a nurse by the first of October, and she hoped the Guardians would grant tlO a year for the first couple of years, when the Asso- elation should be in a position to do with £ 5 a year. She had had a grant of £ 5 a year from the King Edward Memorial Fund and £ 5 from the South Wales Nursing Association, and a like sum from an Endowment Fund of 4: 100. There would be no fear of their Association becoming bankrupt if they could get financial help at the start, because as the services of the nu.r.-e were appreciated thev would get support the cisier.-Citaii-iiiiii. ] don't think we need discuss it.—Mr Evan Davies said he bad great pleasure in proposing a grant of £ 10. There was no need of making any further remarks on the question.—Mr W. Lewis seconded.—Mr Evan Davies went on to make com pari ons with the Llansawel and Tallev parishes, and that of the Llandilo Urban. They gave £ 5 to the latter. If they put them on an equality with that parish Chairman It ought to be a hundred.—Mr^ Harris said a meeting had also been held at Tallev 1st evening when a similar resolution to that adopted at Llansawel was also adopted.—Mr Evan Davies thought they ought to have two nurses.—Mr Harris thought one would do and he begged the Guardians to favour the application.— Chairman: Any amendment.—Mr Evan Davies again thought they should have one for each parish.—Mr Arthur Williams: If essential.—Mr W. Hopkin pointed out that tho appeal was only for two years..—Mr Evan Davies: My roposal is in- definite.—The Clerk said the matter would be brought forward every year.—Agreed to grant tIll <:> LLAN GATHEN RATE COLLECTOR. Tlie Clerk said that in consequence of the death of Mr Thomas Evans. the rate collector, Llangathen, it was re olved at the last mo?twig to ask his widow to complete the collections for the current half year and she was doing so and notice had been given to consider the question of appointing a successor that day. Mrs Evans had not made any further" applica- tion than :-lIe had at the last meeting. He had met her and she had givon him to understand that she intended to apply for the post, but lie believed she meant the last as an application. He said he had had a letter from Timothy Davies. Ysgwyn, in which he applied for tli'e post. Ho said he was 50 years of age and well acquainted with the whole ,r W. Griffiths proposed he should be aprointed.- Mr 'D. Thomas seconded.—The Chairman said they would have to advertise the post before they could consider any application. He said the applicant was applying because he knew from some source there was a vacancy. The woman had not made an application. — In liswer to Mr Evan Davies. the Clerk said that what was on the agenda was "to consider thp appciiitnient."—Air W. Lewis: The lady is too old.-Alr W. Lewis: As to the man you can't get a better man in the whole parish.—Mr Herbert asked for notice of motion.—Mr J. Richards proposed they should advertise the post. Timothy Davies might, be a good man, but it would not be fair to appoint him with- out giving others a chance, and it is quite possible there might he half a dozen. —Mr W. L,»w is did not think there was one of military age.—The Chairman said they would consider that point.—Mr J. L. Williams I move at the start we should adjourn the matter.—Mr Evan Davies: Don't you think it is a case which should be considered I oe'alIv.-A Member: Call a parish rll!e,e Evan Davies For my. self [ would be prepared to leave the responsi- bility to the local members.—Mr Arthur Wil- liams: If they call a parish meeting we will 0011111 in the decision.—Air J. L. W illiams was of the same opinion.—Air Evan Davies: Leave it to the local members.—The Clerk, in replv. said the salary was £ 20 a tear. He said it was thej not the Parish Council had the appoint- meiit.—The matter was left in the hands of the Clerk. LEAVE OF ABSENCE. In consequence of an illness and being run idown Dr Davies, medical officer of health, re- commended that tho matron of tlie Work- house should have a month's leave of absence —ihe recommendation was agreed to. INSURED PERSONS. A discussion took place on a resolution sent from Swansea, which the Guardians asked the Liaiich o Guardians to adopt. It dealt with the sick pay of insured persons who became for a while inmates of hospitals, etc. The Beard were asked to appeal to the Commission to make iii. iltet-afioii in the Insurance Act that such institutions should be leimbursed out of the sick pay.—Mr Matthews said he ki,ix- of a case where £ 17 arrears was paid by the 1 nendly Society and they could get noth- ing back.—Mr Glyn Jenkins held that they should riot let the people suffer in any case. Discussion took place on insured persons who became inmates -or the workhouse and about the disabled tidier. being maintained by the G,.i.ai-d:aii.s, when thoer pensions we e not being paid. In the fornver case it v.-as decided to appeal to the Commissioners and in the latter case it was thought the matter would remedy itself.

