Collection Title: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Institution: The National Library of Wales

Rights: The copyright status or ownership of this resource is unknown.

View full details

First Previous Image 3 of 4 Next Last
Full Screen
14 articles on this page
Carmarthen Rural Tribunal and Married Men

Carmarthen Rural Tribunal and Married Men. CASES ALL DEFERRE D. The Carmarthen Rural Tribunal sat at the Carmarthen (iuiklhall on Wednesday. The members present were: Mr J. Jones, Plae (the chairman), Mr W. Brazell, Mr D. T. Gilbert, Mr W. Williams, Rev J. Herbert, Mr Llew. Morgan, and Mr M. J. Evans. (The members of the Tribunal had a private consultation before starting. The Chairman announced that they would not take the cases of the married men for the present. Oapt Margrave (Military Representative): I quite agree. Mr J. J. Bowen: Well I don't. Treat them all alike. The Cliairruan: That is our decision. There is to be no discussion on the matter.

I Law Defied at Llansaint

Law Defied at Llansaint. ABSEcNTSTFINEiD. At Carmarthen, on Tuesday, Charles Jones (31), Welwyn House, Llansaint, was charged with being an absentee under the Military Ser- Tice Act. Ca.pt. Morton Evans said this was a very bad case. Defendant was one of four sons— lall able-bodied men—at home, and they deefid the law and the military authorities. Defen- dant should have reported himself on April 8. P.O. Davies, Ferryside, said that when he odted defendant on July 27th if he had an exemption card he replied "No, I don't want one. I am not going into the Army. Let them that reap the benefi from this country go there, Ilhare: enough to do to work for a living." -He saw him again on Septernbot- 8, when defendant said "You go to You or anyone else will not send me into the Army. I would sooner be killed at home than in France." Supt. J. E. Jones: I think this case is simply a forerunner of others. There are other bro- kers, and the family have defied us. This kan was arrested away from hpme, otherwise tohere would have been considerable difficulty in doing so. The Chairman QMr H. E. B. Richards): They ould have resisted ? Supt. Jones: They openly defied us. They are able-bodied men engaged in different works Defendant was fined £ 4 and ordered to be landed over to the military, the Chairman re- marking "You have had practically six months Alter the passing of the Act. Supposing all the young men of the country acted as you iha1'e done at such a time of stress and danger. There would be no Army at all and the danger 1t'ould be beyond the expression of words." VIOLENT ATTACK ON POLICE. On Wednesday, Rees Jones (27), Welwyn Ouao, a brother, was also charged with being a military absentee, whilst Daniel Jones, the father, was charged with assaulting Police ^n&table Davies, Ferryside, and Abraham •ones, another brother, was charged with ^scui-ng Rees Jones from the police. John °well, collier, Penybank, Llansaint wias pro- S^tad against on two charges of assaulting *-C. Davi-es and P.6. Hodge Lewis. The magistrates on the bench were Mr D. Drununond (chairman), Major Dowdeswell, the "kyor (Mr John Lewis), Mr H. E. B. Richards and Mr T. E. Bricrstocke. P.O. Davies, who had a black eye and other j^arks of violence on his face, said he and P.S. kewis asked Rees J ones outside the Penybank Inn, Llansaint, on Monday evening if he had 8n exemption card and he replied, "No, by you will not have me so easy as you have had brother this morning." He became rery and said they would not be able and he started to go over a smail of VkiTvt orwJ. T UoJH it, the arm, and defendant with his left e °W (gave witness a blow in the chest. They ^ith him and advised him to Subtly. He then gave witness a violent blow 111 the face, and another one to Sergt. Lewis. They had him to the ground and endeavoured to handcuff him and during the scuffle that en- dued, defendant' s relatives and friends came the scene. Another of the defendants wished on and gave witness a violent kick on left leg and jumped on Sergt. Lewis's back hammered them both "right and left." Daniel Jones, the father, then came on and whilst the Police were on the ground kicked them most T^lently, the sergeant being pinned down *^th Rees Jones on his back. As the result f the violence, Rees Jones was rescued from e police. At 4.55 on Wednesday morning Witness, Sergt. Lewis, and a number of con- Stables proceeded to Rees Jones's home, and answer to a knock the door was opened by defendant's brother. He was immediately 8eized by the police, who also rushed upstairs • 8Ild arrested Rees Jonesand his father in bed and handcuffed them. Witness added that on th& 26th July he asked Rees Jones if he had 411 exemption certificate and he replied, "No, 1 don't want it; no one will find me in the • Later he said, "I will be in h-- ,first. I I Oapt. (Morton Evans said Rees Jones should » reported himself on March 17th. He had y defied the police and the military autho- and he (Oapt. Evans) hoped the Bench OUld make an example of him. Itees Jones was fined £ 10 (inclusive of £ 3 4d expenses) and handed over to the mili- tary lteierring to the changes against the other pendants, P.C. Davies said the defendant Powell gave him a violent kick on the leg, lumped on Sergt. Lewis and held his two knees the small of his back and pinned him down. then hit thef both about the head with his ts and shouted, "By h-- the b-- won't you to-night, Rees bach, while I am We." Daniel Jones encouraged his son Rees to resist, kicked the police a. hard as he could, aild pulled witness off from on top of Rees who 1V hitting him right and left. The whole of the arowd had now become very hostile, and ^Jtimately Abraham Jones rushed on and took brother Rees away. "I was practically Winded with blood," added witness, "and fter I turned in to the public house to wash It off, Sergt. Lewis and I went after prisoners, hut when we got near their home their families there awaiting us with brushes. We did think it wise to go on and wo turned b&siU )> --a. Supt. J. E. Jones: What is the result of the !ti.oltenoo to you?—I have had teeth loosened, 8()tn broken, and I have bruises all over me, whilst it has affected my speech for the pre- j kilt. Questioned by the defendant Powell, who denied doing anything at all, P C. f'&vies said, "You were there like a roaring You gave me a flying kick on the hip, 8.nd I feel the effects of it now." P.8. Hodge Lewis corroborated and said _J*at ultimately he kept Powell and Daniel monies at bay with his truncheon. P.C. Davies .1t:Qi¡ covered with blood. *'I am a free man," remarked Powell, "I not take part at all." ^.O. Dames said the Jones's family had hreatened "to break him up for interfering," nd had said that they would not allow four "to go out to France to be rotted alive. those well-to-do people who have sorne- tljing to fight for go out. It would be just as to be under German rule as under English rule." Daniel Jones (the father) and John Powell sentenced to three calendar months' hard bour. The charge against Abraham Jonos dismissed.

Octogenarian Clergyman Bankrupt

Octogenarian Clergyman Bankrupt. EXAMINATION AT CAKMARTREX COURT At the Carmarthenshire Bankruptry Courr, ou Tuesday before Mr Registrar Stephens- Da-vies, The Official Receiver (iMr H. W. Thomas) conducted the public examination of the Rev Samuel Church Church, clerk in Holy Orders, 80 years of age, recently of Homesdale, Builth Wells, and Mentone, Llandrindod Wells. The case had been transferred from the Mont- gomeryshire Bankruptcy Court, as debtor now lives in furnished rooms at Mill Bank, Llanste- phan. His gross liabilities were put down at £ 106, and his deficiency was stated to be JL353. Mr H. Brunei White, solicitor, Carmarthen, appeared for the debtor, and Mr A. P. Care- less, Llandrindod Wells, for certain creditors. Debtor when asked his name stated that his -1. name originally was Samuel Uhurch rniuips, but he assumed the name and arms of 'Church' under the terms of a will when he became possessed of Ffrwdgrech estate, Breconshire. The estate was mortgaged. When his son came of age they "barred the ent-all" and sold the estate. He was ordained in 1864, and had acted in various parts of England and Wales, including Swansea. His only benefice had been that of Llanrithan, GowerPwhich he held for eight years from 1876. His average income from curacies during the past twenty years had been about R100 a year, but he had not earned anything since July, 1913. In addi- tion he had received under the will of his son since his death in 1905an annuity, determin- able upon his bankruptcy, of JE260 a year, whilst his wife inherited from her father in 1889 about L200 a year from a trust fund, debt, r taking on -her death a reversionary inte- rest in the same fund. The Official Receiver: You have been in financial ddifficulties before?—Oh, yes. When was the first occasion you made any arrangements with your crediton?-In 1876. I was living a Hammersmith. I made an ar- ra-ngement to pay 2s 6d in the L, and that was fully paid up. It was partly paid from my in- come and my friends came to my assistance. Debtor added that he also made an arrange- ment with his creditors in 1913. In 1876 his liabilities were E500 more or less, and in 1913 they were between 2200 and 9300. To pey off the latter he gave up 15s a week from his in- come, and Mrs Church gave up £ 12 10s a quar- ter. At that time it was intended to pay every one in full. The Official Receiver: As a matter of fact only about 15s 6d in the £ of those 1913 lia- bilities has been pa-id F-Yes* And some of these liabilities are included in your present statement of affaire?—Yes. How do you say you have got into your pre- sent position ?—It will take a very long time to explain everything. I went to live in Bir- mingham, and, unfortunately, made the ac- quaintance of a gentleman who was a church- warden. He has ruined everybody who has had anything to do with him. If he is alive he owes me no less than £ 3,000. That, of course, was the beginning. Then, wishing to act honourably—I do not wish to praise my- self, I hate it—Ipaid o ffback debts with bor- rowed money at ruinous interest. I paid as much as 72 per cent. interest. How many years ago did you resort to mon,oyltnders ?-Between 1870 and 1876, and more or less, I have been in the hands of the moneylenders sence. What is the reason for your non-payment of these debts at Llandrindod and Builth Wells? I was paying them off gradually. My income was then f3 12s 6d, and I divided it as well as M I could. On the other hand you were increasing your liabilities in ether directions ?-Yes; it was rather like robbing Peter to pay Paul. Some of the .debts were incurred by Mrs Church. I KltLVl uvf vux? acroyv lur^ar «v vut? t/TilM? WlttX Wtlfl incurring them. The Official Receiver: You estimated your household and other expenses duringl915-16 at E621 10s, so you have been living at the rate of £ 620 a year on an income of consider- ably less than R500. Debtor: Considerably less? I am glad to hear you say so, because I have done my best to impress that upon others. So your position is really due to extrava- gant livingfl-Yes And borrowed money. Debtor added that he had five children, one of whom was a rector and another a vicar. Mr Careless: Did it over occur to you that your wife and you, having a joint income of about R459 a year, it would be better and more straightforward to try and live on C200 to E250 a year and deivote the balance towards paying your debts?—It has occurred to me very often. Then, why didn't you do so? What was the object of your becoming bankrupt? Can you answer that question?—(It is a very difficult question. I quite agree that it is very difficult. Can you assist the court by telling us that P-I did not want to become a bankrupt, as it might cause a scandal of the Church. And was it your solicitude for the Church that was uppermost in your mind in all these transactions?—Yes. I can honestly say it was. Mr Careless: Would you be willing, if your creditors could agree to that course at this stage, to devot a. substantial portion of your income towards liquidating your debts? They are poor people, a great many of them. and 8JI"e you prepared to deny yourself some of the luxuries you have been enjoying, such as wine-- Debtor: Wine! I have no* had wine. Mr Careless: Well, it is in the accounts, and I am sorry to say it has to be paid out of the etate. Debtor said he had, been a total abtainer for 25 years, and had held high office in the Good Templars. "I did not take a drop of it," he said. Mr Careless said that creditors had been told that if they did not accept 7s 6d in the £ they would get nothing at all. Debtor said that statement to his creditc,-ri was made without his knowledge of consent. He would not have agreed' to it. ,Mr Careless: Among the creditors is your washerwoman at Llandrindod. You owe her a substantial sum. Is it your wish that if she does not accept 7s 6d in the £ she gets noth- ing?