What Indigestion Means

What Indigestion Means. Any man or woman who is suffering from indigestion is gradually being starved, becauso nourishment is not being obtained from the food eaten. This is nota.E. for the harmful products given off by undigested food enter tho blood st.ream. and are carried to every part of the body, to the great detriment of your health Thus indigestion means starving and suffering too. But Mother Seigel's Syrup possesses such a remarkable power to tone, strength n. and regulate the action of the stomach, liver, and bowels that indigestion becomes impossible, (rood health reigns in its stead. After fortv years testing by tens of thousands, Mother Seigel's Syrup is still renowned all over the world as a successful .remedy for those dis- tressing ailments which arise from a weak or disordered condition of the stomach, liver, or bowels.

Land Reclaimation and Afforestation

Land Reclaimation and Afforestation. PROPOSALS DISCUSSED AT CARMAR- THEN SHIRE COMMITTEE. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire War Agricultural Committee was held at 'he County Offices, Carmarthen, on Saturday. There were present: Mr Ben Evans. Gwastod Abbot (in the clvair) Mr Wm. Williams, Aber- g,rili; Mr W. Harries. Dry lwyn Mr J. Lloyd Penvbank Mr J. Lloyd Thomas, Ferryside; Mr T. H. Jones, Pantglas; Mr John Griffiths, Abergwili; Mr H. Jones-Davies, GJvneithan; el and Air Daniel John. B.Sc. (County Organiser) A letter was read from the Welsh Agri cultural Council asking if the Carmarthen sh:rre Committee had any suggestion to make with regard to a larger scheme of small hold ings. colonies, afforestation, land reclaiming, etc. The Chairman said that at the last mee'i g they had suggested an area at Troïe,,1 y for small holdings. Mr H. Jones-Davies said that what 'die AVelsh Agricultural Council wanted to I now was whether the Committee had ti:7 scheme to suggest. In the Tregaron district there was a large area of 1.000 acres sug gested. He had lately paid a visit to the salt marsh at Towyn, where there are about a 1.000 acres capable of being reclaimed. ALI that was required was a sea wall to stop the tide coming in. If this could be done and the land reclaimed it would be worth £30 to £6U an acre. The question was whether German prisoners could be utilised to put up thif, embankment. Mr J. Lloyd asked if they were going to improve this land for the owner? Air H. Jones Davies said that no one was a trespasser on the land below high water mark In some counties thousands of acres of land had been reclaimed. Mr J. Lloyd asked if they could not do any thing on Llanybyther mountain in regard to afforestation. The Chairman said that they had plenty of land to grow timber but to get timber to pay it had to be planted within two or three miles of a railway. 'Mr T. R. Jones: It won't pay to grow it in an out of tlie way place. The Chairman said that it took about forty years on an average before the timber was fit for marketing. It might be saleable in thirty years in good meadow land but that was more valuable for agriculture. ( It was decided on the suggestion of Mr James Phillips, to call the attention of the Council to the fact that there was a tract of land between Red Roses and Pendine suitable for a small holding colony. It was also decided to state that there is some land in the countysuitable for afforesta tion. HIRING DIFFICULTIES. Mr B. John called attention to a difficulty which was arising in connection with the hir ing of men servants There was an impression abroad that farmers could not re-engage men under 25. That impression is entirely erronous The Chairman said that this impression was due to the posters being put out giving "Warning to Employers" That only applied to deserters and to those who were in the Army Reserve without being exempted. Of course if they are exempted that warning has nothing to do with them Mr B. John: Some believe that they can't go from one place to another If a man is in a certified occupation it is immaterial where he goes. The Chairman If a farmer thinks fit to employ a young man of military age it will be a question whether the Tribunal will be so ready to exempt him as an older man. Mr B John It is a funny position altogether Mr W. Williams said that he had been ask ed by a good many who had obtained exempt- ions until the 14th November what they should do. He advised them to hire servants and to send in their appeals before the 14th November. A man under 25 on a. farm wa.s not in a certified occupation. Mr B.. John: But he may be indispensable. Mr W. Williams: There are thousands in the dark about it. Mr B. John I have had scores of letters about it. The Chairman: Tlie poster is all right if they undersand it. It leaves matters in the same position a.s before. Mr W W i Ili a ins A fanner can engage a man before hand. The Chairman They have done it all right. APPLICATION FOR SOLDIERS DISCHARGE. A letter was received from the Board of Agriculture asking the views of the Committee as to an application which they had receivod from Mrs Wilson, of East House, Pendine. In the letter Mrs Wilson a.sked the Board of Agriculture to obtain from the War Office the discharge of her husband from the Army. She said that he had been a member of tlio -Pern broke Yeomanry before the war broke out; on the declaration of War the Regiment was I embodied. He had since being serving. His time expired on the 5th April last, but owinc to the operation of the Military Service Act he was obliged to remain in the Army. She had for two years carried on the farm of 90 acres with no other help than a boy of 17 and a girl of 11. She thought that if he came home he would be rendering more service to the country than by acting as regimental cook in a camp in England. Air Wilson attended personally and in answer to questions bore out the statements in the letter Air W. Howells said that lie thought there ought to be a. man. Mr J. Lloyd Thomas: If this ease came before any Tribunal lie would be exempted at once. Mr H. Jones-Davies: Production must go down unless the farm is worked. The Chairman: It is a farm which used to produce- very good corn. It was unanimously agreed to su.pport the application. Mr James Phillips said he believed they wiukl get a similar case from the St. Clears district. Possibly they would get several other applications of the kind. He suggested that they appoint a Mib-comniittee to deal with istich ipplioiiti 0116,