—Certainly not. Your or-editors areonly asking for 10s in the f, and that requires a sum of of £ 190?—Yes, and out of zC260 I would have £ 70 to live. Your wife would also have £ 200?—Yes. Don't you think you could manage with that?—We certainly ought to be able to do it. Then why are you here if your creditors are willing to take that? Why was the demand refu,ged ?-My trustee wrote to me to say that it was impossible for me to pay out of my in- come. At Builth, he added, he paid JE91 a year rent He objected openly at the time to taking such a big house. Asked why he took it, he replied "Because I was a fool." Mr Careliess: I think you hare treated your- self charitably in calling yourself a fool. Debtor said he paid JE2 12s 6d a week rent for his house at Llandrindod. Mr Careless: Do you think you were justified in taking that F-lt is very difficult to answer these questions, because I cannot do so with- out bringiqng in Mrs Church's name. I You signed the agreement with her and also lived in the house, and you hadd all the enjoyment of this extravagance. You must have Jived at a very extravagant rate outside your house rent?—No as quietly as I could. We never entertained. 1 There are a good many accounts for alcohol. It is a time when I think we can deny our- selves these luxuries?—I was ordered to take it because my heart was bad. Your heart seems to be very bad, because you took very large doses?—I took a table spoonful at a' time. Debtor aid he would du his best to his creditors. "You have said hard things to me to-day," he said, "but I thank God no one can accuse me of having lived dishonestly." Mr Careless suggested that the children should raise a certain amount on the policy of £ 6,000 in order to pay the creditors. Mr White: All the money has been raised on it, and they cannot assist any more. The children have done all they possibly can to help the father. Debtor said he would do all in his power to devote as much as possible of his income towards his creditors. The examination was adjourned.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES. At St. Mary's Parish Church on Thursday the 7th inst., the marriage was solemnised of Mr Norman H. Williams, son of Mr and Mrs Frank Williams, Brynteg House, Kidwelly, and Miss Maria Jane Evans, daughter of the late Mr and Mrs Wm. E. Evans, Penygaer, Kidwelly. The Rev E. T. Davies, B.A., offi- ciated. The bride looked well in a navy blue tailor made costume with velour hat to match. She was attended by the Misses Daisy and Winnie Williams, sisters of the bridegroom, and was given away by her elder brother, Mr Phillip Evans. The duties of best man were discharged by Mr Clarence V. Williams, the brother of the bridegroom. The bridal party were greeted with the usual showers of rice and confetti on emerging from the sacred edi- fice, while the church bells rang out a merry peal. The honeymoon is being spent in Gla- morganshire. The best wishes of a large circle of friends go with the happy couple in their journey through life. ••• This year the centenary of Bethesda Welsh Wesleyan Chapel was attained, the founda- tions of the building having been laid in the year 1816, which also marked its opening for the worship of God. On Sunday last anniver- sary services were held when Miss Thomas, Mynyddygarreg, who is coming to the fore as a lady evangelist, occupied the pulpit, in con- junction with the Rev W. J. Arter, pastor. The series of meetings were thoroughly success ful, the preaching being powerful and effec- tive, the congregations large, and the services characterised by unusual heartiness. The cen- tenary celebration took place on Monday even- ing when a large and representative aserembly met at the chapel. Alderman W. N. Jones Ammanfordi, presided and delivered an appro- priate address. Other speakers were Mr John Jones, Llanelly, Revs W. C. Jenkins, Ca-pel Sul (Ind.), H. R. Jones, Siloam (B.), and E. J. Herbert, Morfa (C.M.). The speaking was of a high order, and a most edifying evening re- sulted. The meeting was introduced by the Rev Joseph Jenkins, Carmarthen, who read a suitable portion of Holy Writ, and offeiod up a prayer for a continuance of Divine blessings on the cause. The Chairman was warmly thanked for his services by the Rev W. J. Arter and Mr Daniel Meredith, while a vote of thanks to the speakers was accorded on the proposition of Ald. W. N. Jones, seconded by Mr J. G. Anthony. The Welsh Wesleyans are indebted this year, as in past years, to Siloam friends for placing at their disposal on Sunday afternoon their spacious chapel. A fuller account of the centenary celebrations will pro- bably appear in next week's "Reporter." ••• While following his occupation as collier at the Gwendraeth Colliery on Friday last, Mr W. J. Rogers, Wesley terrace, was injured very Beverly by the fall of a stone on his leg. Mr ID to be conveyed home on a stretcher, and lW8 since been laid up. He is, however, making gradual progress towards recovery. On the large number of local men engaged in the Gwendraeth Valley Collieries emerging from the workmen's train at Tyooch Yard on Monday, they were addressed by Mr W. H. Bellin, county mining organizer. The pro- bable result will be the establishment of min- ing cbsse in the town in the coming winter. Two soldiers, alleged to be ooncerned in the theft of a large sum of money—about £ 50— at Cardiff recently were arrested on Tuesday at Llandefeilog by P.S. Hodge Lewis, and con- veyed to Carmarthen Police Station. «*« In the report of the recent outbreak of fire the names of P.S. Hodge Lewis and P.C. Fred Morris should have appeared among those who rendered admirable services in subduing the flames. They had charge of the fire hose, and generally directed extinguishing operations, with ultimate success. Honour to whom honour is due.

I CARWAYI

CARWAY. I CHILDREN'S CHOIR TRIP.—The above choir took a trip to Burry Port on Saturday last, accompanied by their conductress, Mrs Gilbert Davies, and the accompanist of the choir, Mr D. T. Gilbert, schoolmaster. The older mem- bers of the choir, together with the committee, joined the choir at Glyn Abbey Station at one o'clock p.m. After reaching Burry Port all made for the sands, some to enjoy the "briny bath" others to indulge in games. Mr Gilbert had prearranged for the choirs enjoyment. Tea was served to the choir at the Coronation Hall, the caterer being Mr Morris, Burry Port. After tea, the choir and committee were photographed by Mr Anthony, of Llan- elly. Subsequently the children resorted to another course of games, aftor singing the com- petitive pieces won at the different eistedd- fodau. Crowds enjoyed the splendid render- ings of the choir. At 8.30 p.m. the choir assembled at the station and rendered some choral pieces in excollent style to the delight of a lairge and enthusiastic audience. The favourite rendering with "The Comrades Song of Hope," which was encored. The choir left amongst the cheers of the people and many "hearty thanks" from some of our "Brave Tommies." Mrs Gilbert Davies and Mr Gil- bert have both resigned their positions in the choir after many years of strenuous and useful work. The choir have entered 75 competitions and have wone 64 first prizes, two seconds, divided twice, and aix times only were unsuc- cessful--a record that any choir can be proud of and second to none in the Principality. Wo heartily oongratwlate Mrs Gilbert Davies on her splendid achievements and hope she may long live in happine-ss and prosperity amongst her Jittle family at Carway after devoting so much energy to elevate the young in that which is sweetest to the ear-musio.