A letter from the Rev J Dymailt Owen

A letter from the Rev. J. Dymailt Owen. Dear Sir,—1 shall feci obliged if you will allow tho fj'owirg letter to appear in your next issue. I should LIre to acknowledge gifts of books from Mi s Lewis, Cavendish House, King street; Messrs D. Williams, King street, Owen Jones. Dark Gate, and D. H. Thomas, W a. t c r street. Yours fathfully, HENRY HOWELL. Tessera House, Carmarthen, August 28th, 1916. Dear Air HowerI.-I am deeply indebted to you for your interest in mv work here. Will you kindly thank the Carmarthen friends through the papers not only for the books but for other gifts which have been sent me direct. For tho last fortnight I have been respon- sible for the work in another camp just two miles from the line. The work here is most in- teresting whatever the drawbacks, or may I say the adventures. This is the most ad- vanced pla.ce we have in the direction I am at present. Last Sunday I had the greatest ex- perience of my life. I was asked to take the Brigade Service of a well known "Welsh Brigade I slept on Saturday night in a little village partly demolished by shells, and on Sunday morning before I got up they were dropping uncomfortably close. So we got up-the chaplain and myself—at 6 a.m. and were soon on our way towards the trenches. We passod through a village in ruins—the city of death and destruction c, rcssoa bridge which has figuied much in the war and went along the communication trench until we came to a certain place, where I was privileged just for a moment to look over a parapet and see tha trenches and No Man's Land and beyond that awful place a historic battlefield and a big town looming in the morning mist. We re- turned without any mishap in time for the 9 o'clock parade. I took both services. English and Welsh, in that battered village; then we cycled to another village where I took both services again, in the open air, and celebrated the Holy Communion in the open air on a little green in the afternoon. To me, it was a historic occasion to preach to my countrymen in the zone of fire. The officers were almost to a man not only Welsh in speech but Welsh in ideals and sentiments. The language of the mess was Welsh. The little cemetery where lies a- YOHug Garmwrthen officer was near the secluded spot where I looked towards No Man's Land in the morning. I longed to go and see it, but it was too "unhealthy," and the chaplain advised me to be satisfied with what I had seen. ■My work here is almost done, and though one's heart longs for dear old Wales and quiet Carmarthen, yet, my heart is sore at the thought that the time to part with these heroes is so near. Again thanking you for your interest in the work, I am, yours faithfully, J. DYFNALLT OWEN. B.E.F., France. Aug. 21th, 1916.