ILLANSTEPHAN

"I_ LLANSTEPHAN. WEDDING.—At Moriah Chapel, Llanstephan on the 7th inst., a very quiet wedding was cele- brated between Mr Edgar Evans, son of Mr Evans, Cefn, near Llandilo and Miss Gwladys Harries, elder daughter of Mr J. W. Harries, Pilroath, Llanstephan. The ceremony was performed by the Rev E. J. Evans, Cross Inn. The bride, who was given away by her father, was attired in a navy blue travelling custume, with velour hat to match, and was accom- panied by her sister Miss Sdlie Harries (who is a sister at one of the nursing hospitals for wounded soldiers) as bridesmaid. The best man was Mr John Evans (brother of the bride- groom). After the ceremony a reception was held at the home of the bride. The honey- moon is being spent in North Wales.

West Wales Munitions

West Wales Munitions. EMPLOYEE- WANT MORE WORK. Two (,lllr'oye':j who appealed on Wednesday before the West Wa' s Munitions Tribunal for having eo lifi Llt, s advanced as a reason that they had insufficient work. One, who earned t4 10s 9d in a week, said they were at the works at all times, but an honest man could do more work. The men were allowed to go a way and stop away when they should not be allowed to do so, and men had a lot of idle time. "This sort of thing," he added, "would not go OR if the Government were not paying for it." The Engineer replied that a fortnight or three weeks ago they were idle, but it was quite unavoidable. Now there was so much work that the works were going night and day, including Sunday. The foreman also denied the allegation of the men. The Court refused the applications on the ground that it was not satisfied with the reasons, and could not believe that there was idling at the works.

Tonic SolFa and Pigswash

Tonic Sol-Fa and Pigswash. EXTRAORDINARY EVIDENCE FROM LLAINSAINT. At the Carmarthen County Police Court Saturday before Major Dowdeswell (in the chair), fMr H..E. Blagdon-Richards, and Mr John Lewis ^Mayor), Mary Jane Marks summoned Sarah Ann Howells, Anthony terrace, IAansaint, for threats, etc. There was also a cross summons. Mr H. Brunei White appeared for the com- plainant, and Mr Wallis-Jonies for defendant. Mr H. Brunei White said that on the 22nd August the parties, who were neighbours, had some disturbance about the children, and on the foUowing day, when 'Mrs Marks and her husband were sitting in their cottage, Mrs Howells came aJong the road and sang some rhyme. Mrs Marks, rather foolishly perhaps, said "Go away-M.oo." Mrs Howells then threw two buckets of water into the house, afterwards a bucket of "pigswash," which contained, among other animals, said Mr White, a dead rat. I Mrs Marks gave evidence bearing out the I statement of her solicitor. ítr Wallis-Jones Were you sing "Soh-me- doh-doh-doh" ? (laughter) Complainant: Not on Wednesday, but on Tuesday. What did you mean by it?—I had heard other people use it. John Marks, complainant's husband, corro- borated, and said the pig-wash contained "rats and mice any overything." Mrs Howells admitted throwing a bucket of water into the house Mrs Marks shouted out "Moo, that red bull is drowned," and sang 'Soh-me-doh-doh-doh." Witness reproduced these notes in court, causing much amusement. Mrs Howells was fined tl, and the summons against Mrs Marks was dismissed. DUNKBNNESS AT FERRYSIDE. William Mark, Bank-row, Llansaint, was summoned for having been drunk in Station- square, Ferryside, on the 2nd inst. P.C. Davies stated that at 9.45 p.m. on the 2nd inst. he found defendant in Station- square. Ferryside he was very drunk. Wit- ness warned him and a friend of defendant took him home. Defendant, who did not appear, was fined 10s. HEADLIGHTS ON MOTOR CAR. John Howells, licensee of the Plough Hotel, Lammas street, Carmarthen, was charged with having used headlights within six miles of the sea, contrary to Part 2 of i :I. P.C. Davies said that at 9.45 p.m. on the 2nd inst. he saw the reflection of a bright light coming from the direction of Carmarthen. When the defendant arrived at the village the place was a mass of light. Witness went up to the defendant and asked him if he knew tha.t he was committing an offence. Howells replied that ho was rather timid, and it was a very dark night. He knew that he was com- mitting an offence. Mr Howell Davies, solicitor, Carmarthen, who appeared for defendant, pleaded guilty. The Chairman said that this was a case in which defendant was liable to a penalty of L100 or six months imprisonment, but as this was the first case of its kind in the district, the Bench would under the circumstances deal leniently with defendant, and he would be fined 10s. ATTEMPTED SUICIDE. iHen/ry James Ridgen, Penallt, Llanarthney was charged with attempting to commit sui- cide on the 23rd August at Llanarthney. Wm. Jones, Penpal Farm, Llanarthney, said that he went to see defendant on business on the 23rd of August at 1.30 pm. He shouted for him several times and finally defendant I answered and said "Clear away and take my two children with you." Witness then en- tered the parlour and found defendant lying on the bed, partly dressed, with his face to the wall. He turned towards witness who noticed I the start of a. cut upon the left side of defen- dant's throat. There was some blood running from it. Witness also saw a razor case on the floor. He then informed the police. P.C'. Roberts said that he arrived at defen- dant's house about 2.30 p.m on the 23rd of August. He found defendant in bed; he was breathing heavily. There was some blood on the bed clothes. He asked defendant what was the matter, and Ridgen replied "Let me alone, I'm tired of life, let me die." There were four wounds on the left side of his neck. Witness also founda blood-stained razor on the floor. Dr Timothy. Nantgaredig, attended the defendant, after which he was removed to the Workhouse Infirmary at Carmarthen. That morning when witness arrested him at the Workhouse Infirmary, he (defendant) replied, "I hope you will not press the charge against me; I did it because I was worried by a letter I received that morning. I did it with my own razor. I tried to cut my throat, but I couldn't do it because I was thinking of my little children; they seemed to hold me back." In answer to Supt. J. E. Jones, P.C. Roberts said that defendant's home life was a very un- happy one. Dr Timothy, Nantgaredig, stated that he found the defendant suffering from shock, There were four wounds on the left side of his throat, two superficial ones and the other two involved the thickness of the skin. They were not serious wounds and might have been caused by a razor. There had not been much loss of blood. After dressing the wounds, the defendant and his two children were conveyed to the Workhouse Infirmary. Supt. J. E. Jones 6aid that defendant's home life had been a very unhappy one. His wife, who had previously been married and had two children, had left him three weeks before that occurrence. Defendant said he was very sorry for what he had done. Dr Timothy, who was recalled, said that judging from the wounds, defendant's act had been a very feeble attempt at suicide. Mr Rees Price, Master of the Carmarthen Workhouse, said that defendant who had been at the Workhouse Infirmary since August 23rd had not shown the slightest desire to attempt suicide. The Chairman said that the Bench had con- sidered the case thoroughly, and they had found that there was no prima facie case. They thought he did not really intend to com- mit suicide, and defendant was accordingly discharged.