Carmarthen Mans Appointment

Carmarthen Man's Appoint- ment. We are pleased to observe that Dr Horatio Thomas, B.Sc.. son of a former townsman, Mr J. Cendfryn Thomas, and nephew of Dr S. Glanville Morris, J.P.. Mardy. Glam., ha.s been appointed Medical Officer to the Rhymney Medical Aid Fund at a nett salary of JE600 a. and is provided with lio-use and garage and a new and up-to-date surgery. There were 21 applications. Dr Thomas has had a suc- cessful career. Me is a. Bachelor of Science of c o niversitv of London, aUniversitv scholar of St. Mary's Ho-pital. and a prizenian in Surgery at the same institution. For the last two years he has acted as "war locum" at Merthyr Yale. and such was his popularity there that lie was specially requested by the committee to take direct charge of the practice -an offer he refused. May his experience at Rhymney be as successful and pleasant.

Wilful Damage to Carmarmarthen Park

Wilful Damage to Carmar- marthen Park. DEFENDANT FINED 17S. At Carmarthen Borough Police Court on T. Davies, and Mr Walter Lloyd, John Cannon, who spoke with an Irish brogue, was charged with drunkenness and wilful damage. Air Stephen Jeremy, the Park Keeper, said he found the defendant in the Park drunk. Defendant smashed a window. P.C. Llewelyn gave corroborative evidence. Defendant who expressed great regret said that he had been at the front and had been discharged. He had been twice in torpedoed vesse's. A member of his family ha,d been killed at the front. He promised to sign the pledge. Defendant was fined 15s and ordered to pay 2s damage.

Calf Illegally Slaughtered

Calf Illegally Slaughtered LLANARTBNEY BUTCHER FINED. At the Carmarthen County Police Court on Saturday, before Mr J. LI. Thomas, Gilfach i(n the chair); Mr Thos. Lewis, Brvnglas; and Mr J. Lloyd Thomas, Ferryside. Arthur Ransom, Cefneithin road, Llanartli- ney. was charged with having slaughtered a calf under six months old. P.C. Tudor stated that at 9 p.m. on the 20th July he visited the defendant's shop at Cefn- eithin. in the parish of Llanarthney, and asked defendant if he had killed a calf that week. Defendant said "No," and witness ajiked if he could search the premises, and defendant then said there was a calf hanging in the shop and that it was about six weeks old. He (defen- dant) had bought it at Heolddu Farm. Defen- dant asked witness if they could square it up and he showed him the carcase of a calf hang- ing behind the door and which appeared to have been slaughtered that day. The con- stable then asked to see the skin and Ranson replied "I took it down to Pantyffynon rail- way station and sent it to Swansea." When defendant was served with the summons, he said "Can the ease go on in my^absenoe, as I cannot attend. I have to take the meat round Mr T. HoweH Davies, solioitor, Carmarthen, pleaded guilty on behalf of defendant, and a.sked the Bench to take a lenient view of the case as defendant had not been cautioned by the const abl e. Supt. J. E. Jones (to witness): You went there in the ordinary course of your duties? Witness: Yes. Supt. Jones saiid that the order was an easy one to cva,de. therefore he pressed the charge. Defendant was fined JES. Walter George, Hieolddu Farm, Llanarthney was summoned for aiding and a.betting. P.C. Tudor stated lie visited the defendant's farm at 10 p.m. on July 21st, and asked him if he had sold a calf to Arthur Ransc%. George replied "Yes, I did. t was about eight weeks old. I am sorry if there is any trouble about it," Afr Howell Davies. who appeared for the defendant, said that the Order was an easv one to evade. A person could take a calf to mar- ket. get it branded, and then he could do any thing he likeid with it. A fine of JE1 was imposed. CATUfARTHEN-Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. Lawrence, at her Offices, 3 Blue Street, FRIDAf, September 1st, 1916.