Proposed Increase in Education Rate

Proposed Increase in Education Rate. GOVERNMENT1 ENQUIRY AT CARMAR- THEN. Mr R. C. Maxwell, the Commissioner ap- pointed by the Board of Education, held an enquiry at Carmarthen on Thursday the 7th inst. into a proposal by the Carmarthenshire Education Committee to increase the Higher Education Rate. Mr Maxwell was accom- panied by Dr Williams, H.M.I., and also by Mr Baker. Mr J. W. Nicholas, Clerk to the Carmar- thenshire Education Committee, appeared in support of the application. Mr H. W. Spowart, Town Clerk of Llanelly, appeared to make certain representations on behalf of his Borough. Mr D. Evans, of Manordaf, a member of the Carmarthenshire Education Committee was also present. Mr H. Brunei White, Town Clerk of Car- marthen. who watched the proceedings on behalf of Carmarthen Borough, was accom- panied by the following members of the Car- marthen Corporation: Mr Spurrell, Mr Dunn Williams, and Mr E. Collier. Mr J. W. Nicholas put in a statement show- ing that the total expenditure on higher edu- cation was £10,811. After deducting mis- cellaneous receipts, including the fees of the pupils, the expenditure was £ 8,993. How- ever against that had to be set a oredit balance of £ 2,960. of £ 2,960. The Commissioner That is excluding inter- mediate education. Mr Nicholas Excluding it quite. Mr Nicholas went on to say that these left a pum of £ 6,032 19 s9d to beraised by a rate. The proceeds of a penny rate on the County assessment was 22,808 6s 5d. The Commissioner said that he took it that allowance had been made for the five per cent. to be deducted according to the Act and the Order of the Local Government Board. Mr Pearce, the Financial Clerk, said that the figure given by Mr Nicholas represented the sum actually collected. The Commissioner: The Board ha.ve issued an order carrying out the statute. What is the produoo of a penny rate is not the actual money that you or anyone else receives. It is a sum worked out according to the Order. It is the theoretical produce of a penny rate less five per cent.—no matter what amount you actually get. "'6' -r. ,1 'I Jir rearce: mese are tne actual ngures i receitve from the Clerks to the Guardians. The Commissioner: I have had this argu- ment with other accountants before. You are entitled to spend the produce of a penny rate. What is meant by a penny rate is not the actual money you receive from the Guard- ians. It is an amount determined by the Local Government Boards Produce of Rates Order. The produce of a penny rate for the purpose of the Act, according to the Order, means a penny rate on the County assessment less five per cent. That is the law. You don't know what amount you get until you get the money in. Mr Nicholas went on to say that the figures he had quoted showed that a sum of L516 6s lid was required in excess of the penny rate. Of course that leaves no provision for any balance. The Commissioner: You are absorbing the balance ? Mr Nicholas said that they were. One of the largest items in the increase was the ex- penditure on evening schools. The number of these was 110 as compared with 52 for the previous year. Agricultureal education, ambulance classes, and village nursee also acounted for part of the increase. oMd, with evening classes as well as an increased expenditure. Mr Nicholas said that the total expenditure on evening classes was £ 1,968; the grant re- ceived was R786. He took it that the propor- tion would be the same with, increased expen- diture. With an expenditure of £ 3,255 they ought to get a grant of about £ 1,300. There were also increases in respect of student teachers. The Commissioner: Could you say offhand whether you produce as many teachers in the county as yon require. Mr Nicholas: No. The Commissioner: Nothing like it. Mr Nicholas: No. The Commissioner; That is a Board of Edu- cation point. Mr Nicholas said that there was the further point that whereas the estimate for teachers salaries was L2,000 the actual amount was R2,8W" 10s 3d. There was also a special grant to aid the intermediate schools. The inter- mediate schools had flourished very greatly ia this county, and it was necessary to increase the expenditure. The maintenance of inter- mediate schools in 1903-4 cost £ 7,346; now it was £ 16,601. The number of teachers in these schools had increased from 33 to 62. Mr H. W. Spowart, Town Clerk of Llanelly, said lie was instructed by his council to ask that any additional rate Llanelly might have to pay should be refunded to the town for intermediate education purposes. The Commissioner said that would be out- side his province. Strictly, the Local Govern- ment Board had nothing to do with inter- mediate education funds. Mr Spowart drew attention to the allocation of the proceeds of the county's id rate for secondary education, and said Llanelly paying a proportion of £ 530 of the rate, received, in the first instance only £200. which was subse- quently increased by a special grant of R200. Their balance at Llanelly was getting smaller, and the money was no longer available for very necessary extensions to the intermediate school buildings. He applied that any part of the rate that was levied in Llanelly should bo expended in Llanelly. The Commissioner pointed out that had Llanelly not been under the Welsh Inter- mediate Scheme their education rate would be higher. They formed an important part of that county, and he did, not see how some inequality could be avoided. Mr Nicholas said the expenditure on school extensions referred to by Mr Spowart would be met out of the loan charges fund. The work would have been carried out had it not been for difficulties raised by the Board of Education. Mr H. S. Holmes, Carmarthen, assured the Board that the governors of secondary schools experienced great difficulty in running the schools with the amount of grant received from the county council. The only possible way to make education efficient was to give the schools a higher grant. Mr David Evans, Whitland, said they were working the schools under very great difficulty and, really, they could not go on unless they had more than the 2d rate. The inquiry was closed.

LLANGADOCK

LLANGADOCK. On Saturday evening Llangadock was en fete to welcome the new squire of Glansevin. Mr Francis Lloyd, who has returned from Australia to succeed to the estate upon the death of his brother. Mr Lloyd, who has lived several years in Australia, landed at Plymouth on Friday. He was met at Llangadock rail- way station by Lieut.Col. Lloyd Harries (his cousin), and a large number of villagers, who escorted him home. The houses in the village were beflagged. and the church bells were rung in honour of the occasion.

Carmarthenshire Education 00Committee

Carmarthenshire Education --00 Committee. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Educa- tion Committee was held at the Shire Had, Carmarthen, on Thursday the 14th inst. Mr B. Evans, Gwastod Abbot (chairman) provided. THE LATE MR D. L. JONES. On the motion of the Chairman, a vote of condolence was passed with the family of the late Mr D. L. Jones.

No title

MUNITION WORKERS WAGES. At a previous meeting the Committee had decided to enquire as to the wages of a muni* tion worker whose child the committee had sent to a special school. A letter was read from a munitions firm stating that the average earnings of the maa were k2 14s Id per week. STALE BREAD AND WASTE PAPER. A report was read regarding the disinfec- tion of a school after an epidemic. The In- spector who bad carried out the disinfection stated that thtre was a good deal of stale bread in cupboards left over from lunches and also a good deal of waste paper. Some of the cupboards were locked. It was suggested that stale bread and waste paper should not be allowed to accumulate as they became vehiotoe of infection. It was decided to call the attention of the head teachers to this matter. WADING TO SCHOOL. A letter was read complaining of the state of the road leading to Furnace School, Llan- elly. It was stated that it interfered with the attendance of the infants. Mr W. B. Jones said that the children had to be oarried through two feet of water. Rev R. H. Jones said that the road WM ia a very bad state. He moved that they allow R30 for the repair of the road which was pri- vate. This was agreed to. GARDENING AND WOODWORK. The Clerk said that there were further ap. plications for school gardens and woodwork classes. The approval of the Board would have to be obtained in respect of each. The matter of considering the applications was referred to a small committee. NOT DEAF AND DUMB. A letter was read referring to the case of a boy whom it was intended to send to a at and Dumb Institute. It appeared that he had been sent to an instiue for inspecion. They found that he was not deaf. His hearing was normal; he was merely aphasic, and his speech might be developed illl a suitable institution. His was not a case for a Deaf and Dumb la. stitute. The Clerk was directed to make enquiries for a-suitable place for the boy. A WESLEYAN DISABILITY. A letter was read from the Welsh Wesleyan Assembly in regard to the disability under which the Wesleyan ministers children laboured on account of the "itinerant" system It was decided to grant transfers to other counties where such could be arranged. COUNTY EXHIBITIONS. Two county exhibitions on the result of the examination were awarded to E. A. Victor Pearce, Llandilo County School, who was first, and Marian E. M. Jones, iLlaneily County School, who was second. SUPPLEMENTARY TEACHERS. The following motion by Mr W. J. Williams was carried unanimouslyThat all supple- mentally teachers who have been engaged as pupil teachers, or have served under a School Board, or have attended a County School for one year, are to have their salaries increased by 26 per annum."

Llanelly Bigamy Charge

Llanelly Bigamy Charge. -α- bigamy was preferred against Arthur George Smith, The Flats, Thomas street. Mr D. Jennings, for the prosecution, stated that Smith was married to his first wife at Marylebone in 1911, and then went through a form of marriage with a young woman at Llanelly. Some time afterwards Smith and his second "wife" went to live in London, and during this time he went back and fore to his legal wife. Margaret Smith, Harylebone, the legal wife, stated that after marriage they lived together for six weeks. One evening she went to a party, and on her return found that her hue- band had removed the furniture. She did not soeliim afterwards for eighteen months. From the beginning of 1914 they used to meet each other occasionally. During this time she provided him with clothes and money, and twice or thrice efforts were made to got toge- ther a house, but after getting money from her for this purpose defendant disappeared. While he was in hospital Buffering from an acci dent she visited him, and after hi6 discharge they lived together for a fortnight, and then defendant suddenly left. Harriet Annie Edwards, residing at Oxea- street, Llanelly, stated she first met accused at the 1913 Llanelly May fair, and they were married in June. Defendant represaeted himself to be a single man, an dfor some feyc ■ they lived in London. Defendant had been a good husband to her. Smith was committed for trial at the Assises

Ammanford Astir

Ammanford Astir. MINERS ON HOLIDAY ARRESTED. A crowded meeting of miners was held at the Y.M.C.A. Institute, Ammanford, on Mon- day evening to consider the action of the Car- marthenshire Military Tribunal relative to the "combing out" from the collieries of inexpert single men. Speeches were given by Mr John James, miners' agent, Cwmgorse. Mr S. U. Davies, Tumble, and others. Some excitement was imparted into the proceedings by the fact that colliers from Pen. ygroes who had been absent from work for a few days on holiday had been arrested and lodged in the police station. There was a good deal of feeling on this matter, and eventually a deputation was ap- pointed to visit the police inspector and seek their release. Inspector Davies. however, told the deputa- tion that it was a matter for the military authorities, and the men would be brought before Llaudilo Police Court on the morrow. The deputation returned to the meeting and gave their report. Mr J. Jaines appealed to the meeting to siwpend judgmont and to got someone to represent the men at the court. It was decided that Mr Randall, solicitor, Llanelly, should appear, with Mr J. James, and ask the magistrates to suspend any aotien in regard to these men until the opinion of a higher authority had been obtained. He eon- tended there was no Act of Parliament or Order to arrest men who were in an exempted trade. LLANELLY "ROUND UP." There was some excitement at Llanelly race meeting, held at Half Way Park on Saturday. It was noticed at the commencement that the local Recruiting Officer (Capt. Morton Evans) and Police upt. LI. Jones, together with a large number of soldiers and police officers, were present, and during the afternoon hun- dreds of young men were asked to explain why they were not in khaki. In several cases the men were not in a position to produce sub- stantial evidence, and they were taken to a building on the field and detained. Later about 50 men were .marched from the Park to the Drill Hall, escorted by military and police, and there their cases were thoroughly investi- gated.